RSA-227 for FY-2020: Submission #1159

Puerto Rico
09/30/2020
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Executive Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - Office of the Ombudsman for Persons with Disabilities
PO Box 41309
{Empty}
San Juan
Puerto Rico
00940-1309
787-725-2333
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
Additional Information
{Empty}
Miss Loida E Oliveras-González - Interim Executive Director
787-725-2333
loliveras@dpi.pr.gov
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
50
02
0
04
11
37
104
B. Training Activities
12
271
1 Client Assistance Program: services, population (individuals) served, VR applicants and consumers, Program jurisdiction.
2 Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended: Section 112 an all-related topic
3 Rights and Responsibilities of VR consumers
4 Who and How can Access VR services?
5 How to Apply for Assistive Technology
6 Transition to post-secondary education
7 Employment Promotion
8 Reasonable Accommodation for college students
9 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)
10 State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose to train VR applicants, consumers, family members and professionals was to impact and reach a greater number of people with disabilities and VR potential consumers. Among the people impacted during this year trainings were university students, elementary and middle school students, parents of children with disabilities and community rehabilitation programs that are subsidized through VRA funds.

It is worth mentioning that due to the Covid-19 pandemic the CAP staff could not provide all the propose trainings about the state and federal laws, including the Rehabilitation Act and the services provide by the CAP program in Puerto Rico and the states to the different schools, universities, public and private agencies. Two other reasons were the total services lockdown decreed by the Puerto Rican government from March to June 2020 and the lack of the knowledge about virtual platforms that we can use to offer the trainings. Services were restored in a phased manner to ensure the safety of employees, clients, and the public.

It is worth noting that the CAP staff provided trainings from October 2019 to March 2020. Among the community rehabilitation programs were impacted Fundación Sindrome Down, Empleo-Alianza Ponce, Movimiento para el Alcance de Vida Independiente. The Universities impacted were: Universidad Politécnica de Puerto Rico, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Aguadilla and Cayey campuses, Universidad Ana G. Méndez in Cabo Rojo, NUC University in Arecibo. A training was also provided to the Eladio Tirado López school in Aguada and the Job Corps Center in Ramey. These trainings impacted a total of two hundred and seventy-one (271) people, which included people with disabilities, university professors, elementary and middle school teachers.
C. Agency Outreach
1. Collaboration with the P&A: The CAP staff participated in conferences and trainings of the Puerto Rico Protection and Advocacy System (PR P&A) in the municipality of Mayagüez, which was an activity from the PAIMI program during the month of October 2019. The program distributed information sheets of the CAP program and the P&A services to people with disabilities and the outreach strategies implemented by the Program impacted a greater number of people with disabilities in neglected municipalities, who are unaware of CAP's services and the Puerto Rico's Protection and Defense System (PR P&A). The media is a valuable resource that allows people with disabilities to acquire knowledge and skills to defend their rights and to know where to apply for the services they need. During the pandemic, many municipalities were not providing services to their citizens because there was a total closure of government operations under the Governor’s mandate. The P&A and CAP program were unable to carry out further outreach activities. The CAP staff actively participated in the 2020 P&A/CAP Conference offered by the National Disabilities Right Network (NDRN) during June 2020 through the NDRN Events App virtual platform.

2. Collaboration with other federal programs: CAP personnel participated in workshops provided by the P&A programs: • PADD • PATBI • PAIMI • PAIR • HAVA • PAAT • PABSS: The purpose of these collaborative workshop is to reach more people with disabilities and inform them about the services provided by the CAP program and the rest of the P&A programs.

3. Participation in Service, Health and Employment Fairs: The CAP staff participated in three (3) Service, Education and Employment Fairs. On October 15, 2019, the staff program participated at the Ana G. Mendez University Employment Fair in Bayamón, impacting twenty-seven (27) people. On October 25, 2020, the Southern Regional Office participated at the José Rodríguez de Soto Elementary and Intermediate School Educational Fair in Guánica, impacting fifty-six (56) people. On March 11, 2020, CAP participated in the WIOA Services Fair in conjunction with the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, Bayamón area, impacting one hundred and twenty-two (122) people. These events impacted a total of two hundred and five (205) people, including people with disabilities and the public. The WIOA Fair in which the CAP program participated informed about the Innovation and Job Opportunity Act. This was aimed at students between the ages of 14 and 21 years-old and clients of the Department of Education's special education program or under section 504.

4. Dissemination of information about CAP: The program distributed two thousand two hundred two (2,202) educational materials in these activities. The materials that were distributed were: What is CAP, what is the IPE, and the ARV Consumer Rights and Responsibilities brochure. The materials and documents that are usually distributed are as follows:
• What is CAP? PROGRAM AND SERVICES
• Consumers Rights and Responsibilities
• Individualized Plan for Employment
• WIOA & Transition
• Reasonable Accommodation for College Students
• Technological Assistance
• State Rehabilitation Council

5. Distribution of Information about the P&A: It was not possible to distribute the information sheets of others P&A programs because they were not approved, as required, by the Puerto Rico State Electoral Commission.

6. Media: The CAP staff participated in three (3) radio programs at Radio Victoria 840 in Yabucoa. Information was provided on the CAP Program during the COVID 19 pandemic and on sustained communications with the administrator of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration on how applications for new cases and follow-ups to existing cases during the pandemic process would be addressed. There is still concern about this issue, as in Puerto Rico COVID-19 cases have increased rapidly.

7. The outreach strategies implemented by the Program impacted a greater number of people with disabilities in unattended municipalities, who are unaware of CAP's services and the Puerto Rico's Protection and Advocate System (PR P&A). The media is a valuable resource that allows people with disabilities to acquire knowledge and skills to defend their rights and to know where to apply for the services they need. During the pandemic, many municipalities were not providing services to their citizens because there was a total closure of government operations under the Governor’s mandate.

8. The Section 105 (b) (1) (A) (iii) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, establish that CAP is part of the members that composed the State Rehabilitation Council. Puerto Rico State Rehabilitation Council: The CAP program Staff participated at six (6) ordinary and two (2) extraordinary meetings of the PR State Rehabilitation Council. At these meetings, there was a discussion of how consumers are impacted by VRA processes. The CAP staff revised the State Council Annual Work Plan for the fiscal year 2020 and presented an overview of the main goals and objectives met by the CAP program during fiscal year 2019. The representative of the CAP Program at the Council is a member of two committees: 1. The Legislation and Public Policy Committee, and 2. the Educational and Outreach Activities Committee. The first committee, analyses and offers recommendations about the normative and internal communications of the VRA, which are part of the public policy of the Administration on services offered to consumers and applicants. The second committee collaborates in the preparation and execution of the activities of the State Council to be able to impact employers, service providers and community-based rehabilitation programs. Also, they support other promotional services activities of the designated State Unit for the territory, known as the VRA of Puerto Rico.
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
3
0
0
3
15
15828
We also have a web page www.dpi.pr.gov that contains information on the services provided. During this fiscal year, we received 15, 828 hits
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
n/a
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
70
29
99
7
81
B. Problem areas
1
1
36
19
0
43
0
5
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
10
5
3
0
0
0
18
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
13
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
n/a
E. Results achieved for individuals
5
2
1
1
9
0
0
0
0
0
n/a
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
6
46
26
19
2
99
B. Gender
47
52
99
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
0
0
0
0
99
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
1
11
0
0
0
3
3
0
3
5
2
1
1
3
0
0
1
0
3
10
16
1
3
0
10
11
0
2
0
8
1
0
0
0
99
E. Types of Individuals Served
18
0
85
0
3
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
n/a
B. Litigation
0
0
0
n/a
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Executive Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico - Office of the Ombudsman for Persons with Disabilities
No
{Empty}
B. Staff Employed
Number of Person-years

Type of position Full-time equivalent % of year position filled Person - years

Professional
Full-time 2 100% 2
Part -time 0 0 0
Vacant 1 0 0
Clerical
Full-time 3 100% 3
Part -time 0 0 0
Vacant 0 0 0

PERSONNEL:

All the employees holding the positions listed here are P&A employees who work under fixed hourly rate salary arrangements. Their respective wages are all in compliance with the federal minimum wage provisions contained in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). They also receive all benefits allowed by applicable federal and state law.
In addition to the wages earned by P&A’s employees, the P&A is also responsible to recognize its employees the following benefits allowed by applicable federal and state law and collective bargaining agreement (applicable to union employees):

o An employer combined contribution for Social Security and Medicare taxes under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) equivalent to 6.20% of employee’s earnings for the Social Security portions, plus 1.45% of employee’s earnings for the Medicare portion, for a total combined of 7.65% of total earnings.
o Worker’s compensation (employers’ contribution of 2.10%) for Puerto Rico State Insurance Fund, pursuant to PR Act No. 45-1935, as amended.
o Employer’s contribution of approximately $150 per month for employees for health insurance.
o Christmas Bonus of $600 per year per employee for non-union employees, pursuant to PR Act. No. 66-2014, as amended, known as Special Act of Fiscal and Operational Sustainability of the Government of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
o Military leave of absence with full pay, up to a maximum of 30 days annually, applicable to employees active in the United States Armed Forces, PR National Guard and/or PR State Guard, pursuant to Sec: 231 of Act 62 of June 23, 1969, as amended, (Title 25 Laws of Puerto Rico Annotated section 2082 et seq.), also known as the Puerto Rico Military Code.

UTILITIES & RELATED SERVICES
Expenses incurred are necessary to carry out the works tied to the grant project.
Pursuant to its enacting law. P&A has the responsibility to establish and implement support programs, services and benefits they are entitled, and on the requirements, mechanisms, means, resources or procedures to obtain, participate and benefit from them, and assert their rights. In the execution and implementation of the grant project objectives, to incur in costs for telephone services, both for local and long distance communications, is necessary to allow a direct and prompt communication amongst the grant project clientele and P&A officials, as well as amongst P&A central and regional offices employees, and to ensure effective provision of the services tied to the grant project.

Costs incurred for preventive maintenance and/or reparation of P&A fleet motor vehicles (for example, cost incurred in the replacement of tires, purchase of replacement auto parts, changes of oil and filters, and labor) are necessary to keep those vehicles working an operational, improve their life and avoid unplanned maintenance activity, so P&A’s officials may carry out works also tied to the grant project. Such maintenance and/or repair costs incurred prevent P&A necessity of incurring in major costs related to vehicles that might be caused by highway breakdowns, car accidents towing fees, rental car charges, missed work and warranty expiration. They also increase the efficiency of the engines of the vehicles, as well as the operation of the vehicles and therefore, reduce the amount of gasoline needed to be purchased, also reducing vehicle usage costs.

TRAVEL, PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, SUPPLIES & OTHER EXPENSES:
Local travel P&A employees is needed to attend meetings, project activities, inspections, mediation meetings, court hearings, site visits, conferences and training events, amongst other activities.

P&A’s employees (union and non-union) are entitled to reimbursement for expenses incurred in official business within the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico jurisdiction, including for meals, transportation (travel and mileage) and lodging, at the rates established by regulation No. 7501 of May 8th, 2008, of the Puerto Rico Department of the Treasury, known as “Regulation No. 31 of travel Expenses”.
o Meals – Breakfast, Lunch and/or meal, depending on the departure and return time of employees from or to their private of official residence.
 Breakfast – Departure time before 6.30 a.m. and Return Time after 8.00 a.m. $4.00
 Lunch – Departure time before 12.00 noon and Return Time after 1.00 p.m. $8.00
 Dinner – Departure time before 6.00 p.m. and Return Time after 7.00 p.m. $9.00
o Transportation (Travel, Public Transportation, Mileage when use of private automobile is authorized, Parking, Taxi, Buses, Tolls, Baggage) – Costs incurred thru the most inexpensive means of transportation available.

In the case of mileage when use of private automobile is authorized, employee is entitle to reimbursement of transportation expenses at a rate of .40¢ per mile (which cover all expenses related with the use of the private automobile, such as garage, gas, lubricants, accessories, repairs, depreciation, insurances and others); employee is entitled to receive an additional amount of .02¢ per mile over the regular rate, if traveling with another agency employee or provider, as well as an additional amount of .02¢ per mile, per each additional person traveling with the employee, over the regular rate; if employee is required to transport government equipment in his/her private automobile, is entitled to receive an additional amount of .02¢ per mile over the regular rate for the first 100 pounds of weight of said government equipment, as well as an additional amount of 0.2¢ per mile over the regular rate for the following 100 pounds or fraction, but in no case the employee will be entitle to receive more than an additional amount of .06¢ per mile over the regular rate, even if the weight of the equipment exceed 300 pounds.

For the calculation of mileage, the P&A has to follow the “Table of Distances between Towns” issued by the Puerto Rico Highway Authority.
o Lodging – Expenses incurred, as evidenced by invoices, receipts or payment evidence. Expenses should not be excessive or extravagant and should be incurred within the reasonable limits of austerity and modesty.

When travel outside of Puerto Rico is required and previous authorization is granted, P&A employees (union and non-union) are entitled to receive an advance of funds to cover for travel expenses or a reimbursement for expenses incurred in official business outside the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, depending on the particular circumstances, including for meals, transportation and lodging, in accordance to Regulation No. 7162 of May 3rd, 2006, of the Puerto Rico Department of the Treasury, known as “”Regulation No.38 of Travel to the Exterior”.
o Meals – Breakfast, Lunch and/or meal. If employees has official residence or workplace outside Puerto Rico and is authorized to travel within such jurisdiction for official business, he/she will be entitled to:
 Breakfast – Departure time before 6.30 a.m. and Return Time after 8.00 a.m. $10.00
 Lunch – Departure time before 12.00 noon and Return Time after 1.00 p.m. $14.00.
 Dinner – Departure time before 6.00 p.m. and Return Time after 7.00 p.m. $24.00

If employee has official residence or workplace outside Puerto Rico and is authorized to travel outside such jurisdiction for official business, he/she will be entitled to:
 Breakfast – Departure time before 6.30 a.m. and Return Time after 8.00 a.m. $15.00
 Lunch - Departure time before 12.00 noon Return Time after 1.00 p.m. $20.00
 Dinner – Departure time before 6.00 p.m. and Return Time after 7.00 p.m. $35.00
o Tips for porters a maximum amount of $5.00.
o Tips for maids a maximum amount of $5.00 per night.
o Lodging – Expenses incurred, as evidenced by invoices, receipts or payment evidence. Expenses should not be excessive or extravagant and should be incurred within the reasonable limits of austerity and modesty. If no invoices, receipt or evidence available, the maximum amount will be $50.00 per night.
o Airplane tickets – Coach tickets, unless service to be provided justify other transportation means or if it will be more economical to the P&A to use other mean of transportation instead of waiting for the availability of a ticket in coach. During traveling, the employee is entitled to be reimbursed for breakfast, lunch and/or dinner, according to the applicable rates and depending in the traveling schedule.
o Medical expenses incurred while traveling outside Puerto Rico in official business if evidence is provided that those expenses were incurred as a direct consequence of such travel, as long as such illness or accident is not compensable by means of workmen’s compensation or such expenses are covered by any health plan.
o Reimbursement of rental or purchase costs (the most economical) for special attire needed for official business, presenting the receipt or evidence of payment.
o Reimbursement of charges for long distance or international calls made outside Puerto Rico, directly related to the official business.
o Reimbursement of a maximum amount of $5.00 for telephone calls to their homes, while traveling outside of Puerto Rico in official business.

CATEGORY
CURRENT FISCAL YEAR 2020 NEXT FISCAL YEAR 2021
Personnel Services

Regular Positions $90,361.49 $90,361.49
Social Security $ 6,912.05 $6,912.65
Retirement Fund $ - -
Workers Compensation $1,897.59 $1,897.59
Group Health Insurance $5,941.40 $5,941.26
Unemployment Insurance $ - -
Christmas Bonus $1,980.47 $1,980.00
Professional Services $3,800.00 $3,912.00
(Single Audit and other services)$3,000.00 $1,300.00
Total Personal Services $113,893.00 $112,305.00

Other Operating Expenditures

Travel and Mileage $1,000.00 $1,000.00
Insurances $300.00
Other General Expenditures (Postage) $200.00 $70.00
Printing $500.00
Miscellaneous Services $3,200.00
(subscriptions, meals and NDRN fees) $500.00 $1,300.00
Program Announcements and publication $200.00 $650.00
Materials (office supplies) $2,000.00
Offices Space Rent $5,330.00 $11,765.00
Equipment Purchase $400.00
Equipment Rental - Interboro $400.00 $322.00
Telephone $1,000.00 $1,950.00
Repairs and Maintenance (equipment) $500.00 $585.00
Fuel, Maintenance, Repairs (vehicle) $ - $130.00
Training $2,494.00 $1,840.00
Total Operating Expenditures $18,024.00 $19,612.00

Indirect Costs

Total Budget $ 131,917.00 $131,917.00


CATEGORY CURRENT FISCAL YEAR 2020 NEXT FISCAL YEAR 2021
Personnel Services

Regular Positions $ 90,361.49 $ 90,361.49
Social Security $ 6,912.05 $ 6,912.65
Retirement Fund $ -
Workers Compensation $1,897.59 $1,897.59
Group Health Insurance $5,941.40 $5,941.26
Unemployment Insurance $ - -
Christmas Bonus $ 1,980.47 $ 1,980.00
Professional Services $ 3,800.00 $ 3,912.00
(Single Audit and other services) $ 3,000.00 $ 1,300.00
Total Personal Services $113,893.00 $112,305.00

Other Operating Expenditures

Travel and Mileage $1,000.00 $1,000.00
Insurances $ 300.00
Other General Expenditures (Postage) $ 200.00 $ 70.00
Printing $ 500.00
Miscellaneous Services $ 3,200.00
(subscriptions, meals and NDRN fees) $ 500.00 $1,300.00
Program Announcements and publication $ 200.00 $ 650.00
Materials (office supplies) $ 2,000.00
Offices Space Rent $ 5,330.00 $11,765.00
Equipment Purchase $ 400.00
Equipment Rental - Interboro $ 400.00 $ 322.00
Telephone $1,000.00 $ 1,950.00
Repairs and Maintenance (equipment) $ 500.00 $ 585.00
Fuel, Maintenance, Repairs (vehicles) $ - $ 130.00
Training $ 2,494.00 $ 1,840.00
Total Operating Expenditures $18,024.00 $19,612.00

Indirect Costs

Total Budget $131,917.00 $131,917.00

Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
Case Number 1

A consumer of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration since June 2010 filed a complaint with the CAP program on January 23, 2019, in which he requested that the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration sponsors his training for a vocational goal of a master’s degree in landscape design. The customer is 28 years old and has conditions of Specific Learning Disabilities and ADD/ADHD.

The Panel of Lawyers of the Protection and Defense Division within the Ombudsman’s Office for Persons with Disabilities recommended that a case be opened as a technical assistance, and during the investigation process it became a formal complaint. A written request to the Counselor (hereinafter CRV) asked for a formal communication informing the status of the client's case. The CRV reported through written communication in August 2019, as follows: that an amendment to the initial service plan, aimed at sponsoring the design training at the Inter-American University of Puerto Rico (Metropolitan Campus), was included in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Also, it includes complementary services such as maintenance, transportation, books, counseling, and guidance.

The CRV and the client signed the IPE under the vocational goal of a bachelors’ degree in Design, getting the client to finish this training on February 24, 2017. It enabled him to obtain and retain a job in the field of design. Upon completion of his degree, the CRV explored all viable alternatives to assist the client in the Employment Promotion, under the modality of Regular Employment. The CRV referred the case to the Employment Support and Modalities Centre (CAME) to evaluate the client and make the corresponding recommendations to identify a possible employment scenario to the client. The VRA Employment Specialist evaluated the client but could not help him because the client's occupational goal was required to be clarified. There was a situation in which the client himself expressed that his preparation was a general one and that he has no knowledge in specific programs that would allow him to work as a designer. In addition, the client reported that he wanted to get a job where it is necessary to have a bachelor’s degree, however, he failed to establish an area of interest. This made it difficult to place him in an employment scenario.

The CAP program allowed the CRV to continue exploring alternatives with the client and to work with the Employment Specialist recommendations and to be submitted to consultation to identify potential employers. The CAP staff visited the College of Interior Designers and Decorators (CODDI) for guidance and to exhaust all resources that can be provided to the client, if any. The President of CODDI reported that it is necessary for the client to pass the designers license examination to be able to practice as a designer. The CRV worked the case with the area Supervisor of the VRA and they authorized the client to complete the master’s degree in Landscape Design, as in this way he will be more prepared to compete on an equal footing and maximize his knowledge in an area of specialization. Currently, VRA is paying 100% of the training due to the COVID-19 pandemic situation, to all its clients who are studying and who have a current IPE. The customer expressed his gratitude for the CAP's intervention in the case.


Case Number 2

In April 2020, the mother of a 20-year-old with ADD/ADHD filed a formal complaint against the VRA requesting that her child be paid the checks owed to his for transportation and living accommodation for the months of February and March 2020. In March 2020, the Governor of Puerto Rico decreed a total closure of operations in government agencies. This situation affected the services and payments of the VRA to its customers and service providers, as well as to universities, institutes, among others, where VRA pays for training.

The CAP sent an official communication to the CRV in May 2020 to request a reaction to the formal complaint. A report dated May 2020 was received in which the CRV reported that checks had been prepared for February and March 2020 and were only awaiting notification from the Treasury Department for the issuance of these checks. The Puerto Rico Treasury Department is the Agency where federal and state funds granted to Puerto Rico are deposited.

The CRV reported that as soon as the checks were issued, the customer and his mother would be notified to be on alert of this mailing. In June 2020, the customer’s mother emailed the CAP program that her son had already received the check for February 2020. The case remained opened until the check corresponding to March 2020 was paid. For this reason, the CAP waited until July 2020, when the customer's mother notified via email that the VRA paid the full amount owed for transportation and living allowance for her child. She expressed her appreciation for the CAP's efforts.

The objectives and priorities of the Client Assistant Program (CAP) for fiscal year 2021 were developed to attend the issues mention before:

Priority 1: Individual Advocacy:
Continue providing protection and advocacy services to people with disabilities who come to our office or contact our Program in search for assistance in situations related to the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (VRA) in the face of the new virtual reality and / or in person due to the COVID-19 environment.

Objective 1.1
Provide protection and advocacy services to Vocational Rehabilitation Administration applicants who file complaints related to education, transportation, accessibility, technological assistance, and rehabilitative.

Objective 1.2
Provide technical assistance on services related to Rehabilitation Law to:
• VRA applicants and active consumers
• VRA counselors who request this service
• Municipal, state, and private employees

Objective 1.3
Provide information and referral services to people with disabilities and their families, including applicants and / or consumers of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration and the general public, who come to or communicate with our Program in search of information, guidance, and referrals about the services that CAP offers related to their rights; and how to request other services in public and private agencies.
• VRA services
• Independent Living Programs
• Title 1 ADA Law
• Other information
• CAP Program

Priority 2: Systemic Change

Promote systemic changes that result in greater inclusion and integration in employment, education and other services offered by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration to those applicants and / or consumers who request its services.

Objective 2.1
Active participation in meetings on situations raised by consumers and professionals that affect the services offered to VRA clients, including meetings of the Puerto Rico State Rehabilitation Council, for the analysis and exchange of ideas and situations presented by members of agencies and organizations, in order to promote possible changes and / or recommendations for public policy, procedures and regulatory communications of the VRA that result in benefits for service consumers*
*Due to Covid19, meetings will be held virtually

Objective 2.2
Follow up on the protocols of the VRA, the Centers for Independent Living and Community Rehabilitation Programs subsidized with funds from the VRA, aimed at impacting and improving the services of VRA clients in the face of this new situation of COVID-19 Island wide.

Objective 2.3
Make recommendations on bills presented by the executive and legislative branch in the areas of vocational rehabilitation, independent living and technological assistance.

Priority 3: Education and Outreach

Education is an integral part of the services that CAP offers; we strive to offer services to Rehabilitation Administration applicants and clients to help them acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to protect and advocate for their rights and become self-advocate*
*Services are being pursued virtually in the face of the COVID-19 situation.

Objective 3.1
Coordinate and offer virtual training to applicants, consumers and their families so that they can learn about the CAP Program in served communities and especially those less served, to applicants and consumers of the VRA, their families, government and municipal officials and the general public, on state and federal laws that protect the rights of people with disabilities, Public Law 113-128 known as WIOA of July 22, 2014, which contains the most recent amendments to the Rehabilitation Law and other topics such as, Rights and Duties of Consumers of the Administration of Vocational Rehabilitation, Technological Assistance, Transition, Reasonable modifications for education and other related issues. This activity will be offered through an application or virtual platform to continue empowering the clients and new clients of the VRA in the face of the COVID-19 situation.

Objective 3.2
Prepare surveys and similar documentation to learn about the challenges and / or concerns of people with disabilities and may be unaware of the services offered by CAP, and the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration in Puerto Rico. These surveys, and others materials will be distributed as follows:
• Centers for Independent Living
• Community Rehabilitation Programs
• Consulates in Puerto Rico (to impact foreign individuals who may have a disability)

Objective 3.3
Outreach program in newspapers, television, and/or social media about the CAP program and the rights of people who may be applicants or consumers of VRA services as well as other rights that protect people with disabilities.
Certification
Approved
Executive Office of the Commonwealth of Puerto Ric
Miss Loida E Oliveras-González, Executive Director
2020-12-30
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 16 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0528. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.