RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1098

Virginia
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
disAbility Law Center of Virginia
1512 Willow Lawn Drive
Suite 100
Richmond
VA
23230
http://www.dlcv.org
{Empty}
(800) 552-3962
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
disAbility Law Center of Virginia
1512 Willow Lawn Drive
Suite 100
Richmond
23230
Virginia
info@dlcv.org
http://www.dlcv.org
{Empty}
(800) 552-3962
{Empty}
Additional Information
Colleen Miller
Robert Gray
(804) 225-2042
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
19
0
0
26
16
3496
3557
B. Training Activities
45
3494
dLCV presented to 9 groups on transition related CAP topics. We reached a total of 157 individuals including students, vision teachers, professionals, and parents from the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI), Bon Secours Community Health Workers Association, Blue Ridge Autism Achievement Center, North Star Academy, Resources for Independent Living, Hanover Community Services Board (CSB), and at a resource fair in Prince George County. dLCV provided resources in Spanish and English. <p><p>dLCV reached 106 students and parents in 3 separate trainings about assistive technology and transition rights for those seeking to obtain or maintain employment. The audience learned how to learn to locate employment support services in post-secondary education and how these services continue after graduation. <p><p>We identified and summarized 12 VR success stories to post on social media to encourage others in the community to reach out to dLCV for assistance with their vocational rehabilitation and CAP issues and concerns. Our Facebook posts reached 3,100 people. <p><p>dLCV successfully provided 10 vocational rehabilitation and ADA rights presentations to 75 individuals at day support programs across Virginia. <p><p>The disAbility Law Center (dLCV) provided an in-depth presentation on employment rights and laws reaching 6 people with mental health disabilities. dLCV provided resources from the EEOC to all attendees to help them advocate for themselves in the workplace. <p><p>This year dLCV posted 4 articles to social media to help college students understand classroom accommodations, employment accommodations, their rights under the ADA, as well as self-identifying as an individual with a disability. Over 50 individuals viewed this information. <p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
dLCV&rsquo;s Outreach Coordinator connected with Hispanic community advocacy groups in Chesterfield, Richmond, Hampton Roads in FY 19. We joined the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and participated in multiple community outreach activities including the Que Pasa festival, school resource fairs and meeting with representatives from local health departments. <p><p>During fiscal year 2019, dLCV utilized a total of 96 volunteers that logged 589 hours of volunteer service to dLCV. Volunteers performed tasks such as representing dLCV at resource fairs, promoting the CAP program at outreach events, and administrative tasks such as covering the front desk and research for dLCV staff members for various projects and service requests. <p><p>dLCV continues close communication with all state Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) and Department for Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) offices to ensure their clients understand dLCV and the CAP program. <p><p>dLCV is pleased to report a 98% Satisfaction rate from the 50 client satisfaction surveys we received across all grants in FY 19. This satisfaction rate breaks down as 42 highly satisfied respondents, 7 satisfied, and 1 unsatisfied. <p><p>dLCV conducted follow-up interviews with 10% of our closed clients for more in depth feedback on our services. 100% percent of clients interviewed reported that they were satisfied with the results they received from our agency. Clients felt like dLCV was a valuable resource. One client stated: &ldquo;thank you for all that you do for special needs&rdquo; and another commented &ldquo;Applause! Applause! God sent! When I had nowhere to turn God sent me a blessing thank you again for everything.&rdquo; <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
7
0
2
2380
38
0
dLCV offered a public input survey to identify which disability advocacy issues we should consider in FY 20. We posted the survey on our website and distributed through monitoring, trainings, and multiple outreach activities. Our 405 respondents identified quality mental health care, access to government benefits, and housing as the top three areas of concern. 37% of our respondents were individuals with disabilities. Agencies and groups we reached included: the Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), Partnership for People with Disabilities, Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) , and multiple community advocacy and networking groups. dLCV used this information to develop our FY 20 CAP goals and focus areas.<p>dLCV participated on the Virginia State Rehabilitation Councils (SRACs) for the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI), assigning two different CAP disability rights advocates to each position. dLCV will continue collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Councils in FY 20. Topics included review of Order of Selection (OOS) status and discussion of DARS Combined State Plan. dLCV attended the Coalition of State Administrators for Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) conference to become familiar with best practice for state VR agencies. <p><p>dLCV maintains a website that posts the following: our federal grants&rsquo; goals and focus areas, notices for the Board of Directors and dLCV&rsquo;s Advisory Council meetings, job vacancies, announcements, agency publications, and disability-related links. <p><p>dLCV has a Facebook page and Twitter account which includes CAP agency information and links to resources. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
n/a <P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
13
55
68
5
13
B. Problem areas
6
7
22
18
0
4
2
2
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
19
0
43
0
2
1
65
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
37
22
1
1
0
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
17
7
1
0
10
15
1
10
2
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
7
22
9
25
5
68
B. Gender
32
36
68
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
9
0
4
19
0
30
5
1
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
3
0
0
0
0
10
3
10
4
0
1
3
1
0
1
0
0
0
6
11
0
1
4
3
3
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
0
68
E. Types of Individuals Served
17
2
30
3
5
8
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
2
Who is dLCV?&rdquo; <p><p>dLCV provided a live webinar to educate DARS Counselors about dLCV and the services we provide. dLCV discussed working together with DARS staff and using the lowest level of intervention possible. There were over 70 staff members logged on to the presentation. However, DARS recorded the webinar for their staff to view and be a part of their future staff training. <p><p>dLCV provided outreach materials on self-identifying, classroom accommodations, and reporting problems early to 37 DARS transition counselors. These materials aid and motivate college students to self-advocate and find success in post-secondary education. <p><p>dLCV completed informative CAP chats with 14 different VR agencies and groups to discuss CAP matters and provided guidance to over 92 VR agency staff, individuals with disabilities, VR clients, and members of the general public across Virginia. This includes CAP chats with the Norfolk, Richmond, Roanoke and Fairfax DBVI offices, and the Portsmouth, South Hampton Roads, Norfolk, Richmond and Roanoke DARS offices. <p><p>In FY 2016, dLCV wrote the DARS Commissioner regarding the inconsistencies with their referral process throughout the Commonwealth. The Commissioner promised there would be changes forthcoming. In FY 2019, after investigation and further communication, we learned that DARS developed a uniform practice throughout the Commonwealth for processing referrals. DARS posted this information of their website and established a definite uniform statewide practice. <p><p>In FY 2019, dLCV investigated the DARS vehicle modification policy to determine if it contradicts federal regulations and advocate for corrective action. Per guidance from RSA, dLCV learned the DARS van modification did indeed contradict federal regulations and advocated for corrective action. DARS stated they would work with the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) to review the policy and ensure their van modification policy was in line with federal regulations. dLCV is monitoring the progress of the policy change. <p><p>Helping Lawmakers Understand <p><p>In FY2018, dLCV staff visited 14(c) certificate holders across the Commonwealth to train workers making less than minimum wage about their rights under Section 511. In FY 19, we followed up with a report to the General Assembly detailing the changes to the Rehabilitation Act; the requirement that individuals with disabilities receive counseling and training before they can receive less than minimum wage; and dLCV's experience with sheltered workshops. <p><p>We distributed the report to legislators and dLCV's advocacy partners. It laid out the steps lawmakers would need to take in order for Virginia to make progress toward individuals with disabilities to receive competitive wages. Some of our recommendations included: phasing out of all sheltered work settings; development of better work opportunities for people with disabilities in rural communities; r"
B. Litigation
0
0
0
dLCV did represent one client in a DARS Fair Hearing. See the final narrative in Part VI. <P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
disAbility Law Center of Virginia
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
dLCV utilized 36 advocates, attorneys, and support staff from all units to complete our CAP advocacy in FY 19. <p><p>As Virginia&rsquo;s protection and advocacy system, we utilize multiple funding streams to complete our advocacy projects and casework. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
&ldquo;WIOA protects us!&rdquo; <p><p>Ella learned DARS had closed her case. dLCV argued Ella received inadequate services under her transition plan and Individualized Education Program (IEP). Moreover, DARS also neglected regulations under the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act (WIOA). dLCV requested they reconsider the decision to close her case. Within a day, DARS discovered that the client was still eligible for services and her case remains open. <p><p>&ldquo;Keep it moving!&rdquo; <p><p>Dora called dLCV in distress because she needed services from DARS to find employment. Instead, she received a notice they were going to close her case. DARS told her she had the tools to accomplish her vocational goals, but that was not the case. She still needed job coaching and counseling assistance. She felt as if DARS was leaving her without these supports when she needed them the most. dLCV successfully negotiated for her vocational rehabilitation case with DARS to remain open. After the meeting, Elena reported being able to feel hopeful about the future for the first time in years. <p><p>&ldquo;Establishing expectations&rdquo; <p><p>David contacted dLCV to request a new counselor. He is pursuing a specialized IT profession and is working towards certifications and trainings. David became frustrated with his DARS counselor&rsquo;s tardiness and follow through when it came time to pay for tests. dLCV identified the source of the communication breakdown, negotiated a compromise, and communication was restored. The counselor agreed to work on her tardiness and also put in place monthly meetings via phone and enrolled David in a specialized program. This program allows a counselor to provide insight on trends and trainings for the IT field. David can now pursue his career! <p><p>&ldquo;Forget me not&rdquo; <p><p>Sara requested dLCV assist her with understanding the status of her VR case and denial of additional situational assessments from DARS. All the previous situational assessments had been in food service or janitorial work, areas outside of the client&rsquo;s areas of interest. dLCV requested and obtained records related to the situational assessments that were previously completed and learned there were no official reports or feedback about the assessments. <p><p>After restoring communication, the team agreed to a discovery assessment through waiver services. The discovery assessment is a new technique used to really delve into a client&rsquo;s environment, really get to know them, get to know their likes and dislikes, triggers, interests, etc. thus allowing the assessor insight to an appropriate vocational goal. dLCV monitored the case to ensure the client&rsquo;s discovery occurred and ensured the assessments began in an appropriate amount of time. <p><p>&ldquo;The sky&rsquo;s the limit&rdquo; <p><p>Charles reached out to dLCV in a panic when denied sponsorship for his education from DARS. Although Charles did not want t
Certification
Approved
Colleen Miller
Executive Director
2019-10-21
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