RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1097

Ohio
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights Ohio
200 Civic Center Drive, Suite 300
{Empty}
Columbus
OH
43215
(800) 282-9181
(800) 858-3542
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights Ohio
200 Civic Center Drive, Suite 300
{Empty}
Columbus
43215
{Empty}
{Empty}
(800) 282-9181
(800) 858-3542
{Empty}
Additional Information
Michael Kirkman & Alison McKay
Lyndsey Brown
(614) 466-7264
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
1
0
0
21
4
3
29
B. Training Activities
25
3494
<p>1. (85 Individuals reached) - DRO attended and participated in an event hosted by the state vocational rehabilitation agency, Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), for community organizations, state agencies, and other stakeholders. DRO provided input about strategies and available services regarding postsecondary outcomes for deaf or hard of hearing individuals.</p><p><p>2. (100 individuals reached) - DRO attended the Ohio Transportation Equity Forum and obtained information on the ongoing need for more transportation options for people with disabilities, as well as educated and informed policymakers on various modes of transportation.</p><p><p>3. (25 individuals reached) - DRO conducted a workshop at the NASW Ohio Chapter Annual Conference for social workers on DRO&rsquo;s advocacy and services to people with disabilities, including information on the Client Assistance Program.</p><p><p>4. (40 individuals reached) - DRO gave a presentation on guardianship and its alternatives to attendees who are youth, or family of youth, or those working with youth, who are transitioning out of high school and may be considering obtaining a guardianship.</p><p><p>5. (150 individuals reached) - DRO presented at the Annual Convention of the National Federation of the Blind of Ohio to provide information to attendees about the Client Assistance Program, vocational rehabilitation services, and rights under the Rehabilitation Act.</p><p><p>6. (25 individuals reached) - DRO provided an overview of DRO advocacy and services to individuals with disabilities, including information on the Client Assistance Program, to providers for the Access Center for Independent Living Dayton, one of Ohio&rsquo;s Independent Living services providers.</p><p><p>7. (25 individuals reached) - DRO provided information to college students with disabilities about their rights as students with disabilities, including accessing vocational rehabilitation services and needed accommodations, as well as accessibility and inclusion in the college setting.</p><p><p>8. (58 individuals reached) - DRO participated on a panel to provide information about transition related topics for Ohio Family 2 Family, a family-staffed organization that assists families of children and youth with disabilities and the professionals that serve them.</p><p><p>9. (30 individuals reached) - DRO presented an overview of the ADA and the services that DRO offers, including through its Client Assistance Program, to participants at the MOBILE Disability Resource Center, one of Ohio&rsquo;s Independent Living services providers..</p><p><p>10. (25 individuals reached) - DRO conducted a webinar for the Down Syndrome Association of Central Ohio providing information to families regarding IEP advocacy, transition services and other available educational and transition supports.</p><p><p>11. (2,200 individuals reached) - DRO conducted a training that it live-streamed through Facebook to train to parents and youth about negotiating s
C. Agency Outreach
<p>1. (120 individuals reached) - DRO trained Franklin County public defenders on issues impacting people with disabilities who have involvement in the criminal justice system. Statistically, individuals who have involvement in the criminal justice system come from underserved areas.</p><p><p>2. (150 individuals reached) - DRO trained lawyers at the Ohio State Bar Association Elder Law Conference on the advocacy services that DRO provides and issues and service systems impacting people with developmental disabilities. The trainees provide service to elderly individuals who often face isolation.</p><p><p>3. (30 individuals reached) - DRO trained Legal Aid attorneys on issues and service systems impacting people with developmental disabilities in Ohio. The attorneys that were trained provide services for low income individuals who fall within the category of underserved communities.</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
2
1500
5
0
<p>1. (100 individuals reached) - DRO attended the Ohio Transportation Equity Forum and obtained information on the ongoing need for more transportation options for people with disabilities, as well as educated and informed policymakers on various modes of transportation.</p><p><p>2. (50 individuals reached) - DRO attended the 2019 Ohio Youth Leadership Forum and provided information to students regarding transition planning, services through Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), and general educational materials relating to DRO.</p><p><p>3. (75 individuals reached) - DRO exhibited and attended the OCALICON 2018 Conference. Attendees of the conference were provided with information, advice, and referral information regarding DRO programs and priorities.</p><p><p>4. (25 individuals reached) - DRO exhibited at the Resources for Life Fair at the OhioHealth Rehab Hospital and provided attendees with information about Client Assistance Program and other DRO programs, as well as referrals for other resources.</p><p><p>5. (30 individuals reached) - DRO attended the Visions Resources Expo and provided information about DRO services and programs to other vendors and attendees.</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>1. DRO staff was interviewed for and quoted in an article in the Toledo Blade about a program for high school students with disabilities run by the University of Toledo and the Ability Center (a Center for Independent Living serving northwest Ohio).</p><p><p>2. DRO staff contributed on an article written by The Columbus Dispatch about state lawmakers removing provision targeting Disability Rights Ohio as the designated Protection and Advocacy system and Client Assistance Program for Ohio.</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
35
292
327
6
107
B. Problem areas
15
36
46
0
0
5
0
3
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
189
21
4
1
10
1
226
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
29
168
5
2
4
0
0
1
17
0
0
0
<p>N/A</p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
174
0
1
0
5
13
3
21
2
7
<p>Unable to contact client - 6</p><p><p>Services no longer needed - 1</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
11
29
113
158
16
327
B. Gender
181
146
327
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
2
61
0
203
6
55
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
6
0
2
6
7
28
2
9
16
3
8
16
9
2
4
1
5
9
16
79
7
3
23
15
26
0
4
0
6
3
4
1
5
327
E. Types of Individuals Served
65
0
173
23
5
34
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
<p>DRO reviewed proposed revisions to the state vocational rehabilitation agency&rsquo;s regulations, policies and procedures and submitted public comments in order to protect and advocate the rights of applicants and recipients of VR services. This included revisions to the Informed Choice Policy, VR Application and Intake, and VR Eligibility and Order of Selection. As a result, the VR agency revised their policies and procedures in line with some of our comments (for example, clarifying that people with disabilities can select representatives other than their parent or guardian to take part in the VR process; and bringing their order of selection criteria definitions in line with regulatory requirements).</p><p>
B. Litigation
1
1
0
<p>DRO filed a civil action in federal court on behalf of a client who had been denied services from Ohio&rsquo;s vocational rehabilitation (VR) agency. The client requested that the VR agency support and finance client&rsquo;s participation in a postsecondary program for students with Autism as a necessary service that would enable the client to achieve his employment outcome. The VR agency denied the request on the basis that it does not support such types of programs. DRO represented the client in an informal administrative review and fair hearing, and then filed an action in civil court after the VR agency&rsquo;s actions were upheld by the hearing officer, asserting that the VR agency&rsquo;s actions violate federal law.</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights Ohio
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>CAP Position/ FTE/ % Filled/ Person Years</p><p><p>Professional Part time/ .1/ 36%/.0</p><p><p>Professional Full time/ 4.0/97%/ 3.9</p><p><p>Clerical part time/ .2/ 54%/ .1</p><p><p>Clerical full time/ .4/80%/ .3</p><p><p>Total/ 4.7/ 94%/ 4.4</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>1. Client had started a new job on an assembly line. One month later, his cataracts caused him to miss the holes for the nails he was inserting. He was written up and told unofficially that if he couldn't see, he would be let go. Client reached out to the state vocational rehabilitation agency for help paying for cataract surgery so that he could maintain his job. Because he had private insurance, the state VR agency denied his request. However, his insurance required a large deductible up front, which client was unable to pay. Client contacted DRO for help appealing the denial. A DRO advocate represented the Client in an informal administrative review and argued that Ohio's laws did allow the VR agency to cover the surgery because client would only be able to afford the deductible for surgery after many months, a delay that would cause him to lose his job. After verifying that Client hadn't met his deductible, the VR agency agreed to pay for the surgery. Client withdrew his appeal, and he's now looking forward to having his eyesight restored.</p><p><p>2. Client&rsquo;s family had resettled in Ohio as refugees from Zimbabwe two years ago, and Client began working with the state VR agency to find a program that would teach her American Sign Language (ASL), help her catch up on her education and prepare her for college or a job. The state VR agency initially recommended a local Hearing &amp; Speech Center, but Client and her family felt that she needed more intensive help than that program could provide. They got in touch with the English Language Institute (ELI) of Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C., which teaches English as a second language, ASL and cross-cultural studies over an academic year so that students become proficient in English and qualify for admission to Gallaudet or other universities. However, the state VR agency's evaluation of Client prevented it from supporting her admission to the ELI. Client contacted DRO for assistance in creating a new post-secondary transition plan that would allow her to enroll at the ELI. A DRO advocate met with the state VR agency and argued that the evaluation had underestimated Client&rsquo;s knowledge and abilities because of her language barrier. The ELI also performed its own assessment and accepted her. The state VR agency agreed that Client needed the more formal training offered at Gallaudet and agreed to pay for the program.</p><p>
Certification
Approved
Michael Kirkman
Executive Director
2019-12-20
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