RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1089

California
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights California
1831 K Street
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Sacramento
CA
95811
(800) 776-5746
(800) 719-5798
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
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{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
California
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
Additional Information
Connie Chu
JoAnn Parayno
(510) 267-1232
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
1317
0
0
32
1186
4505
7040
B. Training Activities
43
1511
In fiscal year 2019, Disability Rights California (DRC) utilized Client Assistance Program (CAP) funds for training throughout California to serve and support people with disabilities. In training programs, DRC provided 43 statewide trainings to 1,511 individuals. These trainings focused on transition services for young adults, educational and vocational goals, reasonable accommodations and ADA in employment, barriers to accessing employment, and providing information about the CAP to underserved people throughout the state, including Asian Pacific Islander and Latino communities as well as Deaf, low vision and blind communities. For example, on February 2, 2019, DRC staff presented information on transition services at the Parents Helping Parents Conference in San Jose. The event served 160 API and Latino individuals and family members in Santa Clara county. Attendees learned how the school, regional center, and DOR all work together to provide appropriate services for young adults. DRC also provided informational material about the CAP program in English, Spanish and Vietnamese. On March 9, 2019, DRC participated in the Asian Pacific Islanders with Disabilities in California (APIDC) Conference to inform the API community with disabilities about resources available to support them in the workplace. DRC&rsquo;s Managing Attorney from the Pathways to Work Practice Group was a panelist at the conference and presented about reasonable accommodations in the workplace, DOR services, and work incentive programs. Although the conference took place in Los Angeles, 60 attendees from API communities in Orange County, Santa Barbara, Inland Empire, and San Diego counties attended the event. On March 28, 2019, DRC was invited to the Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders to provide training regarding pathways from school to employment. This training focused on transition services to 25 people with disabilities and their family members about employment rights, accommodations, and how to access employment services and supports from the DOR or regional centers. Attendees were from the Orange County and Los Angeles area and included DOR, low-income clients and those from juvenile justice and/or foster care. Starting at the end of this reporting period, DRC participated in the first of three trainings for consumers and their families in a range of topics that increase choices in work, day, and recreational activities. The first training of the series took place on August 2, 2019 at Rivendell Community, Inc. in Fresno. The emphasis for this training was employment information and services for people with disabilities. Although the audience was comprised of different ethnic groups, the majority of attendees were from the Hmong community and interpreters were available in Hmong and Laotian. <P><p>
C. Agency Outreach
DRC continued its ongoing outreach to unserved and underserved mono-lingual, limited English proficient, and marginalized communities. In fiscal year 2019, CAP staff participated in 8 outreach events, reaching a total of 520 people. DRC staff provided outreach at the Resource and Technology Fair at the Sacramento Society for the Blind on November 3, 2019. DRC provided information about employment and accommodation rights and how to access these employment services and supports. In attendance were 175 individuals who are blind or have visual impairments. Informational material about CAP and DRC services were provided in Large Type and Braille. <p><p>At the end of 2018, DRC participated in a series of three meet and greet outreach activities to build collaborative relationships with DOR to increase our ability to reach underserved disability communities and efficiently resolve disputes. On November 19, DRC met with 20 attendees at the Santa Clarita DOR serving the Van Nuys Foothill area; 20 attendees at the Santa Barbara DOR on December 13; and 20 attendees at the Greater Los Angeles DOR. At these events, DRC met with each district administrator and the team managers to discuss our collaborative efforts to enhance employment opportunities for people with disabilities. DRC staff also discussed the CAP program, local partnership agreements, transition services, and various other topics. <p><p>On March 29, 2019, Fresno Unified School District partnered with the Central Valley Regional Center to provide a resource fair for individuals and families wanting information about employment, post-secondary education, career training, and independent living. At this fair, DRC hosted a resource booth and connected with 170 attendees, including individuals with disabilities and disability organizations about CAP services, DOR, and various options and supports for clients with disabilities. Informational material about CAP and DRC services were provided in English and Spanish. <p><p>On April 12, 2019, DRC informed Spanish-speaking parents and caregivers of children with disabilities about the CAP program at the Transition to Adulthood Information and Resource Fair. DRC staff provided one-on-one assistance as well as informational material in both English and Spanish to the 55 attendees from the greater Los Angeles area. Parents and caregivers learned about rights and access to youth transition services and supports. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
20343
51
0
N/A <P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
N/A <P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
187
513
700
124
248
B. Problem areas
31
187
321
82
0
52
1
24
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
533
0
24
44
3
4
608
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
276
257
3
5
4
40
4
1
14
4
0
0
N/A <P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
459
8
2
9
31
60
8
31
0
0
N/A <P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
12
80
181
368
59
700
B. Gender
364
336
700
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
164
14
40
171
3
264
23
21
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
4
26
3
2
4
31
47
7
51
30
7
19
39
14
5
0
1
7
11
15
171
3
3
5
16
91
1
1
0
46
1
2
1
36
700
E. Types of Individuals Served
190
9
622
27
10
23
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
4
Beginning in 2018, DRC worked with three state agencies, The California Departments of Rehabilitation, Education and Developmental Services to develop a Blue Print for Competitive Integrated employment. The Blueprint (web link: https://www.chhs.ca.gov/home/cie/) identifies specific steps and outcomes each agency will achieve over a 5 year period to increase competitive integrated employment of persons with I/DD. During this year, DRC staff met regularly with a steering committee comprised of agency leaders s to discuss the implementation of the &ldquo;Blueprint,&rdquo; The goals of the Blueprint include engaging eligible individuals in more employment preparation services and other trainings, and helping people to make informed decisions to support a transition to work in the community. DRC also provided feedback on the Competitive Integrated Employment Annual Report for the first reporting year including recommending that more context be provided for data shared so the report was more understandable by the general population. <p><p>Staff continue to participate in the Employment First Committee of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities, whose goal is to advance the rights of individuals with I/DD and increase their access to CIE. <p><p>DRC again served on the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), which is responsible for reviewing, evaluating and advising the DOR regarding its policies and performance. The SRC works to ensure that DOR meets its mission of employment, independence and equality for people with disabilities. A DRC staff person is the chair of the SRC&rsquo;s policy committee, which regularly makes recommendations to the DOR regarding its current and proposed policies. During the review period, the SRC made a variety of recommendations including that the DOR ensure that CAP materials are prominently displayed in each office. The DOR agreed to work with CAP to ensure that the materials are distributed and displayed prominently. <p><p>DRC regularly participates in the Orange County Work Services meeting with the DOR, Regional Center of Orange County, school districts, community colleges, and employment service providers. The Work Services team meets to discuss development and implementation of DOR and regional center policies and programs under WIOA. These policies and programs include the provision of services to youth and students with disabilities and persons with the most significant disabilities seeking CIE. DRC&rsquo;s role is to provide the group with the clients&rsquo; perspective and identify systemic issues clients in these populations encounter when attempting to access these services and programs. Through this collaboration, DRC lead the development of fact sheets for self-advocates and family members preparing for meetings with agencies that provide employment services. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
CAP did not engage in any class action or individual representation litigation during the reporting period using CAP funding, but provided direct representation to individuals in the administrative hearing process with the DOR.<p>The following are examples of DRC&rsquo;s representation of individuals in administrative hearings:<p>1. Judge Orders DOR to Purchase and Modify a Vehicle for Client Jennifer is a person with quadriplegia as a result of a spinal cord injury. She works full time as the coordinator of a school district food services program. Her job duties include traveling to multiple school sites on a regular basis and she is required to maintain a valid driver&rsquo;s license for her employment. Jennifer and the DOR mutually agreed to an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) to support her in maintaining her employment. The DOR agreed to provide her with assistive technology and a Mobility Evaluation Program evaluation to determine if she was safe to operate a vehicle. The client currently utilizes paratransit services, but endures a 3-6 hour commute to her job. To avoid pressure ulcers, Jennifer must perform pressure release exercise by reclining her seat and shifting her weight using her arms and abdomen. Although she would be able to do this in a modified vehicle, she cannot do so while in paratransit because both she and her chair are secured causing her to be unable to recline her seat or shift her weight. Although the mobility evaluation showed she was safe to operate a vehicle, the Department denied her request for the vehicle purchase and modification. The first reason for denial was that the Department determined the service would be solely a transportation service, rather than a transportation service supportive of an individual accessing and participating in other vocational rehabilitation services. The second reason for denial was that paratransit services are similar and available benefits DRC represented Jennifer at an administrative hearing and presented evidence refuting these reasons for denial. The judge concluded the Department must fund Jennifer&rsquo;s purchase of a modified vehicle. <p><p>2. Administrative Law Judge Orders DOR to Pay Full Tuition for College Student <p><p>Jasper is a DOR client and a mechanical engineering student. Jasper&rsquo;s degree program is unique in that he will begin taking upper division courses related to his major during his second semester of college. When the DOR developed his IPE, it included in the plan that Jasper would attend a public four-year university and that DOR would provide full funding. However, after Jasper started college, the DOR said that an error was made when it developed the IPE and it would only help him pay for the equivalent cost of a community college rather than his full tuition at the state university. Since Jasper had already started school, he had to take out loans for his tuition. Because Jasper and the DOR did not agree on the tuition rate, th
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights California
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
CAP services were provided by professional staff of 10.69 PTE with 9.48 years and clerical staff of 3.79 PTE with 3.01 years. <P><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
1. DOR Agrees to Fund Personal Assistance Services for College Student <p><p>Gemma moved away from home to start college in the Fall of 2018. Gemma is a person with spinal muscular atrophy and requires support to live independently and to attend college. The personal assistance services she received from IHSS and EPSDT were not sufficient to meet her needs as student. She sought help from the DOR but was only provided with 8 hours of personal assistance services per week, which did not meet her needs. To meet her needs Gemma and her family paid for additional services out-of-pocket and her mother attended school with her to assist her in the classroom, which did not allow Gemma the independence she desired. Gemma contacted DRC for help. <p><p>DRC represented Gemma in negotiations with the DOR and represented her at an Administrative Review to help her obtain the personal assistance hours she needed. DOR agreed to fund 50 additional hours of personal assistance services per week. DOR also agreed to pay Gemma&rsquo;s mother for services she provided to Gemma. In addition, at Gemma&rsquo;s request, DOR agreed to contract with independent service providers for Gemma to support her independence on campus and that her mother would only provide services in an emergency basis going forward. Lastly, DOR agreed to reimburse Gemma and her family for their out-of-pocket costs for her services. <p><p>2. DOR Agrees to Fund Private School Funding for Master's Degree <p><p>Tabatha is a person with a significant visual impairment who requires vocational rehabilitation services to pursue her employment goal of becoming a dietician, including funding for a Master's degree in Nutrition. When Tabatha requested DOR funding for a private school that is close to her home, DOR told her that because there are public schools that offer a Master's Degree in Nutrition, DOR can only fund the cost of the public school, and she would have to pay the difference of the cost of the private school. Tabatha explained to her counselor that she did not meet the entrance requirements to any of the public schools and that all of the public schools are too far for her to attend. Therefore, her only option is to attend a private school that is close to her home. Tabatha&rsquo;s counselor asked her to draft a letter to justify why DOR should support her at a private school. <p><p>Tabatha contacted DRC for assistance with drafting the letter. DRC provided Tabatha with technical assistance in drafting a letter she could submit to her counselor requesting full tuition funding for the private school of her choice, citing the applicable regulations. Tabatha submitted the letter to her DOR counselor, and DOR approved her request for full funding. <p><p>2. DOR Agrees to Reimburse Student for Out-of-Pocket Expenses Tessa received training at an out-of-state university through her IPE in 2017. The DOR agreed that it would fund the cost of her tuition and fees at the California sta
Certification
Approved
Catherine Blakemore
Executive Director
2019-12-27
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