RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1087

Wyoming
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Protection & Advocacy System, Inc.
7344 Stockman Street
{Empty}
Cheyenne
WY
82009
http://www.wypanda.com
(800) 821-3091
(800) 821-3091
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Protection & Advocacy System, Inc.
7344 Stockman Street
{Empty}
Cheyenne
82009
Wyoming
wypanda@wypanda.com
http://www.wypanda.com
(800) 821-3091
(800) 821-3091
Additional Information
Lee Beidleman
Lee Beidleman
(307) 638-7668
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
15
1
0
1
0
4
21
B. Training Activities
15
1039
During the 2018-2019 fiscal year, the CAP program conducted presentations, in-services and training activities throughout Wyoming. The venues were varied and the audiences were quite diverse, depending on the venue. CAP presented information to groups with as many as 340 people to as little as a single individual. <p><p>On October 3, 2018, CAP presented information regarding the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), and the Client Assistance Program to the school-to-work transition coordinator for Park County School District No. 6, in Cody, Wyoming. Attendance: 1 person. <p><p>On October 3, 2018, CAP presented information regarding the Client Assistance Program to the Laramie County Department of Family Services office, in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Attendees included agency staff. Attendance: 12 persons. <p><p>On February 28, 2019, CAP presented information regarding the Client Assistance Program and services for transition-age youth to persons attending the Rock Springs Community Services Fair, in Rock Springs, Wyoming. Participants included students many of whom were school to work transition age, and their family members. Attendees included persons who are members of traditionally underserved or unserved population groups. Attendance: 100 persons. <p><p>On February 28, 2019, CAP presented information regarding the Client Assistance Program and required school-to-work transition services to a teleconference of Department of Family Services&rsquo; caseworkers, including Adult Protection Services staff. The teleconference was attended statewide. Attendees included agency personnel. Attendance: 19 persons. <p><p>On April 12, 2019, CAP presented information regarding the Client Assistance Program to a round table meeting of human resource managers, held in Laramie, Wyoming. Attendees included prospective employers of individuals with disabilities. Attendance: 20 persons. <p><p>On April 17, 2019, CAP presented information regarding school-to-work transition, vocational rehabilitation process and services, work incentives, and the Client Assistance Program to the Laramie County School District No. 1 community services and transition fair, held in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Attendees included potentially eligible students and their family members, several of whom were members of traditionally underserved or unserved population groups, including enrolled tribal members. Attendance: 29 persons. <p><p>On May 16, 2019, CAP presented information regarding the Client Assistance Program to persons attending a rights and responsibilities training at the Laramie County Library, in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Attendees included individuals with disabilities and service provider staff. Attendance: 10 persons. <p><p>On May 23, 2019, CAP presented information on the Client Assistance Program to the Wyoming Community Service Providers conference, in Saratoga, Wyoming. Attendees included service providers primarily serving persons who have intellec
C. Agency Outreach
The Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment conducted and recently concluded has identified individuals with disabilities living in rural areas of Wyoming as the most underserved group. The lack of public transportation and the distance that has to be traveled to get to the DVR offices or to work was the primary reason noted for being underserved. This determination is a curious one, as it does not identify a certain category of disability as being underserved, but instead includes individuals with any disability that live in a rural area with limited transportation access. In past needs assessments, unserved/underserved groups have always been identified according to their disability category. For example, individuals with mental illness diagnoses and traumatic brain injury diagnoses have always been the two groups identified as underserved. In retrospect, individuals in these two disability categories were probably not so much underserved by DVR, but instead were less successful in gaining and maintaining employment due to their disability characteristics. CAP has spent most outreach activities communicating and presenting to mental health agencies, service providers, community groups, independent living centers, state agencies, education personnel, juvenile detention centers, and parents/guardians. Most of these outreach activities are conducted in the more populated cities and towns in Wyoming which are beneficial to those targeted audiences. However, it may be necessary to expand outreach activities to some of the more rural and less populated areas of the state where the identified underserved population resides. <p><p>Wyoming&rsquo;s most predominant minority community is the Native American population living on the Wind River Indian Reservation most of which is located in Fremont County. The Reservation is home to approximately 12,500 Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribal members, which is just over 2% of Wyoming&rsquo;s 579,315 total population (2017). The two tribes are plagued by alcoholism, drug abuse, crime, high suicide rates, and a 20% disabilities rate. The unemployment rate on the Reservation is above 70% and 60% of the households are below the poverty line. The Reservation is by far the most depressed location in the state of Wyoming. Changing the culture from hopelessness to one of hope will be a long and evolutionary process. The Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act and the Pre-Employment Transition Services outlined in the Act can help to speed the process at least for those students who are potentially eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. It can provide services that allows students the opportunity to experience success in the world of employment while they are still in school, which will carry over to their adult world. CAP has spent a large amount of outreach effort this past year on the Reservation talking with school officials and the Project 121 programs about benefits the Pre-ETS program
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
1
0
1648
9
0
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
The following agencies provide contact information to the public: Wyoming Workforce Services Department (16 offices), Wyoming Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (36 offices), Wyoming Department of Health-Behavioral Health Division, Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities, Wyoming State Bar Directory, Goshen County Services, Wounded Warriors website, NAMI website, Wyoming Brain Injury Alliance, Wyoming Real Estate Commission website, Wyoming Independent Living (5 offices), Wyoming Services for Independent Living Services (5 offices) State Independent Living Council website, State Rehabilitation Council website, Northern Arapahoe Vocational Rehabilitation, Red Feathered Eagle Vocational Rehabilitation and Veteran Administration Centers. <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
5
7
12
0
2
B. Problem areas
12
3
3
3
0
3
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
0
0
10
0
0
0
10
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
7
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
0
1
4
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
1
4
5
2
12
B. Gender
6
6
12
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
1
0
0
0
0
11
0
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
4
1
0
0
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
E. Types of Individuals Served
6
0
6
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
2
CAP has been very active with systemic activities throughout the past year. Some involve policy changes while others involve procedural adjustments. On 9/27/18 the Wyoming Division of Vocational Rehabilitation established a new policy requiring prior approval for all travel (no matter the amount). This new policy was all encompassing for employees, clients, and state rehabilitation council members. When a request for travel was submitted, it would go through several local steps for approval and the final step would require RSA approval. The entire process could not be accomplished in less than two weeks. CAP was apprised of this new policy and procedure early in November 2018 when a DVR client called to complain that he could not go to a job interview because he couldn&rsquo;t get gas for his car. CAP immediately investigated the reason for the new policy with DVR administration and discovered that it was a result of a Technical Assistance Circular, RSA-TAC-18-02, that had not been read completely and was misinterpreted. CAP made a verbal request to the Director of DVR asking him to reread the TAC in full and reconsider the new policy because it does allow for an alternative option so as not to hinder normal operations of state agencies. After the DVR Director&rsquo;s resistance to reread and reconsider the policy, CAP engaged the help of the Deputy Director of Workforce Services who took the time to read the entire directive and understand the message. The prior approval per the travel policy was expediently rescinded on 11/09/18. CAP is unaware of how many clients may have been adversely affected while it was in place, but the client who lodged the complaint did get the immediate service needed to go to his interview. <p><p>Wyoming has a total of 48 public school districts with 52 high schools. The message to Wyoming schools about the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act has not been consistent throughout Wyoming. CAP has written a letter to every superintendent, special education director, and high school principal in all 48 districts to explain the involvement and collaboration DVR counselors should have in the transition process with their students. Funding and services available to schools through Pre-Education Transition Services, Pre-ETS was new information to many school districts. As explained in the Agency Outreach section of this report, CAP also contacted all juvenile placement centers and the foster parent program coordinators with the same information. This activity has resulted in several follow-up calls, e-mails, and two school visits requesting more information. CAP collaborated with DVR on this project as both agencies were aware that not all school districts and other student placement agencies were consistently informed of DVR&rsquo;s transition services. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
N/A <P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Protection & Advocacy System, Inc.
No
Not Applicable
B. Staff Employed
Professional Staff: 0 FT for 12 months. The professional part-time category is comprised of 4 professional staff positions working part-time in the CAP Program, as follows: 1 CEO/Administrator at .03 FTE, filled the entire funding period; 1 attorney at .01 FTE, filled the entire funding period; 1 CAP Director at .69 FTE filled the entire funding period; 1 Advocate at .02 FTE, filled the entire funding period. No vacant professional positions. Clerical/Support Staff: 2 FT working PT in the CAP Program at .23 FTE, 1 position filled the entire funding period and 1 position filled the first 3 quarters of the year. CAP is working on filling this part-time position. <P><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
CAP 2010093 This case involved an individual with mental illness who was also a convicted felon for drug use and distribution. The client served a prison sentence and has been a Division of Vocational Rehabilitation client since the individual's release. The client had been receiving DVR services to stabilize mental and emotional issues, as well as receiving services to attend school. The individual's career goal was to become a petroleum engineer. The client attended a community college and completed the first two years toward a degree with a 4.0 GPA. This client&rsquo;s rehabilitation program was progressing extremely well. After completing all the necessary course work toward a degree at a community college in the Spring of 2018, the individual applied in the Fall of 2018 to attend the University of Wyoming, hoping to continue the goal to become a petroleum engineer. However, the University of Wyoming denied admission because of the previous felony conviction. The client completed the required appeal process in an attempt to get the denial reversed, but to no avail. Therefore, the opportunity for the individual to continue the education without skipping a contiguous semester was missed. Accepting the fact that life may have some hurdles because of the previous mistakes and bad decisions, the client was disappointed but also accepted the consequences. It was too late to continue the education in the Fall of 2018, but, the client did not give up on the education and career goals. The individual once again applied to the University of Wyoming in hopes of being admitted in the Spring semester of 2019. An application was presented, along with many letters of support from employers, community college professors, a mental health therapist, and the DVR counselor, but was again denied. After the second denial, the DVR counselor suggested the client contact CAP for assistance. CAP, along with the DVR counselor, scheduled a meeting with the University of Wyoming&rsquo;s Director of Admissions and the Dean of Students. After explaining to the University officials about this individual's success in the rehabilitation program, along with the client's perseverance, determination, and commitment to becoming a good citizen and a better person, the individual was finally accepted for admission for the Fall semester of 2019. The client is currently a full-time student in the Engineering College at the University of Wyoming. <p><p>CAP 1949221 This case involves an individual with Dercum Disease and morbid obesity. Dercum&rsquo;s is a very rare incurable disease that causes several medical issues related to the disease itself or to the medications to treat the symptoms. This client suffers from severe pain, fatigue and weakness directly related to the disease, but also has endured severe tooth decay and the loss of most of the individual's teeth because of some of the medications used to treat the disorder. The client also experiences some psychological pr
Certification
Approved
Jeanne A. Thobro, M.A.
Chief Executive Officer
2019-10-29
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