RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1086

West Virginia
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights of West Virginia
1207 Quarrier St, Ste 400
{Empty}
Charleston
WV
25301
https://www.drofwv.org/
(800) 950-5250
(800) 950-5250
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights of West Virginia
1207 Quarrier St, Ste 400
{Empty}
Charleston
25301
West Virginia
contact@drofwv.org
https://www.drofwv.org/
(800) 950-5250
(800) 950-5250
Additional Information
Taniua Hardy
Jodi Calissie
(304) 346-0847
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
39
6
0
34
0
2
81
B. Training Activities
7
487
<p>A DRWV staff attorney gave a presentation about conflict resolution at the annual Families Conference. She also participated in a panel discussion on issues facing families, along with representatives from the WV University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVUCED), the Fair Shake Network, Community Access, plus others. This gave families the opportunity to ask questions, find resources, and obtain information about services across West Virginia. Participants of the conference include individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, their family members, and other stakeholders.</p><p><p>In September of 2019, DRWV participated in a mock job fair at the Federal Correctional Institution in Beckley, WV. A DRWV staff attorney conducted outreach by hosting an informational booth. Over 200 inmates at the prison visited the booth. The attorney answered questions and provided information. The information provided focused on employment accommodations, WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS) services, working while receiving social security benefits and vocational training.</p><p><p>During the summer of 2019, a DRWV staff attorney spoke at three camps attended by transition age youth with disabilities. During the events, presentations where given on requesting employment and educational accommodations, services provided by WVDRS and Centers for Independent Living, guardianship and supported decision making, and general DRWV services. The attorney also met with individual youth to answer questions and provide information.</p><p><p>DRWV&rsquo;s Legal Director gave a presentation about specific justice issues for people with disabilities to members of the WV Access to Justice Commission and West Virginia University (WVU) law school faculty.</p><p><p>DRWV&rsquo;s Legal Director is a member of the Board of the Disability Rights Bar Association (DBRA). The DRBA is an online network of attorneys who specialize in disability civil rights law. Through the DRBA, disability rights attorneys share information, coordinate litigation and other legal representation strategies, and mentor lawyer and law students who are new to disability rights practice. During the DBRA&rsquo;s annual meeting, DRWV&rsquo;s Legal Director served as moderator for a plenary discussion on effective communication with a client with a disability.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>In all of the outreach events described in this report, we hope to reach individuals that we have not yet served as well as people from diverse ethnic and minority communities. DRWV continues to look for ways to reach out to minority populations including the outreach efforts described throughout this report.</p><p><p>In an effort to reach out to veterans and the organizations which serve them, DRWV has developed a relationship with the Veterans Program Coordinator at the VA Medical Center located in Huntington, WV. We are hopeful that referrals will come from this program. In addition, DRWV set up a display at the following veteran focused events:</p><p><ul><p><li>Homeless Veterans Stand Downs in Wheeling, Martinsburg, Fairmont, Huntington</li><p><li>Veterans Resource Fairs in Charleston and Morgantown</li><p><li>Homeless Veterans Summit, Huntington VA</li><p></ul><p><p>During FY 2019, a staff attorney from DRWV gave presentations and conducted outreach at several WorkForce West Virginia Offices. During the visits, WorkForce employees were educated on DRWV services and CAP. DRWV gave a similar presentation at Workforce OneStop Partner meetings. The meetings are attended by local programs that provide employment services such as Job Corps, Veterans workforce programs, adult education programs, WVDRS, US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs), and employers. The DRWV staff attorney also presented to WVDRS counselors on DRWV services including CAP.</p><p><p>As reported in the FY 2018 CAP PPR, we planned to host a conference in April 2019 to train high school students and families about their rights and opportunities related to transition planning. Although we did plan and widely promote the event, the number of registrants was so low that we cancelled it as the event grew near but soon enough to not have any further expenditures. We did, however, attend several transition events throughout the year with our outreach display and spoke to transition-age youth when the opportunity arose.</p><p><p>Events where DRWV staff provided CAP outreach displays in person between October 1, 2018, and September 30, 2019, included:</p><p><ul><p><li>Handle with Care Conference</li><p><li>Jackson/Roane County Transition Fair</li><p><li>Employment Disability Rights Forum at Tamarack planned by WVDRS</li><p><li>BridgeValley Community and Technical College Disability Resource Fair</li><p><li>Disability Advocacy Day (at the State Capitol)</li><p><li>WV Deaf Awareness Day (at the State Capitol)</li><p><li>TBI Conference at Glade Springs</li><p><li>Transition Fair at the Disability Action Center in Fairmont with Marion County Schools</li><p><li>Kanawha Valley Job and Resource Fair</li><p><li>One For All in Huntington</li><p><li>Reentry Resource Fairs in Beaver and Wheeling</li><p><li>Ohio Valley Health Education Council Conference</li><p><li>Spring Career and Job Expo at Big Sandy Arena</li><p><li>South Charleston Senior Expo</li><p><li>Aging Well in WV at the Charl
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
1
0
1
6000
34
8500
<p>According to DRWV&rsquo;s latest Facebook page statistics, we had 1,696 followers and 1,632 likes at the end of FY 2019 and reached over 2,310 people with our posts in the last month of the FY. People and agencies who like our page are viewing and sharing things we post on a regular basis. Additionally, our Twitter feed has 170 followers. We shared numerous employment related posts throughout the year, and even more during National Disability Employment Awareness Month in October. We often include information about upcoming events and trainings available to people with disabilities. Our website is also used for sharing information and resources.</p><p><p>DRWV worked with Rooted in Rights in collaboration with other P&amp;As to create a video about Reasonable Accommodations in Employment. It was posted in June 2019 and can be found on our YouTube channel at: <a href=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMr9F5JxEfc&amp;list=PLiPYpaY69dfRUF5XHpma7S9hUARgR-VK4">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMr9F5JxEfc&amp;list=PLiPYpaY69dfRUF5XHpma7S9hUARgR-VK4</a>.</p><p><p>In addition to the total publications in Part 1.D.4 of this report, DRWV distributed over 6,000 other outreach items. See Section E below regarding newsletter distribution as well. DRWV also distributed brochures for the three Centers for Independent Living through Information and Referrals.</p><p>"
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>DRWV collaborates with the West Virginia Assistive Technology System (WVATS) to include half page articles designed by DRWV staff in their quarterly newsletters. Each article includes our contact information along with the topic that we choose. The Fall 2018 Edition included an article about DRWV&rsquo;s iTransiton app including details about how it can be used. The Spring 2019 edition contained general information about DRWV.</p><p><p>The Fair Shake Network (FSN) circulates a quarterly e-newsletter to over 2,000 individuals. DRWV is a member of the FSN and we are listed as an &ldquo;Organizational Partner&rdquo; in each edition. The FSN is a grassroots non-profit association which provides training and systems advocacy on issues affecting people with disabilities throughout WV.</p><p><p>DRWV&rsquo;s logo and contact information was included in the event materials for the following very well-attended annual events: Celebrate Youth; the TBI conference; the People First conference, and the WV Elder Abuse Awareness Day seminar.</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
0
7
7
0
0
B. Problem areas
2
2
3
0
0
0
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
6
0
1
0
0
0
7
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
4
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
1
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
2
<p>1-Client obtained information regarding services provided by WVDRS and CAP.</p><p><p>2-Because the client was not able to participate in services of the CRP nor the WVDRS, DRWV was unable to provide any further advocacy and the service request was closed.</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
3
0
4
0
7
B. Gender
5
2
7
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
0
0
0
7
0
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
E. Types of Individuals Served
3
0
2
0
0
2
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
<p><a name=_Hlk22648905">DRWV monitored juvenile justice and privately-operated facilities who provide services to children with disabilities in FY 2019. In one facility, staff reported that their students would benefit from additional independent living skills. DRWV arranged a meeting with the local Center for Independent Living (CIL) and the Case Managers. This meeting resulted in the CIL starting weekly independent living classes at the private facility. When requested, DRWV will contact the students&rsquo; family to offer them information on services that may assist them when the child returns home. Information includes: a copy of the Parents Advocacy Guide to Special Education, WVDRS, local Center for Independent Living, etc. DRWV is also gathering information on the pre-employment transition services that WVDRS is providing to students who are residing in a residential facility.</a></p><p><p>DRWV&rsquo;s Executive Director is a member on the WV Developmental Disabilities Council (WVDDC) and participates on their Employment First Workgroup. This activity clearly impacts employment issues for people with disabilities. The Workgroup&rsquo;s charge is to provide recommendations for actions the Council should take to support the creation of Employment First policies and/or practices in WV, including workforce training and development. Their goal is to develop initiatives that will increase opportunities for young people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) to have community work experiences, and for all working-age people with I/DD to gain valued, integrated employment. In FY 2019, the Workgroup decided on the following four (4) issue areas to develop further for funding:</p><p><p>1.Regional Employment Support Team: Advisory group serving a county or region to assist people with I/DD seeking work, as well as supporting and working with local public and private programs and entities (schools, rehabilitation services, DD providers, local government, business community). The group would be made up of parents, people with I/DD, and others in the community with a common interest in improving integrated employment opportunities for youth and adults with I/DD. The group would assist individual job seekers by leveraging their community connections, expertise and advocacy.</p><p><p>2.Workforce Credentialing Project: Training project to demonstrate and test the use of nationally recognized credentialing curricula for key personnel as a factor in improving access to community integrated employment (CIE) for people with I/DD. Grantees could use the Certified Employment Support Professional (CESP) program or Association of Community Rehabilitation Educators (ACRE) curricula. Grantee would evaluate and compare the results of services provided by credentialed and non-credentialed staff.</p><p><p>3.Parent to Parent Engagement and Support for Employment: Parent led group who can meet one on one with other parents whose sons or daughters in school will"
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>NA</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights of WV
No
NA
B. Staff Employed
<p><br><br><br><br><br></p><p><table border=0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="524"><thead><tr><th width="152" nowrap="" valign="bottom"></th><th width="150" nowrap="" valign="bottom">Full-time</th><th width="111" nowrap="" valign="bottom">% of year</th><th width="111" nowrap="" valign="bottom"></th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:left">Type of Position</td><td style="text-align:left">equivalent</td><td style="text-align:left">position filled</td><td style="text-align:left">Person-years</td></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left"><b><i>Professional</i></b></td></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left">Full-time</td><td style="text-align:right">0.89</td><td style="text-align:right">100%</td><td style="text-align:right">12.00</td></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left">Part-time</td><td style="text-align:right">0.67</td><td style="text-align:right">47.2%</td><td style="text-align:right">8.50</td></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left">Vacant</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td></tr><p><tr></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left"><b><i>Clerical</i></b></td></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left">Full-time</td><td style="text-align:right">0.07</td><td style="text-align:right">100%</td><td style="text-align:right">2.00</td></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left">Part-time</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td></tr><p><tr><td style="text-align:left">Vacant</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td><td style="text-align:left">N/A</td></tr><p></tbody></table><p>"
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>A CAP client requested assistance with the continued failure of WVDRS to provide appropriate job placement and training related services. DRWV obtained and reviewed the client's WVDRS records, spoke with the client's WVDRS counselor on the client's behalf, provided the client with information about accommodations that she may need to fully participate in the college program she desires to attend, and facilitated a meeting with the client and her WVDRS counselor. Due to DRWV&rsquo;s advocacy, the client: learned she has an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) which has an employment goal she desires and appropriate services; acknowledged her need to commit to a treatment regime to manage her mental health needs and follow through with her plan; began to establish a working relationship with her counselor; and participated in a meeting with her counselor facilitated by DRWV that was positive, collaborative, and solution oriented, the approach that will be necessary for her to achieve her employment goals.</p><p><p>A client who resided in a group home requested information about getting a job and/or volunteering. DRWV met with the client and staff at group home and conducted training on the Rehabilitation Act, WVDRS services, CAP, and Title I of the ADA. The client had not been aware of WVDRS or CAP prior to the visit. Group home staff were aware of services but not well educated on what was provided. After the training, group home staff and the client were more aware of services available and stated that they would contact WVDRS immediately to complete an application.</p><p><p>A CAP client requested assistance in advocating for additional services from the WVDRS. DRWV requested and reviewed the client&rsquo;s WVDRS records and conducted research on WVDRS policy and federal regulations on VR sponsorship for training. DRWV communicated with the client&rsquo;s WVDRS with counselor and the district manager. WVDRS agreed to sponsor the client's master&rsquo;s degree program as outlined in her IPE.</p><p>
Certification
Approved
Susan Given
Executive Director
2019-11-08
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