RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1065

Maine
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Bureau of Rehabilitation Services
150 State House Station
{Empty}
Augusta
ME
04333
http://www.maine.gov
(888) 755-0023
(888) 755-0023
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Bureau of Rehabilitation Services
150 State House Station
{Empty}
Augusta
04333
{Empty}
http://www.maine.gov
(888) 755-0023
(888) 755-0023
Additional Information
Kathy Despres
Brenda Drummond
(207) 624-5977
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
100
3
0
1
20
102
226
B. Training Activities
7
60
This year, we focused on transitioned age youth and case management agencies. These were obvious areas to focus upon. Transition to aged youth because of the emphasis within WIOA. Case management agencies because of the high turnover rate and the significant changes he brought on by how the state will be providing Community Rehab Provider (CRP) services. <p><p>CAP staff presented to students and faculty at Maranacook Community High School on self-advocacy skills and vocational rehabilitation services available to transition youth. At the College and Career Fair at Spruce Mountain High School, where we talked with other presenters, teachers, Special Education staff and student with and without disabilities. Finally, to the Augusta School Department Special Education about the CAP services and how a client should be flowing thought the DVR/DBVI program. <p><p>The CAP staff provided an overview of CAP services twice to new Vocational Rehabilitation staff as part of their New Counselor Training along with providing an overview of out services to the Center for Independent Living staff. <p><p>The CAP regularly attends trainings provided by the DSU. We find this a wonderful opportunity in which to interact with staff to provide better understanding of what services the CAP can provide. The trainings that we attended were joint training of the DVR and DBVI SRC&rsquo;s. CAP staff attended a training on Personality Disorders as well as DBVI&rsquo;s annual training day. CAP staff also joined DBVI staff for a training on conflict and communication. <p><p><p><p><p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
The CAP always seeking opportunities to reach the &ldquo;New Mainer&rdquo; population though we are not always successful. An area that the CAP is concerned about is for persons with developmental disabilities and acquired brain injuries. In order to help facilitate services to these pockets of populations the CAP conducted outreach to case management agencies across the state. CAP also attended Neurorestorative Clubhouse Health and Wellness fair to outreach to individuals with brain injury and their service providers. CAP conducted outreach to Special Education departments in several school districts across the state. CAP also attended the Brain Injury Resource Fair to outreach to individuals with brain injury and their service providers. <P><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
29
71
2
0
NA <P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
We are featured in many consumer phones books and in the Maine 211 directory. The CAP website is a great source of information for our clients. DVR/DBVI are very good about getting our information out to consumers. The CAP is posted on the state web page and it is reported to us by consumers VR frequently gives our name to consumers. Our information also goes out on the standard paperwork at application, on IPE&rsquo;s and at closure. The Independent Living program gives our contact information and goes out at key times during the process. Several community rehab providers within the state also give out the CAP's information. We are also a prominent contact Consumer Handbook provided to clients by DVR. <P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
22
59
81
3
0
B. Problem areas
83
48
36
9
1
38
0
3
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
29
22
29
4
0
0
84
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
47
12
15
2
0
1
0
1
6
0
0
0
NA <P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
23
3
1
1
41
12
0
2
1
0
NA <P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
2
9
22
39
9
81
B. Gender
44
37
81
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
1
3
0
77
0
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
8
2
0
1
1
7
6
0
2
2
0
1
3
4
0
1
1
1
0
8
17
3
4
4
1
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
81
E. Types of Individuals Served
7
1
73
2
4
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
CAP staff met with the Directors of DVR and DBVI four times this year. Issues discussed included: status of Special Appointment Program staffing mechanisms for consumers voicing concerns high cost of van modifications as it relates to the transportation policy. VR purchasing items that are used for both employment and independent living activities. availability of CAP involvement with ADA complaints second opinion policy surrounding rehab technology CAP staff continues to be actively involved in the State Rehabilitation Councils (SRC). CAP staff serve on several committees of each council, including Executive, Legislative, and State Plan. The State is making some comprehensive changes to the way CRP services will be provided within the State. The CAP staff began logging concerns expressed by CRP&rsquo;s regarding the RFP that was posted at the end of the 1st quarter. CAP staff sat in on the bidder&rsquo;s conference for the CRP RFP and continues to monitor concerns from providers and consumers. <P><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
NA <P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
Internal to the State VR agency
Bureau of Rehabilitation Services
Yes
C.A.R.E.S. Inc.
B. Staff Employed
2 FTE 1 .2 FTE The CAP was fully staffed this year. <P><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
Mr. Brady contacted the CAP after he made several unsuccessful attempts to have his VR case re-opened in post-employment service (PES). It appeared to the CAP staff that he would be eligible but was unsure why the VRC was reluctant to open the case in PES. CAP staff contacted the Case Work Supervisor and learned the VRC was out on leave and would open the case in PES. However, this proved to be difficult as the Supervisor could not re-open the individual in PES and transfer the client to another case. Given the VRC was out, it was determined the client could quickly reapply and be found eligible with existing information. The client was agreeable to this and began receiving services in a timelier manner.<p>Mr. Edelman has been working with CAP for some time. He is being served by VR in an area that is difficult to retain VR staff. Mr. Edelman was working with his 4th VRC in two years (all out of the same office), when that VRC left. When this was brought to the attention of the Case Work Supervisor that he would now be on his 5th VRC, the Supervisor agreed to take over the case. CAP staff continue to work with Mr. Edelman to ensure he receives the services he requires.<p>Mr. Gronkowski came to the CAP many months ago. The CAP has worked with Mr. Gronkowski on many aspects of his case. Recently we&rsquo;ve helped Mr. Gronkowski navigate a creative business plan which involves the purchase of a building. Working collaboratively with outside finance agencies, SBDC, DVR and RSA for preauthorization we are moving along nicely with a 100K small business plan.<p>Brandin asked us to look into his case after many months of not being able to access the services of a job developer. The CAP became involved and because of a collaborative effort on the part of the CAP, the case manager and the VRC other programs who that provide placement services were accessed. The client is now actively looking for employment with a new job developer.<p>Bill B. contacted the CAP when his VRC denied payment of a college course, which was outlined in his IPE. After CAP reviewed the case, it appeared the VRC denied the course for several reasons, including because Bill B. already held two bachelor&rsquo;s degrees. As a result of CAP&rsquo;s advocacy, VR paid for the course and Bill B. agreed to work with his new VRC & a CRP to explore her field of interest more thoroughly to determine its viability in her local labor market and the requirements to enter the field.<p>Dont&rsquo;a asked the CAP to assist him with representation for his conciliation meeting at the Maine Human Rights Commission (MHRC). Dont&rsquo;a was seeking was seeking representation for the conciliation meeting. After being turned down some private layers and some nonprofits. Don&rsquo;t&rsquo;a&rsquo;s VRC reached out to our office to see if we had any suggestions of who may assist her client. The VRC was surprise that the CAP could assist and was happy when we did assist. <p><p>
Certification
Approved
Kathy Despres
Program Manager
2019-12-22
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