RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1061

Kansas
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights Center of Kansas
214 SW 6th Ave, Suite 100
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Topeka
KS
66603
http://drckansas.org
(877) 776-1541
(877) 335-3725
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights Center of Kansas
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Additional Information
Rocky Nichols
Rocky Nichols
(785) 273-9661
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
B. Training Activities
334
7937
<p>DRC staff provided numerous trainings surrounding employment for people with disabilities. One training entitled The Power of Employment was developed for people with mental illness. Over 70% of adults with a serious and persistent mental illness are unemployed. This training educates people about their rights under the ADA, how to request accommodations, with a focus on informing them about how Vocational Rehabilitation can empower people with a mental illness to seek successful employment. This presentation was given at three conferences, two NAMI affiliates, three Consumer Run Organizations, and a Community Mental Health Center in FY 2019 with approximately 250 mental health consumers, mental health staff and family members trained.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>DRC staff made a presentation about employment to a group of 40 sheltered workshop &ldquo;employees.&rdquo; During the presentation, staff educated the adults with disabilities about resources such as Vocational Rehabilitation and how it can help people with disabilities get out of the sheltered workshop and instead obtain competitive, integrated employment in the community. Attendees learned about onsite employment evaluations, accommodations, job coaches, and other options to obtain competitive, integrated employment in the community.</p><p><p>Additionally, DRC staff provided information, including a specific CAP brochure, at events targeting adults and youth with disabilities across the state of Kansas.</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
36
31
5
9
47
0
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>Radio/TV Coverage - DRC Staff was quoted on 36 TV or Radio Reports</p><p><p>Newspapers/Magazines/Journals - DRC was interviewed or quoted in the following radio and newspapers (for a total of 31 times throughout the year); Topeka Capital Journal (12); KCUR (9); Kansas Public Radio (6); Wichita Eagle (2); KC Star (2)</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
13
33
46
46
13
B. Problem areas
2
10
25
4
0
4
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
31
0
0
1
1
0
33
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
12
5
3
0
1
7
0
0
5
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
1
0
0
1
12
8
5
6
0
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<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
1
6
12
27
0
46
B. Gender
21
25
46
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
3
2
0
5
0
32
1
3
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
2
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
5
19
0
0
4
2
5
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
46
E. Types of Individuals Served
29
1
16
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
<p>Last year DRC Kansas reported its work establishing the Employment Systems Change (ESC) Coalition in the systems change PPR example. If you recall, the ESC Coalition conducted a statewide survey of 1,700 Kansans, which identified numerous significant shortcomings regarding post-secondary transition services and supports in Kansas schools. This year DRC Kansas is pleased to report that we took the results of ESC Coalition survey and we worked with educators, school administrators, parents and people with disabilities to develop ideas to make positive improvements in the post-secondary transition system. Therefore, this year&rsquo;s systems change PPR example builds upon the good work we reported in last year&rsquo;s PPR example.</p><p><p>DRC Kansas helped develop these positive and proactive ideas to improve post-secondary transition by working with the Chairman of the State Board of Education, Jim Porter, to establish a Transition Workgroup. This Workgroup was tasked with the goal of making recommendations to dramatically improve the systems responsible for ensuring successful post-secondary transition. This Transition Workgroup was established under the authority of Chairman Porter. However, Chairman Porter recruited DRC&rsquo;s Executive Director, Rocky Nichols, to serve as the Co-Chair of the Transition Workgroup. Among other things, this Transition Workgroup identified the obstacles and barriers limiting Kansas students with disabilities before and after they go through post-secondary transition.</p><p><p>Disability and students&rsquo; rights advocates have known for years that problems and barriers were preventing Kansas from having the most effective post-secondary transition program possible. Unfortunately, in spite of everyone&rsquo;s best efforts, the ESC Coalition survey data showed that serious improvements were needed in the area of post-secondary transition.</p><p><p>The Workgroup worked long and hard to recruit a wide variety of stakeholders to join as members. The membership of the Transition Workgroup includes state agencies, educators, administrators, self-advocates, parents, disability advocates, legislators, and Kansas experts in the field of post-secondary transition.</p><p><p>In total, the 45 members of the Workgroup met and spent a considerable amount of time discussing the major challenges facing students with disabilities as they transition from school to adult life (including employment, community settings, independent living, etc.). After learning from the experts, including self-advocates and parents of young adults who have gone through transition, the group outlined six areas of need and split into six subcommittees to continue its work.</p><p><p>The six subcommittees of the Transition Workgroup were the following:</p><p><p>1) Improving the Transition Process for All Students with Disabilities</p><p><p>2) Examining current transition outcomes and data and making improvements in future outcomes a
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>N/A</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights Center of Kansas
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>Deputy Director - Legal Division - Responsible for legal work product of the agency. Supervises the staff attorneys and advocates. Carries an active caseload. Prosecutes cases.</p><p><p>Director of Policy &amp; Outreach - Responsible for performance of work directly relating to the management policies or general business operations of DRC or its customers.</p><p><p>Case Attorneys - Provide legal representation.</p><p><p>Case Advocates - Provide advocacy representation and case advocacy.</p><p><p>Office Assistant - Answers phones, does office and administrative tasks, etc.</p><p><p>Administrative Assistant - Provides administrative support to the legal division and assists with general administrative tasks for the entire agency.</p><p><p>Communications &amp; Outreach Director - manages the tasks associated with outreach, communications/public relations, marketing/publications, and certain administrative office functions of the agency.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>Johnson County: MC is an individual with Autism, ADHD, and Dysgraphia. He began working with Voc Rehab after graduating high school and attended a local community college to obtain general education credits. MC expressed to his VR counselor that he would like to attend an out-of-state school that specialized in the major he wished to seek. VR denied his request stating that all services could be replicated in Kansas, even though the program wasn&rsquo;t offered anywhere in Kansas. MC contacted DRC for assistance in disputing the denial. A DRC advocate worked with MC to demonstrate that the out-of-state school&rsquo;s program was unique and necessary for his employment goal. VR reversed the decision and approved the out-of-state school. MC is thriving in his desired program.</p><p><p>Douglas County: NJ is 25-year-olds and is deaf. NJ began working with VR to complete his Bachelor&rsquo;s Degree in psychology and deaf studies at the University of Kansas. After expressing his education and employment goals, there was an issue with communication between NJ and his VR counselor about the type of program and requirements necessary, which resulted in the threat of his case being closed. NJ contacted DRC for assistance. A DRC advocate met with NJ&rsquo;s VR counselor to explain the situation and what is needed for NJ to be successful. The conversation was successful, and his IPE was changed to reflect the requirements needed. NJ&rsquo;s IPE was approved, and he began classes in the fall semester.</p><p>
Certification
Approved
Rocky Nichols
Executive Director
2019-12-28
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