RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1058

Iowa
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Iowa Department of Human Rights
321 East 12th Street
Lucas State Office Building
Des Moines
IA
50319
(800) 652-4298
(800) 652-4298
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Office of Persons with Disabilities
Lucas State Office Bldg., 321 East 12th
321 East 12th Street
Des Moines
50319
Iowa
lisa.schneider2@iowa.gov
(800) 652-4298
(800) 652-4298
Additional Information
Lisa Schneider
Lisa Schneider
(515) 281-8088
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
54
24
23
45
259
94
499
B. Training Activities
42
781
CAP provided trainings to vocational rehabilitation counselors, interns, and other staff within the Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services and its satellite offices throughout the state. Topics included: The CAP program Effective service provision Outreach efforts Federal regulations and compliance WIOA Issues CAP clients are presenting and how to work effectively with CAP during the process of CAP's involvement as an advocate for the clients who seek CAP's services CAP&rsquo;s due process as allowed under Title I Cultural differences and disabilities and diversity and disabilities CAP as a resource for consultation on Title I of the ADA and on the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (Rehab Act). <p><p>CAP also provided trainings and gave presentations to: The State Rehabilitation Council Members of the Harkin Institute Graduate students in Drake University's Counselor Education Program, which includes Clinical Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, and School Counseling Drake University graduate program class, Disability Policy & ADA The Division of Criminal & Juvenile Justice Planning Juvenile Reentry Task Force The Latino Service Providers Coalition Private and public agencies and businesses, including a hair salon requesting training and information related to the ADA and its relation to: ?Service dogs and horses, assistance animals, emotional support animals, and therapeutic animals; ?Differences between service dogs, service animals, assistance animals, emotional support animals, and therapeutic animals; ?Service, assistance, emotional, and therapeutic animals in the workplace; ?Service dogs and horses; assistance animals; and emotional support animals as reasonable accommodations; ?Service, assistance, emotional, and therapeutic dogs and other animals under Iowa law and Code, and as defined by Iowa law and in Iowa Code. Other topics have included: Employment and the ADA Title I Reasonable accommodations Process for requesting reasonable accommodations Service animals versus emotional support animals as accommodations Section 508 of the ADA Section 504 of the Rehab Act WIOA WIOA and how it amends Title V of the Rehab Act to place limitations on the payment of subminimum wages (Section 511), including its impact in Iowa Other relative information contained within the ADA and Rehab Act Mental illness and employment, including reasonable accommodations Deaf and hard of hearing cultural difference within subpopulations (Big &ldquo;D&rdquo; deaf versus deaf) including choice and assistive technology Presumption of benefits Informed Choice Residency requirements for vocational rehabilitation agency eligibility <p><p>CAP was contacted on several occasions to provide consultation to IVRS staff regarding ADA and IVRS client rights; ADA and accessibility; reasonable accommodations; and assistive technology.<p>
C. Agency Outreach
CAP has participated in FUTURE READY IOWA summits. Please see the important information below from the Future Ready Iowa website: ABOUT THE FUTURE READY IOWA INITIATIVE ABOUT FUTURE READY IOWA Future Ready Iowa is an initiative to build Iowa&rsquo;s talent pipeline Education or training beyond high school is the new minimum to earn a living wage Careers today and in the future require advanced knowledge and/or technical skills The goal of Future Ready Iowa is for 70 percent of Iowa&rsquo;s workforce to have education or training beyond high school by 2025 Education and Workforce Trends through 2025 provides a forecast of Iowa's talent pipeline A Stronger Nation is a report which shows where Iowa is today in terms of education after high school Metrics That Matter, key statistics shaping Iowa's workforce talent pipeline FUTURE READY IOWA HISTORY The initiative was created after Iowa received a National Governors Association grant A Future Ready Iowa Summit was held in April of 2016 to create a broader conversation about next steps A Future Ready Iowa Alliance was created through the signing of Executive Order 88 in August of 2016 Executive Order 88 charges the Alliance with developing and recommending a strategic plan by October 31, 2017, to accomplish the 70 percent goal, including metrics and benchmarks FUTURE READY IOWA GOALS Progress toward reducing the socioeconomic, ethnic and racial achievement gaps in kindergarten through 12th grade and increasing equity in postsecondary enrollment Progress toward increasing the percent of traditional-age students and adult learners who earn postsecondary degrees, certificates or other quality credentials Progress toward how well degrees, certificates and other credentials awarded by Iowa postsecondary institutions align with high-demand job needs and job-placement rates <p><p>CAP was interviewed and contributed to the Institute for Community Inclusion (ICI), School for Global Inclusion and Social Development (SGISD) at the University of Massachusetts Boston - IA Case Study on Employment for people with IDD - Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Advancing Employment for Individuals with IDD. <p><p>CAP participated in and was represented at the 19th Annual National Rehabilitation Educators Conference Sponsored by the National Council on Rehabilitation Education. <p><p>CAP contributed to EducAsian - a college and career preparation course formatted for first-generation, college or career-bound Asian high-school students in Central Iowa. <p><p>CAP contributed to and helped develop the Data/Status Report for Underserved and Underrepresented Populations in Iowa - Iowa Department of Human Rights, assisted by SPPG, LLC + Essman Research. <p><p>CAP collaborated with the Office of Persons with Disabilities on the creation and implementation of a pilot project for a new program: AccessAble - A Leadership/Post-Secondary Education Assistance Program for Yo
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
3
2
5
9500
10
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CAP created handouts updating the description, purpose, and history of CAP. These have been popular at meetings, trainings, orientations, and exhibitions. <P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
The State Rehabilitation Council shares CAP information and our publications: The Americans with Disabilities Act - Employer/Employee Rights & Responsibilities: A Guide for Iowans"; "Disability Rights Guide - A Guide for Iowans"; and "The Great Debate: The Shift From Sheltered Workshops to Competitive Integrated Employment" with legislators.<p>Drake University and The Harkin Institute for Public Policy & Citizen Engagement have shared and disseminated CAP information and publications, including our publications, "The Americans with Disabilities Act - Employer/Employee Rights & Responsibilities: A Guide for Iowans". "Disability Rights Guide - A Guide for Iowans", and "The Great Debate: The Shift From Sheltered Workshops to Competitive Integrated Employment".<p><p><p>The Iowa Department of Human Rights includes and disseminates information regarding CAP and our publications, "The Americans with Disabilities Act - Employer/Employee Rights & Responsibilities: A Guide for Iowans", "Disability Rights Guide - A Guide for Iowans", and "The Great Debate: The Shift From Sheltered Workshops to Competitive Integrated Employment" on its website and via its Community Advocacy & Services newsletters and at their conferences and during other outreach endeavors.<p><p><p>The Goodwill of Central Iowa Career Connection Center now disseminates CAP information. <p><p><p><p>"
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
3
29
32
0
12
B. Problem areas
30
21
24
9
0
21
3
14
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
11
6
3
0
0
0
20
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
14
0
1
0
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
1
After providing technical assistance; information; explaining and clarifying law and policy; providing alternative resources and referrals; and investigation and monitoring, it was mutually determined that the case was more related to the Randolph-Sheppard Act. The client was provided the proper resources and guidance on how to proceed according to the Randolph-Sheppard Act and was satisfied with his course of action. <P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
3
2
0
0
4
4
2
2
3
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
1
6
8
17
0
32
B. Gender
16
16
32
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
0
1
0
29
0
2
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
3
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
2
4
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
7
0
0
1
4
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
32
E. Types of Individuals Served
8
0
28
3
7
15
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
5
1. CAP identified a gap in appropriate services for the deaf and hard of hearing populations, including a lack of providing qualified interpreters, which is required according to &sect; 361.48 Scope of vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities: (b) Services for individuals who have applied for or been determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. (10) Interpreter services, including sign language and oral interpreter services, for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and tactile interpreting services for individuals who are deaf-blind provided by qualified personnel. <p><p>CAP advocated on behalf of the deaf and hard of hearing, and deaf-blind, populations to ensure each individual has qualified personnel conducting interpreter services. Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services (IVRS) enforced this regulation and policy by implementing training emphasizing this for their staff and VR counselors agency-wide. CAP designed trainings that bring awareness to this regulation and how to be, and stay, in compliance. CAP incorporated this during trainings with IVRS satellite offices. <p><p>2. Another systemic issue CAP identified regarding the deaf and hard of hearing populations was a lack of services; outreach; cultural understanding, including the specific dynamics and differences between the Deaf (big &ldquo;D&rdquo; deaf), deaf, and hard of hearing populations, including identifying the differences; and aptitude and knowledge on how to work with the different subpopulations. CAP worked with our State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) Service Delivery Committee to bring awareness to this systemic issue and subsequently assisted in the development of a plan for improving services and outreach efforts for the deaf and hard of hearing populations, which was presented to the entire SRC. <p><p>CAP collaborated with Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services (IVRS) on implementing this plan. At CAP&rsquo;s and the SRC&rsquo;s recommendation, IVRS formed a work group and conducted, and are continuing to do so, a series of focus groups across the state. CAP participated in the work group and in the initial focus group for Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services&rsquo; most underserved county. CAP partnered with Iowa's Office of Deaf Services to aid in this endeavor, and through this joint effort, CAP and the Office of Deaf Services have become an integral part of the work group and the focus groups. <p><p>CAP has continued this partnership with the Office of Deaf Services to strengthen the service provision to CAP clients who are deaf or hard of hearing and contribute to enhancing IVRS's outreach and service delivery efforts. As a result, IVRS has hired a new counselor who is deaf; implemented new training for staff and VR counselors; increased outreach efforts within this population; and sent VR counselors to a deaf and hard of hearing immersion training at Western Oregon University. <p><p>3. CAP identified systemic
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-other public agency
Iowa Department of Human Rights - Office of Persons with Disabilities
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
CAP Director: 1.0 Supporting Staff Executive Officer 3: .04 Secretary: .07 Administrative Intern 1: .16 Administrative Intern 2: .08. There is one full time equivalent employee (CAP Director) and 3 supporting staff positions, none of which are full-time. The Administrative Interns are not employed at the same time. <P><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
CAP has been providing services and advocacy for a client of Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services (IVRS). This client has different mental illness diagnoses and physical disabilities. CAP's client has experienced many hardships and barriers, as well as many conflicts, denials, and issues with IVRS. The denials were successfully appealed via negotiations and there have been three VR counselor transfers and one transfer to a different office. <p><p><p><p>CAP's client lives in rural Iowa. She was unemployed and had no sources of income and no natural supports. She didn&rsquo;t have a vehicle at the time. She also didn&rsquo;t have a computer or laptop, which she needed to assist in reaching her employment goals. She didn&rsquo;t have internet service or access to Wi-Fi. This client had completed a formal computer request, which was denied. It was at this point that the client contacted CAP to file an appeal. CAP investigated and found that the computer request was not submitted through the proper request process per IVRS policy, nor was there an assessment to determine how a computer could assist with achieving her employment goals and how it relates to her disabilities. CAP has identified that frequently IVRS didn&rsquo;t consider financing computers for persons with mental illness &ldquo;disability-related&rdquo; and beneficial to attaining or advancing towards their employment goals. CAP found that because of this perception, there were no assessments administered to determine a relation. It was also found that CAP&rsquo;s client was informed by her VR counselor and the supervisor that she would have to utilize, as comparable benefits, the various libraries in different towns or her cell phone. <p><p><p><p>There are few rural libraries and getting to most involve driving long distances. There is a lack of transportation options in this part of rural Iowa. Due to being rural, these libraries have few computers and inconsistent hours and days of operation, as well as days with split hours, leaving a portion of the day unavailable to the public. In addition, this client has several significant mental illnesses as well as physical disabilities. Due to symptoms of the mental illnesses, and the limitations imposed by her physical disabilities, including PTSD from serving in the military and being hard of hearing, it is extremely hard to concentrate. There would frequently be many children, adults, and students, using the library and competing for time on the computers. It would become loud which increased the client's anxiety and exacerbated other symptoms, especially extreme startle reactions. The libraries set time limits on the use of computers, which added significant stress and caused her to have to rush employment searches, the completion of job applications, r&Eacute;sum&Eacute; updates, and tailoring r&Eacute;sum&Eacute;s. Scheduling job interviews, IVRS appointments, therapy appointments, and doctor appointments around library hours, with no guarantee of use of the comp
Certification
Approved
Lisa Schneider
CAP Director
2020-01-22
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