RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1055

Georgia
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Martin & Jones
123 N. McDonough St.
{Empty}
Decatur
GA
30030
http://www.georgiacap.com
(800) 822-9727
(800) 822-9727
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Martin & Jones
123 N. McDonough St.
{Empty}
Decatur
30030
{Empty}
jpage@georgiacap.com
http://www.georgiacap.com
(800) 822-9727
(800) 822-9727
Additional Information
Jennifer M. Page
Jennifer M. Page
(404) 373-2040
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
859
6
1
5
29
672
1572
B. Training Activities
7
287
<p>CAP was asked by the Telic Empowerrment Group, an advocacy group to empower familes by teaching them how to locate resources and how to utilize them. CAP was able to speak about the services we provide and how to navigate the Designated State Unit resources when their children are of age. The families were able to visit our table and ask specific questions for services after the presentations. Those in attendance were parents, their children, the Telic staff and volunteers, and the local media. There were 55 in attendance.</p><p><p>CAP presented to the Georgia Council for the Blind (GCB) at a educational workshop at the invitation of the President of the Council. She wanted the blind and visually impaired participants in her program to know the advocacy resources available. She had a DSU representative present as well, so the consumers would know the services available for employment. The information CAP shared were the services we offer, when a client can call for assistance and how our advocacy works in conjuction with the DSU. There were 35 in attendance.</p><p><p>CAP was asked to present by the the Georgia Rehabilition Association (GRA) committee to present how we handle a case from start to finish. We did a powerpoint presentation to field staff, supervisors and other interested parties at the GRA annual conference. The session was interactive to keep our audience engaged in the process and information was presented in the form of case examples for the groups to share solutions. DSU policy advisors were asked by CAP to assist in this presentation, which allowed for systemic collaboration. There were 80 in attendance.</p><p><p>CAP presented to the National Federation for the Blind (NFB) to share what our services are and the populations we serve. The blind and visually impaired consumers were interested in advocacy services when clients of the DSU. The consumers take what they learn and share it with other agencies in the community. CAP is happy to share information to be disseminated to others in their community who are interested in DSU services or just to inform those of options they have available. There were 32 in attendance.</p><p><p>CAP presented to the Statewide Independent Council (SILC). Since the council has new members, they invite CAP to come and present what services we offer consumers. We provide the information verbally and also utilize our brochures as another resource for reference. Members are allowed to ask questions and get our contact information. There were 30 in attendance.</p><p><p>CAP presented to the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) on the types of cases we have and how we best serve the client when they need our advocacy services. Many consumers and members believe CAP provides services like the DSU, so we must give information appropriate to be shared in the community. There were 25 in attendance.</p><p><p>CAP Fiscal Activities</p><p><p>CAP attended community workshop called Let&rsquo;s Talk Employment
C. Agency Outreach
<p>CAP has created a social media presence to be able to reach more communities and families. We have determined if the families of the un-served and underserved know about our services, it can be shared with clients who may not speak English as their first language or clients that may be deaf-blind and their families know how to communicate with them. CAP monitors social media on a daily basis and shares all information pertaining to employment services, community services, social services, conferences and webinars. Consumers also share the information on their sites, so we are reaching a broader audience to reach the client un-served or underserved.</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
1
0
0
111
2
0
<p>CAP disseminated our informational brochure in an email blast to 89 Georgia Colleges and Universities and to 22 Georgia Technical Colleges. These brochures went to the Disabilit Coordinators Offices to share with clients of the DSU and those who may be interested in those services. CAP explains that anyone who needs braille or large print brochures can contact our office and we will mail them to the office or client.</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>CAP was able to get the DSU to put a direct link to the CAP website and other contact information on their website. We reached out to the Marketing Department of the DSU and they were happy to assist with our request.</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
11
284
295
5
70
B. Problem areas
23
125
142
4
2
0
0
45
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
158
0
72
0
0
0
230
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
173
36
9
1
1
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
53
1
0
1
33
76
10
54
0
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
21
48
71
143
12
295
B. Gender
157
138
295
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
9
4
6
156
0
99
0
21
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
13
11
2
1
6
0
31
4
44
11
1
4
11
4
2
3
0
1
7
11
47
1
1
18
9
9
4
1
0
20
5
0
7
6
295
E. Types of Individuals Served
9
0
244
1
0
45
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
<p>CAP did not participate in any non-litigation systemic activities for FFY 2019.</p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>The CAP attorney's services were not needed in any hearing activities. The CAP attorney consults on cases when asked by CAP advocates for assistance in FFY 2019.</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-all other private agencies
Martin and Jones
No
None
B. Staff Employed
<p>The Georgia CAP staff consist of the CAP Director, who also serves as a Counselor/Advocate for case management, a Counselor/Advocate that does case management, and a part-time administrative assistant. CAP has an attorney for legal representation as needed. Jennifer M. Page is the CAP Director who has worked for CAP since 2006, but was a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor before becoming a CAP counselor. Ms. Page ensures CAP daily operations, deals with issues with the DSU and clients, and supervises CAP staff. The Counselor/Advocate, Stephanie Woods was a Service Area Manager for Vocational Rehabilitation before joining CAP February 2019 and does daily case management, CAP social media and the CAP website, which is being redesigned.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>Client contacted RSA and was referred to CAP for assistance. Client and VR communication was reestablished after a few meetings and the client was able to find a therapist of her choosing and a Supported Employment provider to help lead to an employment outcome.</p><p><p>Client contacted CAP because the personal/social adjustment (PSA) training was being stopped after having this service over a year. The client was using PSA as therapy and not for the short-term adjustment in which it was intended. The client was going to Job Corp in another state, so the service was not needed in this program. Client agreed to this service being discontinued at this time.</p><p><p>Client contacted CAP because services were needed to attend a school for the blind and visually impaired. The client needed typing services and mobility training. This information requirements were given by the Director of Admissions for the school. The client was able to get these services from the agency and move the case forward.</p><p><p>Client needed CAP assistance because of a delay in services. The client needed anger management therapy before the agency could move forward with services and the client asked that the case be transferred to another office. The case was transferred before the therapy started. The client was cleared to move forward with Supported Employment and transportation to assist with getting him employed.</p><p><p>Client contacted CAP because of lack of employment. The client was working with a Supported Employment consultant, but the contract ended. The client stated that the consultant was unable to place the client because of his graduate degree and the consultant had not worked with a client with this type of degree and experience. CAP requested a consultant from another county be used that has this experience and the client was referred the same week.</p><p><p>Client needed some job leads because she worked from home and was caring for her child with disabilities. Communication was the issue she was having. CAP reconnected the client and counselor, so a referral could be made to the employment consultant. Client was able to get some interviews and obtain employment within a month.</p><p><p>Client was unable to reach her counselor. CAP was able to determine her counselor was no longer with the agency and connected the client to the supervisor to assign a new counselor. The new counselor developed a plan with the client and was placed in job readiness and job placement was started soon after.</p><p><p>Client contacted CAP for assistance with assistive work technology that the agency had not yet provided. CAP spoke with the agency about the items the client needed according to the evaluation completed. The supervisor was able to determine the items had been ordered and the client would receive them when they arrived.</p><p><p>The client called CAP because the computer services being received were going to be stopped. The client did not feel he was pr
Certification
Approved
Jennifer M. Page
CAP Director
2019-12-17
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