RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1052

Colorado
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Center for Legal Advocacy
455 Sherman Streeet
Suite 130
Denver
CO
80203
(800) 288-1376
(800) 288-1376
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Center for Legal Advocacy
455 Sherman Streeet
Suite 130
Denver
80203
Colorado
(800) 288-1376
(800) 288-1376
Additional Information
Jennifer Purrington
Jennifer Purrington
(303) 722-0300
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
3
0
0
0
2
8
13
B. Training Activities
15
552
November 9, 2018 Presentation at Parents Encouraging Parents in Fort Collins, CO on Special Education Law and transition services/CAP. There were 100 parents and educators present. November 13, 2018 - Presentation at New DVR Counselor Orientation about CAP services. There were 7 new counselors present. January 25, 2019 Presentation at Parents Encouraging Parents in Grand Junction, CO on Special Education Law and transition services/CAP. There were 60 parents and educators present. February 26, 2019 Presentation to attorneys and advocates at Colorado Legal Services on special education law and transition services/CAP. There were 20 attorneys/advocates present. February 27, 2019 Presentation at New DVR Counselor Orientation about CAP services. There were 10 new counselors present. March 8, 2019 Presentation at Parents Encouraging Parents in Colorado Springs, CO on Special Education Law and transition services/CAP. There were 150 parents and educators present. March 19, 2019 Presentation at Aging and Disability Resources for Colorado to council members regarding the services provided by DLC, including CAP work. There were 23 people present for the presentation. April 11, 2019 Presentation to special education directors across the state on hot topics in education law, including transition services and DVR. There were 75 directors and administrative staff present. May 1, 2019 Presentation at New DVR Counselor Orientation about CAP services. There were 3 new counselors present. May 21, 2019 Presentation at Community Impact Council of Mesa County, a non-profit network, to educate various social service entities regarding the services provided by DLC, including CAP work. There were 16 people present for the presentation. June 5, 2019 Presentation at New DVR Counselor Orientation about CAP. There were 12 new counselors present. July 11, 2019 Presentation to attorneys about the special education law and transition services/CAP. There were 50 attorneys trained. August 15, 2019 Presentation to students in program, College Living Experience, about DLC services, especially transition, DVR, and CAP/PABSS services. There were 3 students present. September 4, 2019 Presentation to school district professionals on special education law and transition services/CAP. There were 13 education professionals present. September 23, 2019 - Presentation to parents and advocates on special education rights and transition services/CAP. This was a collaboration with the local ARC office. There were 10 parents/advocates present. <p><p>We have created a fact sheet on DVR services and a fact sheet on Transition services. These fact sheets are available to the public on our website. We also bring this information to any resource fairs and events we attend on behalf of Disability Law Colorado. <p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
We collaborate with and reach out to the following entities and request referrals of individuals who are unserved/underserved/minorities: the Colorado Department of Education, the Arc of Colorado and the local Arcs throughout the state, the PEAK Parent Training Center, Parent to Parent Colorado, the Colorado Autism Society, the International Dyslexia Association, the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council and the University Centers for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research, and Service, the Colorado Assistive Technology Project, the Denver Metro Parent Center, the Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center, and Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition. Our primary means for reaching minority communities has been through our training sessions across the state. This is especially true with our participation with Parents Encouraging Parents and the trainings they have all across Colorado. These sessions attract hundreds of parents from varying ethnic and racial communities from across Colorado. We have also increased our presence at tabling events and resources fairs over the last year. During these events we provide information and fact sheets about our services and encourage people to contact us with issues. We also provide a large majority of our resource information in English as well as Spanish so consumers in the Hispanic community have access to the same information. We have also increased the amount of Spanish materials on our website to make those materials more accessible to people as well. <p><p>In 2008 we published &ldquo;Gu&Iacute;a de la Ley de Educaci&Oacute;n Especial,&rdquo; the Spanish/English version of the award-winning publication, &ldquo;The Everyday Guide to Special Education Law Third Edition.&rdquo; This guide also includes information on transition services. The Spanish and English text appear side-by-side so that people can literally be on the same page. One of our goals in publishing Gu&Iacute;a de la Ley de Educaci&Oacute;n Especial was to eliminate the language barrier for Spanish-speaking parents in learning about their child&rsquo;s educational rights. Efforts are underway to produce the 2nd edition of Gu&Iacute;a de la Ley de Educaci&Oacute;n Especial in FY20. <p><p>Our website, which was redesigned in 2015, has a Spanish section and we regularly update resources. In FY19 we were intentional in bringing focus to this effort by recruiting a volunteer, who is a professional Spanish translator, audit the Spanish version of our website, and to bring available content in Spanish current and equitable. We routinely make surveys, fact sheets and educational materials available in both Spanish and English. We have begun a strategic Latino Community Engagement initiative to intentionally focus our quest to provide additional Spanish resources and identify Latino community groups and organizations throughout the state with whom we want to partner. Recently, we sent two representatives (1 volunteer and 1 staff person) to the Latino Lea
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
1
0
350
2
3143
Twitter: 654 Following | 992 Followers | Avg Reach: 2.7K Facebook: 1,649 Likes/Followers | Avg Post Reach: 683 Instagram: 152 Following | 419 Followers LinkedIn: 83 Followers | Avg Impressions: 147 <P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
During FY19, Disability Law Colorado launched a multi-program initiative on 14(c) certificates, which allow employers to pay people with disabilities sub-minimum wages. We have met with stakeholders and held a public symposium on 14(c). Disability Law Colorado and stakeholders are developing a Legislative initiative so that we can have a systemic impact. A Colorado newspaper published an article about the issue and DLC's involvement. We anticipate more coverage during FY20. <P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
7
29
36
4
13
B. Problem areas
0
11
21
4
0
2
0
7
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
24
0
3
0
1
0
28
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
7
6
0
11
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
13
1
0
0
5
5
1
2
0
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
5
6
22
3
36
B. Gender
23
13
36
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
4
0
0
0
0
27
1
4
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
3
0
0
0
0
3
4
1
0
0
0
2
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
6
1
0
1
1
6
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
36
E. Types of Individuals Served
27
2
9
0
0
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
4
1) Last year we visited multiple schools across the state in a general monitoring effort. One of the major issues discovered was that many schools either did not know about DVR services, did not utilize the services, or felt that DVR was not willing to have a presence in their schools. We took the information we gathered during our monitoring to create a report: &ldquo;Are Colorado Students on a Path to Independence?&rdquo; The recommendations in the report include that School Districts must improve their communication with DVR and collaborate with DVR and the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) to develop and disseminate educational materials on transition services to school staff, students, and parents. Beyond our report, we believe this issue is systemic, and we plan to address it as such with DVR and schools. As a result of our work and report, CDE asked us to train the state&rsquo;s special education directors about providing appropriate transition services, including incorporating DVR, and we did so at their annual meeting in April 2019. Additionally, CDE emailed a list of local DVR contacts to all special education directors. We continue to work on this issue and hope to report further changes in policy or practices next year. 2) Also, during the past year we advocated for DVR clients by requiring a change in DVR Colorado policy regarding the release of client&rsquo;s records. This required several meetings with DVR to negotiate agreed upon language and much back and forth about the purpose behind the regulations and the obligations DLC has based on the regulations. Eventually, we were able to get DVR to change the language to match the regulations. 3) We have continued to have an open dialogue with DVR at the highest level possible, namely the director. During the past year however, the Director of Colorado&rsquo;s DVR changed. We were able to meet with the new Director, Kristin Corash, several months ago to explain DLC&rsquo;s experience with DVR and to listen to any new policy initiatives she may have. We were encouraged to hear that she shares a forward-thinking vision for DVR and wants to achieve meaningful work goals for clients. We will continue to discuss issues with her as they arise. We have seen that the change in leadership has allowed us to have a more direct relationship with DVR and address systemic issues more quickly. 4) Additionally, we continue to accept every opportunity available to talk with incoming DVR counselors to inform them about our role as advocates and answer questions. We have presented multiple trainings over the last year with this goal in mind. Our trainings have been presented to incoming DVR counselors. We are not changing policies during these trainings but merely reminding the counselors of their responsibilities to their clients and introducing them to CAP and the role CAP may play in their work in the future. The more information counselors have about CAP and its services, the more likely a co
B. Litigation
0
0
0
During the past year, we advocated for DVR clients by requiring a change in DVR Colorado policy regarding the release of client&rsquo;s records. DVR believed they had control over the documents we release to clients. We contested that the regulations control what information we can release to the client after receiving it. We are not subject to a restriction by DVR themselves. This issue required several meetings with DVR to negotiate agreed upon language and much back and forth about the purpose behind the regulations and the obligations CAP has based on the regulations. Eventually, we were able to get DVR to change the language to match the regulations. This change will assure clients have access to necessary DVR information and potentially to use that information in future mediation or litigation. <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Center for Legal Advocacy d/b/a Disability Law Colorado
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
Total FTE = 1.76 Program Coordinator 18.6% Advocate 63.2% Grand Junction Attorney 9.5% Grand Junction Advocate 14.2% Attorney 10.4% Attorney 2.1% Senior Intake Specialist 5.0% Director of Legal Services 10.2% Executive Director 8.3% Director of Administrative Services 5.9% Office Manager 3.4% Accounting Manager 3.8% Administrative Assistant 5.5% Administrative Assistant 2.7% Administrative Assistant 2.9% Administrative Assistant - Grand Junction 10.2% <P><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
1.Client is a 58-year-old female with significant orthopedic and physical impairments. This case was handled by our advocate in our Grand Junction office, as the client lived in a rural area on Colorado&rsquo;s western slope. Client went to DVR to maintain self-employment as a horse breeder. Due to client&rsquo;s physical disabilities, aspects of the self-employment became harder over time, and the client was looking for adaptive equipment to be able to maintain the business. While client was going through the DVR process, client obtained employment elsewhere to be able to afford living expenses while working toward the goal of being self-employed full-time. Due to the employment client obtained, DVR determined client was not eligible for DVR services and denied client the opportunity to develop the self-employment IPE. Client contacted CAP after the ineligibility determination was made. The CAP advocate reviewed records and spoke with DVR regarding the denial. The CAP advocate worked with client to advocate for DVR to reconsider the denial and allow client to develop a self-employment IPE. Once CAP helped DVR understood Client was not planning on keeping her current job permanently, DVR reconsidered their decision to deny services and the client was able to initiate the self-employment process with the goal of maintaining self-employment as a horse breeder. <p><p>2.The client is a 59-year-old woman with Cerebral palsy and significant vision impairments. Many years ago, she had a stable, long-term job. Since losing that job, the client has been unable to find further employment. There were delays in engaging in VR re-employment activities, due to chronic, disability/impairment related health problems. As the client was averse to offers for medical/mental restoration, the VR agency attempted to work within the client&rsquo;s expressed desires and constraints. The client&rsquo;s disabilities affect her vision, which can change quickly, and which requires a somewhat specialized solution in terms of lenses/frames needed to support the weight of the lenses. Beyond that, the client has a need for a particular type of frame style that would allow her to read print in front of her. After the client contacted the CAP, the CAP advocate spoke with the counselor and requested and reviewed documentation. With the proper documentation, the CAP advocate was able to negotiate an exception to the VR agency&rsquo;s fee schedule and the glasses were provided. Due to the client&rsquo;s disabilities, the client also needed more than the usual time with the VR agency&rsquo;s job placement vendor, as well as a more responsive and interactive job placement vendor. Through discussion with the Counselor and the Supervisor I, CAP was able to help the client receive a new job placement vendor and two times the usual job placement vendor hours. The client expressed satisfaction with the new job placement vendor, who seemed more responsive and active on the client&r
Certification
Approved
Mary Anne Harvey
Executive Director
2019-12-23
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