RSA-227 for FY-2019: Submission #1051

Arizona
9/30/2019
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Arizona Center for Disability Law
5025 East Washington Street
Suite 202
Phoenix
AZ
85034
(800) 927-2260
(800) 927-2260
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Arizona Center for Disability Law
5025 East Washington Street
Suite 202
Phoenix
85034
Arizona
(800) 927-2260
(800) 927-2260
Additional Information
John Gutierrez
Michelle Thomas
(602) 274-6287
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
26
2
0
13
0
18
59
B. Training Activities
8
103
<p><b><u>Trainings</u></b></p><p><p>During this reporting period, the CAP program conducted 8 presentations/trainings.</p><p><p>1. October 17, 2018 - Presentation/Training at South Mountain Community College in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 7 people attended.</p><p><p>2. November 2, 2018 - Presentation/Training at the University of Arizona UCEDD in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 6 people attended.</p><p><p>3. November 16, 2018 - Presentation/Training on CAP and Vocational Rehabilitation in Glendale, Arizona. Topics covered included Rights as an applicant or Client of the VR Program. 15 people attended.</p><p><p>4. December 5, 2018 - Presentation/Training at DIRECT Independent Living in Tucson, Arizona. Topics covered all ACDL Services. 10 people attended.</p><p><p>5. December 5, 2018 - Presentation/Training at DDD/DES in Avondale, Arizona. Topics covered all ACDL Services. 15 people attended.</p><p><p>6. February 15, 2019 - Presentation/Training at the African American Conference on Disabilities. Topics covered included Ethics of ADA Lawsuits. 20 people attended.</p><p><p>7. February 27, 2019 - Presentation/Training at the International Rescue Committee in Tucson, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 5 people attended.</p><p><p>8. May 4, 2019 - Presentation/Training at Pilot Parents in Tempe, Arizona. Topics covered including vocational rehabilitation. 25 people attended.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p><b><u>Other Outreach</u></b></p><p><p>During this reporting period, the CAP program conducted 11 booths/tables.</p><p><p>1. October 17, 2018 - Booth/Table at Sierra Vistability Day at Cochise College in Sierra Vista, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 120 people attended.</p><p><p>2. November 16, 2018 - Booth/Table at The Arc of Arizona DD Family Resources Conferences in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 56 people attended.</p><p><p>3. November 28, 2018 - Booth/Table at the Arizona State Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 5 people attended.</p><p><p>4. February 13, 2019 - Booth/Table at the Beyond High School: Vail Transition Open House in Vail, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 40 people attended.</p><p><p>5. June 13, 2019 - Booth/Table at the Election Officials of Arizona Conference in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 113 people attended.</p><p><p>6. July 15 &amp; 16, 2019 - Booth/Table at the NAU/IHD Evidence Based Conference on the Fort McDowell Mohave Apache Nation. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 175 people attended.</p><p><p>7. July 20, 2019 - Booth/Table at the Maricopa County Recorder Town Hall in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics covered included all ACDL Services. 150 people attended.</p><p><p>8. July 20, 2019 - Booth/Table at Inclusion Day at Chase Field in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics included all ACDL Services. 35 people attended.</p><p><p>9. July 20, 2019 - Booth/Table at the Back-to-School Rodeo in Yuma, Arizona. Topics included all ACDL Services. 150 people attended.</p><p><p>10. September 14, 2019 - Booth/Table at the Disability Fair in Snowflake, Arizona. Topics included all ACDL Services. 150 people attended.</p><p><p>11. September 28, 2019 - Booth/Table at the Resource Fair for At-Risk Students in Phoenix, Arizona. Topics included all ACDL Services. 10 people attended.</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
1
0
1491
11
133653
<p>Website Hits</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>N/A</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
20
56
76
1
18
B. Problem areas
2
18
47
3
2
3
1
1
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
44
9
2
4
0
0
59
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
35
13
0
2
0
2
3
0
1
2
1
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
23
0
2
1
18
6
1
6
0
2
<p>VR case remained open for consideration of new employment goal and necessary post-secondary education.</p><p><p>Provide appeal rights information.</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
4
13
22
34
3
76
B. Gender
43
33
76
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
11
0
1
13
0
48
2
1
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
1
2
0
1
0
4
4
2
2
4
0
3
4
1
1
0
0
1
0
2
21
2
2
1
1
9
0
0
0
6
0
2
0
0
76
E. Types of Individuals Served
3
3
70
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
3
<p><b>Self-Employment</b></p><p><p>This fiscal year ACDL CAP staff attended a public forum held by RSA Administration to discuss their revisions of the Self-Employment policy. CAP staff were able to provide input for this part of the policy in an effort to make Self-Employment a more viable and basic option for clients to understand this process. Some of the comments that CAP staff provided included ensuring that Self-Employment policy includes informed choice for clients when receiving this service. Also, that VR needs to consider that there may be services a client will require above and beyond the $18,000 limit for clients starting their Self-Employment plans. This could include such services as rehabilitation technology and skills for entrepreneurship training. VR agreed to add this language. CAP staff also commented that the section about purchasing goods and services in stages may be difficult for some clients to understand when starting a business. VR agreed to change the language stating that all goods and services will be provided for 3-6 months after the plan&rsquo;s approval. VR also had a statement that they would not support an employment outcome that was &ldquo;sufficiently controversial as to create community disapproval&rdquo;. CAP staff asked VR to remove this language, and they agreed. The Self-Employment process is a complicated process, but with the revisions of the policy, along with the assistance of the CAP staff, the process has been made more understandable for clients.</p><p><p><b>Customer Service as a Vocational Goal</b></p><p><p>ACDL CAP staff have noticed that there has been a huge increase in the vocational goal of customer service related jobs, especially when it comes to transition students. Most transition age clients that CAP staff have assisted have customer service as their vocational goal. One CAP Advocate is a member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This CAP advocate brought this to the attention of both the SRC and the Director of Vocational Rehabilitation Services. The Director agreed with the CAP Advocate that VR Administration was aware that customer service was being over used as a vocational goal. The RSA Director stated she would be speaking with VR offices and she would explain that customer service may be acceptable for some clients, but VR counselors should consider other viable vocational goals that are consistent with the strengths, abilities, job interest, and informed choice of the client.</p><p><p>ACDL CAP staff successfully represented 3 clients at mediation whose employment goals of customer service changed to higher level employment goals.</p><p><p><b>Meeting with VR Ombudsman</b></p><p><p>CAP staff had a meeting with VR's new Ombudsman. The VR Ombudsman plays an integral part in appeals which are filed by VR clients. The Ombudsman prepares both the mediation and administrative fair hearings. This person also participates in the mediation and sits in on the fair hearings. ACDL CAP staff con
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>ACDL does not have any on-going or completed litigation activities involving individual representation during fiscal year 2019.</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Arizona Center for Disability Law
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>CAP - PPR Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2019. Arizona Center for Disability Law (ACDL) attorneys, Chief Executive Officer, J.J. Rico and Legal Director Rose Daly Rooney, provide direct supervision over the CAP program and its staff. Total CAP Attorney time:.11 FTE. CAP Advocates and short term assistance team (STAT) advocates provide assistance to persons with disabilities who are seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation (VR) services as well as individuals who are receiving services from independent living centers or other Rehabilitation Act funded programs. Total CAP Advocate time: .84 FTE. Support Staff provides clerical support to the CAP Advocates and Attorneys. Total CAP Support Staff time: .54 FTE Other CAP staff includes the Director of Administration and Finance, Program and Quality Assurance Manager, and Office Manager provide support to the CAP program. The Director of Administration and Finance is responsible for budget preparations, day-to-day accounting duties, and the financial reporting requirements for the CAP program. Additionally, the Program and Quality Assurance Manager develops data systems necessary to complete reports for the CAP program, tracks CAP activities, and compiles responses from consumer satisfaction surveys. The Program and Quality Assurance Manager supervises the preparation of the annual CAP Program Performance Report (PPR). ACDL&rsquo;s Office Manager facilitates the distribution of support services and serves as a liaison to coordinate the workload between attorneys/advocates and support staff. Total CAP for other staff time: .17 FTE.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p><u>The case of NL</u></p><p><p>NL is a 24-year-old female with Spina Bifida. NL was seeking services from VR to receive driving lessons, so she could obtain her driver&rsquo;s license and van modifications. NL required van modification because she was employed. The agency that NL worked for had recently moved further away from her residence and because of her disability she had difficulty finding appropriate transportation to get to and from work. These services were approved by her initial VR Counselor. NL did complete the driving lessons and obtained her driver&rsquo;s license, but the VR Counselor that approved these services left VR. NL was assigned a new VR Counselor and this Counselor denied the van modification.</p><p><p>When NL learned of the denial, she contacted ACDL for assistance. CAP staff advocate researched the case to determine why the new VR Counselor denied NL&rsquo;s request for a van modification. After review of the client&rsquo;s file, CAP Advocate saw that the services for a van modification were on NL&rsquo;s Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). The IPE was signed and approved by the VR Supervisor. The CAP Advocate contacted the Supervisor and discussed this issue. Since NL&rsquo;s services were on the IPE and signed by the Supervisor, there was no reason why VR should not be paying for NL&rsquo;s van modification.</p><p><p>After CAP Advocate&rsquo;s discussion with the Supervisor, VR agreed that the van modifications would be approved.</p><p><p>NL withdrew her Mediation request. A few months later, NL contacted CAP Advocate and informed him that she had her van modifications which enables NL to transport herself to and from work in order to stay successfully employed.</p><p><p><b><u> The case of JE</u></b></p><p><p>JE is a 21-year-old male living with autism. JE attends Northern Arizona University (NAU) to earn a degree to become a Park Ranger. ACDL CAP Advocate had previously negotiated for an approved Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) as a park ranger. This included paying for tuition, housing and related expenses for a four-year program. JE contacted ACDL again due to another VR issue. VR refused to pay for one additional semester for JE to complete an internship at a park. VR management cited that JE had enough credits to graduate and did not need the additional semester. When the matter could not be resolved informally, JE appealed the decision and asked for a hearing. Prior to hearing, CAP Advocate negotiated for VR to reverse its position because of JE&rsquo;s Plan of Study and IPE listed the additional semester for a second internship. The second internship was necessary for JE to gain more experience interacting with the public as a member of the park management team. Working with the public was a challenge for JE because of his disability. VR paid for the semester and JE completed his second internship.</p><p><p><b><u>The case of DW</u></b></p><p><p>DW is a 21-year-old individual with a learning disabili
Certification
Approved
J.J. Rico
Chief Executive Officer
2019-11-05
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