RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1032

California
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights California
1831 K Street
{Empty}
Sacramento
CA
95811
(800) 776-5746
(800) 719-5798
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights California
1831 K Street
{Empty}
Sacramento
95811
California
(800) 776-5746
(800) 719-5798
Additional Information
Connie Chu
JoAnn Parayno
(510) 267-1232
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
2474
0
0
1267
1466
10536
15743
B. Training Activities
42
1064
In fiscal year 2018, Disability Rights California (DRC) utilized Client Assistance Program (CAP) funds for training throughout California to serve and support people with disabilities. In training programs, DRC focused on the rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to Competitive Integrated Employment (CIE) instead of sub-minimum wage jobs and to make informed choices when receiving vocational rehabilitation services. CAP trainings also addressed employment discrimination, barriers to accessing employment, and providing information about the CAP to underserved people throughout the state, including limited English proficient, elderly, and low vision and blind communities. <p> For example, in October 2017, DRC provided a substantive training for the Los Angeles Chapter of the National Federation of the Blind. DRC answered questions from the community about how changes under the Work Incentives Opportunity Act (WIOA) impact people with visual impairments, how the DOR helps people with disabilities to obtain CIE, and other services the DOR offers to blind individuals. DRC also collaborated with Fiesta Educativa, a non-profit organization that works with the parents of children with disabilities, to organize and convene a conference in November 2017 for Latino parents and youth with intellectual/developmental (I/DD) and other disabilities to educate families about their rights to disability related services. Legal clinics were held in conjunction with the conference provided parents with one-on-one intake sessions to answer questions regarding special education, regional centers (case management service providers for people with I/DD), and the DOR. More than 50 participants from Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, and Ventura attended the training. <p><p>In October 2017, DRC provided a training at the 5th biennial Council de Las Manos national conference. This organization's objective is to empower Latinx Deaf, Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing, Deaf-Blind, and late deafened individuals. DRC provided a training on education and employment to 40 participants. <p><p>In June 2018, DRC provided a training to nearly 50 parents in a Japanese support group receiving services from the Chinese Parents Association for the Disabled. The training, called Life After High School, focused on transition to work programs, school and community living options, transition services, regional center services, and services from the DOR and how they all work together. The purpose of the event was to empower and educate consumers with I/DD, and mental and physical disabilities of their rights and options. DRC also provided information regarding available DRC services for the Asian Pacific Islander (API) community. <p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
DRC continued its ongoing outreach efforts to unserved and underserved mono-lingual, limited English proficient, and marginalized communities. In fiscal year 2018, CAP staff participated in 12 outreach events, reaching a total of 1,399 people. <p>On October 2017, DRC participated in the DOR Resource Fair in Sacramento to provide information to new and existing DOR clients. DRC provided information and publications in both English and Spanish regarding work incentives and the CAP program to 100 people. <p>In addition to collaborating with Fiesta Educativa to develop a successful legal clinic for Latino parents and youth described above, DRC also staffed and participated in the 39th annual Fiesta Educativa Conference in November 2017. This goal of the event was to educate and empower the Latino community about their rights to disability related services. More than 150 participants attended the conference including students with I/DD, Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) clients, disability service providers, school staff, parents, and disability community members. DRC provided attendees with information in English and Spanish about our statewide disability services.<p><p>In November 2017, DRC participated in the Valley Deaf Festival in Fresno. Our staff provided information on DRC services, including CAP, to more than 160 participants. Attendees, many with hearing and sensory disabilities, came to the booth asking questions about their disability-related situations and DRC staff encouraged all of them to call DRC intake lines for additional information and assistance. DRC&rsquo;s participated in the event to promote disability rights awareness among the Deaf community in Central Valley California. <p>In June 2018, DRC participated in the 2nd Annual Transition Fair in Fresno to provide information to parents and youth regarding transition plans and competitive integrated employment (CIE). This new, annual event reaches youth and their families during a crucial time in their lives as they consider job and career options available to them. More than 100 people attended the event and a majority were Spanish speakers from Latino communities in the Central Valley area. DRC provided information and publications in both English and Spanish and were able to provide short term assistance to at least five participants about receiving transitional services through their child&rsquo;s school, regional center help, and issues regarding DOR.<p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
12820
55
0
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
0 <P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
147
609
756
107
187
B. Problem areas
124
86
346
35
0
140
0
13
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
652
0
30
0
11
8
701
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
266
306
5
2
3
47
6
3
12
51
0
0
N/A <P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
578
6
4
8
39
42
9
15
0
0
N/A <P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
35
77
211
392
41
756
B. Gender
376
380
756
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
192
12
58
159
3
268
36
28
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
16
15
1
0
18
64
4
47
33
6
26
31
18
4
3
1
5
10
29
184
5
3
5
17
112
2
1
0
46
3
1
2
42
756
E. Types of Individuals Served
197
14
520
12
31
11
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
4
(a) the activity undertaken, <p><p>(b) the policy or practice that changed as a result of your agency&rsquo;s non-litigation systemic activity, and <p><p>(c) the manner in which this change benefited individuals with disabilities. <p><p>1. a) During the review period, DRC participated on advisory boards and stakeholder committees focused on increasing CIE options for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Throughout the year, staff met regularly with a steering committee comprised of leaders from the California Departments of Rehabilitation (DOR), Education, and Developmental Services to discuss the implementation of the &ldquo;Blueprint,&rdquo; a proactive interagency plan developed by these three California agencies to coordinate how the State will work together to implement CIE. <p><p>b) The Blueprint required the three state departments to increase the number of individuals with I/DD in CIE from 780 to 1,080 in SFY 2017/18 and to 1,280 in SFY 2018/19, with increasingly progressive goals for the following three years. As one way to achieve these goals, the state departments jointly issued written guidance, reviewed by DRC, requiring local educational agencies, DOR district offices, and regional centers to improve coordination in order to increase CIE opportunities in their geographic regions. The enhanced coordination between local agencies resulted in agreements known as Local Partnership Agreements. To date, 11 of these agreements have been developed, and 12 more are under development. <p><p>c) The goals of the Blueprint include engaging eligible individuals with disabilities in more employment preparation services and other trainings, and helping them make informed decisions to support a transition to work in the community. <p><p><p>2. a) Staff continue to participate in the Employment First Committee of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. This group meets quarterly to make recommendations for measuring employment participation for people with developmental disabilities. b)The Department of Developmental Disabilities (DDS) tracks certain data regarding the delivery of services by regional centers. The Employment First Committee recommended that DDS separate out data regarding services and outcomes based on race and ethnicity. The goal of this change would be to help identify disparities in service based on race and ethnicity and to highlight communities being underserved. DDS has agreed to breakout data based on these recommendations. <p><p>c) The goal of our engagement in the Employment First Committee of the State Council on Developmental Disabilities is to advance the rights of individuals with I/DD and increase their access to CIE. Having data regarding disparities will help efforts to support outreach to diverse communities and provision of culturally competent services. <p><p><p>3. a) DRC again served on the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), which is responsible
B. Litigation
0
0
0
CAP did not engage in any class action or individual representation litigation during the reporting period using CAP funding, but provided direct representation to individuals in the administrative hearing process with the DOR. The following are examples of DRC&rsquo;s representation of individuals in administrative hearings :<p>1. Client receives a favorable outcome via administrative hearing vs. the Department of Rehabilitation <p><p>Cheryl has several disabilities that affect her ability to work long hours. Cheryl required assistance from the DOR to help her with self-employment services to start her own business. Due to Cheryl&rsquo;s disabilities, a self-employment setting is necessary because it provides her with a flexible work schedule. Previously, she worked in the marketing department of two prominent national entertainment companies and also worked as an event planner, designing and manufacturing different products to promote events. Cheryl applied for DOR services in 2016 and signed an interim Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) contract to allow her to develop a small business plan (SBP) to determine if DOR could support her with self-employment services. Because Cheryl wanted to open her own manufacturing business for event planning, which requires significant preparation, the DOR agreed to extend her IPE several times to allow her more time to develop her SBP. When Cheryl finally completed her business plan, her counselor told her that DOR would need to hire a small business consultant to review her plan for feasibility. DOR gave Cheryl the option of only one small business consultant to review her plan. After reviewing the individual&rsquo;s qualifications, she requested a different consultant. DOR told her that they did not have any other consultants available and that, if she did not go with the consultant that they were offering, they would not be able to help her with self-employment services. Cheryl reached out to DRC for assistance. <p><p>DRC requested an administrative review of Cheryl&rsquo;s case based on the denial of informed choice regarding the small business consultant assigned to review her plan. The District Administrator denied Cheryl her right to informed choice and ruled that Cheryl did not meet the attributes to be successful in a self-employment setting anyway. Therefore, her request for self-employment services was denied. The administrative review decision also listed several negative accusations against Cheryl&rsquo;s character and her ability to run a business, all of which were untrue and unsubstantiated. <p><p>DRC requested a mediation and a fair hearing with the Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) regarding DOR&rsquo;s denial of her request for self-employment services. At the fair hearing, DRC presented credible evidence and testimony to refute all of DOR&rsquo;s false allegations against Cheryl&rsquo;s character. DRC provided the judge with a copy of Cheryl&rsquo;s business plan
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights California
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
CAP services were provided by professional staff of 10.99 PTE with 8.58 years and clerical staff of 3.28 PTE with 2.67 years. <P><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
1. DOR Client Overcomes Past and Upholds Her Right to Choose Employment <p><p>Mila is a DOR client with an interest in wealth management. She had difficulty completing a Bachelor&rsquo;s degree program due to her multiple disabilities including hearing impairment and mental health disabilities. After reenrolling at a local community college, she sought DOR services but the DOR denied her chosen vocational goal based on their assertion that she would not benefit from training. <p><p>Mila contacted the DRC for help and was given information about her right to appeal the DOR&rsquo;s decision. She requested an Administrative Review but, rather than conducting the review, DOR sent her back to the same Team Manager who denied her initial request. The Team Manager told Mila that, because she had failed to cooperate with DOR services, her case would be closed. This was a violation of Mila&rsquo;s due process rights. Mila asked DRC for further assistance. <p><p>DRC helped Mila request a new Administrative Review and assisted with negotiations with the DOR. DRC negotiated for DOR to develop a provisional IPE with a vocational goal of accountant and to support Mila&rsquo;s goal of obtaining an associate degree. Once Mila completes this provisional IPE and demonstrates that she is a successful student, the DOR agreed to support her in a Bachelor&rsquo;s program with the vocational goal of wealth manager. DRC also helped Mila obtain additional DOR services to help her achieve her goal including obtaining a computer, assistance with childcare costs, transportation, books and supplies, support for an internship program, and clothing. <p><p>2. DRC Helps Client Receive Needed Assistive Technology to Pursue Employment Goal <p><p>David is deaf and communicates through American Sign Language. He has worked in restaurants and wants to start his own food services business. The DOR agreed to develop an interim IPE for self-employment so that David can develop a small business plan. Pursuant to his IPE, the DOR agreed to provide David with an assistive technology (AT) evaluation for computer equipment to help him with his business plan development. <p><p>The AT specialist who conducted the evaluation advised David that he was recommending that the DOR provide a MacIntosh computer because David was familiar with MacIntosh devices and could link his MacIntosh computer software to software on his iPhone. Later, David learned that the assessment had been revised at the direction of his DOR counselor. David&rsquo;s DOR counselor told him that the DOR would not purchase a MacIntosh computer because it was too expensive, and therefore she had requested that the AT specialist change the report to reflect a recommendation that the DOR purchase a personal computer (PC) instead. David contacted his counselor&rsquo;s supervisor and requested that the DOR provide him with MacIntosh computer as recommended in the original AT report, and also to change hi
Certification
Approved
Catherine Blakemore
Executive Director
2018-12-27
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