RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1030

Wyoming
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Protection & Advocacy System, Inc.
7344 Stockman Street
{Empty}
Cheyenne
WY
82009
http://www.wypanda.com
(800) 821-3091
(800) 821-3091
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Protection & Advocacy System, Inc.
7344 Stockman Street
{Empty}
Cheyenne
82009
Wyoming
wypanda@wypanda.com
http://www.wypanda.com
(800) 821-3091
(800) 821-3091
Additional Information
Lee Beidleman
Lee Beidleman
(307) 638-7668
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
21
2
1
0
0
0
24
B. Training Activities
19
1169
<p>The Client Assistance Program has completed educational training through several delivery methods, the most prominent being through group presentations at conferences, workshops, state agencies, public organizations, disability support groups, and through individual requests.</p><p><p>On October 9, 2017, information was presented and distributed to participants at the Deaf/Hard of Hearing Conference, in Casper, Wyoming. A large portion of attendees included school to work transition aged students with hearing disabilities and their parents and guardians. Several individuals were enrolled tribal members. Attendance: 50 persons</p><p><p>On October 11 - 12, 2017, CAP materials was distributed at the Caring For Our Elders event, held at the Wind River Casino on the Wind River Indian Reservation, near Riverton, Wyoming. The participants were for the most part enrolled tribal members and many were family members of school to work transition aged students, making Workforce Innovative and Opportunities Act information very relevant, especially pre-employment transition services, Pre-ETS. Attendance: approximately 170</p><p><p>On November 9, 2017, CAP presented training and distributed information to Area One DVR counselors and management in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Content of the presentation included CAP as a positive resource for counselors and clients, and points for improved counseling and relationships with clients. Attendance: 12 persons</p><p><p>On November 11, 2017 CAP presented training and distributed information to Area Two DVR counselors and management in Casper, Wyoming. Content of the presentation included CAP as a positive resource for counselors and clients, and points for improved counseling and relationships with clients. Attendance: 15 persons</p><p><p>On November 15, 2017, CAP presented information regarding the CAP program and Employment First initiatives to self-advocates and program staff of Simple Supports in Riverton, Wyoming. Attendance: 12 persons</p><p><p>On January 22, 2018 CAP presented a teleconference training to Wyoming Independent Living Project Out coordinators. Wyoming Independent Living center serves thirteen counties on the eastern side of the state. Topics included CAP services and other program services designed to protect individual rights and freedoms of individuals with disabilities. Attendance: 6</p><p><p>On February 22, 2018, CAP presented information about CAP, the Rehabilitation Act and the WIOA amendment to transition-age students and family members at the Sweetwater County School District 1, Family Fair, held in Rock Springs, Wyoming. Attendance: 80 persons</p><p><p>On March 3, 2018, CAP distributed materials and presented information regarding CAP, independent living, and vocational rehabilitation at the Governor&rsquo;s Council on Developmental Disabilities Disability Awareness Event, held in Cheyenne, Wyoming. Participants included self-advocates, guardians, family members, and provider staff. Attendance: approximately 10
C. Agency Outreach
<p>Wyoming&rsquo;s largest minority community is the Native American population living on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The reservation has a population of approximately 26,500 and is home to nearly 12,500 Eastern Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribal members. The town of Riverton, Wyoming is within the reservation boundary, which largely explains the difference in Native American inhabitants and other inhabitants on the reservation. However, this vast reservation of 3,500 square miles is the most economically depressed and crime ridden area in the state. The two Native American tribes are plagued by alcoholism, drug abuse, crime, high suicide rates and a 20% disabilities rate. Unemployment rates of the Northern Arapaho and the Eastern Shoshone are above 70% and 60% of the Native American households are below the poverty line. The plight extends to the youth population of both tribes, as well. Only 60% of Native Americans complete high school, compared to 80% of White students who complete high school. The Wind River reservation dropout rate is 40 percent, more than twice the state average. Teenagers are twice as likely to commit suicide compared to other young adults in Wyoming. There are other issues that commonly occur on the reservation, such as; child abuse, teen pregnancy, sexual assault, and domestic violence, which all contribute to the feelings of hopelessness and despair among many of the reservation children. Not only are the Native Americans with a disability unserved or under-served but so are the non-disabled citizens. There are two Project 121 vocational rehabilitation programs on the Wind River Reservation. The Red Feathered Eagle Vocational Rehabilitation Program is authorized through the Eastern Shoshone Tribal Business Council and the Northern Arapaho Vocational Rehabilitation Program is authorized through the Northern Arapaho Tribal Business Council. CAP has spent time with the directors of both programs discussing the benefits and positive impacts they could have with the students on the reservation through their involvement with their schools and school to work transition-aged students. In addition to the discussions with the Project 121 directors, CAP has also sent letters to all the school districts on the reservation and districts bordering the reservation, explaining the benefits of partnering with their local vocational rehabilitation agencies to take advantage of Pre-Employment Transition Services (Pre-ETS), as provided through the Workforce Innovations and Opportunities Act (WIOA). CAP included in the letter an explanation of the five core services that are designated in the Act and can be provided to &ldquo;potentially eligible&rdquo; students and paid for through the vocational rehabilitation agencies; 1) job exploration counseling, 2) work-based learning experiences, 3) counseling on post-secondary educational opportunities, 4) work place readiness training, and 5) self-advocacy training. If both the school dis
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
2
0
1614
9
0
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>The following agencies provide contact information to the public: Wyoming Workforce Services Department (16 offices), contact information; Wyoming Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (36 offices), Contact information; Wyoming Department of Health - Behavioral Health Division, contact information; Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities, contact information; Wyoming State Bar Directory, contact information; Goshen County Services, contact information; Wounded Warriors Website, contact information; NAMI Website, contact information; Wyoming Brain Injury Alliance, handout materials and contact information; Wyoming Real Estate Commission Website, contact information; Wyoming Independent Living Centers (5 office), handout materials and contact information; Wyoming Services for Independent Living Centers (5 offices), handout material and contact information.</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
3
7
10
0
4
B. Problem areas
0
1
5
3
0
1
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
0
0
6
0
0
0
6
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
4
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
<p>Not applicable</p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
2
0
1
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
<p>Not applicable</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
3
2
5
0
10
B. Gender
2
8
10
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
0
0
0
0
8
0
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
4
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
E. Types of Individuals Served
6
0
4
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
3
<p>CAP has engaged in several activities throughout this past year to successfully affect changes that have had positive results for individuals with disabilities seeking vocational rehabilitation services.</p><p><p>CAP began receiving complaints about group orientations from prospective clients of Wyoming&rsquo;s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. Their complaints centered around the fact that they were required to attend a group orientation before they were given an application for services. The orientations were scheduled once a week or sometimes less often, if there were interruptions to the counselor&rsquo;s normal daily schedule. Most of the complaints about the group orientations were lodged based on a number of legitimate reasons. For example, many were reluctant to attend because of self- esteem and personal issues, others had transportation or scheduling problems, some needed more immediate supports and couldn&rsquo;t afford the wait. Some individuals felt so strongly about this practice that they declined to return, and therefore, never applied for services. As CAP examined this issue, it was discovered that group orientations were not a statewide practice. Only two of the four service areas in Wyoming had employed the practice. CAP questioned the two area managers who were not using group orientations in their service areas and they expressed that they were a &ldquo;waste of time.&rdquo; They felt the information that could be shared in a group setting was so global that it was already explained in the DVR guidelines booklet that is distributed to applicants when they pick-up an application. The managers also explained that the administrative assistants in their offices who tend to the walk-up clients, gives a brief overview and answers any preliminary questions the individual may have when they are given an application. They felt the group orientations were repetitious of these activities and also of information shared at the initial interview with an assigned counselor. These managers said that an initial interview is usually scheduled within a two week period of an application submission, unless there are identified circumstances that requires more expediency. The time between application submission and an initial interview in the service areas using group orientations took anywhere from four to six weeks, which doesn&rsquo;t count the one to two weeks between group orientation and application submission. After this investigation, CAP wrote a formal letter to the Director of Wyoming&rsquo;s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation detailing the concerns discovered through client complaints and the assessments of the area managers not using the practice. CAP explained that group orientations were not only a deterrent to applicants, but in some cases resulted in a total refusal to continue the process, because of personal feelings and emotions. CAP also expressed concerns about group orientations being, in part, a cause for a lack of
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Protection & Advocacy System, Inc.
No
Not Applicable
B. Staff Employed
<p>Professional Staff: 1 FT for 11 months and PT for 1 month at .97 FTE. In addition, the professional part-time category is comprised of 5 professional staff positions working part-time in the CAP Program, as follows: 1 CEO/Administrator at.05 FTE, filled the entire funding period; 3 attorneys at .09 FTE, filled the entire funding period; and 1 Advocate at .001, filled the entire funding period. No vacant professional positions. Clerical/Support Staff: 2 FT working PT in the CAP Program at .2 FTE, filled the entire funding period. No vacant clerical/support staff positions.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>This case involves a 32 year old male who is now totally blind due to macular degeneration. He was recently released from prison. He is currently on probation. When he contacted CAP he was living in a halfway house where he had transportation services, meals, and lodging. However, he was about to be released from that facility and was in the process of moving into an apartment. He had an open case with DVR and was attending the local community college taking one class. He had the accommodations necessary for his class work which was provided through the college. The biggest problem facing the client was the fact that he was moving to a new living arrangement and would not be familiar with accessing his surroundings. He needed orientation &amp; mobility training, O&amp;M, for his new environment. DVR had contacted Vision Outreach at the Wyoming Department of Education. They were willing to provide the service but it would be administered an hour or two at a time, and only when the trainer could get to his town, which could take several months to do the comprehensive job that was needed. DVR wanted the client to accept this arrangement because it was the cheapest way to accomplish the service. The client located a certified independent O&amp;M trainer in his community, but DVR had rejected the client&rsquo;s request to use that individual because she was not a DVR vendor and also felt the cost was too high at $70 per hour for approximately 10 hours. CAP explained to DVR that O&amp;M training was necessary because of the safety concerns for this client and it was imperative for him to learn how to access transportation back and forth to school and other daily living necessities that he would encounter within and outside his apartment. Providing this service through piece-meal arrangements was not acceptable and could cause a liability issue for DVR if an accident occurred before the service was completed. After CAP&rsquo;s negotiations, DVR agreed to contract the independent provider for the O&amp;M training and agreed to pay for the service with a State credit card rather than prolonging the process by waiting for vendor approval. After the O&amp;M training was authorized, CAP attended a DVR/client meeting in which the client&rsquo;s IPE, independent plan for employment, was rewritten. He is now enrolled in school full-time. DVR is paying for his books, fees, and tuition. He is using his Pell Grant for living expenses. Wyoming Independent Living, the local center for independent living, is providing transportation funds for school and other transportation needs. This case involves a 46 year old lady who had an open case with DVR but was having trouble with her counselor not responding to her calls for help. She has a hearing impairment and had hearing aids that were old and outdated. She reported to CAP that she was working in a medical office as a receptionist but when there was any peripheral noise, which happened a lot, she had trouble hearin
Certification
Approved
Jeanne A. Thobro, CEO
Chief Executive Officer
2018-11-05
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