RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1029

West Virginia
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights of West Virginia
1207 Quarrier St, Ste 400
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Charleston
WV
25301
https://www.drofwv.org/
(800) 950-5250
(800) 950-5250
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
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Additional Information
Taniua Hardy, Program Director
Jodi Calissie, Data Report Sp
(304) 346-0847
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
44
4
0
18
1
6
73
B. Training Activities
35
443
<p>A DRWV Advocate gave an &ldquo;Employment Rights for People with Disabilities&rdquo; presentation at the Disability Action Center in Marion County to twenty (20) of their clients, and five (5) staff. Most of their clients have intellectual/developmental disabilities. Also, a Supported Decision Making training was provided in the same location for the People First Self-Advocacy group who meets there. Each of these trainings contained general DRWV outreach.</p><p><p>The same Advocate gave an employment rights and outreach presentation to a group of ten (10) service providers and state representatives at the WV Department of Health and Human Resources (WVDHHR) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Title XIX Medicaid Waiver Quality Improvement Advisory Council. DRWV is a member of this Council and attends all meetings. The Council is charged with providing guidance and feedback to the WVDHHR Bureau for Medical Services (BMS) in the development of an ongoing quality assurance and improvement system for the TBI Waiver Program. The role of the Council is advisory in nature.</p><p><p>After presenting to the Council described above, DRWV was invited to present at the TBI Waiver Quarterly Providers Meeting about employment rights as well as a general outreach presentation. The thirteen (13) attendees at this meeting/training were providers of services through the Title XIX Medicaid TBI Waiver throughout WV.</p><p><p>In FY 2018, a CAP Advocate completed a project to meet with the leadership at all five (5) Centers for Independent Living, twenty (20) WorkForce WV, and thirty-four (34) WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS) offices. In addition to meeting with the leadership at each of these agency offices, the Advocate met with the Director of WVDRS, six (6) district managers, and the state-wide WorkForce WV Director. The Advocate made presentations during twenty-two (22) agency staff meetings while visiting the offices; a total of 192 counselors, managers, directors and other staff of the agencies were reached. The Advocate provided each office with DRWV&rsquo;s publications and employment posters to distribute to their clients; provided information about the role of DRWV as the P&amp;A; how CAP can assist their clients; provided examples of situations in which they could refer their clients to DRWV; and engaged agency staff in dialogue to build and/or strengthen communication between agency staff and DRWV. It is hoped that this project will result in an increase in the number of referrals to DRWV resulting in CAP service requests.</p><p><p>The US Commission on Civil Rights WV Advisory Committee hosted a day at the Legislature. DRWV&rsquo;s Legal Director presented on the consequences of a felony conviction on a person&rsquo;s ability receive public benefits and how a person with a disability could be especially harmed by these consequences. Fifty (50) Legislators and staff were present for this event. He also participated in a two-hour long panel at the event wh
C. Agency Outreach
<p>In all of the outreach events described in this report, we hope to reach individuals that we have not yet served as well as people from diverse ethnic and minority communities.</p><p><p>In July 2018, DRWV sent an outreach mailing to areas of the state where we receive few if any calls. The outreach mailing included DRWV&rsquo;s printed publications. The letter that was enclosed with these items described other available publications and resources, as well as an offer to provide in-person training and/or outreach. This mailing was sent to: drop-in centers who serve individuals with mental illness; homeless services providers; senior services providers; West Virginia University Extension Services; numerous children&rsquo;s services providers; and other groups who serve individuals in these underserved areas.</p><p><p>We renewed our partnership with the Kroger Pharmacy to have our logo, services, and contact information printed on their pharmacy bags in an effort to continue to reach out to underserved populations. Twenty-four thousand bags were purchased at the end of FY 2017 for distribution in FY 2018 and were used when filling prescriptions at a Kroger pharmacy located in a low-income area of Kanawha County WV.</p><p><p>At the end of FY 2018, we were invited and set up an outreach display at the annual Tri-State Diversity and Inclusion Conference called &ldquo;Intersectionality: Celebrating the Difference Among Use&rdquo; at Marshall University. This event was &ldquo;designed to celebrate individuals from different backgrounds, experiences and perspectives and to share dialogue and engage in critical thinking exercises to enhance multicultural awareness&rdquo;. It was hosted by Mountwest Community and Technical College in collaboration with several other colleges in the Huntington area.</p><p><p>We have continued to look for opportunities to reach out to veterans and groups that serve veterans. We participated in the planning of an annual veterans Stand Down event. We also set up displays at numerous veterans Stand Down events throughout the state of WV. These events are mainly targeted toward homeless veterans.</p><p><p>In May 2018, DRWV sent an outreach letter to all remaining Sheltered Workshops in WV to offer to meet with the workshops staff, Boards, individuals whom they employ, and family members of those individuals. The letter included information about the Stephen Beck, Jr. Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, as well as several of our publications.</p><p><p>In FY 2018, a CAP Advocate conducted an outreach effort to meet with staff at public high schools to make them aware of DRWV. The Advocate met with staff from nine (9) high schools in WV, nearly all of whom were guidance counselors. At each of the schools the Advocate explained what DRWV does, our role as the P&amp;A, and provided information pertaining to our advocacy and programs that pertain to transitioning youth. The Advocate also briefly told them about the WV iTransition ap
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
3
24472
25
15090
<p>In addition to the total publications in Part 1.D.4 of this report, DRWV distributed 10,200 other outreach items. See Section E below regarding newsletter distribution as well.</p><p><p>DRWV developed CAP ads for television and radio at the end of FY 2017. These ads aired in early FY 2018. One of the radio ads focused on CAP services related to WVDRS, and the other on CAP services related transition from high school. The television ad was focused on CAP in general, both WVDRS and the Centers for Independent Living. The estimated reach of the television commercial was over 700,000 people.</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>The Fall 2017 edition of the WVU Center for Excellence in Disabilities (CED) WV Assistive Technology System (WVATS) quarterly newsletter included a half page article about CAP. It also included how to contact us for assistance. It can be found at: http://wvats.cedwvu.org/media/2859/fall2017.pdf. In addition to being send to WVATS&rsquo; publication list of 4,890 people, it was shared on our Social media outlets and website as well.</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
9
19
28
3
0
B. Problem areas
0
4
19
2
0
3
3
2
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
26
0
7
0
0
0
33
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
17
4
5
1
0
1
1
0
4
0
0
0
<p>NA</p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
9
2
0
0
7
9
0
2
0
4
<p>In all four cases, the clients received information about their rights and options. It is unknown what outcomes, if any, were achieved since all four clients stopped following up with the advocates.</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
1
12
6
7
2
28
B. Gender
12
16
28
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
0
0
2
0
22
2
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
6
0
1
0
0
1
1
2
1
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
4
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
28
E. Types of Individuals Served
9
0
16
1
1
3
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
3
<p>2. Describe the systemic activities conducted by CAP during the fiscal year and its impact on other agency's policies or practices.</p><p><p>DRWV is a member on the WV Developmental Disabilities Council and participates on their Employment First Workgroup. This activity clearly impacts employment issues for people with disabilities. The Workgroup&rsquo;s charge is to provide recommendations for actions the Council should take to support the creation of Employment First policies and/or practices in WV, including workforce training and development. The goal is to develop initiatives that will increase opportunities for young people with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD) to have community work experiences, and for all working-age people with I/DD to gain valued, integrated employment. The Workgroup has five (5) key activities planned for the next four (4) years: development of a marketing campaign; funding/supporting creation of educational materials and tools for families; funding/supporting a study to report on the status of employment of person&rsquo;s with I/DD in WV; funding/supporting training for a variety of stakeholders about school to work transition, customized employment, and other options; and providing technical assistance to local groups regarding employment.</p><p><p>DRWV is a member for the WV Statewide Rehabilitation Council (SRC). DRWV&rsquo;s employment trained staff attorney serves as our representative on the SRC and attends all meetings. During one SRC meeting, the staff attorney hosted a panel discussion about &ldquo;WVDRS providing transition age youth who are in nontraditional education programs with the federally mandated transition services&rdquo;. Service providers described some of the barriers these youth face and WVDRS provided information about the federally mandated transition services, including examples of how they serve youth in non-traditional educational settings. During FY 2018, the WVDRS made significant changes to their training sponsorship policies. WVDRS placed a cap on tuition, fees and books for all clients who were receiving sponsorship for training through their agency. DRWV advised WVDRS of the problems with such a policy and was instrumental in creating an exception policy which allowed clients with a financial need that exceeds the policy limits to receive additional funds to allow them to remain in college and vocational training programs. This exception process helped to prevent many WV students from dropping out of college and vocational training programs due to lack of funding. During FY 2018, WVDRS made several changes to their training sponsorship policy which were contrary to both state and federal regulations. Neither the SRC nor DRWV were made aware of the changes until after they went into effect. To allow DRWV and other SRC members to have more significant input in policies prior to their implementation, DRWV worked with WVDRS to create a policy committee which meets monthly t
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>NA</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights of WV
No
NA
B. Staff Employed
<p>Full-time % of year Type of Positionequivalentposition filledPerson-years Professional Full-time 1.49 100% 15.00 Part-time 0.48 44.2% 5.75 Vacant N/A N/A N/A Clerical Full-time 0.12 100% 2.00 Part-time N/A N/A N/A Vacant N/A N/A N/A</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>A CAP eligible client requested DRWV's assistance with getting the WVDRS to accommodate her need for transportation assistance and/or an accommodation in the location for her to complete an application for services. DRWV advocated for WVDRS to provide the client with accommodations to meet her at a location near her home for the application meeting. As a result, WVDRS met the client at a local restaurant to complete the application for services and begin to develop her Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). DRWV accompanied the client at this meeting, then maintained contact with the client and WVDRS during the client's job search process. DRWV advocated for the client to receive services that were useful to her to help her secure employment. WVDRS provided job placement services to the client, which included providing the client with transportation to job interviews. The client obtained employment in her chosen field as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). After the client obtained employment, DRWV successfully advocated for WVDRS to provide relocation expenses to the client to help her transition to an apartment that was near her work.</p><p><p>A CAP eligible client was being funded by WVDRS for out-of-state tuition and requested DRWV&rsquo;s assistance with a planned reduction to her Fall 2017 educational sponsorship which was to be cut by 50% for Spring 2018. Because this was a systemic issue that impacted numerous CAP eligible individuals, DRWV&rsquo;s legal team met with WVDRS&rsquo; Executive Director regarding the decision to reduce the maximum tuition sponsorship without following the appropriate process to do so and failing to honor current signed IPEs. As an immediate result of this advocacy, WVDRS agreed to provide exceptions to this policy change for the Spring 2018 semester for clients who met the criteria for the exception and received the amount of tuition sponsorship that was included in their IPEs. Since this CAP client met the criteria for the exception, WVDRS agreed to provide the previous amount of tuition sponsorship for the Spring 2018 semester. In addition, DRWV provided guidance to other CAP eligible clients who contacted as for assistance for the same issue. As a result, several other CAP clients qualified for this exemption.</p><p><p>A CAP client contacted DRWV with complaints about difficulty in getting services from a Center for Independent Living (CIL). DRWV contacted the CIL on the client's behalf and was able to establish communication between the client and CIL. As a result the client was able to complete the application process with the CIL to obtain their services and was satisfied with the advocacy outcome.</p><p>
Certification
Approved
Susan Given
Executive Director
2018-11-06
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