RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1024

Utah
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Law Center
205 North 400 West
{Empty}
Salt Lake City
UT
84103
{Empty}
(800) 662-9080
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Law Center
205 North 400 West
{Empty}
Salt Lake City
84103
Utah
{Empty}
(800) 662-9080
{Empty}
Additional Information
Katie Carroll
Adina Zahradnikova
(801) 363-1347
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
29
1
0
0
0
5
35
B. Training Activities
25
585
Trainings As individual CAP case numbers continue to trend downward due to the implementation of an order of selection for Utah’s VR agency, we have greatly increased our training efforts to ensure that those who are working with VR are receiving high-quality services. During FY18 we also continued to provide Title I ADA trainings to community members to ensure people with disabilities understand their rights and have the tools necessary to be successful in employment. In FY18 we more than doubled the number of trainings provided from FY17 and reached several hundred more individuals. Granite School District Staff Training on VR Services Granite School District is the third largest school district in Utah and one of the largest in the nation. The Disability Law Center’s (DLC) CAP team trained ten Granite School District transition coordinators on the VR process and what kinds of issues and/or barriers students seeking VR services may face as they go through the VR process. The team had a productive conversation with transition staff regarding issues they have encountered with students attempting to work with VR. Plans were made to meet again and discuss issues and strategies for overcoming barriers. National Federation of the Blind (NFB) Conference CAP shared information about our services with 75 attendees at the NFB Annual Conference held in Salt Lake City, UT in April 2018. We presented during the general assembly and during a breakout session the following day. Since Utah’s VR has undergone a number of changes in the last three years, services for blind and visually impaired clients have changed as well. The CAP team presented information to attendees about how our services work, what they can expect from the VR process, what issues have been trending in recent months, and how to self-advocate to resolve issues as they navigate VR services. Utah Independent Living Center (UILC) Training on DLC and CAP Services The CAP team trained 15 UILC staff members on DLC and CAP services during their May 2018 staff meeting. A special emphasis was placed on educating staff on the availability of CAP services for both VR and ILC clients. We discussed the VR process, case trends and how the DLC can assist ILC clients with various employment and other disability-related issues they may face. Several of the UILC staff in attendance work with transition students through VR’s pre-employment transition services (Pre-ETS) and we were able to answer specific questions on helping students who plan to apply for individual VR services. Utah Parent Center (UPC) Staff Training on VR and CAP Services UPC is Utah’s information and training center for parents of children with disabilities. UPC works with parents to educate and connect them to services, as well as provides advocacy. In May 2018 the CAP team trained 30 UPC employees, including parent advocates and administrative staff, on CAP and VR services. We explained what the VR
C. Agency Outreach
In addition to the CAP team’s regular outreach efforts at employment events and fairs targeted to people with disabilities, in FY18 we made an effort to: visit rural areas of the state that are traditionally underserved by disability services, reach out to the Spanish-speaking community which encompasses members of Utah’s largest minority community, and target veterans and people who are homeless. Work Ability Job Fair Members of the CAP team operated an information table at the Work Ability Job Fair held in April 2018. The job fair occurs semi-annually and hosts disability-friendly employers looking to hire individuals with disabilities. The fairs are held at the Sanderson Center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and attract attendees from the deaf community, as well as transition-aged students, and the blind and visually impaired community. The DLC provided information to approximately 90 attendees about how the DLC can advocate to remove employment barriers in regards to working with VR, requesting reasonable accommodations, and addressing disability-related discrimination at work. School District and Transition Fairs The CAP team understands the importance of quality transition services to youth moving from high school to higher education and/or employment opportunities. In an effort to provide information to this key group, we operated information tables at seven district and transition fairs during FY18 and spoke to 395 students, parents, and service providers. Several of these events are in school districts that are either rurally located or predominated by minority communities. Event individuals who received information Cache/Logan District Fair 55 Davis Transition Fair66 Granite District Agency Fair23 Granite District Fair43 Alpine Transition Fair100 Jordan District Family Resource Fair40 Sevier District Transition Fair68 Disability Resource Center (DRC) Outreach The CAP team visited college and university Disability Resource Centers (DRC) around Utah during FY18, including several rurally located campuses, and spoke to DRC staff about the CAP program and common problems we encounter with VR services in higher education, such as delays in receiving tuition and books, and disagreements about employment objectives. We dropped off brochures, had productive conversations with 15 DRC staff members, and made plans for future outreach opportunities including participation in campus-sponsored Disability Awareness Week(s). Campuses visited include: University of Utah, Utah State University, Brigham Young University, Salt Lake Community College, Westminster, Weber State University, Snow College, LDS Business College, Southern Utah University, Dixie State College, Ogden-Weber ATC, Davis ATC, and USU extension campuses in Price and Blanding, UT. Independent Living Center (ILC) Outreach The CAP team visited all six of Utah’s independent living centers (ILC) during FY18 in an effort to develop working
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
19
0
0
8794
18
598
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
Radio/TV Appearances (19) The DLC sponsored Bottom Dollars film screening received most of our employment-directed press this year. DLC attorney, Amberly Datillo was interviewed on radio KRCL Radioactive where she discussed issues surrounding sub-minimum wage issues. https://soundcloud.com/user-45260846/radioactive-may-16-2018 <p><p>PSA/Videos Aired about CAP (0) <p><p>Website Mentions The Disability Law Center&rsquo;s (DLC) website was mentioned by a number of external web sources throughout the year, covering a variety of disability rights-related topics. Sources that mentioned the DLC include: Utah Independent Living Center, utahfairhousing.org, Utah State Office of Rehabilitation, 1800wheelchair.com, 211 Utah, Ability Indiana, KUTV.org, Utah Parent Center, Salt Lake Legal Defenders, utahautismregistry.org, and many others. <p><p>Website hits (47,236) Employment page views (739- 598 unique views) <p><p>Online Training Webinars and YouTube Videos The Disability Law Center produced three online tutorials and published five presentations from our Successful Strategies for Integration symposium: Home Cooking https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8UM8Nc9Q5Q Impact of Work on Social Security Benefits https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9f52HJiSeU&t=15s My Voice Counts https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCTnTJ6oxHs&t=248s Best Practices in Residential Settings: How to Avoid Barriers and Pitfalls to Inclusion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RmP-q1O9bvE&t=6s Closing Session: Coordination of Services to Support Competitive Integrated Employment https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRAvy39zisM&t=10s Keynote Address https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8pmDcSZJqA&t=3s Opening Session: Olmstead and the Promise of the Home and Community Based Settings Rule https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7knZFYz2oQ&t=4s Best Practices in Non-Residential Settings: How to Avoid Barriers and Pitfalls to Inclusion https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SogvRbE41xI&t=2s <p><p>Facebook Throughout the year, the DLC posted 35 employment-related articles on Facebook. Through these posts, we reached 16,188 readers with information about DLC advocacy services, employment-related disability discrimination settlements from around the country, articles about subminimum wage and sheltered workshops, and more. <p><p>CAP Brochures Approximately 8,794 CAP brochures were distributed to the disability and service provider communities during presentations, trainings, and outreach efforts. 449 brochures were distributed to attendees during our training events. 1,345 brochures were shared during outreach events and efforts. 7,000 brochures were given to VR offices to include with their orientation packets, applications, and for counselors to utilize during any part of the VR process with clients. <p><p>Other External Media Coverage DLC Law Clerk, Katie Cox, wrote and published an article on the SJ Quinney School of Law website called &ldquo;Working the Accommodation Puzzle: A Year in the Life of
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
15
51
66
2
10
B. Problem areas
13
7
41
0
0
1
0
4
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
17
0
35
0
2
0
54
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
28
15
5
1
0
5
2
0
0
0
0
2
Withdrew because individual wouldn't cooperate. <P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
13
0
2
1
10
12
2
6
3
9
-Requesting information -Assistive technology provided to client by independent living center -Individual seeking assistance did not return release (3) -Unable to contact individual seeking assistance (4) <P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
3
9
21
28
5
66
B. Gender
26
40
66
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
10
0
0
3
0
47
0
6
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
1
1
0
0
0
0
6
0
2
4
0
0
5
3
0
0
0
0
0
2
20
0
1
2
3
11
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
66
E. Types of Individuals Served
9
0
53
1
2
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
6
Association of People Supporting Employment-First (APSE) APSE is an organization of people who support Employment-First to facilitate the full inclusion of people with disabilities in the workplace and community. Nationally, APSE advocates for policies and practices promoting Employment-First. Utah&rsquo;s chapter of APSE was recently revived after a several year lapse and meets monthly to share information and set goals for Employment-First in Utah. The CAP team became involved with the chapter during FY18, attending four scheduled meetings and a reverse career fair for people with disabilities sponsored by APSE. Many members of APSE are service providers who work with VR and we hope to increase our understanding of challenges they face in providing services to VR clients. State Rehab Council During this past year, the CAP team attended monthly SRC meetings to provide a voice of advocacy while Utah&rsquo;s VR program adjusts and adapts to major changes in service delivery including the current Order of Selection waitlist and recent department move from the State Office of Education to the Department of Workforce Services (DWS). We provided leadership and expertise on issues related to case service delivery of VR services to applicants and clients. Following a CAP case that revealed the need for VR policy to be changed, we advocated for VR to update their financial needs assessment and exclude ABLE account balances from being counted against clients and applicants when determining their financial contribution towards VR services. This effort was met with full agreement by the SRC council. We also advocated for the agency to hire more benefits planners to meet the needs of beneficiaries wanting to return to work. We also provided input on VR&rsquo;s consumer needs survey and advocated for changes to be made for the survey to be more accessible and readable for clients and applicants with more significant disabilities. Department of Workforce Services (DWS) Advocates Meeting The DWS Advocates meetings were held on a quarterly basis throughout FY18. This meeting gathers partner agencies to meet with DWS staff and discuss common concerns, agency updates, and changes to services. Utah&rsquo;s VR agency has recently moved under DWS. These meetings allow the DLC to get the latest information from DWS that may impact people with disabilities as they seek services to become employed or to obtain general assistance, food stamps, or other DWS programs and services. DLC staff on the CAP team attended three quarterly meetings during FY18. The DLC was provided with up-to-date information about the new Medicaid expansion program and difficulties DWS has faced in enrolling eligible individuals. We provided feedback on ideas to overcome those obstacles. Utah Parent Center (UPC) Board The DLC served on the Utah Parent Center (UPC) Board during FY18. We provided leadership and expertise on various UPC agenda items, including assisting the center with goal
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Law Center
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
Full-time professional: 1.53 Part-time professional: 0.09 Full-time clerical: 0.15 Part-time clerical: 0.09 Total: 1.86 <p><p>The numbers above represent time spent on CAP by our supervising attorney, a full-time advocate, a part-time advocate, law clerks, support staff, three intake/information & referral advocates and various contributions from other staff throughout the year. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
Emerging Trend: Issues with informed choice in selecting an employment goal that will require higher education. <p><p>Client is 22 and has ADHD, autism, mental illness and a learning disability. Client came to CAP after VR had begun closing her case for successful employment. Client was working in concessions at a planetarium but is interested in becoming a paleontologist. In the past VR had supported her in pursuing a degree in geology but withdrew support after client&rsquo;s GPA fell below a 3.0 one semester-although the school only requires a 2.5 GPA. Client continued to attend school on her own, however, and has since consistently performed well. Client obtained her job at the planetarium in hopes of gaining employment experience, but after she was hired VR changed her employment goal from geologist to retail floor associate. When client came to CAP she said she was not told what changing her employment goal and signing a new IPE meant, only that it would allow her to get a job coach to learn her job at the planetarium. Because client was still interested in pursuing geology and receiving VR support, CAP advocated for client&rsquo;s employment goal to be changed back and support for a bachelor&rsquo;s degree in geology reinstated. CAP expressed concern about the manner in which client&rsquo;s IPE was changed and participated in developing a new IPE which will allow client to work towards her goal with reasonable expectations, including maintaining a GPA consistent with the requirements of her program. <p><p>Client is 60 and has mental illness. Client called CAP because she believed that VR had denied support for her desired employment goal of paralegal and the training that would be required. CAP learned that client&rsquo;s VR counselor had not officially denied support for this goal, but was pressuring client to utilize the training she received ten years ago to be a pharmacy technician in order to prevent the need for retraining. Client no longer wanted to be a pharmacy technician and also felt it would aggravate her disability, as she was very worried about &ldquo;messing up and killing someone.&rdquo; CAP advocated that VR should continue exploring client&rsquo;s desired objective of paralegal with her. After repeated delays from client&rsquo;s counselor and difficulty establishing what evidence client would need to provide to have her request evaluated, CAP appealed to the district director level. Client was given a clear list of items she would need to complete with her counselor to have her desired employment goal evaluated. CAP shared concerns with the district director about the delays client had already experienced working with VR, as well as the hesitancy of client&rsquo;s counselor to support a goal requiring further education and the district director agreed to remain involved in the case. <p><p>Client is 30 and is deaf. Client came to CAP after asking VR to support him in obtaining his master&rsquo;s degree in ASL. Client w
Certification
Approved
ADINA ZAHRADNIKOVA
Executive Director
2018-12-10
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