RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1020

Puerto Rico
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RIC
PO BOX 41309
San Juan, PR
San Juan
PR
00949
http://www.dpi.pr.gov
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTO RIC
PO BOX 41309
San Juan, PR
San Juan
00949
Puerto Rico
jcollazo@dpi.pr.gov
http://www.dpi.pr.gov
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
Additional Information
{Empty}
Carmen J Collazo
(787) 725-2333
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
505
80
0
103
1104
527
2319
B. Training Activities
52
1278
<p>CAP staff provided trainings in different schools, universities, public and private agencies, to instruct about state and federal laws, including the Rehabilitation Act, and the program services in Puerto Rico and the States. The Rehabilitation Act protects the rights of applicants and clients who receive services from the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration and the Client Assistant program (CAP), established in section 93-112, as amended. Some of the organizations, high school, vocational schools, universities and technical institutes that received trainings are mentioned below:</p><p><p>1) Universidad Carlos Albizu</p><p><p>2) Universidad del Este</p><p><p>3) Pontificia Universidad Cat&oacute;lica</p><p><p>4) Colegio Universitario Nacional</p><p><p>5) Universidad de Puerto Rico</p><p><p>6) Escuela Superior Trina Padilla de Sanz</p><p><p>7) Escuela Superior Dr. Santiago Veve Calzada</p><p><p>8) Escuela Theodore Roosevelt</p><p><p>9) Centro de Actividades Villa Pesquera</p><p><p>10) Instituto de Banca y Comercio</p><p><p>11) Colegio Educativo Tecnol&oacute;gico e Industrial ( <a>CETI)</a></p><p><p>12) Programa de Empleo Sostenido (PESOS)</p><p><p>13) Colegio Comunitario de Humacao</p><p><p>14) Universidad Interamericana</p><p><p>15) Centro de Acci&oacute;n Social de Puerto Rico</p><p><p>16) Centro de Ayuda y Terapia al Ni&ntilde;o con Impedimento (AYANI)</p><p><p>17) Municipio de Caguas</p><p><p>18) Municipio de Gurabo</p><p><p>19) Municipio de Can&oacute;vanas</p><p><p>20) Municipio de Las Piedras</p><p><p>21) Municipio de Camuy</p><p><p>During these activities CAP disseminated information and educational material about the program services, and other topics related to the Rehabilitation Act, and the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration. The trainings provided were as follow:</p><p><p>1. Client Assistance Program: services, population (individuals) served, VR applicants and consumers, Program jurisdiction.</p><p><p>2. Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended: Section 112 an all related topics</p><p><p>3. Rights and Responsibilities of Vocational Rehabilitation consumers</p><p><p>4. Individualized Plan for Employment</p><p><p>5. Who and How can Access Vocational Rehabilitation services?</p><p><p>6. How to request Technological Assistance Services?</p><p><p>7. Transition to post-secondary education</p><p><p>8. Job Promotion</p><p><p>9. Reasonable Accommodation for college students</p><p><p>10. Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)</p><p><p>11. State Rehabilitation Council</p><p><p>Also, CAP provided orientation to clients of the Independent Living Centers, and community rehabilitation programs, and service providers, which are subsidized through funds that belong to the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (VRA), and entities that served people with disabilities and their relatives. These are some of the organizations that collaborated with individuals with disabilities and their families: Movimiento para el Alcance de Vida Independiente (MAVI).</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p><b>1. Collaboration with the P&amp;A</b>:CAP staff participated in conferences and trainings of the Protection and Advocacy System of Puerto Rico (PR P&amp;A) across the island. The program coordinated, provided conferences and disseminated educational material about CAP program and P&amp;A services to individuals with disabilities and their families. Also, CAP staff offered workshops about federal and state laws, and equal treatment toward persons with disabilities. The outreach efforts were made throughout the Island due to the situation generated, after the pass of Hurricane Maria, in the populations of people with disabilities, elderly and bedridden, especially in rural areas due to the difficulty of the roads. Each home visited was guided on the services of the Federal Programs in Puerto Rico P&amp;A System. The efforts were in collaboration with the American Red Cross, FEMA, USDA Rural Development, Puerto Rico National Guard, Friends of the People Group of the Honorable Senator Jos&eacute; Vargas Vidot and through the Citizen Interaction Committee of the Puerto Rico Police.</p><p><p><b>2. Collaboration with other federal programs</b>:CAP personnel participated in workshops and chats provided by the P&amp;A programs:</p><p><p>&bull; PADD &bull; PATBI &bull; PAIMI &bull; PAIR &bull; HAVA &bull; PAAT &bull; PABSS</p><p><p>The purpose of these collaborative workshops was to reach more individuals with disabilities and orientate them about CAP services and each one of the P&amp;A programs.</p><p><p><b>3. Participation in Service, Health and Employment Fairs</b>: CAP staff participated in <b><u>25</u></b> service, educational and job fairs. On this events <b><u>1,690</u></b> individuals, including persons with disabilities and general public.</p><p><p><a><b>4. </b></a><b>Participation in orientation at Vocational <a>Rehabilitation</a> Administration</b>: CAP staff participated in <b><u>23</u></b> orientation activities in the different offices of the Rehabilitation Vocational around the Island. On this events, <b><u>626</u></b> participants of the VRA clarified doubts and questions and/or requested intervention of the CAP for the solution of their claims.</p><p><p><a><b>5. Dissemination</b></a><b> to the consulates and embassies of Puerto Rico in order to impact a greater number of foreigners who are unaware of the services offered by the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the services it offered by the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration: </b>We achieved a collaborative agreement with the Consul of the Dominican Republic, since this is the largest foreign population in Puerto Rico. An outreach activity will be coordinated to all consulates through the Department of State of Puerto Rico.</p><p><p><b>6. Dissemination of information about CAP </b>The program distributed <b>4,389</b> educational materials in the different activities held around Puerto Rico. The materials and documents distributed were as follow:</p><p><p>&bull; What is CAP?, PROGRAM AN
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
2
0
0
3
91
4532
<p>Puerto Rico P&amp;A System (www.dpi.pr.gov) web-page hits 4,532.</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>n/a</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
71
12
83
3
59
B. Problem areas
0
0
35
12
0
30
1
3
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
7
15
2
0
0
0
24
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
12
2
6
0
0
1
0
0
3
0
0
0
<p>Renal Disease</p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
11
0
1
2
8
0
0
0
2
0
<p>n / A</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
8
29
29
16
1
83
B. Gender
45
38
83
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
0
0
0
0
83
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
4
0
1
0
1
0
0
2
4
1
0
4
3
6
0
5
0
4
3
12
1
2
2
1
11
0
3
0
11
1
0
0
1
83
E. Types of Individuals Served
12
0
74
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
<p>n/a</p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>n/a</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Office of the Ombudsman for Persons with Disabilities
No
n/a
B. Staff Employed
<p><b>A.PERSONNEL: </b></p><p><p>All the employees holding the positions listed here are P&amp;A employees who work under fixed hourly rate salary arrangements. Their respective wages are all in compliance with the federal minimum wage provisions contained in the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). They also receive all benefits allowed by applicable federal and state law.</p><p><p>(1) Program Coordinator:</p><p><p>The <b>Program Coordinator</b>, under the general supervision of the Executive Director of the P&amp;A, is responsible of the planning, direction, coordination, monitoring and evaluation of the works and activities of the Program, provide guidance, advise, legal and programmatic counseling in the service area according to the federal program CAP.</p><p><p>The <b>Program Coordinator </b>also coordinate, offer and attend talks, conferences or workshops related to the Program, either held at Puerto Rico or outside the Island, coordinate and conduct studies, investigations, inspections or monitoring test, intercede or mediate in situations where non-compliance with the service is observed, provide technical assistance to the employees under supervision or to the service agencies; develop written materials about the Program, supervises the intercessors of Persons with Disabilities, as well as secretarial employees assigned to the Program.</p><p><p>The <b>Program Coordinator </b>also prepare the reports required by the Program, as well as letters, progress reports and related assessments; monitor the cases handled by the Program; develop reports and inventories of cases and; participate in administrative hearings in coordination with the Office of Legal Affairs.</p><p><p>(2) Advocate:</p><p><p>The <b>Advocate</b> is an employee knowledgeable of the laws implemented by the P&amp;A, as well as with state and federal laws and regulations related to the rights of the persons with disabilities, including the American with Disabilities Act. Under the supervision of the Program Coordinator, Perform office and field work, including receiving and providing counsel to P&amp;A&rsquo;s clients and/or visitor as well as with other providers of services to persons with disabilities: provide assistance to people seeking information about services, programs and benefits available to persons with disabilities.</p><p><p>The <b>Advocate </b>also perform investigations, inspections and visits to public and/or private entities or entities or individuals, including those providing services to persons with disabilities, about incidents, situations and/or acts that may affect the rights and benefits of such population, recommend specific actions, according to the outcome of his/her investigations; collect and file information, data and pertinent documents regarding his/her investigations; prepare and submit reports about the investigations performed and of the cases.</p><p><p>The <b>Advocate </b>coordinate meetings amongst parties; hear their respective points of view; identify and
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>With the intervention of CAP, a 32 years old lady who Works for the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) and who resides in the municipality of Cayey, achieved obtained a positive response for her claim within the framework of the Rehabilitation Law and fulfilling what is proposed in the Individualized Plan for Employment (PIPE).</p><p><p>This client understood that her rights were violated. She expressed been a RSA client since 2002, when she was evaluated in Atlanta, GA to drive motor vehicules. At that time it was determined that she has the capacity to drive a modified and adapted unit according to her needs.</p><p><p>The client expressed that the RSA Central Advisory Committee approved the modification of the vehicle once the client purchased the same, in this way the RSA would issue the payment that guarantees the adaptation. The CAP notifies the case to the Counselor and request to send us the responsive report. The RSA report received indicated that they had requested the disbursement of the money three months ago to the Department of the Treasury of Puerto Rico for the payment to be made to the supplier who would be making the modification of the motor vehicle.</p><p><p>The CAP offered continuous follow-ups to the client and the RSA Counselor through calls, letters, and e-mails with the purpose of achieving the recommended disbursement to resolve the case in favor of the client. It was not until February 2018 that the modification was finally achieved. It should also be noted that the client was able to receive driving classes in Puerto Rico, coordinated by the RSA through the &quot;Freedom and Mobility&quot; Company. Once the entire process of modifying the vehicle was completed, it was delivered to the consumer, and a driver's license was issued in her name.</p><p><p>Regarding the physical barriers, <b>6 </b>site inspections were made at <a>the</a> Appraisal and Adjustment Centers of Arecibo, San Germ&aacute;n, R&iacute;o Piedras, Toa Baja and Caguas. In addition, a site inspection was made to the office of the Administration of Vocational Rehabilitation in Ponce. This activity was contemplated within the Objectives and Priorities of the Client Assistance Program, Fiscal Year 2018.</p><p><p>We want to mention that the findings of these inspections is worrying, that due to Hurricane Maria, many facilities of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration were affected and this situation was beyond human control. In the Work Plan of the CAP Fiscal Year 2019, we will be following up on them for the benefit of the VRA participants.</p><p>
Certification
Approved
Carmen Janet Collazo
Puerto Rico's P&A System Executive Director
2018-12-30
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 16 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0528. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.