RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1018

Oregon
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights Oregon
511 SW 10th Ave Suite 200
{Empty}
Portland
OR
97207
http://droregon.org/
{Empty}
(800) 452-1695
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights Oregon
511 SW 10th Ave Suite 200
{Empty}
Portland
97207
{Empty}
welcome@droregon.org
http://droregon.org/
{Empty}
(800) 452-1695
{Empty}
Additional Information
Ted Wenk
Jamie Jones
(503) 243-2081
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
6
0
0
1
2
35
44
B. Training Activities
11
30
1)CAP staff gave a classroom lecture to Western Oregon University rehabilitation graduate students. The topics included the role of CAP, the Protection & Advocacy system in terms of services provision and the purposes of WIOA. 2)CAP staff presented a program to counselors with the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) section of the Oregon Commission for the Blind on Reasonable Accommodations and the interactive process under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The purpose of the training was to educate OCB VR counselors to better serve clients who face discrimination issues in employment, or who need to engage in the interactive process while employed in order to secure accommodations in employment. 3)CAP attended the Pacific Northwest Employment Forum, sponsored by the Association of Professionals for Supported Employment. CAP participated in a panel on the subject of job coaching and reasonable accommodations - specifically, how job coaching can be a reasonable accommodation in employment under Title I. The audience for the presentation was primarily VR counselors, job developers, job coaches, and other employment support staff. The purpose of the panel was to educate this audience on the right of their clients, largely Voc Rehab clients, to access job coaching in employment. <P><p>
C. Agency Outreach
CAP staff attended a youth transition fair in a rural Oregon county, where a high percentage of attendees were Latinx. CAP staff were able to provide information about VR services in a rural Oregon County and information about employment and employment accommodations. DRO also met with several local advocates serving communities of color whose work focuses on ensuring qualified individuals apply and receive appropriate SSI services. DRO urged this agencies to refer any potential callers to DRO for assistance. <p><p>CAP staff also attended a healthcare conference in Portland focused on healthcare for LGBTQ communities. Many of the organizations and individuals present were from trans and HIV+ communities. CAP was able to distribute brochures and talk about the services we provide to VR and ILR clients. <p><p>Throughout FY2017, DRO collaborated with Padres en Accion on more than 30 rights in special education (SPED) outreach and training activities, most conducted in Spanish. The primary audience for these outreach and training activities were Latino, Spanish-speaking parents of children with disabilities. As a result of this outreach, CAP staff has given recommendation to VR regarding the shortage of bilingual job developers and the need to expand the range of CRP&rsquo;s who have bilingual staff. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
29
0
0
1082
9
3
1) Email to DRO listerv regarding CAP and Job Coaching, with an email open rate of 32% 2) 3 infographics created 3) 27 blog posts authored 4) 56 listerv emails sent to DRO email list <P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
- Mentioned in 83 Newspaper and Digital Outlets - Facilitated 9 separate coffees between DRO staff and individual journalists - Secured meeting w/ Oregonian editor & DRO staff on writing about people w/ disabilities - Helped secure Oregonian editorial board meeting w/ staff member and director - Media relations work helped lead to 5 favorable editorials on our issues - Worked with staff/external messengers to edit/pitch 9 op-eds published in newspapers - Worked with staff/Board to edit/pitch 7 letters to the editor published in newspapers - Worked with board member on authoring letter to the editor that was published in The Oregonian - Helped secure Think Out Loud coverage of our issues/staff appearance 5 times - Unexpected messengers: Worked with business owner to author op-ed on disability employment published in Portland Business Journal - Nat&rsquo;l coverage: worked with advocate to draft op-ed published in Washington Post and reprinted in The Oregonian <P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
21
18
39
39
21
B. Problem areas
1
8
18
2
0
10
1
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
0
1
13
0
1
3
18
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
7
4
0
0
0
2
1
0
3
0
1
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
1
0
3
0
3
2
2
0
1
6
2 - loss to follow up 1 - CAP withdrew 1 - Client withdrew 1 - Individual maintained employment 1 - Unsuccessful attempt to implement the IPE that client desired through the fair hearing process <P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
2
10
24
3
39
B. Gender
24
15
39
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
1
1
1
0
15
1
19
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
1
0
0
0
2
1
2
0
3
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
16
0
0
0
1
4
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
39
E. Types of Individuals Served
8
0
30
0
0
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
2
CAP reviewed and provided recommendations and input regarding the following VR policies which ensured and enhanced client rights: <p><p>CAP held an interactive presentation session with VR staff, which addressed systemic misunderstanding by VR staff as to the role of CAP as client advocate. This session helped address reluctance of VR staff to cooperate with CAP in provision of timely file information and with individual representation at the informal level of e-mail exchange and phone conferences. CAP is thereby empowered to bring solutions of client issues which comply with state and federal regulation. VR has amended its practice of requiring CAP to address all levels of dispute resolution directly to and through administrative level quality assurance VR staff. CAP is able to address most matters more promptly by having informal discussion with VR counselors and local branch managers. This helps speed up resolution time and results in a less stressful process for many VR clients who engage CAP services. <p><p>CAP submitted formal written public comment on state administrative rule changes which would impact the timeliness of processing individual application for services; comment on rules which cause barriers for tribal members from providing tribal identification towards eligibility and rules which were overbroad and not clearly defined as to what constitutes pre-approved services and pre-existing debt. VR is re-drafting these rule proposals. CAP also provided input and comment on rules pertaining to vehicle purchase and modification, supported employment assessment and CRP service rates, repossession policy, due process forms, stabilization determination, WIOA 511 implementation, and confidentiality and privacy assurances. VR adopted most CAP recommendations, thereby ensuring client informed choice and person-centered services. VR&rsquo;s practice and policy of requiring a signed written application as available only after orientation and a wait for assignment to and meeting with a VR counselor is thereby foregone allowing for more prompt processing of client application for services. VR&rsquo;s attempt to eliminate all vehicle purchases is withdrawn. Barriers for tribal members to apply for services are reduced. The clarified job stabilization determination allows clients to have a uniform measurement under which they can then qualify for on-going supported employment services. WIOA 511 implementation policy and practice now more accurately and consistently communicates with students about the availability of VR services, resulting in more individuals seeking VR services while they are transition age. Confidentiality and privacy assurances help give confidence to clients that their data will be handled appropriately. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
N/A <P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights Oregon
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
During FY2018, eight (8) individuals (1 Intake Advocate, 3 Attorneys, 1 Communications Specialist, 1 Administrative Assistant, 1 Chief Financial Officer, and 1 Director of Operations) spent part of their time on CAP activities. Total FTE for CAP-related activities totaled FTE 0.951. <p><p>All 8 positions were filled for the entire year, so there are 8 person-years during FY 2018. They were not full-time on the CAP program and charged to the Grant part-time. There are no Part-Time employees on this program. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
1) The client contacted Disability Rights Oregon (DRO) in February of 2018 because their VR counselor had refused to approve car repairs needed in order to meet emissions requirements for the car to be &ldquo;legal&rdquo; on the road. The client needed to use the car to access an employment program through which they was earning wages. The client&rsquo;s VR counselor informed the client that, in lieu of repairs, they could instead provide a monthly paratransit pass. <p><p>The client had many reasons why paratransit was not an appropriate option. With a car, the client could both work and travel to the grocery store and other places needed for activities of daily living. Because of the increased time that trips take on paratransit, both working and accessing those activities would have been impossible for the client without their own vehicle. <p><p>Shortly after CAP was contacted, on February 12, 2018, DRO filed a hearing request on the client&rsquo;s behalf in order to protect the client&rsquo;s hearing rights on the issue of the requested car repair. On February 23, CAP arranged a meeting between the client and local branch managers in order to explain to VR why the car repairs were the cheapest available means of providing the client with effective transit to work, and why paratransit was not an effective alternative. Following this meeting, VR agreed to pay for the requested repairs in order to make the client&rsquo;s vehicle &ldquo;street legal,&rdquo; and CAP withdrew the hearing request on March 14, 2018. <p><p>Client was able to continue employment while driving their own vehicle. In May, the client&rsquo;s VR file was closed as &ldquo;successfully employed,&rdquo; and CAP informed the client of their right to post-employment services. <p><p>2) When contacting CAP, the client was employed and seeking post-employment VR services to help with accommodations needed to maintain employment. The client had created a plan for post-employment services with a VR counselor in July of 2017. However, the client was unable to reach the counselor following the creation of the plan, and the services were not delivered. At the time the client contacted CAP in October of 2017, the client was at risk of losing their job because VR had not provided the services needed to maintain it. <p><p>After receiving the information from the client, CAP contacted the local branch manager to ask why the services had not been provided. The branch manager confirmed that the client&rsquo;s counselor had gone out on leave and many of the items had never been ordered. The branch manager then agreed to contact the counselor to ensure that this occurred. <p><p>Shortly afterwards, the client&rsquo;s existing counselor resigned. CAP followed up with the branch manager to ensure that the client was quickly assigned a new counselor who could follow through on the requested post-employment services and the items needed. CAP also intervened to make sure that client wasn&rsquo;t
Certification
Approved
Disability Rights Oregon
Robert C. Joondeph
2018-12-11
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