RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1002

Idaho
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
DisAbility Rights Idaho, Inc.
4477 Emerald Street
Suite B-100
Boise
ID
83706-2066
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(866) 262-3462
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Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
DisAbility Rights Idaho, Inc.
4477 Emerald Street
Suite B-100
Boise
83706
Idaho
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(866) 262-3462
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Additional Information
Dina M. Flores-Brewer
Dina M. Flores-Brewer
(208) 336-5353
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
1
1
0
0
0
1
3
B. Training Activities
22
254
<p>Tools for Life Transition Conference:</p><p><p>Hot Topics in Employment Law: Training covered most recent issues and changes to the law regarding employment, including Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504, Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, as well as various state and federal labor laws. Attendees were primarily high school students/transition age youth, parents, providers and teachers. Approximately 4 Native, Latinx and Asian attendees; the rest were Caucasian.</p><p><p>Supported Decision Making: Training was provided to 8 parents and teachers, and 3 students (2 attendees were Native American). Topics included rights in guardianship proceedings, description of the supported decisionmaking process as an alternative to guardianship, and recent changes to guardianship laws. Valuable discussion that more training is needed, as guardianship is the only option given to transition teachers to give to parents.</p><p><p>Transition Planning - It's a Team Sport: Information was provided to 3 students and 5 parents/providers regarding transition planning in Individuallized Education Plans, its importance, the student's role, and the role of others on the IEP team. Focus was put on the importance of students advocating for their own transition plan development.</p><p><p>Self-Advocacy - Making Your Dreams Come True!: Training on self advocacy, explaining what it means to be a self-advocate, providing information on self-advocacy skills and skill development, and providing examples for decision making opportunities to increase independence. Opportunity was provided for students to practice their new self advocacy skills. 20 students and 4 parents/staff attended.</p><p><p>Turning 18! - Rights and Choices: Information was provided on the rights and responsbilities for transition age youth when they turn 18. Legal information such as rights as an adult, voting, adult planning, and other topics were discussed with 4 parents and staff.</p><p><p>Training for Challenger Little League Moms: Information on transition planning and alternatives to guardianship was provided to 6 mothers from a local little league team for transition age youth with disabilities, ages 16-25. Attendees were mothers of youth on the same team as the CAP Director's son, and asked for information on what options for education and employment existed for their children, what were their options to assist/protect their children transitioning to adulthood, and alternatives to guardianship.</p><p><p>Cultural Competency and Service Disparities to the Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities and 10 guests: CAP Director provided training on cultural competency and disparities in services to Spanish speakers in Idaho at the April meeting of the Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities. In attendance were approximately 20 DD Council members, and 10 guests from different agencies and the Idaho Legislature. Information was provided on basic cultural competency, why
C. Agency Outreach
<p>CAP increased outreach to underserved and un-served communities in Fiscal Year 2018:</p><p><p>- Outreach to Native American communities: CAP conducted 5 outreach activities with Idaho's Native American Tribes - 3 visits to the Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation Programs at the Nez Perce, Coeur d'Alene, and Shoshone-Bannock Reservations, and providing information about the P&amp;A and CAP at the Compassionate Communities Conference in November of 2017 at Boise State University. Over 200 attendees attended the conference, and over half were people from Refugee, Native American, Latinx, African-American and LGBTQ communities.</p><p><p>- Outreach to Latinx communities: In additional to the Compassionate Communities Conference, the P&amp;A and CAP provided outreach at the We Choose All of Us quarterly convenings. In attendance were leaders in the Latinx community, with some family members of people with disabilities and transition age youth. The CAP Director also participated in a Diversity Project by Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competence as part of its Leadership Institute for Cultural Diversity and Cultural and Linguistic Competence. As part of this project, the CAP Director met with members of the Latinx community, providing information about CAP and the P&amp;A, and ultimately developed 4 videos (in English and Spanish) about the importance of addressing disparities in services to the Spanish speaking community in Idaho.</p><p><p>-Transition Age Youth: The P&amp;A/CAP conducted several presentations and outreach at the 2018 Tools for Life Transition Fair in Pocatello, ID in March 2018. Approximately 270 high school and college students, parents, professionals, and others attended the event. In addition to Tools for Life, the P&amp;A/CAP also provided outreach to high school and college students (the majority were students of color, Native American and low income students from rural Idaho) during multiple Love the Law! events sponsored by the Diversity Section of the State Bar. This program encourages disenfranchised students to consider entering the legal field as a career option, and provides opportunities for scholarship, mentoring and assistance with test preparation. Additional outreach was conducted at 7 transiton fairs at high schools in the Treasure Valley, Pocatello and Blackfoot areas.</p><p><p>-Outreach to sheltered workshops: The P&amp;A/CAP provided outreach to several 14c/sheltered workshops in northern Idaho. CAP advocates visited Tri-Co and Opportunities Unlimited, providing information to 15 consumers and multiple staff on employment supports available to consumers through Vocational Rehabilitation. Information was also provided regarding the P&amp;A and CAP services.</p><p><p>- General outreach activities: CAP participated in several outreach events, including Disability Advocacy Day at the Capitol in Boise (January 2018), Idaho Fair Housing Council Summit (April 2018), State Rehabilitation Council in
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
5
0
4559
22
0
<p>6. Other: There were 21,667 Blog and Facebook hits on the P&amp;A/CAP website, and followers on Twitter.</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>N/A</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
4
32
36
3
7
B. Problem areas
3
6
10
9
0
7
0
2
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
27
0
2
2
0
1
32
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
15
3
1
2
0
9
1
0
1
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
4
3
1
0
6
5
2
5
1
5
<p>No response from client (3)</p><p><p>Complaint filed with IDOL/Wage &amp; Hour Division (1)</p><p><p>Client put VR services on hold due to emerging medical condition (1)</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
1
7
24
4
36
B. Gender
19
17
36
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
3
0
1
0
0
30
3
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
1
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
1
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
9
0
0
0
1
10
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
36
E. Types of Individuals Served
30
0
0
6
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
8
<p>Idaho State Rehabilitation Council: CAP attended the Vocational Rehabilitation inservice program as a member of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). As a member and vice-chair of the SRC, the CAP Director was able to attend the Council for State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation and National Council of State Rehabilitation Councils meetings in Washington, DC in April. The CAP Director was able to bring information back to the SRC regarding new training and orientation materials, information about the evolving role of SRCs, and how to ensure the SRC voice is heard and is an equal partner to Vocational Rehabilitation in WIOA required activities. As a result of the information obtained by CAP, the SRC made plans to have a strategic planning/advanced orientation meeting with a professional facilitator from the Technical Assistance Center, Paul Dziedzack, scheduled for the October 2018 meeting. In addition, CAP as a member of the SRC, was able to provide input regarding proposed changes to Voc Rehab rules regarding extended employment supports, order of selection and others. The SRC also provides input on agency goals, the state plan, work plan and strategic plans for the agency.</p><p><p>Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition: The Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition is made up of multiple agencies involved in the education and employment of transition age youth. The Council is currently revising the Moving On Binder, which provides transition information and training curriculum to transition age youth, to be used hopefully in conjunction with transition goals and acitivities provided by the student's school. The Council also helps organize the annual Tools for Life Transition Fair in partnership with the Idaho Assistive Technology Project, providing workshops and information to transition age students, their parents, school staff and service providers. The group reviews data regarding transition services and post school outcomes for youth, providing input to the State Department of Education, and sharing information from the member agencies on programs, projects, and services for transition age youth.</p><p><p>Tribal 121 Programs: With the renewed focus on cultural and linguistic competency, the P&amp;A and CAP have made significant progress in re-building relationships with the Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation/121 Programs in Idaho. Idaho has 4 Tribes with their own vocational programs, and CAP has successfully provided information and training to 3 of the programs on the Coeur d'Alene, Nez Perce, and Shoshone-Bannock reservations. The 4th Tribal reservation is Duck Valley, home of the Shoshone-Paiute people, which straddles the Idaho-Nevada border. Services and housing are primarily located on the Nevada side, so conversations continue as to which agency is most appropriate to assist. CAP was able to facilitate talks between the Coeur d'Alene and Nez Perce programs, to review policies and update p
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>No litigation this fiscal year. All cases were resolved through lower levels of advocacy. One case was set for hearing, resulting in settlement on the eve of hearing.</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
DisAbility Rights Idaho, Inc.
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>CAP Director/Attorney, Legal Director, Advocacy Supervisor, Senior Advocate (2), Staff Attorney (2), Advocate (3). Type of Position Professional: FTE = 1.27, % of year filled = 99.62%, Person-Years = 1.26 Full-time: FTE = N/A, % of year filled = N/A, Person-Years = N/A Part-time: FTE = 1.27, % of year filled = 99.62%, Person-Years = 1.26 Vacant: FTE = .04, % of year filled = .35%, Person-Years = 0.00 Clerical: FTE = .40, % of year filled = 87.50%, Person-Years = 1.77 Full-time: FTE = N/A, % of year filled = N/A, Person-Years = N/A Part-time: FTE = .40, % of year filled = 87.50%, Person-Years = 1.77 Vacant: FTE = 3.29, % of year filled = 27.43%, Person-Years = .90</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>1. CAP was contacted by 48 year old woman of Asian descent, with multiple disabilities including mental illness, and physical/orthopedic issues. She was receiving services from the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), had an individualized plan for employment (IPE) in place, and was to take classes to support her goal of becoming a peer support specialist at IDVR's suggestion. Required classes were identified and approved. IDVR waited for location before putting the reimbursement services on IPE. The vocational rehabilitation specialist agreed the classes and associated travel costs were necessary for the client and assured client they would be added to IPE. Nonetheless, when opportunity to attend class in Boise 400 miles from client's home, IDVR refused reimbursement based on the fact that the IPE did not have the services added prior to client's attendance. Client was placed in a difficult financial position, as she had put off mortgage payment to attend classes, assuming reimbursement would be forthcoming based on her IDVR specialist's communications with her. CAP unsuccessfully attempted to negotiate with the Regional Manager and Chief of Field Services, who paid for the classes, but continued to deny travel reimbursement for over $1300. CAP agreed to provide legal representation and requested a Fair Hearing, seeking full reimbursement based on IDVR documentation that the VR specialist intended to include payment for the classes and reimbursement for travel expenses in the IPE, but neglected to do so prior to the actual start date of the class. On the eve of hearing, CAP was able to negotiate settlement for nearly full amount (less $100 for child care reimbursement). Client was able to get payment and catch up on her bills. She is now employed in her preferred job as a peer support specialistt, helping other people with disabilities in her community.</p><p><p>2. CAP was contacted by a 40 year old white male with deafness who was seeking assistance with obtaining job development from the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, among several other issues. Client was able to obtain an advanced degree and other assistance through IDVR; however, he was having difficulty locating jobs in his community commensurate with his skills and education level. The local community rehabilitation partner contracted by IDVR for job development was unwilling or unable to pursue employment opportunities beyond entry level employment at minimum wage. The client had already requested a fair hearing prior to contacting CAP, and participated in the hearing pro se. CAP reviewed his IDVR records and agreed there was a gap in services in that the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act required IDVR to help consumers with career attainment, not just basic entry level employment. IDVR had provided the services to the client to obtain his advanced degree and credentials, but failed to ensure its contractees were complying with WIOA
Certification
Approved
Dina M. Flores-Brewer
CAP Director
2018-12-10
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