RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #1000

Hawaii
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER
1132 Bishop Street
Suite 2102
Honolulu
HI
96813
(800) 882-1057
(800) 882-1057
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER
1132 Bishop Street
Suite 2102
Honolulu
96813
Hawaii
(800) 882-1057
(800) 882-1057
Additional Information
Louis Erteschik
Michael Rabanal
(808) 275-4013
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
0
0
0
0
0
112
112
B. Training Activities
14
70
<p>During the past fiscal year, CAP staff saw the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation move into an Order Of Selection (OOS) on October 1 , 2017, which greatly impacted clients applying for services. CAP training of Department of Education staff required for better understanding of OOS as transition teachers need to plan for their students&rsquo; transitioning post high school. CAP training included an overview of OOS, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP&rsquo;s) with Hawaii non-profit providers, and Pre-Employment Training Services (Pre-ETS) under WIOA. Trainings were conducted in small settings at high schools throughout the State.</p><p><p>CAP continued its orientation to new applicants of DVR for a total of 14 trainings with a total of 70 attendees and CAP plans to continue this effort next fiscal year.</p><p><p>It should also be noted that two CAP staff had the opportunity to participate in the annual NDRN/Cap training in Baltimore, Maryland in June.</p><p><p>Our CAP advocate provided training to multiple school transition teachers and the Department of Education (DOE) designated staff responsible for providing transition services in public high schools and charter schools in Hawaii on the required transition process for special education (SPED) and 504 students under FAPE. In addition to the quarterly meetings held in Honolulu, the DOE sponsored a Transition Fair targeted for training teachers and counselors on the Windward side of Oahu, resulting in 17 new attendees from different area schools. They were targeted by DOE because of low training attendance from this geographic area.</p><p><p>CAP trainings were developed in coordination with the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and are now held at quarterly meetings with DOE and DVR.</p><p><p>Attendees include staff from the Center for Disability Studies at the University of Hawaii, the State Council on Developmental Disabilities, the Developmental Disabilities Division of Hawaii&rsquo;s Department of Health, and many community nonprofit providers that contract with DOE and/or DVR. Attendance has grown significantly over the year.</p><p><p>CAP routinely presents at DVR&rsquo;s New Applicant Orientation meetings (for new and returning applicants to DVR). In addition, our advocates conducted CAP orientations to several high schools with both teachers and students in attendance. CAP has increased outreach to middle schools throughout Hawaii to reach younger students (and parents) that should be planning for transition at an earlier age.</p><p><p>CAP routinely attends Hawaii&rsquo;s annual PAC RIM Conference, with 450 attendees this year as well as the annual SPIN conference, with 900 attendees in 2018.</p><p><p>CAP serves as a representative member on the State Rehabilitation Council. CAP plans to continue participation in coordinated trainings with DVR and DOE staff next year and our agenda includes additional topics such as an overview of WIOA and appeal rights for individuals.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>The outreach efforts for CAP were targeted toward the prioritized unserved and underserved communities. These communities include the Micronesians, the Filipinos and the military.</p><p><p>Our outreach efforts promote collaborative relationships built on the agency&rsquo;s familiarity with the cultures, values, and disability-related needs of the prioritized unserved and underserved communities. CAP&rsquo;s approach recognizes that the people who are a part of the prioritized unserved and underserved populations are best served through the most culturally and linguistically appropriate methods for outreach. We prioritize community members who seek to or already receive rehabilitation services provided by or funded through the State of Hawaii's Vocational Rehabilitation and Services to the Blind Division.</p><p><p>The stories shared during an outreach at the Honolulu Community College (HCC) and the Filipino Community Center (FCC) display the eagerness of the younger generation of mostly Filipinos to understand existing CAP services:</p><p><ul><p><li>Of the attendees, approximately 60 people in each event, very few were familiar with CAP or rehabilitation services available for people with disabilities. While events are held frequently at both HCC and FCC, very few are targeted towards applicants and recipients of programs and services authorized by the Rehabilitation Act. Most of these young people said they know someone with a permanent disability and were encouraged to learn that DVR offers training and other preparation so people with disabilities can find a job and go to work. They thanked CAP staff for the work they are doing for our community.</li><p><li>The younger generation of Micronesians who joined the events at the Kapiolani Community College and the Kuhio Park Terrace Housing community expressed a keen interest in disability issues. They asked questions, wrote haikus, and expressed themselves freely through dance. These young people felt relieved, knowing CAP assistance is available to the most vulnerable among them. Later, Event facilitators conveyed to us that the young people who stopped by at the HDRC table and asked questions expressed an increased knowledge of CAP assistance and DVR programs and services available to those eligible in unserved and underserved communities.</li><p></ul><p><p>HDRC also participated in the annual Special Parent Information Network (SPIN) where they staffed a table. Representatives from the military communities stopped by to extend their gratitude as it was the first time they attended this conference, having learned about it at another one of HDRC&rsquo;s presentations. They noted that because of the frequent moving back and forth by military families from one state to another, it is customary for families impacted by disabilities to solely rely on DoD-based services, and ignore state-based assistance, including CAP and DVR services available to them. They told us that HDRC is one of the few state-based non
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
3
0
0
849
9
0
<p>N/A</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<ul><br /><li>Disabled Job Seekers Left in Limbo by Agency's Cash Crunch, Civil Beat, November 2017</li><br /><li>Class Action Settlement Reached for Special Education Students against Department of Education: KHON2.com</li><br /><li>State Settles for $10 million in special-education lawsuit: Hawaii News Now</li><br /></ul><P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
17
32
49
1
20
B. Problem areas
4
5
7
27
0
20
1
3
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
19
4
6
1
0
0
30
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
15
7
1
2
0
3
0
1
1
0
0
0
<p>NA</p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
11
3
5
2
4
4
0
1
0
0
<p>NA</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
22
14
5
7
1
49
B. Gender
19
30
49
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
8
1
3
10
27
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
6
0
0
0
0
10
0
1
0
1
1
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
5
8
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
9
0
0
0
1
49
E. Types of Individuals Served
6
20
0
0
20
2
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
<p>The CAP representative serves as Vice-Chair of the State Rehabilitation Council. CAP made recommendations to DVR for cost-cutting measures to improve DVR&rsquo;s fiscal accountability while under an Order of Selection (OOS) as CAP testified at DVR&rsquo;s OOS public hearing of mismanagement. A Trend Analysis Task Force was formed to study DVR&rsquo;s program income and expenditures and make recommendations. Consequently, an SRC/DVR OOS Mitigation Plan was developed.</p><p><p>This year, CAP and SRC will be continuing to track DVR expenditures and monitoring status of OOS clients through the number of applicants for VR and Most Severely Disabled (Priority 1), Severely Disabled (Priority 2) and Not Severely Disabled (Priority 3).</p><p><p>Additionally, HDRC advocate met with the administrators of the Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) in order to monitor the impact of the Order Of Selection on persons with disabilities who were being served. We found that DVR no longer contracted with two CRPs as another CRP underbid the two. As a result, clients in those two programs were no longer being served, effective September 30, 2018. CAP cases were opened in an effort to determine what assistance DVR would provide and will indicate what will transpire during this fiscal year.</p><p><p>Finally, as a systemic issue, CAP will be monitoring DVR&rsquo;s RSA compliance plan and will monitor updates to DVR&rsquo;s policies and procedures.</p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>Not Applicable</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Hawaii Disability Rights Center
No
Not Applicable
B. Staff Employed
<p>Professional Full-time = 12 1.2</p><p><p>Professional Part-time = 5 .5</p><p><p>Administrative Full-time = 2 .2</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p><b><u>Case Example 1</u></b></p><p><p>CAP served a eighteen year-old male, diagnosed with Schizophrenia and Developmental Delay. Mother is legal guardian (advocate received guardianship court documents forverification). Mother&rsquo;s speaks English as a second language. Mother&rsquo;s complaint was that the Department of Education was refusing to implement School to Work supports for Division of Vocational Rehabilitation services. Client hasn&rsquo;t been attending school for more than a year and been arrested for loitering. Advocate, working with the client&rsquo;s transition teacher and VR Counselor, attended Individualized Educational Program and Individualized Plan for Employment meetings for the client and secured new transition goals and objectives to learn how to fill out a job application, Work Readiness Program, Community-based Instruction, completing a resume, practice job interviews, and to learn how to write out a check. All of the stated supports and services are stated in both his IEP and IPE and client is now making significant gains as a result of CAP advocacy.</p><p><p><b><u>Case Example 2 </u></b></p><p><p>HDRC&rsquo;s CAP was contacted by the parents of a 22 year-old male who had an intellectual disability. He had been receiving work training services through a Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP), but the program contacted the parents that their contract was going to be cut by DVR due to budget cuts caused by the Order Of Selection. Both his Department of Health Case Manager and CRP program Coordinator expressed concerned about what would happen when the program funds were cut. The CAP advocate investigated and determined that another CRP had underbid the client&rsquo;s existing program, but the client&rsquo;s parents were not informed and could not determine where or if their son would transition to the new program. The CAP advocate worked with the new program and the client made a smooth transition, where he continues his work training.</p><p><p><b><u>Case Example 3</u></b></p><p><p>CAP was contacted by the parents of a 22 year old male who was placed on an Order Of Selection (OOS). The CAP advocate determined that the client had actually applied for DVR services prior to the October 1, 2017, beginning of OOS. The assigned CAP advocate determined that his application was submitted in July, when VR Counselors believed was the effective date for OOS. However, VR pushed their OOS effective date to October 1<sup>st</sup>, so the client should have been made eligible. The client was subsequently found eligible and an IPE was completed and signed by the client. Both client and parents were happy with HDRC assistance.</p><p>
Certification
Approved
Louis Erteschik
Executive Director
2018-12-31
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