RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #998

Georgia
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Martin & Jones
123 N. McDonough St.
{Empty}
Decatur
GA
30030
http://www.georgiacap.com
(800) 822-9727
(800) 822-9727
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Martin & Jones
123 N. McDonough St.
{Empty}
Decatur
30030
Georgia
jpage@georgiacap.com
http://www.georgiacap.com
(800) 822-9727
(800) 822-9727
Additional Information
Jennifer M. Page
Jennifer M. Page
(404) 373-2040
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
901
3
0
1
35
940
1880
B. Training Activities
3
150
<p>The CAP representative provided a training on the CAP program. The training took place at the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) quarterly meeting as a part of the official agenda for the SRC members. Others in attendance were Vocational Rehabilitation management and other vocational rehabilitation staff. The training lasted 30 minutes and time for questions and answers lasted around 15 minutes in January 2018 . There was 55 people in attendance for the training that covered topics discussing, advising clients of their rights, solving communication issues, referrals to other agencies, negotiations for services and advocating for clients in need of assistance with vocational rehabilitation.</p><p><p>The CAP representative partnered with a Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Counselor who was presenting on the VR process from the application intake to a successfule closure. CAP was able to discuss topics of how the CAP agency can advocate for clients and that CAP contact information was listed on VR letters and the client handbook, so clients knew of their due process rights. There was 60 attendees of VR counselors, VR managers and vendors and lasted approximately 2 hours with time left for questions and answers of 20 minutes in August 2018.</p><p><p>The CAP training took place during an SRC quarterly training meeting in April 2018. The meeting had 35 in attendance of SRC members and VR support staff that works with the SRC. The topics discussed were they types of CAP issues that were the most prevalent, policy information and since the changes with WIOA had happened, were there more transition clients calling CAP. The training lasted 30 minutes as a part of the SRC agenda and allowed time for questions and answers of 15 minutes.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>The CAP staff attended public hearings on policies that would effect the Inclusive Postsecondary Education Program (IPSE) to evaluate the consensus of the community this program would serve. The Work Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) gave cause that the agency would support this program for the state fiscal year. The strategy for attending these sessions was to gain education on IPSE to be able to share this information with clients who had questions about the program. Transition clients that graduated with a special education diploma have been unserved/underserved, so this program is one I can discuss with clients as an option to gain experience and employment outcomes. CAP distributed CAP brocures and business cards for clients to contact the agency.</p><p><p>CAP staff attended the town hall meetings that Vocational Rehabilitation had after implementing the Sensory Populations category to serve these specialized groups of the blind, low vision, deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind. These communities were able to address their concerns ahead of VR implementing policies that would effect these clients. CAP staff was able to gain insight how to better serve these clients when they contact CAP. CAP contact information was given out in different formats for the sensory disabilities being served by VR. CAP understands that many clients do not have accessibility to contact VR or CAP, so CAP is reaching out more to this unserved/underserved population is by using agencies who work with individuals with disabilities that create large print, braille and technology to better assist clients.</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
75
2
0
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>CAP staff provides brochures to external affairs Vocational Rehabilitation personnel who travels to conferences and exhibits to display on the table for clients who are interested.</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
62
39
101
0
11
B. Problem areas
12
16
76
5
27
6
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
20
14
56
0
0
0
90
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
59
4
17
3
0
6
0
1
0
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
25
3
0
0
37
15
3
7
0
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
1
19
36
40
5
101
B. Gender
52
49
101
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
3
0
3
54
0
40
0
1
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
2
1
2
1
1
4
1
11
4
0
1
7
0
1
1
1
0
2
9
20
0
0
0
12
4
0
1
0
10
2
0
1
2
101
E. Types of Individuals Served
7
0
90
0
0
7
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
<p>CAP did not participate in any non-litigation systemic activities for FFY 2018.</p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>The CAP attorney did not participate in any litigation activities for FFY 2018. CAP clients did not have hearings in FFY 2018.</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-all other private agencies
Martin and Jones
No
none
B. Staff Employed
<p>Number of Person Years- 2 and 1/2 professional and 1/2 clerical</p><p><p>The georgia CAP staff consistes of the Director, Assistant Director, a Counselor/Advocate and a part-time administrative assistant. The Georgia CAP has available legal representation. Jennifer M. Page is the newly appointed CAP Director who has worked for CAP since 2006, but was a vocational rehabilitation before becoming a CAP counselor and will continue to have an active CAP caseload. The Assistant Director, Ashley Carraway, was previously an attorney and litigation manager and carries an active CAP caseload. A new Counselor/Advocate has been hired to begin in 2019.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>Client contacted CAP services because of a delay in graduation from post-secondary. Client believed that WIOA would help with the transition services she required. CAP was able to communicate with VR staff and client was able to graduate and start job placement.</p><p><p>Client was anticipating the service of receiving eyeglasses to move forward with job placement. There was a delay with this service and client called CAP. CAP was able to assist the client with receiving this service and client was able to find employment.</p><p><p>Client was having a lack of communication with his VR office. CAP was able to meet with the client and family to discover the client was job ready. Client requested the case be moved to a smaller area. Client received personal assistance services, which led to the job placement search.</p><p><p>Client wanted CAP to assist with post-secondary after moving from a state supported school to a private one. Client was in the last year of the major in post-secondary. CAP explained how the post-secondary fee schedule works and VR policy when attending a private institution. Client stated she was no aware of this before changing schools. Client insisted on staying at the private institution with less assistance from VR.</p><p><p>Client wanted to attend post-secondary with VR assistance. CAP was able to get all of the documentation from the Client that VR would request. The counselor was able to look at the information and determine the client would be able to attend post-secondary the next semester.</p><p><p>Client needed CAP services to maintain employment. Client stated that VR had been contacted, but the job was in jeopardy. VR had helped him get this position but needed a device to enlarge print because of the chemicals in the facility and it being a safety issue. CAP was able to speak with the counselor who was willing to help with the equipment and a provider to assist with using the device.</p><p><p>CAP was contacted because the client needed a van modification. VR was willing to provide this service after they assisted with job placement. The client needed some evaluations before the process could begin. The client was willing to cooperate with VR to start the process to gain employment.</p><p><p>Client contacted CAP for assistance with VR because the client wanted to work but was unsure how to navigate VR services. CAP explained the types of services VR provided but the client thought Warm Springs would be a good place to go for daily living and job skills. CAP helped establish communication with the counselor who began the process to get the client on the waiting list at Warm Springs.</p><p><p>Client needed CAP services due to a lack of communication and services with VR. CAP scheduled a meeting with the counselor and the supervisor to assist the client. VR was willing to assist the client with an auditory assessment. The client was able to get the other services she needed through PELL and working part-tim
Certification
Approved
Jennifer M. Page
CAP Director
2018-12-14
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