RSA-227 for FY-2018: Submission #994

Arizona
9/30/2018
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Arizona Center for Disability Law
5025 East Washington Street
Suite 202
Phoenix
AZ
85034
(800) 927-2260
(800) 927-2260
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Arizona Center for Disability Law
5025 East Washington Street
Suite 202
Phoenix
85034
{Empty}
(800) 927-2260
(800) 927-2260
Additional Information
John Gutierrez
Michelle Thomas
(602) 274-6287
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
73
6
0
31
19
45
174
B. Training Activities
9
509
<p>1. 10-17-17- Your Rights as an Applicant or Client of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). A. Topics Covered - Vocational Rehabilitation and Client Assistance Program (CAP). B. To educate trainees on ACDL&rsquo;S Services relating to VR and CAP. C. 25 people attended the training.</p><p><p>2.. 11-15-17 - Accessing Your Community. A. Topics Covered - How to file a notice under the new Arizonans with Disabilities Act (AzDA) notification law. B. To educate trainees on AzDA Law and ACDL. C. 40 people attended the training.</p><p><p>3. 11-21-18 - Discussion on the Americans with Disability Act (ADA). A. Topics Covered ADA bills in Arizona and Nationwide. B. To educate trainees on the Americans with Disabilities Act. C. 50 people attended.</p><p><p>4. 12-6-17 - Client Assistance Program. A. Topics Covered - Vocational Rehabilitation and Client Assistance Program. B. To educate people on Arizona Center for Disability Law (ACDL) services including VR and CAP. C. 20 people attended.</p><p><p>5. 2-28-18 - Client Assistance Program. A. Topics Covered - Vocational Rehabilitation and Client Assistance Program. B. To educate people on ACDL services including VR and CAP. C. 12 people attended.</p><p><p>6. 5-19-18 - Your Advocacy Options, How We Can Help. A. Topics Covered Included Disability rights information. B. To educate people on Advocacy and Disability Rights. C. 40 people attended.</p><p><p>7. 7-11-18 - STAT 101. A. Topics Covered - ACDL Services, intake process, common areas of assistance, and resolution methods. B. To educate people on ACDL Services. C. 2 people attended.</p><p><p>8. 7-26-18 - ADA Celebration. A. Topics Covered included - recent legislature developments impacting people with disabilities. B. To educate people about the ADA. C. 110 people attended.</p><p><p>9. 9-8-18 - Strategies for a Successful IEP Meeting. A. Topics Covered included - IDEA and Section 504. B. To educate people on ACDL Services, IDEA, and Sections 504, and transition services. B. To educate people on ACDL services. C. 250 People attended.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>ACDL held the 7<sup>th</sup> annual African American Conference on Disabilities on February 16, 2018. Written materials on the Client Assistance Program, self-advocacy for VR applicants and clients of VR were available to participants. Staff was also available to answer individual questions. The conference had sessions on Title I of the ADA and Transition Services and was attended by over 350 individuals.</p><p><p>ACDL staff attended the Native American Disability Summit in Ganado, Arizona on February 21, 2018. Ganado is located on the Navajo Nation, which is the largest reservation in the country. This was attended by 100 people from this Native American community. Staff provided information about CAP to individuals at this conference.</p><p><p>ACDL staff attended Rays of Hope, the annual Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Conference on May 8, 2018. ACDL staff provided information to attendees regarding the VR services they may be entitled to and information about their rights as a VR client. The Conference also had VR Counselors who specialize with working with clients with traumatic brain injuries. This conference was attended by approximately 200 people.</p><p><p>ACDL staff did a presentation for students with special needs and their families who are members of a service agency known as Pilot Parents. Many of the students plan to apply for VR services to receive transition and other services necessary to reach an employment goal through the VR program. This training is particularly helpful at this time, now that the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) has strengthened VR&rsquo;s requirement to provide transition services to students with disabilities.</p><p><p>ACDL staff provided a presentation at the Latino Disability Summit on September 8, 2018. The Latino Disability Summit is the largest conference of its kind for the Latino community and had over 250 participants this year. ACDL&rsquo;s presentation included information regarding the VR program, what services are available, and how to file appeals if the services are denied.</p><p><p>ACDL has a wide range of publications and guides. These publications and guides are available to people who contact ACDL for assistance. They help with self-advocacy and to educate people who contact ACDL about multiple topics including vocational rehabilitation, employment, and education. Many guides and publications are available in English, Spanish, and Plain Language.</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
2
0
0
2051
8
0
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>N/A</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
42
88
130
7
21
B. Problem areas
2
35
84
4
4
8
2
1
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
98
2
14
3
2
0
119
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
79
31
0
0
1
3
1
1
1
2
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
33
0
5
2
58
2
6
11
1
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
5
18
37
62
8
130
B. Gender
69
61
130
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
24
3
5
17
0
79
2
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
2
0
0
1
3
13
1
7
10
1
4
8
8
1
0
1
1
0
7
35
0
0
3
4
11
0
0
0
5
0
2
0
0
130
E. Types of Individuals Served
4
5
121
1
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
2
<p><u> ACDL Assisted VR with Appeal Form Revisions</u></p><p><p>ACDL staff worked with the VR Policy Manager on revisions to their appeal form. ACDL staff reviewed the updated appeals form and recommended the form be simplified because the form contained too many complex words and legal terms. ACDL suggested using plain language with an accompanying handout so the process and rights are clear. It was also recommended that additional language about the Client Assistance Program be added. The VR Policy Manager accepted ACDL&rsquo;s suggestions and they completed the revisions. The updated appeal form is available and has been distributed.</p><p><p><u> Client of VR who is Deaf Receives Appropriate Accommodations Through ViewFinder</u></p><p><p>A blind client was sent to ViewFinder for an eye evaluation. ViewFinder is an agency contracted by VR. The client informed ViewFinder that she was deaf and needed an interpreter. ViewFinder did not provide the requested interpreter so the client canceled the appointment. The client then made another appointment several months later, and again ViewFinder refused to provide the interpreter. The client was in desperate need for glasses, so this time she kept the appointment. The staff from ViewFinder, attempted to communicate with the client by writing notes and the client did not believe this was an effective way to communicate.</p><p><p>Due to the ineffective communication, the glasses received, were not the correct prescription for her vision. ACDL spoke with the VR supervisor regarding this concern. The VR supervisor stated that they could not do anything because ViewFinder is a state contracted agency, and there is not a clause that they will provide accommodations to specific VR clients.</p><p><p>ACDL wrote a letter to the Arizona&rsquo;s Office of Equal Opportunity. An investigation was conducted and the outcomes were as follows:</p><p><p>1) The State pursued the contract dispute process with the vendor, ViewFinder, through the contract procurement office. ViewFinder has agreed that in the future it will provide American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters for RSA clients who are deaf and use ASL or sign language.</p><p><p>2) The State VR program will modify the form that it uses to make referrals to vendors to identify when a person needs an auxiliary aid or service and make a notation on the revised form at the time of the referral.</p><p><p>3) The State VR system has agreed that, in the future, if a dispute arises between VR and the vendor about whether an auxiliary aid and service is necessary, the state will pay for the auxiliary aid and service and pursue its remedies against the contract provider separately. This will be done to avoid delays in the delivery of services.</p><p><p>In addition, the Office of Equal Opportunity, will improve consistent compliance with accommodations for clients of state VR services, they will be reviewing accommodation requests. Also, they intend to hire an additional ADA coordinator a
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>ACDL does not have any on-going or completed litigation activities involving individual representation during fiscal year 2018.</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Arizona Center for Disability Law
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>CAP - PPR Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2018. Arizona Center for Disability Law (ACDL) attorneys, Chief Executive Officer, J.J. Rico and Legal Director Rose Daly Rooney, provide direct supervision over the CAP program and its staff. Total CAP Attorney time:.13 FTE. CAP Advocates and short term assistance team (STAT) advocates provide assistance to persons with disabilities who are seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation (VR) services as well as individuals who are receiving services from independent living centers or other Rehabilitation Act funded programs. Total CAP Advocate time: 1.14 FTE. Support Staff provides clerical support to the CAP Advocates and Attorneys. Total CAP Support Staff time: .47 FTE Other CAP staff includes the Chief Financial Officer (CFO), Program and Quality Assurance Manager, and Office Manager provide support to the CAP program. The CFO is responsible for budget preparations, day-to-day accounting duties, and the financial reporting requirements for the CAP program. Additionally, the Program and Quality Assurance Manager develops data systems necessary to complete reports for the CAP program, tracks CAP activities, and compiles responses from consumer satisfaction surveys. The Program and Quality Assurance Manager supervises the preparation of the annual CAP Program Performance Report (PPR). ACDL&rsquo;s Office Manager facilitates the distribution of support services and serves as a liaison to coordinate the workload between attorneys/advocates and support staff. Total CAP for other staff time: .07 FTE.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p><u>The Case of DB</u></p><p><p>DB is a 17-year-old transition student with Cerebral Palsy who, was seeking VR&rsquo;s assistance to provide him a driving evaluation to determine if he would be able to drive. DB lives in a rural area where there are no forms of transportation.</p><p><p>VR had instituted a policy stating that they would no longer provide driving evaluations for any clients. ACDL assisted DB with an appeal and advocated on their behalf with VR Administration. ACDL advocated that exceptions must be made to this policy, because there are many clients like DB who need a driving evaluation because of disability related reasons, or the fact that there are no other forms of public transportation because of living in a rural area.</p><p><p>VR Administration reversed the decision of the VR Supervisor and agreed that DB should be provided the driving evaluation. DB did receive a driving evaluation and it was determined that DB could indeed drive. DB is now receiving driving lessons from Driving to Independence, which is being provided through VR.</p><p><p><u>The Case of KN</u></p><p><p>KN is a 48-year-old male, with a visual impairment who was seeking VR&rsquo;s assistance with a Self-Employment Plan. The goal of the self-employment plan is to create web based graphic novels with audio for both the sighted and visually impaired. KN was offering fan art from well-known artists and planned to offer a special class to children called Kids &lsquo;n Komics.</p><p><p>VR denied the plan. ACDL worked with the KN and VR to determine what was needed to make this plan successful and get an approval. KN revised his plan and provided an excellent presentation to VR. VR then approved the plan and agreed to provide him with all the funding he was requesting to start his business. KN is now has his own successful business.</p><p><p><u>The case of EB</u></p><p><p>EB is a 36-year old female with physical and psychiatric disabilities. She had previously been a client of VR and had an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) with an employment goal of becoming a dentist. Due to some medical issues that needed to be addressed, EB&rsquo;s first VR case was closed. By the time she reapplied for VR services, EB had done extensive volunteering at the VA and low-income based dental clinics while improving her functional abilities through medical care, physical therapy and medications. When EB reapplied for services, VR would not approve this same employment goal saying EB could not perform the physical requirements of a dentist. This conclusion was based on VR staff&rsquo;s observations of EB&rsquo;s limited physical abilities and the findings of a Functional Capacity Evaluation conducted by a contracted vendor. EB was not provided a choice of evaluator and believed his results were not correct. EB appealed VR&rsquo;s decision not to support her employment goal of dentistry and requested mediation. ACDL represented EB at mediation where several current refe
Certification
Approved
J.J. Rico
Chief Executive Officer
2018-11-07
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