RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #982

Virginia
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
disAbility Law Center of Virginia
1512 Willow Lawn Drive
Suite 100
Richmond
VA
23230
http://www.dlcv.org
{Empty}
(800) 552-3962
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
disAbility Law Center of Virginia
1512 Willow Lawn Drive
Suite 100
Richmond
23230
{Empty}
info@dlcv.org
http://www.dlcv.org
{Empty}
(800) 552-3962
{Empty}
Additional Information
Colleen Miller
Robert Gray
(804) 225-2042
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
36
4
1
63
28
1772
1904
B. Training Activities
21
1772
Through our Coming of Age Project (COA), dLCV educated students regarding VR Rights and Services. The COA project also provided valuable information on supported decision making, the age 18 redetermination for Social Security Income (SSI) and transition services in an IEP. dLCV provided these educational topics to community groups and advocacy partners when asked. dLCV provided full day conferences on all topics and individual presentations on specific topics in the targeted underserved areas of Charlotte, Appomattox, and Southampton Counties, as well as the Eastern Shore of Virginia. Many who attended the presentations had never heard of dLCV or our services. dLCV reached over 585 individuals through 13 presentations and conferences. <p><p>dLCV presented at 5 advocacy groups and job clubs on the topics of benefits planning, transition services and VR services including an explanation of the Client Assistance Program (CAP). dLCV provided these presentations at the Richmond Disability Resource Fair, Job Club for the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI), Wilson and Workforce and Rehabilitation Center (WWRC), Disability Resource Center in Fredericksburg and at a college program for students from Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU). dLCV trained a combined total of 69 individuals on the above topics. All had an increase in knowledge on the topics. <p><p>dLCV provided 6 trainings throughout the fiscal year in Richmond City, Colonial Heights, Williamsburg, Halifax, and Lynchburg on vocational rehabilitation services in the schools. It was evident throughout the presentations that the students and families needed more information and connectivity with VR services. dLCV offered our services and provided valuable information. <p><p>dLCV provided 1 presentation to Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI) and 1 presentation for Wilson Workforce and Rehabilitation Center during fiscal year 2017. The topic was how to avoid an overpayment and work incentives from the Social Security Administration (SSA). There were a combined total of 95 individuals trained at both presentations. <p><p>dLCV worked with the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) offices in Lynchburg, Franklin, and South Boston to provide presentations on CAP related topics as well. dLCV reached a total of 63 individuals for these presentations. Those who attended the presentations had great questions about dLCV services and CAP. <p><p>dLCV staff met with leaders at multiple 14c worksites to discuss the impact of Section 511 on their programs, how initial counseling had gone, and any emerging issues. dLCV provided information on our Client Assistance Program (CAP) as a support for those seeking VR services and our other programs that also assist employees as they seek competitive employment. dLCV then met with the DARS representative and with the contractor who is providing the employee counseling requi
C. Agency Outreach
Using CAP and other funding as part of a targeted outreach effort to reach underserved areas in the Commonwealth, dLCV selected the rural counties of Charlotte, Southampton, and Appomattox for training and project work. This work is found in Section B. dLCV also provided Office Hours at Centers for Independent Living (CILs), clubhouses, and workforce centers to reach 54 individuals across the state using CAP and other funding streams. dLCV used our volunteer core of over 50 individuals to attend fairs, conferences and other events to reach many across the Commonwealth as well. <p><p>dLCV posted 4 quarterly EEOC hot topic articles in FY 2017. dLCV worked with a volunteer to get a concise summary of each of the articles. Topics included employment &lsquo;reassignment&rsquo; and EEOC guidance about employment rights of individuals with mental health conditions. <p><p>An outreach effort of our COA project involved distributing our COA handbook, a valuable resource book full of information of transition and CAP related topics to ten (10) PRTFs including Berry Robinson Center, Harbor Point Behavioral Health, Newport News Behavioral Health, Cumberland Hospital, Hughes Center, Bridges Treatment Center, Hallmark Youthcare Center, Liberty Point Hospital, and United Methodist Families Services Center. We left a combined total of 25 handbooks at 10 facilities. <p><p>dLCV participated in 6 resource fairs across Virginia. The fairs reached the Arc South of the James, &ldquo;I&rsquo;m Determined&rdquo; conference at James Madison University, a job fair and resource fair at the Kenmore Club, The Diversity and Inclusion Conference in Virginia Beach Virginia and a Senior Resource Fair in Manassas Virginia. We reached 475 parents, students, service providers, community advocates, individuals with disabilities and their families. dLCV was able to utilize volunteers to attend 3 of the fairs on dLCV&rsquo;s behalf. <p><p>dLCV visited 8 office hours sites in FY 17. They included the Endependence Center in Norfolk, Independence Empowerment Center in Manassas, The Kenmore Club in Fredericksburg, Workforce Center in Petersburg, Workforce Center in Richmond, Workforce Center in Fredericksburg, The Virginia House in Goochland, and LASCIL in Lynchburg. dLCV provided information and referral to 54 individuals on a variety of topics including waivers, social security, special education, powers of attorney, accessibility, transition planning, and CAP. dLCV continues close communication with all state DARS and DBVI offices to ensure their clients understand dLCV and the CAP program. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
2
5887
29
{Empty}
dLCV offered two public input surveys during the spring and summer of this fiscal year. The first survey allowed our 218 respondents the opportunity to express which disability advocacy issues they feel are most important. The top three categories chosen: quality mental health care, community access and barrier free environment and government benefits. 42% of our respondents were individuals with disabilities, which is an increase of over 10% from last fiscal year. Agencies and groups we reached included: the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), Virginia Board for People with Disabilities, Arc South of the James, I&rsquo;m Determined in Harrisonburg (sponsored by the Virginia Department of Education), Partnership for People with Disabilities, Department for Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS), three business networking groups and dLCV volunteers. dLCV used this information to develop our FY 18 goals and focus areas. <p><p>The second systemic input survey allowed dLCV to receive targeted input from established disability advocacy agencies who reviewed our dLCV Board adopted FY 18 goals and focus area. Agencies contributing to this effort include Mental Health America of Virginia, Virginia Spinal Association, Formed Families Forward, National Alliance on Mental Illness- Central Virginia, VOCAL, DBHDS Office of Recovery Services, Richmond Behavioral Health Authority, Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Arc of Northern Virginia, Parents of Autistic Children-Northern Va. Chapter, Brain Injury Association of Virginia. dLCV reviewed these suggestions and those of our PAIMI Council and incorporated them into our FY 17 work plan. One specific suggestion we incorporated in our FY 18 work plan is focusing on vocational rehabilitation services for individuals with developmental disabilities. <p><p>dLCV is pleased to report a 97.7% satisfaction rate from the 44 client satisfaction surveys we received across all grants. This satisfaction rate breaks down as 31 respondents who indicated a high level of satisfaction, 12 were satisfied and 1 was unsatisfied. <p><p>dLCV conducted follow-up interviews with 10% of our closed clients for more in depth feedback on our services. 85% percent of clients interviewed reported that they were satisfied with the results they received from our agency. Clients felt dLCV is a valuable resource. One stated, &ldquo;If I had the money, I would open another dLCV office. Thank you guys so much.&rdquo; Another client reported &ldquo;In time of overexerted hopelessness disAbility Law Center of Virginia stepped in.&rdquo; <p><p>dLCV participated on the Virginia State Rehabilitation Council (SRAC) for the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) and the SRAC for the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI), assigning two different CAP disability rights advocates to each position. dLCV will continue collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Cou
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
DARS and DBVI provide information about CAP in their client communication. <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
10
56
66
56
14
B. Problem areas
5
7
46
8
0
7
0
2
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
0
0
31
27
3
0
61
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
40
10
1
2
0
4
0
0
4
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
9
3
0
1
8
19
2
15
3
1
non-responsive <p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
14
15
12
22
3
66
B. Gender
26
40
66
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
0
2
31
0
27
2
2
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
3
1
0
0
0
8
1
6
3
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
1
9
13
0
0
2
3
6
0
0
0
5
1
0
0
1
66
E. Types of Individuals Served
5
4
44
2
10
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
2
dLCV opened an investigation of DARS&rsquo; statewide procedures and practice related to vocational and psychiatric evaluation in order to obtain corrective action to make evaluations fully accessible and timely. <p><p>dLCV initiated communication with DARS to find a solution to this problem after gathering information, listening to our clients&rsquo; experiences and frustrations as they waited months at a time in order to receive assessments and evaluations from DARS. DARS listened. They made this issue a priority and developed a plan to fix it through making changes in their service delivery and operation. <p><p>Because of dLCV&rsquo;s advocacy efforts, and the many strategies DARS has implemented, DARS reports there is now no back log on psychiatric evaluations and the vocational evaluations in FFY17 year to date median time between referral for vocational evaluation to the actual vocational evaluation is 28 days. This is down from median of 39.5 days in FFY16 and the lowest it has been in five years! <p><p>dLCV also participated on the Virginia State Rehabilitation Council for the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired assigning two different disability rights advocates to each of the positions. During our participation on the Councils this past year, we assisted with reviewing the candidates for new hearing officer positions for both DBVI and DARS. dLCV will continue collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Councils in FY 18. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
N/A <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
disAbility Law Center of Virginia
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
dLCV utilized advocates and attorneys and support staff from all units to complete our CAP advocacy in FY 17. <p><p>Six dLCV advocates and attorneys have attended the NDRN CAP training. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
Let Me Learn <p><p>dLCV assisted Kevin, who has an auto-immune disability that prevents him from being around a lot of people. He requested dLCV assist him by advocating for DARS to sponsor his degree through an online education due to his disability. <p><p>dLCV attended a meeting with him and successfully negotiated for DARS to provide a trial semester for this individual with further consideration for completion of his degree. The client&rsquo;s only responsibility is to complete research on how the credits will transfer and what college he wishes to attend for his online degree. Kevin can now pursue a vocational goal that fits his knowledge skills and abilities! <p><p>A New Beginning <p><p>Dorothy is an individual with mental illness and is a client of the Culpeper DARS Office. She and her vocational rehabilitation counselor had poor communication, so she contacted dLCV to request we assist her in re-establishing positive communication with DARS. <p><p>dLCV agreed and brought everyone together to the same table. At the meeting, Dorothy explained she can no longer work in her current hair salon because she is allergic to the chemicals that the salon uses for hair color. She needed DARS assistance to help find a new job in a different salon. <p><p>We discussed the types of salons she would like to work in. DARS offered her a job coach and she was glad to accept. Due to dLCV&rsquo;s advocacy, she will interview the three vendors and select her own vendor to provide the job coaching services. She was excited about this. At closure, the client was very pleased with the direction of her VR case. She thanked dLCV and reflected, I wish this could have happened months ago.&rdquo; <p><p>Working and Driving <p><p>Sherry contacted dLCV to request help negotiating services from DARS. She is a young woman trying to work and learn to drive. dLCV worked hard negotiating over several months and as a result, Sherry received a post-secondary training program and training as well as private transportation to and from the program. She also received supported employment to assist Sherry to find a job, driving training and a review of the Individualized Plan for Employment to ensure appropriate services were included on the IPE so she could pursue her vocational goal. <p><p>Case Open <p><p>Sarah contacted dLCV to request that we assist her in inquiring about the status of her application for services with DBVI. dLCV learned Sarah&rsquo;s application for DBVI services was closed because at the time of the initial application appointment, the client&rsquo;s vision loss was not permanent or severe enough to be eligible for services. In lieu of Sarah&rsquo;s decreased vision, dLCV was able to negotiate for her application for DBVI services be re-opened and for the client to be re-evaluated at the expense of DBVI. Sarah&rsquo;s appointment was scheduled she was reconnected to services. <p><p>Talk to Me <p><p>Marsha contacted dLCV and requested we assist "
Certification
Approved
Colleen Miller
Executive Director
2017-10-19
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 16 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0528. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.