RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #981

Ohio
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights Ohio
200 Civic Center Drive, Suite 300
{Empty}
Columbus
OH
43215
(800) 282-9181
(800) 858-3542
{Empty}
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights Ohio
200 Civic Center Drive, Suite 300
{Empty}
Columbus
43215
{Empty}
{Empty}
(800) 282-9181
(800) 858-3542
{Empty}
Additional Information
Barbara Corner
Michael Kirkman
(614) 466-7264
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
7
0
0
3
1
7
18
B. Training Activities
22
948
(79895) (18 trained) At the 2017 Safety Congress, in collaboration with the Bureau of Worker’s Compensation and the Department of Veterans Affairs, DRO trained potential employers on the myths regarding veterans being dangerous" employees and their obligations to accommodate applicants/employees with disabilities. Emphasis was placed on ideas for accommodating employees with mental health, traumatic brain injury or other invisible disabilities. (79372) (30 trained) DRO provided a two-hour training on special education issues to new legal aid attorneys, as part of a training series provided by the Legal Aid Society of Columbus. Legal Aid serves low-income and underserved clients. (79371) (12 trained) DRO and UCEDD sat on a panel discussion at OSU for a course for students becoming genetic counselors. The discussion included the rights of people with disabilities, and the relationship of the disability community to genetic counselors. (78188) (35 trained) DRO’s Director of Advocacy and one Board member trained federal court staff on how to interact, work with, and provide customer service to people with disabilities who engage with the court system. The training included an overview of legal issues and an interactive presentation on best practices and tips provided by people with disabilities in a film and QA format. (78183) (40 trained) DRO provided a presentation to MSW students at Ohio State University regarding information about DRO, the everyday impact of the ADA, and the need for accountability (77433) (180 trained) DRO gave a presentation at the UC UCEDD Transition Bootcamp on Alternatives to Guardianship and staffed a DRO informational table. Staff provided information to parents, school workers, and service providers about alternatives to guardianship when a youth is about to finish high school and promoted DRO's other advocacy work, too. (80207) (20 trained) DRO provided staff at Community Legal Aid Services with information regarding special education law and how to provide legal advocacy to students to remove barriers to FAPE and transition services. CLAS serves low-income and underserved clients. (80812) (150 trained) At this UCEDD-Cleveland Transition Bootcamp, DRO trained families and transition-age self-advocates about self-determination and alternatives to guardianship. (83252) (25 trained) DRO Provided training to legal aid attorneys in special education advocacy with the goal of increasing the ability of legal service offices to represent families in special education matters. Legal service attorneys represent low income families who are traditionally underrepresented in the legal community. (81303) (13 trained) DRO presented to a group of employment specialists at Columbus Speech & Hearing, discussing employment situations, rights and remedies, and strategies in self-advocacy and employment law. (81437) (15 trained) DRO gave a presentation to law and Master’s in Public Administration students study"
C. Agency Outreach
(77076) (100 reached) DRO, along with the Ohio Developmental Disabilities Council, Services for Independent Living, the Center for Disability Empowerment and the Leadership Conference Education 8and advocacy groups. The event, held at the Xenos Community Fellowship Center, discussed how transportation funding, policy, and public-private partnerships can positively impact local communities and people with disabilities. People with disabilities struggle with the lack of public transportation, especially in rural areas of the state. (78341) (250 reached) DRO participated as a conference sponsor and provided information and resources regarding P&A services as well as materials regarding community integration, employment, and voting. Conference attendees included advocates, self-advocates, policy makers, stakeholders, and consumers. DRO&rsquo;s participation was part of an effort to raise awareness about DRO's community integration efforts with individuals who are in institutions and their advocates. (77816) (2000 reached) DRO provided resources to attendees at the annual OCALICON conference held at the Columbus Ohio Convention Center. Attendees included educators, peer mentors, behavioral specialists, service providers and parents. This conference addresses the needs of students with autism. DRO provided information about assistive technology's role in education, employment, and P&A services. Parents of children with autism struggle to find services, behavioral supports and equity in the educational system. Students with disabilities continue to rank as an underserved population. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
2
0
0
na <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
N/A <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
33
97
130
10
19
B. Problem areas
13
36
79
2
0
3
1
5
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
60
38
5
0
18
2
123
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
46
17
14
6
1
5
3
2
22
0
0
{Empty}
na <p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
81
1
0
1
5
23
3
9
0
31
na <p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
3
18
34
67
8
130
B. Gender
59
71
130
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
1
0
0
27
0
66
2
34
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
3
1
1
0
1
13
1
3
8
0
3
7
3
0
0
0
0
1
9
33
1
2
3
9
15
1
3
0
3
1
0
1
4
130
E. Types of Individuals Served
61
0
68
3
2
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
(77628) At its annual policy briefing, DRO gathered subject matter experts to present on topics relative to the disability community to assist in advocating, testifying regarding services and programs that support/maintain integrated living and employment for PWD. The purpose of the briefing was to discuss the proposed state budget which impacts all people with disabilities as well as the P&A&rsquo;s federal grant related work. (78211) At You&rsquo;ll Move Better in Greater Toledo: Building a Transportation Network for All, DRO provided a presentation to self-advocates, policy makers including state representatives and county commissioners, professionals, disability services providers, and community members and partners about the importance of transportation as an issue for people with disabilities, recent research on the issue, and what DRO and partners are doing to develop advocacy around the issue. <p><p><p><p>
B. Litigation
0
1
0
(1655102) In FY17, DRO continued to press for a resolution in litigation filed in federal court against Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities on behalf of a client, appealing from an unfavorable hearing officer decision to advocate for his right to receive written notice of his appeal rights, and his right to appeal the denial of a counselor change. DRO exchanged initial disclosures and agreed with OOD about a discovery and motion schedule; ultimately, DRO submitted an Initial Settlement Demand to OOD which was rejected, but laid the groundwork for meeting with OOD as part of the Court&rsquo;s Settlement Week. At that mediation on 3/14/17, a volunteer mediator assisted the sides in clarifying their positions, and settlement discussions were productive. Over summer 2017 DRO requested and received additional documentation from OOD as contemplated at the mediation. Following review of that documentation, a further in-person negotiation between the client and OOD took place on 9/14/17, and the parties reached an agreement in principle on a settlement. In that settlement, OOD agreed to spell out in OOD policy the multiple times OOD applicants and eligible individuals are required to receive written notice of their appeal rights. OOD also agreed to train their counselors and contract staff, including written materials, that it may be possible to appeal the denial of a counselor change request if it affects the provision of vocational rehabilitation services. OOD agreed to give the client a new case, expedite it to the extent possible, and assure him his appeal rights in that new case. <p><p><p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights Ohio
No
na
B. Staff Employed
POSITION: FTE / % FIlled / Person Years PROFESSIONAL Part Time: .1 / 81% / .1 Full Time: 3.2 / 95% / 3.1 Vacant: -- / -- / -- CLERICAL Part Time: -- / -- / -- Full Time: -- / -- / -- Vacant: -- / -- / -- TOTAL: 3.3 / 1.76% / 3.2 <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
(1805681) An individual who receives SSDI and has been working as a computer programmer for over forty years, needed to complete his Bachelor of Science degree to remain competitive for jobs for which he was interested in applying. The client requested vr to provide services and financial assistance to complete his BS degree, but was denied his request because vr deemed his Associates Degree sufficient for the jobs for which he wanted to apply, but the client found it to be insufficient. The client filed an appeal of the decision and requested CAP represent him at the hearing. A disability rights attorney had discussions with the client and represented him at an informal hearing. The client had a successful resolution and withdrew his appeal. The client is receiving the assistance he requested to complete his program, and become more competitive in his field. (1806157) A client had been working with vr, but hadn&rsquo;t heard from them in a while, received a letter from a work program that led him to believe his vr case had been closed. He requested DRO to help him reestablish communication with his vr counselor. A disability rights advocate provided rights information to the client and facilitated communication between the client and vr. The client and his vr counselor worked to amend his IPE for job development in another area. The client was satisfied. (1743544) A client who was working with vr, found a job board website that screens its postings to ensure each post is legitimate and offered jobs with flexible work hours. The client requested vr pay the membership fee for one month while she looked for a job, but her request was denied. She contacted the P&A for assistance. An advocate reviewed details of the case with the client and determined they would file an appeal of the denial. The advocate successfully represented the client at an informal hearing. Vr reversed the decision and agreed to pay for a two-month&rsquo;s membership to the job board site. The client was satisfied with her outcome and found the website useful in her job search. <p><p>
Certification
Approved
Michael Kirkman
Executive Director
2017-12-27
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 16 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0528. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.