RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #971

West Virginia
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights of West Virginia
1207 Quarrier St, Ste 400
{Empty}
Charleston
WV
25301
https://www.drofwv.org/
(800) 950-5250
(800) 950-5250
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights of West Virginia
1207 Quarrier St, Ste 400
{Empty}
Charleston
25301
West Virginia
contact@drofwv.org
https://www.drofwv.org/
(800) 950-5250
(800) 950-5250
Additional Information
Stephanie Thorn
Jodi Calissie
(304) 346-0847
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
13
0
0
19
0
2
34
B. Training Activities
13
421
A DRWV Advocate presented information about CAP to attendees during the June 2017 WorkForce WV Career Center Partner Meeting in Wheeling, WV. She provided examples of the issue for which CAP can provide advocacy, as well as how to access our services. She also touched on advocacy for college students with disabilities to facilitate their pursuit of certificates or degrees to lead to gainful employment. This invitation to present was extended due to previous communication between our Data Report Specialist and staff from the Center who organizes these regular meetings. It will likely result in more regular invitations to attend and/or present. Attendees at these meetings include: staff from WorkForce WV; Workforce Investment Board (WIB); WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS); local disability and/or youth services providers; the US Department of Labor; the Indian and Native American Job Training Assistance and Employment Program; the YWCA; and housing providers. <p><p>A DRWV Advocate gave an Employment Rights for People with Disabilities" presentation to the WV Association for Disability Employment (WVADE) conference in July 2017. The presentation also included Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) requirements. There were about thirty attendees at the conference, most who work for Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRP). <p><p>The same Advocate gave an Employment Rights presentation to a group of twenty individuals at Pace Enterprises, a CRP. She discussed Title I of the ADA regarding employment rights, WIOA, and CAP services. She distributed brochures and copies of the PowerPoint presentation to attendees. Most of the individuals were people with disabilities receiving services from Pace, and some were Pace staff providing those services. One staff person identified them self to the Advocate as having a disability. <p><p>The Advocate also gave an Employment Rights presentation for attendees of the September 2017 Customized Employment Grantees meeting. The attendees included disability services providers and a representative from the WV Department of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF) who oversees the grant. <p><p>Additionally, the Advocate attended a round table meeting focused on resources for veterans with disabilities who are in need of employment held at the WV University Center for Excellence in Disabilities (WVU CED) in September 2017. The attendees were from WorkForce WV Veteran&rsquo;s Services division, WVU CED, Mountain Line Transit Authority, and Operation Welcome Home (a Veteran&rsquo;s employment agency). The attendees presented information about the services available in their respective agencies that would help Veterans in need of employment and other needs to be met in order to be successfully employed. <p><p>"
C. Agency Outreach
In November 2016, an employment related outreach mailing was sent to all WVDRS and Center for Independent Living (CIL) offices, as well as the Comprehensive Behavioral Health Centers and Title XIX Medicaid Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities Waiver providers throughout WV. It included: a flier about CAP; the Employment Advocare newsletter (described elsewhere in this report); and our Your Guide to WVDRS Services booklet. <p><p>In July 2017, DRWV sent an outreach mailing to Vietnam Veterans of America chapters throughout WV, Veterans Administration Medical Centers and organizations who serve veterans who are homeless. The mailing included a copy of our FY 2017 Priorities and Objectives, as well as our general and work programs brochures. The letter that went along with these items described other available publications and resources, as well as an offer to provide in-person training and/or outreach. <p><p>In August 2017, DRWV sent an outreach mailing to areas of the state where we receive few if any calls. The outreach mailing included DRWV&rsquo;s printed publications. The letter that was enclosed with these items described other available publications and resources, as well as an offer to provide in-person training and/or outreach. This mailing was sent to health departments, senior services providers, Family Resource Networks, Councils on Aging, hospitals, Birth to Three Program offices, churches, Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance chapters, and other groups who serve individuals in these underserved areas. <p><p>Events DRWV staff attended and provided outreach with CAP and other program funds in FY 2017 included: An outreach table at WV State University in Institute, WV an event which included students from the university as well as high school and middle school. Outreach tables at several Veterans Stand Down events throughout WV. Outreach tables during events at three BridgeValley Community and Technical College&rsquo;s WV sites in early FY 2017, as well as a presentation to a group of students about DRWV at the South Charleston, WV site in late FY 2017. A presentation to a group of parents in Milton WV. A presentation to staff and people who were using the Winter Freeze Shelter in Wheeling, WV. An outreach table at both the Disability Advocacy and Deaf Awareness days at the WV Legislature. An outreach table at the Transition Committee of the Mid-Ohio Valley Spring Event. Outreach tables at the One4All Disability Expo, Celebrating Connections, National Association of Social Workers WV chapter, People First of WV, and the WV Secretary of State&rsquo;s annual conferences. An outreach table at the WV Association of Housing Agencies Conference. An outreach table at the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) conference in Morgantown, WV which was attended by TBI survivors and their families, as well as professionals. A presentation at a &ldquo;Brunch and Crunch&rdquo; event which included community members and
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
1
1
0
12327
23
4431
In FY 2017, we created two new CAP brochures for distribution. One of the brochures explains the CAP as a whole. It details all of the services that CAP can provide, including examples of issues for which we can assist. The other CAP brochure pertains to CAP is it relates to Centers for Independent Living (CIL). This brochure was created due to communication between DRWV and the Executive Director of WV&rsquo;s Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC). Multiple copies of this brochure were distributed to all CIL offices in WV as soon as it was printed, and supplies are replenished upon request. <p><p>In addition to the total publications in Part 1.D.4 of this report, DRWV has distributed 2,073 other outreach items. <p><p>DRWV's social media presence has significantly increased, resulting in our ability to network with other organizations throughout WV to share information and resources. DRWV now has 1,073 Facebook Followers, generating even more activity than last FY. According to DRWV's latest Facebook page statistics, we reached an average of 1,998 people in the last month of the FY. People and agencies who like" our page are viewing and sharing things we post on a regular basis. There have been 1,096 "likes". Additionally, our Twitter feed became active January 26, 2017. We have 60 followers and have had approximately 4,000 impressions. We often include information about upcoming events and trainings available to people with disabilities. In FY 2017, in light of the changes brought about by WIOA, we made a concerted effort to provide employment related information and resources to people with disabilities and employers. We also include helpful resources available to beneficiaries to gain, re-gain or maintain employment. These posts can be found on our website at: https://www.drofwv.org/news/ and https://www.drofwv.org/resources/. <p><p>In October 2016, our Advocare newsletter in honor of National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM) was distributed to our mailing list and posted on our social media outlets. The entire focus of this edition was around employment for people with disabilities. It contained articles from two individuals with disabilities about their employment and education experiences, as well as articles from WVDRS, the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) program, National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) and WorkForce WV.<p>All Advocates who provide advocacy to 300+ individuals with developmental disabilities through a state grant have now been trained to recognize CAP issues when they arise with the individuals they serve. New Service Requests will be opened as issues arise for these individuals.<p>DRWV developed CAP ads for television and radio at the end of FY 2017. These ads will be aired in early FY 2018.<p>"
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
DRWV's Community Education and Resource Development Specialist was interviewed about National Disability Employment Month on WJLS AM radio in the Beckley area of WV in October 2016. <p><p>A half page article about our employment programs was included in the Winter 2016 edition of the WVU CED WV Assistive Technology System (WVATS) quarterly newsletter. It briefly explained CAP and listed the services we provide under CAP. It can be found at: http://wvats.cedwvu.org/wvats-quarterly-newsletter/winter-2016/. Another half page article that DRWV prepared for the WVATS newsletter listed five employment rights of people with disabilities. It appeared in the Summer 2017 newsletter and can be found at: http://wvats.cedwvu.org/wvats-quarterly-newsletter/summer-2017/. <p><p>In January 2017, we officially changed our name from West Virginia Advocates, Inc. to Disability Rights of WV. An event was held in Charleston, WV in December 2016 to kick off our new name and logo. Several people with disabilities and representatives from disability related organizations attended. A press release was sent out to media outlets throughout WV. An article about the name change appeared in the February 21, 2017 edition of the West Virginia Record newspaper. An article about our name change appeared in the Winter 2017 edition of the Fair Shake Network's (FSN) newsletter. DRWV is a member of the FSN, described as an association of West Virginians dedicated to a 'fair shake' for people with disabilities and to the belief that diversity makes our communities stronger". The announcement also appeared in the Spring 2017 WVATS newsletter. <p><p>In September 2017, DRWV hosted a screening of "Bottom Dollars". This event is described later in this report. The announcement for this screening was shared via social media by numerous groups throughout WV including but not limited to: The Arc of WV; the WV Press Association; the WV Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; People First of WV; and, the WV Developmental Disabilities Council (WVDDC). <p><p>"
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
10
11
21
1
8
B. Problem areas
0
6
9
3
0
3
1
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
8
0
5
0
1
0
14
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
7
4
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
NA <p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
2
1
0
0
0
3
1
1
0
3
1 - The client was not interested in re-opening his case with WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS). <p><p>2 - DRWV was unable to maintain continued communication with the client's legal guardian. <p><p>3 - DRWV was informed by WVDRS that they had no record that the client had filed an appeal regarding the closure of her case with them, and suggested she re-apply and they will serve her again. <p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
6
8
4
3
21
B. Gender
7
14
21
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
1
0
0
2
0
16
2
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
3
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
4
0
0
0
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
21
E. Types of Individuals Served
6
0
14
0
0
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
At the beginning of FY 2017, DRWV staff were trained by NDRN to conduct monitoring of Sheltered Workshops (SW). This training included a viewing of the Bottom Dollars film and an on-site monitoring of five facilities in WV. Twelve total facilities were monitored throughout the FY. During the FY we determined that six of the facilities had either not renewed their 14(c) certificates or were paying at, or above, minimum wage. This reflects that WV's SWs are aligning themselves with the national effort of discontinuing paying subminimum wages. Additionally, as of July 1, 2016, WV had fifteen SWs identified by the DOL as CRPs with a 14(c) certificate. This number has been reduced to eleven SWs in 2017. Also, during the monitoring visits, facility staff and individuals working at the SWs were provided information regarding their employment rights. DRWV offered to provide on-site trainings to individuals working in the SW, their families, guardians and agency staff. However, when follow up was conducted with these facilities, none accepted our repeated offer to provide outreach and education. <p><p>DRWV's Community Education and Resource Development Specialist attended WVDRS' Ability Works banquet in October 2016. This annual WVDRS event honored one recipient of services from each of the agency's six districts, coinciding with National Disability Employment Awareness Month. A DRWV attorney attended the annual WVDRS conference in the Spring of 2017. <p><p>DRWV staff continue to monitor NDRN&rsquo;s CAP and Return to Work listservs, and share pertinent information and resources with other agency staff. Staff also read the NDRN Training and Advocacy Support Center (TASC) newsletters, which often contain information, training opportunities and resources related to CAP. NDRN's Amy Scherer is often consulted about our CAP work. An Attorney hired in early FY 2017 attended the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) annual conference where she attended numerous employment related sessions. Our Legal Director also attended the conference and participated in sessions pertaining to CAP. <p><p>DRWV is a member for the WV Statewide Rehabilitation Council (SRC). DRWV attended five SRC meetings in FY 2017. Meeting topics that affect CAP include: Workforce Investment Boards no longer offering programs for school-age children; WV Division of Rehabilitation Services (WVDRS) Order of Selection and staff shortages; and the Unified State Plan for WIOA. One of DRWV's CAP trained staff attorneys is now our representative on the SRC and is working to strengthen collaboration with members. <p><p>DRWV continued to participate in the WV Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) meetings. DRWV attended six meetings in FY 2017. DRWV is not a member of the SILC, but attends and participates in the meetings to keep informed and updated on the status of independent living services in WV. This allows DRWV to maintain current information to provide to our Board, clients and sta
B. Litigation
0
0
0
NA <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights of WV
No
NA
B. Staff Employed
Full-time equivalent % of year Type of Positionposition filledPerson-years<p>Professional<p>Full-time 0.85 100% 10.00 Part-time 0.65 60.2% 10.83 Vacant N/AN/A N/A<p>Clerical<p>Full-time 0.11 100% 2.00 Part-time N/AN/A N/A Vacant N/AN/A N/A <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
A CAP eligible client requested assistance to ensure that WVDRS provided his vouchers for books and supplies in a timely manner so he would not get behind in college. The Advocate communicated with WVDRS on numerous occasions, and reviewed their policies pertaining to college sponsorship and required documentation. The Advocate went over this information with the client, and advised him to provide WVDRS with the documentation as soon as it was available. Because the Advocate realized that the college would not post spring term grades until days prior to the beginning of summer term I, the Advocate requested that WVDRS provide the college with the client's voucher for books and supplies prior to grades being posted to allow the client adequate time to purchase his books, a request WVDRS denied based on their policy. The Advocate confirmed that WVDRS received the client's grades as soon as possible after they were posted, and provided the college with the client's voucher for books and tuition. Due to DRWV's advocacy efforts, WVDRS provided the university with the client's voucher for books and supplies, and the client was able to purchase his books prior to the first day of summer term I. <p><p>At the end of FY 2016, a CAP eligible client asked for assistance with getting services from the WVDRS. In FY 2017. The Advocate obtained and reviewed the client's records from WVDRS and spoke with his WVDRS Counselor. The Advocate recommended that an updated vocational assessment be completed due to the progressive nature of the client's disability, which had limited his ability to do his current job, and then advocated that his Counselor identify potential new careers that may be of interest to the client. The Advocate attended a meeting with the client and his team members from WVDRS and the AgrAbility program. Due to DRWV's advocacy, the client received an updated vocational evaluation, and information about potential new careers that took into account his increased physical limitations. With information the AgrAbility program provided to the client, he identified a new career goal that suited him, and built on his current career and passion as a farmer. In addition, communication between the client and his WVDRS Counselor improved. <p><p>In FY 2016, a CAP eligible client requested assistance with understanding her rights as a client of WVDRS, and wanted DRWV to make sure that WVDRS provide her with the assistive technology she needs in a timely manner. Through the course of this Service Request, which carried over into FY 2017, the Advocate obtained and reviewed the client's WVDRS records and communicated with WVDRS on behalf of the client. The Advocate provided the client with information on her rights as a client of the WVDRS; provided the client with the web address for the WVDRS' policies and procedures known as the Client Services Manual; and discussed relevant sections of this manual with the client. The Advocate met with the client to prepare
Certification
Approved
Jodi Calissie
Data Report Specialist
2017-11-09
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