RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #969

Washington
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Client Assistance Program
2531 Rainier Avenue South
{Empty}
Seattle
WA
98144
http://washingtoncap.org
(800) 544-2121
(888) 721-6072
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Client Assistance Program
2531 Rainier Avenue South
{Empty}
Seattle
98144
{Empty}
jcap@qwestoffice.net
http://washingtoncap.org
(800) 544-2121
(888) 721-6072
Additional Information
Jerry Johnsen
Jerry Johnsen
(206) 721-5996
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
1098
19
22
58
225
440
1862
B. Training Activities
75
1058
1.Presentation to general VR agency local units. <p><p>Topic: Role and purpose of the Client Assistance Program within both state VR systems to provide advocacy and address clients&rsquo; rights and remedies throughout their VR process. <p><p>Purpose: To engage VR Counselors, VR support staff and VR Supervisors, throughout the state to build relationships, strengthen partnerships and promote open communication and transparency with the Client Assistance Program. Explain CAP&rsquo;s perspective related to WIOA and Order of Selectionl. <p><p>Description of attendees: VR Counselors, Supervisors and Rehabilitation Technicians. <p><p>9 presentations to units of VR staff, for a total of 85 persons. <p><p>2.Individual training with VR staff about CAP role and services. <p><p>Topic: Role and purpose of the Client Assistance Program within both state VR systems to provide advocacy and address clients&rsquo; rights and remedies throughout their VR process. <p><p>Purpose: To engage VR staff by working with them one on one to understand Client Assistance Program role and function to improve customer service, build relationships and promote open communication and transparency with the CAP. Explain CAP perspective on WIOA and Order of Selection. <p><p>Description of attendees: VR Counselors and VR Supervisors from General and Blind VR agencies. <p><p>36 individual sessions, for a total of 36 persons. <p><p>3.Training on CAP rehabilitation law/history, systemic issues in VR system and how to better serve customers. <p><p>Topic: New Employee Orientation (Division of Vocational Rehabilitation) <p><p>Purpose: Explain CAP role, responsibilities, function, and how to best work with CAP to support customers. Enlighten VR staff to the mission, purpose and goals of VR legislation. Brief explanation of history of VR related laws, nationally and locally, as well as providing an overview of WIOA related changes. <p><p>Description of attendees: New staff - VR Counselors, Supervisors, and support staff from General and Tribal VR agencies. <p><p>2 training sessions, for a total of 130 persons. <p><p>4.Presentation to General VR staff during area wide WIOA training: <p><p>Topic: CAP and WIOA <p><p>Purpose: To partner with General VR as they educate staff about WIOA changes. Explain CAP&rsquo;s role in VR WIOA workgroup, CAP perspective on WIOA, and issues related to individual and systemic advocacy under WIOA regulations to be aware of to ensure clients&rsquo; rights and laws are followed. Explain how WIOA changes to federal and state laws, state laws are still in draft process, but federal laws apply. <p><p>Description of attendees: All levels of General VR staff, required training for all staff: VR Counselors, Supervisors, Support staff in the field and at VR headquarters. <p><p>3 group sessions, for a total of 325 persons. <p><p>5.Presentations to General and Blind State Rehabilitation Councils. <p><p>Topic: Updates on CAP role and inter
C. Agency Outreach
CAP is located, as a tenant, in a large WorkSource located in the most diverse zip code in the state. We work closely with our workforce partners providing information and referral to their staff and customers. <p><p>CAP also continues to reach out to school districts and special education providers to help them, their transition youth, and families understand services under WIOA and changes related the implementation of Order of Selection. <p><p>CAP developed relationships with the Deaf-Blind Service Center and the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults. They now have a better understanding of CAP&rsquo;s role in the Vocational Rehabilitation process and refer appropriate customers. <p><p>CAP connected with the Statewide Benefits Planning Network, a consortium of all the certified Benefits Specialists in WA state. They work for a variety of programs, from Vocational Rehabilitation to Mental Health, and include the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance organizations funded by Social Security. This group assists customers who receive Social Security benefits and want to go to work. Many of their customers are not connected to a VR program. We explained the VR process, CAP&rsquo;s role, and shared changes related to WIOA implementation and the implications of Order of Selection. <p><p><p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
21000
3
{Empty}
In addition to the above outreach, CAP continues to work closely with the State Independent Living Council (SILC), both General and Blind Agency SRC&rsquo;s, and the Governor&rsquo;s Committee on Disability and Employment to provide information on our advocacy services across the state. CAP has also disseminated over 21,000 brochures and other CAP materials to its rehabilitation partners and clients. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
16
105
121
0
15
B. Problem areas
58
90
63
18
0
101
5
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
18
45
50
0
8
0
121
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
46
42
26
0
0
1
0
1
5
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
30
1
10
20
29
19
12
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
9
33
74
5
121
B. Gender
58
63
121
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
7
5
4
30
0
69
5
1
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
7
2
0
3
1
5
5
0
6
2
1
1
4
5
2
1
0
0
1
8
25
2
0
6
3
12
12
1
0
3
0
0
3
0
121
E. Types of Individuals Served
19
0
99
0
3
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
1) CAP has been actively involved this year in the development of the state laws, (WACS), with both the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, (DVR), and The Department of Services for The Blind, (DSB). These law changes not only reflect new changes brought about by the passage of WIOA but also provided us with an opportunity to review all policies of the state Vocational Rehabilitation agencies. The proposed changes reflect a more progressive customer centered set of rules. CAP&rsquo;s participation in this process allowed us to help shape a foundation that will better serve our customers as well as bring clarity to new regulations for VR staff. Additionally, it was an opportunity strengthen our partnerships with the agencies. We have been invited to review and give feedback for DVR staff training materials, which will be a significant systemic activity for the coming year, see 3 below. <p><p>2) CAP continued to work on seeking a better placement of our general VR agency, (DVR). Its current alignment does not allow for the DVR director to report directly to the Director of the designated agency. At this writing, working in partnership with the SRC, we have made considerable progress towards this goal. <p><p>3) Training and staff development of DVR staff. CAP is concerned about the absence of training available to DVR staff over the past year. We understand some is due to implementation of WIOA but foundational skill development has been noticeably lacking at a time when many new VR staff have come on board. This is especially noticeable in the field as inconsistent practices happen across the state. CAP has observed that VR staff are hungry for opportunity to improve their skills and provide good customer services but are often unclear of agency priorities. This has been compounded by the push to implement WIOA and from WIOA&rsquo;s new obligations and mandates. The quality of VR services is dependent on good training and staff development. CAP will continue to challenge DVR to develop training that elevates best practice and professionalism. <p><p>4) Order of Selection. As FY2017 comes to a close DVR prepared to enter into OOS. DVR involved CAP, the SRC and the community in this process. CAP would like to acknowledge the preparation that was built on good communication and engagement with community partners. CAP worked with DVR to make sure customers have ample information and as much warning as allowed. As DVR moves into OOS we will continue to evaluate the classification process for consistency and fairness. <p><p><p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-other nonprofit agency
Client Assistance Program
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
1.0 CAP Director, 1.0 Rehabilitation Coordinator <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
Amanda: <p><p>Amanda sought DVR services to help achieve her goal of being a Home Beauty Consultant. The goal as Amanda envisioned it would be considered self-employment. Her Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) discouraged her from pursuing self-employment, and recommended retail beauty consultation instead. <p><p>Amanda contacted CAP because she did not feel supported by her counselor and wanted CAP&rsquo;s help to request a VRC change. After talking with the VRC and Amanda further, it was clear that neither had enough labor market information to make an informed choice about the goal. Amanda was willing to continue working with the VRC as they gathered more information, however, she wanted both myself and the VRC&rsquo;s supervisor to be part of the next meeting. <p><p>During the meeting, the VRC communication appeared very defensive and impatient. The supervisor stepped in and recommended he take over the case and set up a meeting with Amanda without the VRC. Amanda was shaken by the meeting but felt supported by the supervisor and was comfortable moving forward with him as her counselor. <p><p>After completing labor market research it was mutually agreed that Amanda&rsquo;s original goal for self-employment move forward. The supervisor set up a self-employment feasibility study with the local self-employment vendor. The vendor gave Amanda an extensive amount of paperwork and communicated with her only via email. Amanda had many questions as she worked on completing the paperwork. She found the emails responses confusing and contradictory. I encouraged Amanda to follow up with the supervisor to get assistance and clarification. <p><p>The supervisor recommended a meeting with the vendor. During the meeting, it appeared the vendor did not have a good understanding of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) process or disability issues. The vendor was not sensitive or supportive of the challenges Amanda had with the paperwork and was dismissive of the contradictions in her emails. The VR supervisor skillfully mediated the meeting and CAP helped identify strategies and creative solutions to complete the feasibility study. <p><p>The feasibility study was favorable for Amanda&rsquo;s employment goal. The next step was working with vendor for the business plan. However, Amanda did not want to continue working with this vendor. The supervisor indicated this was the only option in their area. I advocated for customer choice and encouraged the supervisor to talk with other agency approved vendors to determine if anyone out of area was willing to work with Amanda. The supervisor agreed, and was able to find a vendor who travelled to Amanda for a one-day meeting, with the remaining work completed via email and phone. <p><p>Amanda and the new vendor worked well together and in less than one month, completed the business plan. The VR agency wrote Amanda&rsquo;s Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) for self-employment home beauty con
Certification
Approved
Client Assistance Program
Jerry Johnsen
2017-12-21
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