RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #945

Kansas
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights Center of Kansas
214 SW 6th Ave, Suite 100
{Empty}
Topeka
KS
66603
http://drckansas.org
(877) 776-1541
(877) 335-3725
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
{Empty}
Additional Information
Rocky Nichols
Rocky Nichols
(785) 273-9661
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
B. Training Activities
213
6482
<p>a) Topics Covered - DRC Staff present a variety of topics at our outreach presentations. These include many topics about rights of persons with disabilities regarding working and rights to services funded under the rehabilitation act, such as vocational rehabilitation. b) The purpose of DRC&rsquo;s trainings are always to education persons with disabilities on their rights and service options. c) Attendees at DRC&rsquo;s outreach events include: persons with disabilities, family members, support persons and members of the general public.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>DRC engages in on-going outreach efforts to underserved populations to ensure effective access to our services. Whenever DRC considers whether it will conduct an outreach or training, one of the aspects we consider how the training reach out will to previously unserved or underserved communities.</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
12
27
5
9
32
2760386
<p>This is the total above reference media hits (each of the above methods multiplied by the circulation, viewership, etc.).</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>1. Radio/TV Coverage DRC Staff was quoted on 12 TV or Radio Reports 2. Newspapers/Magazines/Journals DRC was interviewed or quoted in the following radio and newspapers (for a total of 27 times throughout the year); Topeka Capital Journal (8); KCUR (9); KHI (4); Wichita Eagle (4); KC Star (2) 3. PSAs/Videos DRC has 5 video flyers about persons with disabilities rights on their website. 4. Publications/Booklets/brochures Agency brochures on several disability topics and fact sheets on a specific issue.</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
20
58
78
78
8
B. Problem areas
6
24
39
8
0
4
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
64
0
1
1
5
0
72
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
19
24
3
1
0
11
0
1
11
1
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
7
3
4
{Empty}
8
22
5
10
0
15
<p>Client withdrew request Client was not responsive</p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
1
7
23
39
8
78
B. Gender
45
33
78
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
0
0
16
0
57
0
3
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
1
0
2
0
0
2
1
11
0
2
2
6
2
1
0
0
0
0
3
25
0
0
6
5
5
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
1
78
E. Types of Individuals Served
31
3
42
1
1
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
<p>DRC engaged in a critically important group advocacy project that did not end up requiring litigation, although DRC was prepared to file litigation with this issue. DRC&rsquo;s advocacy was a systemic activity which had a large positive impact on the lives of Kansans with disabilities. This DRC&rsquo;s efforts led to a successful outcome, positively impacting. This is an important CAP issue because access to Medicaid is a critical issue and important disability rights issue. Advocacy on this systems change activity occurred over two federal fiscal years, FFY 2016 and FFY 2017. In 2016, the State of Kansas created what is believed to be the largest backlog of Medicaid beneficiaries in the history of Kansas. This backlog caused dramatic problems for beneficiaries trying to apply for Medicaid. At one point the Medicaid backlog ballooned to nearly 50,000 Kansans waiting for Medicaid benefits. People were often waiting 8 or more months just to obtain a determination of their application for Medicaid. This included both those who were found eligible last year and were simply renewing their Medicaid eligibility and new applicants for Medicaid. While Kansans were waiting in this backlog, their Medicaid bills were not being covered, doctors and providers were not getting paid, and people were suffering because they could not access life-sustaining and life-saving Medicaid services. DRC tackled this as a systemic, group advocacy project. After significant research, we believed that it was illegal and not allowable for the State of Kansas to maintain any backlog where people were waiting longer than the short period of time spelled out in federal law (45 or 90 days, depending on the type of application). DRC worked closely with stakeholders to find real-life examples of people harmed by this massive backlog. DRC conducted an investigation into this matter. The results were clear. The State of Kansas was violating federal law by not promptly processing Medicaid applications. People were being harmed. Because this was a systemic group advocacy project, we concurrently worked this case up as both a group advocacy case and as a potential litigation case. From a group advocacy perspective, DRC advocated with the media, stakeholders, decision-makers and key thought leaders on Medicaid issues. We forcefully advocated and promoted the results of our investigation, namely that the huge Medicaid backlog was both unallowable under federal law and that we were treating this as a systemic and group advocacy effort. We were clear with all the players that if the harm being caused by the backlog was not corrected that DRC would take any and all steps within our power, including further public and media advocacy and legal remedies. We advocated that this strong posture was needed to protect the rights of Kansans with disabilities. Non-attorney staff interacted and outreached closely with providers, advocacy organizations, and others to find people who were har
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>N/A</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights Center of Kansas
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>Type of position FTE % yr filled Person-years Executive Director 1 100% 1 Deputy Director &mdash; Administrative Division 1 100% 1 Deputy Director &mdash; Legal Division 1 100% 1 Director of Policy &amp; Outreach1100%1 Case Attorneys 4 100% 4 Case Advocates 3.75 93.75%3.75 Office Assistant 1 100% 1 Administrative Assistant 1 100% 1 Communications &amp; Outreach Director1 100% 1 Explanation of Duties for all Positions: Executive Director - Overall leader and director of the agency. Administrative head of the agency. Employs staff (hires/fires). Ensures accountability, effectiveness and efficiency of agency&rsquo;s programs and services. Deputy Director &mdash; Administrative Division - Responsible for accounting, bookkeeping, accounts receivable &amp; payable, building and lease issues, human resources, etc. Supervises the Office Assistant and Communications &amp; Outreach Director. Deputy Director &mdash; Legal Division - Responsible for legal work product of the agency. Supervises the staff attorneys and advocates. Carries an active caseload. Prosecutes cases. Director of Policy &amp; Outreach &mdash; Responsible for performance of work directly relating to the management policies or general business operations of DRC or its customers. Case Attorneys - Provide legal representation. Case Advocates - Provide advocacy representation and case advocacy. Office Assistant - Answers phones, does office and administrative tasks, etc. Administrative Assistant &mdash; Provides administrative support to the legal division and assists with general administrative tasks for the entire agency. Communications &amp; Outreach Director - manages the tasks associated with outreach, communications/public relations, marketing/publications, and certain administrative office functions of the agency.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>EF-S is a 23-year-old female with cerebral palsy pursuing a degree in Social Work. She has been a Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) consumer for several years and is only one year from graduation. EF-S receives attendant care services to assist her with her daily living activities such as preparing meals, assisting with bathing, and transportation through the Physical Disabilities (PD) HCBS Medicaid Waiver. She was not able to find an attended care worker in Kansas for over a year. She needed attendant care in order to be able to successfully attend college. Frustrated, she finally found a college in Illinois that has on-campus housing with dedicated attendant care students with disabilities. EF-S had tried in vain to get VR to pay for this college with included attendant care, to no avail. With only three months until the enrollment deadline, EF-S contacted DRC for help. VR was insisting she spends another 60 days searching for an attendant care worker before they would even consider paying for an out of state university. A DRC Advocate stepped in and convinced the VR Regional Coordinator that due to the lack of resources in KS and EF-S&rsquo;s exhaustive search, there were no other legitimate options than to for VR to help EF-S attend school in Illinois. Kansas VR agreed to pay tuition, room, and board. EF-S is currently completing her degree at the University of Illinois with the attendant care provided through its specialized program.</p><p><p>SH has mental health issues, musculoskeletal impairments and was receiving VR services. One of the services on her Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) called for VR to provide up to $3,000 for her to purchase a vehicle for transportation to/from work. SH notified VR that she had identified a vendor to assist her with buying the vehicle, but for over 3 months VR did nothing in response to her requests. A DRC attorney filed an administrative appeal on behalf of SH. Before the hearing, VR acknowledged that it had not complied with the IPE and released the funds for SH to finally buy her vehicle. Because this vehicle was purchased, SH was able to obtain employment.</p><p>
Certification
Approved
Rocky Nichols
Executive Director
2017-12-21
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 16 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0528. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.