RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #941

Hawaii
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER
1132 Bishop Street
Suite 2102
Honolulu
HI
96813
(800) 882-1057
(800) 882-1057
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER
1132 Bishop Street
Suite 2102
Honolulu
96813
Hawaii
(800) 882-1057
(800) 882-1057
Additional Information
Louis Erteschick
Ann E. Collins
(808) 949-2922
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
0
0
0
0
0
77
77
B. Training Activities
14
323
<p>This past school year, our CAP advocate trained multiple school transition teachers and Department of Education (DOE) designated staff responsible for providing transition services in Oahu public high schools and charter schools on the required transition process for special education and 504 students under FAPE.</p><p><p>CAP trainings were developed in coordination with the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and were held at quarterly meetings with DOE and DVR staff, with attendees including the Center for Disability Studies at the University of Hawaii, the State Council on Developmental Disabilities, the Developmental Disabilities Division of the Department of Health, and community nonprofit providers that contract with DOE and/or DVR.</p><p><p>During one quarterly meeting, the CAP advocate was a participant in role-playing an IEP meeting, discussing all the steps that should be included in planning for a student&rsquo;s transition to employment or post-secondary education. During the training sessions, CAP aggressively pushed for all transition staff to make student referrals to DVR as soon as possible as Hawaii&rsquo;s DVR was planning to enter into an Order Of Selection (OOS). If school teachers or counselors missed the 2017 deadline for referrals, their students would certainly have to be placed on a waitlist.</p><p><p>The CAP advocate informed the June attendees that DOE and charter school transition staff were given a 4-month reprieve, as DVR&rsquo;s planned Order of Selection was originally scheduled for July 2017, but after HDRC successfully challenged DVR&rsquo;s public hearing process, DVR was forced to delay the effective date to October. Many of the DOE staff expressed their gratitude for HDRC&rsquo;s efforts. As a result of our CAP transition services training, it is estimated that approximately 300 more referrals were made to DVR before the deadline and implementation of the waitlist.</p><p><p>CAP also presented at 14 DVR new applicant Orientation meetings for new and returning applicants to DVR. In addition, our advocate conducted a CAP orientation to 5 new DVR staff members and also serves as a reprehensive member on the State Rehabilitation Council.</p><p><p>CAP will continue to participate in coordinated trainings with DVR and DOE staff next year, and our agenda includes additional topics such as WIOA and appeal rights. Finally, a strategic planning training is scheduled for CAP, DVR and the State Rehabilitation Council in 2017.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>In all of our outreach efforts to the underserved, we provide program brochures and information about CAP.</p><p><p>HDRC staff conducted an in-service training at the Next Step Shelter in Pier 1 in the Kaka'ako area in Honolulu. The Next Step Shelter is home to over 200 unsheltered single people on Oahu.</p><p><p>With homeless families with children in mind, HDRC presented at a converted maintenance shed next to Kaka&rsquo;ako Waterfront Park in Honolulu. From what once was a broken-down storage shed now stands the State&rsquo;s Family Assessment Center (FAC), a rapid rehousing project for Hawaii's homeless families. In the afternoon there, a number of kids of Micronesian descent were just out of school, busy playing by the Center&rsquo;s front yard where a Catholic Charities Hawaii tarpaulin was hanging. The Catholic Charities Hawaii has been running the Center since September of 2016.</p><p><p>HDRC staff greeted the kids and entered the open, airy facility filled with bright orange accents. A young Chuukese couple with their four-year-old daughter was sitting on the nearby table. The personnel at the front desk inside the building waved their hands, trying to get the HDRC staff&rsquo;s attention.</p><p><p>The FAC staff was elated upon knowing the group was from HDRC. They introduced themselves, along with some families, and excitedly received the HDRC brochures, available in English, Tagalog, Ilokano, Spanish, Chuukese, and Marshallese.</p><p><p>During the visit, the facility explained that, currently, they were housing 11 families for around 50 people, primarily of Chuukese and Marshallese ethnicities. One of the personnel asked if the group could talk to one of the families with a daughter with a developmental disability. After a short presentation, the HDRC staff met with her family, asked questions, listened, gathered information, and filled out the HDRC application form.</p><p><p>One month later, the HDRC staff joined yet another event geared toward the unserved and underserved populations. This time, it was at the Towers at Kuhio Park, a public-private partnership housing where a good number of Micronesians live.</p><p><p>On this Saturday, approximately 17 organizations gathered at the Community Hall for the &ldquo;Road to Wellness Fair.&rdquo; Hosted by Better Tomorrows, the Fair aimed to provide the 130 family attendees, all residents, with various information, including insurance enrollment, disability rights, fraud, and other community resources.</p><p><p>Parents of children with disabilities stopped by at the HDRC table. They asked questions and took with them HDRC brochures and copies of the bill of rights for people with disabilities. They left thankful, some were teary-eyed, and others just delighted. It was a humid day, and the display of gratitude and appreciation of the unserved and underserved population impacted by disabilities made the atmosphere sunnier and warmer.</p><p><p>HDRC continues to employ community outreach tailored to t
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
2781
18
0
<p>None</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p>None</p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
17
31
48
2
16
B. Problem areas
5
8
9
24
0
11
0
4
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
19
3
11
0
1
0
34
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
20
11
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
3
2
3
{Empty}
0
9
3
5
0
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
19
14
5
9
1
48
B. Gender
24
24
48
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
0
5
0
3
11
29
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
4
0
0
0
0
8
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
4
17
1
0
3
1
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
48
E. Types of Individuals Served
6
28
12
0
26
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
<p><strong>DVR Contract Monitor</strong></p><p><p>HDRC advocate met with the administrators of the community employment contractors on Oahu to assure that clients were receiving services in integrated settings and that they were at least receiving minimum wage. The contractors are Network Enterprises, Lanakila Rehabilitation Center and Abilities Unlimited.</p><p><p>The major issue that arose with contractors is clients sometimes being &lsquo;channeled&rsquo; by VR counselors to the contractor they prefer to work with instead of providing more information for informed choice. The contractors tended to take the time to explain the different programs and encourage clients to visit all the programs to enhance individual informed choice.</p><p><p>Another issue that contractors noted was VR not maximizing collaboration between contractors. Some contractors have stronger placement programs and others have classes and work experience that better prepare clients for placement. Clients sometimes are forced to wait longer because of the lack of continuum in services.</p><p><p>All contractors assured pay at minimum wage or above and also placing clients in employment in integrated settings.</p><p><p><b>CAP Involvement with the State Rehabilitation Council</b></p><p><p>Hawaii Disability Rights Center administers the CAP program. In FY17 the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) published a Hearing Notice dated April 29<sup>th</sup> to include a discussion on the plan to enter into an Order Of Selection (OOS). The HDRC CAP representative, who serves as Vice Chair of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), in discussion with the Executive Director of Hawaii Disability Rights Center noticed that the Hearing Notice appeared invalid.</p><p><p>On May 30th, Hawaii Disability Rights Center&rsquo;s Executive Director, Lou Erteschik, testified at the hearing on a number of issues:</p><p><ul><p><li>the Hearing Notice dated April 29 was technically invalid;</li><p><li>the SRC should act autonomously from DVR;</li><p><li>the SRC should advocate for additional funding for DVR; and</li><p><li>the SRC should work with DVR to minimize the failure to serve people with disabilities while DVR is in OOS.</li><p></ul><p><p>Another Public Hearing was scheduled on September 15<sup>th</sup> and OOS began in October, 2017. CAP&rsquo;s action, however, pushed DVR&rsquo;s planned OOS from July 1<sup>st</sup> to October which resulted in over 100 DOE students being referred to DVR and obtaining Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) prior to implementation of OOS.</p><p><p>Further, as a result of HDRC&rsquo;s efforts, CAP and the DVR Acting Administrator met with Department of Human Services Director and advocated for an emergency $1,000,000 appropriation to be included in the Governor&rsquo;s budget request to the legislature. The DHS Director agreed to include the appropriation recommendations to the Governor and CAP has committed to supporting DHS and DVR&rsquo;s efforts.</p><p><p>CAP will continue to monit
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p>Not applicable.</p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Hawaii Disability Rights Center
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>Professional Full-Time = 13 1.3</p><p><p>Professional Part-Time = 6 .6</p><p><p>Administrative Full-Time = 2 .2</p><p><p>Total = 21 2.1</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p><strong>Case Example 1:</strong></p><p><p>The parents of D.D., a 16 year-old male who is a student at a public high school, contacted HDRC for CAP assistance when he was given a failing grade in his core classes. His parents were concerned because he was interested in a career after graduation that required non-failing grades. He was found eligible for special education and had an Individualized Education Program (IEP). The CAP advocate determined that the failing grade was the result of student being absent for some assignments. He spoke to the teacher, discussed the student&rsquo;s disabilities and the student was allowed to make up the assignments and passed with a &ldquo;C&rdquo;.</p><p><p>When the CAP advocate reviewed the student&rsquo;s IEP, he noticed there was no transition plan. The advocate asked the client and his parents if they were aware of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) and all said that they were not. The advocate, who had participated in several presentations with the Department of Education, asked for a referral form, but was told by the school&rsquo;s transition teacher that the form was unreadable. The advocate got a new referral form from another source and gave it to the family to complete. A new DVR Counselor replaced the previous one in April (assigned to the school) and had to be trained - all at the same time that Hawaii&rsquo;s DVR was planning to go into an Order of Selection (OOS). The CAP advocate constantly monitored the referral until the process was completed as he was concerned with the deadline. In August, the Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) was finally developed, signed and implemented. The family was very grateful with HDRC&rsquo;s CAP assistance and the client now has established positive communication with his VR Counselor.</p><p><p><strong>Case Example 2:</strong></p><p><p>Part of CAP outreach includes serving the military in Hawaii as an underserved high priority. During one annual event that targets homeless veterans - known as &ldquo;Boots On The Ground&rdquo; - held on the north shore of Oahu this year, our CAP advocate met a soldier. Our HDRC table displayed Program brochures, including CAP brochures, and that caught the attention of D.L., a former Army soldier. He explained that after being discharged from the Army, after two tours in Vietnam, he was diagnosed with PTSD, became addicted to drugs, divorced his wife and became homeless. The Veterans Administration funds temporary housing for homeless veterans, found a place for D.L. and the soldier moved in. Now clean and sober as a result of a drug rehab program he was looking for employment. The advocate explained the CAP program and his right for assistance. The following week, D.L. contacted HDRC and indicated that he had scheduled an orientation at the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and wanted CAP to review his Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) when completed. He thanked the CAP advocate for discussing the program with
Certification
Approved
Louis Erteschik
Executive Director
2017-12-18
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