RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #939

Georgia
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Martin & Jones
123 N. McDonough St.
{Empty}
Decatur
GA
30030
http://www.georgiacap.com
(800) 822-9727
(800) 822-9727
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Martin & Jones
123 N. McDonough St.
{Empty}
Decatur
30030
Georgia
ssappeals@gmail.com
http://www.georgiacap.com
(800) 822-9727
(800) 822-9727
Additional Information
Charles L. Martin
Charles L. Martin
(404) 373-3116
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
826
0
0
7
36
0
869
B. Training Activities
3
12
<ol><p><li>topics covered- The topics at the first fiscal SRC meeting allows CAP to discuss why the agency exists, the clients we assist, the guidelines followed under the federal regulations, and CAP staff duties</li><p><li>purpose of the training- The purpose of this training is to give SRC members a chance to understand how VR consumers are served not just by VR, but the other agency created to assist clients and to refer consumers they encounter in the disability community to CAP</li><p></ol><p><p>c.description of the attendees- SRC members appointed by the Governor of GA</p><p><p>Each presentation was to describe CAP's role in the VR process, and ways that CAP can improve chances of success with VR.</p><p><p>GVRA Project Horizon Training December 13-14, 2016 - VR provided training on this new program for transition students in accordance with the WIOA law</p><p><p>NCSRC/CSAVR Conference in Bethesda, MD March 30-April 5, 2017- National annual training provided to SRC members for continuing education on VR and legislative changes</p><p><p>GRA Annual Conference September 6-8, 2017 in Pine Mountain, Georgia- Annual training for those who work in the rehabilitation field with educational sessions on VR and presentations on new services and service providers available to assist VR clients</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>Meeting with Georgia Statewide Coalition on Blindness VaShaun Jones February 8, 2017 to hear concerns from the blind community and how VR and the SRC can better serve these clients</p><p><p>Public Hearing for GVRA Blind and Deaf Services May 2, 2017 to allow clients to state issues and possible solutions with this new department under VR</p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
0
1
0
<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
54
33
87
2
60
B. Problem areas
15
15
68
3
0
26
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
12
2
14
0
0
0
28
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
23
2
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
14
0
0
0
8
3
2
1
0
0
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
2
21
30
28
6
87
B. Gender
42
45
87
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
1
3
38
0
41
0
2
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
3
1
1
0
2
3
0
12
3
0
1
5
1
1
1
2
0
3
7
12
0
0
0
10
5
0
1
0
8
1
0
0
4
87
E. Types of Individuals Served
9
0
81
0
0
1
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
<P><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-all other private agencies
Martin and Jones
No
None.
B. Staff Employed
<p>The Georgia CAP staff consists of the Director, Assistant Director, a Counselor/Advocate, and a part-time administrative assistant. The Georgia CAP has available legal representation. Charles Martin, previously the CAP attorney, has served as the CAP Director since 1997. The Assistant Director, Ashley Carraway, was previously an attorney and litiGation manager. The Counselor/Advocate, Jennifer Page was a vocational rehabilitation counselor before becoming a CAP counselor.</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<ul><br><li>Client withdrew from college following an episode of depression. He called CAP to try to get assistance compelling his school to provide tuition help. CAP explained why he should call VR, and he did. VR determined that he had exhausted the post-secondary support available from VR. At CAP&rsquo;s suggestion, the client asked VR to try to find other options for him. Sadly, no other options were found, and client was unable to continue his education. In a follow-up call to see how client was doing, client said he gave up on VR after the school situation, and stopped calling them, not believing there was anything VR could do for him. CAP inquired about depression, and client confirmed that depression continued to be an issue. CAP advised him that counseling was among the services that VR could provide, something he had not realized.</li><p><br><li>Client had acted with hostility to the VR manager involved in his case, and had felt that he was the victim of racism in the handling of his VR case. CAP reviewed the situation, and determined that there was a basis for VR decisions, actions, etc. that had nothing at all to do with race. CAP so advised the client in what proved to be a very difficult conversation. The client ultimately came to understand and agree; however, he still wanted his case to be transferred. With CAP&rsquo;s help, the case was transferred. The client developed and maintained an adequate working relationship with the VR personnel, and his vocation goal was achieved.</li><p><br><li>Client contacted CAP because she was having issues with her local VR office and wanted to reestablish communication with her counselor. CAP was able to facilitate the establishment of a good working relationship between the counselor and client, allowing her case to move forward.</li><p><br><li>Client called CAP and was extremely angry, ostensibly because he was having difficulty getting VR to provide the transportation he said he needed. CAP worked with VR to get that issue resolved, but the client remained quite angry and hostile. CAP had multiple conversations with this client, and hardly a conversation occurred in which client was not angrily threatening to sue VR. In due course, VR obtained for this client the service he was seeking. Client, harboring such anger toward VR, denied that the outcome was because of anything VR did. VR offered to provide help with his anger issues. The client refused, denying that he had any such issues. Instead, he terminated his relationship with VR. Given that there was no longer a basis CAP involvement, the client agreed that CAP could close his case, which it did.</li><p><br><li>Client was working in a position when she reached out to CAP. Because her newly diagnosed disabilities, she was having problems getting her job duties completed in a timely manner. CAP helped this client make an appropriate request to VR to provide accommodations needed to help her maintain her employment.</li><p><br>
Certification
Approved
Charles L. Martin
CAP Director
2017-12-25
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 16 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0528. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.