RSA-227 for FY-2017: Submission #934

Arizona
9/30/2017
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Arizona Center for Disability Law
5025 East Washington Street
Suite 202
Phoenix
AZ
85034
(800) 927-2260
(800) 927-2260
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Arizona Center for Disability Law
5025 East Washington Street
Suite 202
Phoenix
85034
{Empty}
(800) 927-2260
(800) 927-2260
Additional Information
John Gutierrez
John Gutierrez
(602) 274-6287
{Empty}
Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
10
3
1
27
20
27
88
B. Training Activities
5
91
1)10/24/2016 Title: Client Assistance Program a)Topics Covered: Client Assistance Program (CAP), Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Rehabilitation Act &sect;501 b)Purpose of the training: c)Description of the trainees: 3 <p><p>2)1/18/2017 Title: Client Assistance Program and VR Rights a)Topics Covered: CAP, VR, Rehabilitation Act &sect;501 b)Purpose of the training: To educate VR Counselors of the CAP c)Description of the trainees: 15 <p><p>3)5/16/17 Title: Your Rights as an Applicant or Client of VR a)Topics Covered: CAP, VR, Transition Services b)Purpose of the Training: To educate staff from Raising Special Kids c)Description of the trainees: 20 <p><p>4)7/20/2017 Title: Elite Community Services/Your Rights as an Applicant or Client of VR a)Topics Covered: VR, CAP, and Social Security b)Purpose of the training: Provide information on the services available to VR clients c)Description of the trainees: 22 <p><p>5)7/24/2017 Title: Arizona Assistive Technology Conference a)Topics Covered: How to Obtain Assistive Technology as a Client of VR b)Purpose of the training: c)Description of the trainees: 31 <p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
CAP Advocates staffed ACDL&rsquo;s table at the 6th Annual African American Conference on Disabilities, providing information on CAP. This conference was attended by 225 participants. <p><p>During FY 2017, the CAP Advocates revised three of our CAP self-advocacy guides. These guides are entitled: (1) Your Appeal Rights for Disputes Regarding Vocational Rehabilitation Services; (2) Summary of VR Rights: Vocational Rehabilitation Services; and (3) Summary of VR Rights: Eligibility for Services. <p><p>The following CAP guides are also available: An Overview of the Employment Protections of the Americans with Disabilities Act; How to Enforce Employment Rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act; The ADA and the Job Applicant: Recruitment, Applications and Interviews; The ADA and the Reasonable Accommodations; Drug and Alcohol Testing under the Americans with Disabilities Act; The ADA and Medical Examinations; The ADA and Confidentiality of Medical Information; The ADA and Disability-Related Harassment; Summary of Vocational Rehabilitation Rights: Evaluations Summary of Vocational Rehabilitation Rights: Individual Plan for Employment (IPE); and A Summary of Your Vocational Rehabilitation Rights: Assistive Technology and Services. <p><p>Four of these guides have been translated into American Sign Language (ASL) videos and posted on our website: Reasonable Accommodations for Employees Under the ADA; Disability-Related Harassment; What Happens After I File a Charge of Discrimination; and Enforcing Your Employment Rights. <p><p>ACDL provides guides in alternate formats such as plain language to accommodate our clients who may have cognitive disabilities or a lower reading level or difficulty with English. The Center has 17 self-advocacy guides written in plain language. The plain language guides relating to the CAP are: How to File a Charge When You Have Been Treated Unfairly; Making Your Job Work for You; Have You Been Treated Unfairly at Work?; Getting a Job When You Have a Disability; and How the ADA Protects Your Medical Information at Work. <p><p>ACDL also has 16 of our guides translated into Spanish. All of our guides are available on our website and in additional alternate formats by request. All of our intake information materials have been translated into Spanish and are available at our outreach events, conferences, trainings, and on our website. Our satisfaction surveys, training materials, and grievance procedures are all translated into Spanish. <p><p>ACDL has increased its use of social media such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube where individuals can find out more about our agency, including the Client Assistance Program. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
819
9
{Empty}
1)11/19/2016 Booth/Table, Alhambra High School Transition Open House, Phoenix, AZ. 60 individuals attended. 2)1/18/2017 Booth/Table, Beyond High School Open House, Andrada Polytechnic High School, Vail School District, Tucson, AZ. 25 individuals attended. 3)2/17/2017 Booth/Table, 6th Annual African American Conference on Disabilities, Phoenix, AZ. 200 individuals attended. 4)3/29/2017 Booth/Table, Education Rights of Students with Disabilities under IDEA and Section 504, Casa Grande, AZ. 22 individuals attended. 5)4/5/2017 Booth/Table, Westwood High School Transition Fair, Phoenix, AZ. 100 individuals attended. 6)4/28/2017 Booth/Table, Health and Wellness Fair, Phoenix, AZ. 400 individuals attended. 7)6/29/2017 Booth/Table, Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council Community Meeting, Globe, AZ. 23 individuals attended. 8)7/24/2017 Booth/Table, Assistive Technology Conference, Phoenix, AZ. 75 individuals attended. 9)9/16/2017 Booth/Table, 2nd Annual Latino Disability Summit, Phoenix, AZ. 10 individuals attended. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
N/A <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
56
79
135
8
44
B. Problem areas
0
43
76
8
7
10
0
1
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
70
1
26
2
0
2
101
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
53
29
1
1
0
9
1
0
1
6
0
0
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
53
0
5
0
21
12
8
1
0
1
Economic need changed to benefit client <p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
8
22
31
68
6
135
B. Gender
71
64
135
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
21
3
3
15
0
90
3
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
4
0
0
1
9
5
0
9
8
0
5
12
8
0
0
1
3
1
6
41
0
0
2
3
8
0
0
0
3
1
2
1
0
135
E. Types of Individuals Served
7
7
123
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
3
Systemic Activity 1 <p><p>Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) held a public forum to introduce new policies that Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) was planning to implement. The most concerning policy to be discussed at the public forum was the issue of VR Administration attempting to set a policy that would require all VR clients to first utilize a One-Stop/Career Center for basic job development and placement services prior to receiving those services from VR. The proposed policy reads: <p><p>1.Require the exploration and utilization of One-Stop/Career Center services when considering VR support for basic job development and placement services. a.VR will continue to purchase disability related employment services when One-Stop/Career Center services have been exhausted or are unable to meet the client&rsquo;s disability related employment needs. <p><p>The proposed policy change was in direct violation of the Federal Rehabilitation Act, which states that job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits. (34 CFR &sect;361.53(b)(4)). <p><p>Additionally, CAP Advocate shared the notice of the public forum with several VR service providers and community partners who had not seen the notice. When community partners asked why they had not received the notice, RSA&rsquo;s response was that they only posted the notice on RSA&rsquo;s website. Community partners responded that simply posting the notice on RSA&rsquo;s website did not constitute a true effort in informing the public of the forum. <p><p>Ultimately, after questioning by the CAP Advocate and the overwhelming negative response from the community partners to this proposed policy change, VR Administration opted not to implement this policy. <p><p>Systemic Activity 2<p>CAP Advocate met with the new VR Administrator to discuss concerns regarding the manner in which they have been revising and eliminating policies. CAP Advocate questioned why several essential sections of the policy manual had been eliminated including information on CAP, the self-employment policies, and approximately half of the manual. The policy manual had been removed from Rehabilitation Services Administration&rsquo;s website, denying access to the general public as well as CAP staff. CAP Advocate requested and the Administrator agreed to write a letter stating she would conduct public meetings with both the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Director of the CAP in matters relating to policy changes governing VR services. The Administrator also agreed to work towards a strong, cooperative relationship with both the SRC and CAP and assured collaboration with both entities for both programmatic policy development and any future amendments. Even though the Administrator wrote the letter, the Administrator has failed to collaborate with both the SRC and CAP. Additionally, services that had formerly been
B. Litigation
0
0
0
N/A <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Arizona Center for Disability Law
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
CAP PPR Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 Description of CAP Staff Attorneys Arizona Center for Disability Law (ACDL) attorneys, Executive Director J.J. Rico and Legal Director Rose Daly-Rooney, provide direct supervision for the CAP and its staff. Total CAP attorney person years: .15 Advocates CAP advocates and short-term assistance team (STAT) provide assistance to persons with disabilities who are seeking or receiving vocational rehabilitation (VR) services as well as individuals who are receiving services from independent living centers or other Rehabilitation Act funded programs. Total CAP advocate person years: 1.37. Support Staff Support staff provides clerical support to the CAP advocates and attorneys. Total CAP support staff person years: .88. Other The financial staff, Grants Manager, Director of Abuse & Neglect Investigations, and Office Manager provide support to the CAP. The financial staff is responsible for budget preparation, day-to-day accounting duties, and the financial reporting requirements for the CAP. The Grants Manager develops data systems necessary to complete reports for the CAP, tracks the CAP&rsquo;s activities, and compiles responses from the Consumer Satisfaction Surveys. The Grants Manager also supervises the preparation of the annual CAP Program Performance Report (PPR). The Director of Abuse & Neglect Investigations is responsible for providing leadership and direction to the STAT. ACDL&rsquo;s Phoenix office manager facilitates the distribution of support services and serves as a liaison to coordinate the workload between attorneys/advocates and support staff. Total CAP other staff: .43. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
Case Example 1 <p><p>A CAP Advocate assisted a 55-year-old male with a mental illness who had been working in a successful self-employment business as a chiropractor. However, after working in this field for over 12 years, there were serious concerns that he would not be able to continue in this field. He had an evaluation done that showed he had developed carpel tunnel syndrome and also had developed fractures and dislocations in his hands and wrists. <p><p>Since he would no longer be able to work as a chiropractor, he was seeking Vocational Rehabilitation&rsquo;s (VR) assistance to determine what field would be most appropriate for him. Since he had a background in the medical field, he decided he would pursue a nursing degree. VR initially denied his request. The CAP Advocate assisted the client with having VR support him in obtaining a degree in the nursing field, and he is currently attending school to obtain a Master&rsquo;s Degree in Nursing. <p><p>Case Example 2 <p><p>A CAP Advocate assisted a 20-year-old male with Autism. The client had completed his freshman year at a state university, working towards a degree in business. He asked Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) to provide him with driving lessons so he could drive himself to classes and activities required for his degree. VR authorized a driving evaluation, which recommended specialized driving training to accommodate his autism. VR then made the decision to not pay for driver training saying they only provide driver training to clients who need to learn to drive an adaptive vehicle for persons with physical disabilities. VR also said they would not pay for the training because the client&rsquo;s employment goal did not require a driver&rsquo;s license. He appealed VR&rsquo;s decision. The CAP Advocate represented the client at mediation and argued that the federal Rehabilitation Act says nothing about limiting driving lessons to only clients who need an adaptive vehicle. The CAP Advocate also argued that without the ability to drive, the client would have a difficult time fulfilling his college requirements and reaching his employment goal. It is a 2.5-mile walk from his home to the nearest bus stop. Each bus ride to and from campus is approximately 2 hours long. The client also participates in tutoring services and required activities on campus that are scheduled after the public bus system stops running. VR agreed to pay the client to take lessons at a commercial driving school, which includes 30 hours of one-to-one driving instructions. If the driving school is unable or unwilling to accommodate the client&rsquo;s disability-related needs, VR also agreed to reconsider his request for driving lessons from their provider who specializes in driver&rsquo;s training for individuals with disabilities. <p><p>
Certification
Approved
J.J. Rico
Executive Director
2017-11-03
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 16 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0528. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.