RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #926

Oklahoma
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Oklahoma Office of Disability Concerns
1111 N. Lee, suite 500
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Oklahoma City
OK
73103
http://www.ok.gov/odc
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(800) 522-8224
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Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Oklahoma Office of Disability Concerns
1111 N. Lee, suite 500
none
Oklahoma City
73103
Oklahoma
William.Ginn@odc.ok.gov
http://www.ok.gov/odc
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(800) 522-8224
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Additional Information
William Ginn
William Ginn
(405) 522-6702
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
98
0
2
8
10
5
123
B. Training Activities
11
389
(a) history of CAP, other P&As, CAP client concerns, CAP procedures, self-advocacy, CAP outcomes, importance of transition services, demand occupations, counseling and guidance services <p><p>(b) meet and greet DRS supervisory groups, introduce the CAP program to new DRS employees, encourage transition services, encourage transition-age youth to plan for their future, inform job-seekers about demand occupations <p><p>(c) DRS employees, transition-age youth, college students studying to be DRS counselors, special education teachers <p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
On July 18, 2016 I addressed 90 parents and students with disabilities of transition age who were of disadvantaged and low-income families. I spoke to them about planning for their future as well as how DRS services could benefit them to achieve an employment goal.<p>On May 18, 2016 I addressed ten dislocated workers at a DRS Job Club in Tulsa, Oklahoma. <p><p>On February 17, 2016 I addressed 75 students with disabilities and their teachers about how the DRS program could benefit them in achieving their employment goals and the role of the CAP program. The school (Astec Charter School) is predominantly Hispanic.<p>October 22, 2015 the Office of Disability Concerns held a Job Fair in Shepherd Mall in Oklahoma City. CAP was represented at the Job Fair at a table with CAP information available for job seekers.<p><p>On January 28, 2016 CAP mailed CAP brochures together with brochure holders to all DRS offices in Oklahoma. This was an effort to generate broader knowledge of the CAP program among all DRS clients. CAP attributes this effort to serving an additional ten people to the 58 people served in the 2015 CAP report.<p>On January 19, 2016 I had a table with CAP information and transition information for parents and teachers at a Resource Fair at Douglas High School in Oklahoma City. Douglas is a 90% black high school within Oklahoma City Public Schools. <p><p><p><p>CAP visited the Disability Services departments of several colleges and universities including Panhandle State College, the University of Central Oklahoma, Tulsa Community College, Southern Nazarene University, Oklahoma State University in Oklahoma City and Rose State College. We provided transition brochures geared to students transitioning from high school to college and their parents.<p>CAP provides a regular article (A Tip of the Hat from CAP) in our agency newsletter which is published quarterly online. CAP information is available on our agency website as well as Facebook.<p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
1
0
0
1499
9
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On April 4, 2016 both CAP and the Office of Disability Concerns were represented with a table at Disability Day at the Capitol which serves as a resource fair for people with disabilities and an opportunity for people with disabilities to meet with their state legislators. CAP distributed to ten legislators DRS Success Stories generated in the legislators own district. We also distributed the Disability Primer which was information on people with disabilities seeking employment developed by the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
On October 12, 2015 our agency director and CAP supervisor was featured in a piece on disability parking for KFOR Channel 4 television in Oklahoma City. <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
4
64
68
0
7
B. Problem areas
127
38
39
6
0
31
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
30
0
31
2
5
0
68
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
32
12
16
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
0
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<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
19
0
2
1
26
9
6
4
1
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<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
8
26
32
2
68
B. Gender
35
33
68
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
5
1
25
0
33
2
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
2
1
0
1
6
1
1
5
4
0
0
1
1
0
0
2
0
3
0
12
0
0
0
7
11
0
3
0
1
0
0
1
3
68
E. Types of Individuals Served
5
0
63
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
I addressed new DRS employees in their semi-annual Academy on March 9 and August 24, 2016 in which I discussed the importance of communication and its number one position within all CAP complaints. I addressed three DRS supervisory groups across the state and discussed the importance of communication and its number 1 position within all CAP complaints. I suggested they consider a policy on returned phone calls and returned emails. On March 2, 2016 I participated in the Policy Committee of DRS which resulted in minor changes to department policy. I chair the Policy Legislative Committee of the Oklahoma Rehabilitation Council. We met March 3, 2016 and June 27, 2016 and revised our Legislative Primer containing facts about employment of people with disabilities. We also produced DRS success stories of people with disabilities who had achieved their Employment Outcomes through DRS supports. We took the Legislative Primer and DRS success stories to Oklahoma legislators at the annual Disability Day at the Capitol. In a year of severe budget cuts to state agencies, DRS maintained a level budget. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
Defining &quot;litigation&quot; as a Fair Hearing, there have been no such CAP cases filed this fiscal year. One case with Tribal VR went to the agency director which took it to the Tribal Council. This resulted in partial success. A second case was of alleged discrimination against a person with disabilities which CAP investigated to the level of Division Administrator. This case was referred to the Office of Civil Rights for possible litigation. <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-other public agency
Oklahoma Office of Disability Concerns
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
In Oklahoma, the Client Assistance Program has one full-time director. During a part of this fiscal year, the Client Assistance Program had one assistant at one time with 30% of their wages paid through the CAP program and at one time 100% of their wages paid through the CAP program. At the close of this fiscal year, this assistant left our agency. Currently the CAP program has only one employee. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
One CAP client was accused by an out-of-state school contracting with the Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services with sexual misconduct. This individual was expelled from the school without a police report. With negotiation the way was made for the client to attend another out-of-state facility. A client of Tribal VR complained of items on their IPE which were not purchased. Tribal VR reported that they had authorized all items, but the Tribal Council held the right to pay or not pay any authorized items. This case resulted in the client receiving part of what was authorized. CAP did not have authority to force the Tribal Council of an independent nation to pay for the items. An international student came to Oklahoma to go to school with a tuition waiver which allowed them to pay in-state tuition. Because of the oil bust in this clients native country, they did not have funds to pay even in-state tuition. They sought DRS services to pay the tuition. DRS was not able to provide services because of their &quot;citizenship&quot; clause in policy. One client approached the CAP program with a conflict of interest concern. The client worked for DRS in the same office where they received services. This clients case was transferred to another office, and their job was also transferred to a different supervisor. Another client approached CAP because DRS had turned their case over to the local district attorney. The client was afraid of going to jail. The client was able to produce receipts and certification of having attended a class that the department paid. The client was absolved of any debt to the department, and their DRS case was closed successfully as the client was working. One client came to CAP alleging discrimination against them as a person with disabilities. CAP investigated including contacting the Division Administrator involved. The client was referred to the Office of Civil Rights to file a discrimination complaint against the agency. <p><p>
Certification
Approved
William Ginn
Client Assistance Program Director
2016-11-29
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