RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #924

Ohio
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights Ohio
50 West Broad St. Suite 1400
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Columbus
OH
43215
(800) 282-9181
(800) 858-3542
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Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
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Additional Information
Barbara Corner
Debbie Higginson
(614) 466-7264
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
16
0
0
27
10
3
56
B. Training Activities
7
495
(75927)(35 trained) DRO participated on a panel with a county board DD staff to discuss important issues in the DD system. LEND trainees were among the employees of the County Board of DD present for the training. DRO provided an overview of DRO priorities and services, employment discrimination issues and CAP-related advocacy efforts on behalf of individuals served by vr. <p><p>(75582)(125 trained) A DRO staff member provided Cincinnati Childrens Hospital health care providers with information about DRO services and resources and CAP advocacy for appropriate transition services for youth. <p><p>(75783)(10 trained) A DRO attorney provided training at OSUs Multiple Perspectives Conference regarding the developmental disabilities system, the changes happening in the system and the principles of integration, including integrated competitive employment and VRs role in providing employment services and supports. <p><p>(73401)(10 trained) A DRO attorney provided training to OSLSA/LASC legal service lawyers to increase their capacity to represent individuals and their families in IDEA matters. The training was provided as part of the work plan of the education taskforce which focuses on furthering a broad range of education related issues that affect all students with disabilities and involve issues including job training and employment outcomes for youth. <p><p>(74601)(100 trained) CAP provided a training at the 2016 Ohio Recovery Conference to audience of individuals in recovery, family members, and allied professionals who work with individuals in recovery. DRO discussed strategies for keeping a job and obtaining vr services to be able to work. <p><p>(69717)(5 trained) CAP provided training to youth in child residential treatment facilities to ensure transition-age youth are aware of transitional programs including vr, that they are entitled to, educated in how to utilize them, and knowledgeable about who to contact for assistance. <p><p>(74595)(85 trained) CAP presented to the American Council of the Blind of Ohio convention attendees on the progress made to have a Statewide Rehabilitation Council with the majority of seats held by individuals with disabilities to advise the state vr regarding employment issues <p><p>(77448)(70 trained) DRO/CAP provided training to UC UCEDD Transition Bootcamp attendees regarding guardianship, alternatives, voting rights, use of assistive technology in transition planning, and information regarding CAP advocacy for students transitioning to employment. <p><p>(75061)(100 trained) A DRO attorney provided training at Wright State University to students with disabilities, family members, staff and faculty regarding the P&A system and the CAP program. <p><p><p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
(72962)(60 individuals received info). A DRO attorney provided employment transition information at a resource table to students, parents and service providers. Students with disabilities continue to rank as an underserved population. <p><p>(73915)(110 individuals received info). A DRO staff member covered the three location event that spanned over four days. DRO hosted P&A resource tables at the events to provide information regarding transition and beneficiary information relevant to those who were transitioning into adult services including vr, applying for Social Security benefits and those interested in employment. The organization hosting the event provides educational support and services in the rural multi-county area in NW Ohio. <p><p>(76436)(/250 received info) DRO cosponsored and provided stipend resources to allow self-advocates to attend and participate in the 2016 People First of Ohio conference. Additionally, DRO staff attended the conference and spoke individually to many self advocates regarding community integration rights, employment rights, vr issues and to determine if the individuals were supportive of community living options. Conference attendees were intellectually and developmentally disabled self-advocates, many of them living in the Appalachian region of Ohio where there are fewer resources and services available to clients from this area of the state. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
2
0
0
11
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E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
http://www.rootedinrights.org/videos/employment/bottomdollars/<p>A documentary released in October 2016 featured an interview with DRO CAP supervisor Barbara Corner. Corner discussed the main challenges to community employment for our clients--transportation for individuals in both rural and metro areas, and acquiring services from Ohios VR agency, Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD). In addition to the Ohio CAP interview, the documentary also included the stories of several DRO clients who received assistance with employment issues.<p>DROs legal director was interviewed by a staff reporter from the Cincinnati Enquirer regarding sheltered workshops and the VR system. http://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2015/12/31/ohios-problem-with-people-with-disabilities/77313254/?from=global&sessionKey&autologin <p><p>A reporter from the Hechinger Report interviewed DROs employment team leader regarding the issues students in Ohio have been experiencing when trying to access VR services. http://hechingerreport.org/800000-people-disabilities-eligible-help-got-nothing/ <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
27
127
154
8
34
B. Problem areas
14
29
84
6
0
5
0
3
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
69
28
6
1
23
0
128
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
49
14
12
9
0
30
6
1
7
0
0
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E. Results achieved for individuals
76
6
2
0
6
16
8
13
1
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Part III. Program Data
A. Age
6
22
35
84
7
154
B. Gender
64
90
154
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
4
0
1
30
0
80
1
38
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
1
1
0
0
2
0
11
0
4
16
0
7
1
1
0
0
0
1
4
11
43
2
2
9
10
15
0
1
0
5
0
1
0
6
154
E. Types of Individuals Served
57
0
92
1
6
2
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
(76026) (20 impacted) Disability Rights Ohio collaborated with Center for Public Representation, National Disability Rights Network, U.S. Department of Justice to develop strategies for better legal and policy advocacy for integrated day programs and services for individuals with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities are entitled to integrated day programs and services and this advocacy effort helps to bring them closer to achieving this outcome. <p><p>(75448) (500 impacted) DRO and Nationwide Childrens Hospital Social Work Department collaborated to share information and identify systemic issues that can be addressed through mutual advocacy. DRO team leaders met with social workers from Nationwide Childrens Hospital to talk about our teams, priorities and areas of focus, the level of assistance we typically provide in specific types of cases, different resources available, etc. DROs employment team leader discussed the Client Assistance Program and our advocacy for appropriate transition services for youth. We will continue to work with this group in the next fiscal year. (76576) (150 impacted) Advocates attended a policy briefing presented by DROs policy team. Attendees were provided information on the rights of students with disabilities, including their rights to education services and supports and transition services and supports to ensure a successful transition from school to post-secondary education, employment, and independent living. Presenters included the Deputy Director for Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities(OOD) BVR to discuss the multimillion dollar partnership between OOD and ODE (Department of Education) to provide pre-employment transition services and regular transition services to students with disabilities in Ohio. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
na <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Ohio Disability Rights Law and Policy Center dba Disability Rights Ohio
No
na
B. Staff Employed
POSITION: FTE / % Filled / Person Years <p><p>PROFESSIONAL Part time: 2.24 / 95% / 8.56 Full time: -- / -- / -- Vacant: -- / -- / -- <p><p>CLERICAL Part time: -- / -- / -- Full time: -- / -- / -- Vacant: -- / -- / -- <p><p>TOTAL: 2.24 / 95% / 8.56 <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
A high school student who is blind applied to an out of state residential summer program that was more suitable to her needs than programs offered in Ohio and requested Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD) to pay the cost of the program. OODs policy is to choose the least cost option and to use Ohios programs, so the request was denied. The student and her parent requested CAP assistance with an appeal of the decision. A disability rights advocate investigated the issue and the rules regarding how OOD determines provision of services for their clients. She advocated for the client at an informal hearing with the client, her parents, the OOD counselor and the OOD supervisor, successfully negotiating a reversal of the original decision. OOD agreed to pay an equal amount towards what the services would have cost at a similar program offered in Clevelandthe Cleveland programs living skills component was not as intense and wouldnt have provided as much training as the out of state program. Fortunately, the amount OOD agreed to cover equaled the cost of the out of state program. The student was able to attend the summer program to increase her readiness for college the following year.<p>An individual who had worked with OOD in the past wished to return to work. When he reapplied for OOD services he requested that he not be assigned to his prior counselor. Despite his request, he was assigned to his former counselor due to caseload issues. CAP provided advice to the client about his rights in the event he had to work with that counselor. CAP assisted in filing an appeal on behalf of the client and successfully negotiated a change in counselor at an informal hearing. The client withdrew his appeal and was assigned a new counselor.<p>An individual with a spinal cord injury was working with OOD who agreed that she needed a van modification in order to be successfully employed. Before OOD would approve and pay for the modification, the client had to participate in driver training and obtain a drivers license to drive a modified van. A problem arose because the local vendor did not have a van she could fit into to drive for the training and the driving test. It was discovered that an out of state vendor had an appropriate van but was not licensed to have her drive the van to obtain her Ohio drivers license. CAP advised the client that if the issues could be resolved so she could obtain the necessary training out of state, OOD could pay for her room and board while she trained. The client worked with her OOD counselor and the out of state vendor to work out an agreement so she could proceed with her employment goals. At the clients request, CAP reviewed the agreement OOD wished her to sign and CAP assured her that OOD had agreed to pay the costs of room, board and travel for her to obtain the out of state training. <p><p>
Certification
Approved
Michael Kirkman
Executive Director
2016-12-21
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