RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #917

California
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights California
1831 K Street
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Sacramento
CA
95811
(800) 776-5746
(800) 719-5798
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
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Additional Information
Connie Chu
JoAnn Parayno
(916) 504-5919
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
4924
0
0
345
1429
888
7586
B. Training Activities
38
1345
CAP staff provided a variety or employment related training in FY 2016 for the purpose of improving clients and families knowledge of and access to services leading to employment. Topics covered included service and incentive programs of the Social Security Administration (SSA), the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), regional centers (nonprofit agencies that provide or coordinate services and supports for individuals with developmental disabilities), and Department of Education as well as information about CAP. Attendees at all trainings included SSI/SSDI eligible individuals and their families, service providers, and educators. Examples of trainings provided include: <p><p>Example 1: <p><p>DRC provided a training entitled Life After High School: Accessing Funding for College and Independent Living at the 2016 Special Needs Network Conference, a conference for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities and their families, primarily targeting low-income and underserved families and individuals from African American and Latino communities. The training provided by a CAP advocate taught parents, advocates, and community leaders about utilizing advocacy principles to effectively advocate for services and supports for transition age youth (TAY), including funding for college, employment, and independent living. Participants learned about the intersection and responsibilities of the various entities, including local education agencies, the DOR, regional centers, and Independent Living Centers, and how they interface in the provision of services and supports to TAY during the critical years of transition from secondary to postsecondary environments leading to independent living and higher education and/or employment. <p><p>Example 2: <p><p>DRC provided a training to bilingual advocates and job developers contracted through the DOR to assist people with disabilities from underserved communities in preparing for, seeking, and finding employment. Participants learned about the rights and responsibilities of DOR clients and the variety of training and employment services available to persons with disabilities from multiple agencies including the DOR, Independent Living Centers, regional centers, and local education agencies. During the training, staff from the Southern California Resource Services for Independent Living (SRCS-IL) shared their experiences about working with the DOR and the barriers faced by persons with disabilities attempting to integrate into the workforce and the community. <p><p>Example 3: <p><p>DRC presented information in Spanish on transition services and work incentives through the Social Security system and the DOR at a training for parents from ParentsCAN, a parent-led organization that helps families of children with disabilities. The training discussed the roles and responsibilities of the school district, the DOR and the SSA. DRC staff informed parents about their childrens rights
C. Agency Outreach
During this past year, DRC continued its ongoing outreach efforts, identified in DRCs 2013-2017 Advocacy Plan, to increase our visibility and services to underserved communities including language and ethnic distinct communities, rural and low-income communities, people who are homeless, individuals from the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and intersex community, individuals from district disability communities, veterans, and children and youth in the foster care and juvenile justice systems. DRC identifies outreach opportunities specifically targeted to increase DRCs visibility and services to underserved communities and to ensure that the clients we serve are representative of the diversity in our areas of services. CAP advocates continue to identify the unserved and unserved populations in their service areas and target outreach and training about CAP and DRC services to these populations.<p>CAP staff participated in 31 outreach events including staffing informational booths at 15 statewide events, reaching a total of 2829 individuals, families and others, providing information in Spanish, English and other languages. These events were dispersed throughout California and were sponsored by a variety of organizations, including school districts, the DOR, California Department of Social Services, and the State Board of Equalization. The outreach efforts informed people with disabilities and others about CAP, the Federal Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.<p>The following are examples of DRCs outreach and trainings to underserved/unserved populations:<p>1. Panel Presentation at 2016 Fiesta Educativa Conference in Los Angeles Accessing Our Communities: School, Work, and Independent Living on September 30, 2016 DRC developed, coordinated, and participated in a monolingual Spanish speaking panel presentation entitled Accessing Our Communities: School, Work, and Independent Living at the 2016 Fiesta Educativa Conference. Fiesta Educativa is a statewide organization that provides critical services and advocacy to Spanish speaking Latino families to enhance the quality of life of persons with disabilities throughout the state. The panel included Latina/o representatives from the CAP program, the Office of Clients Rights Advocacy (a division of DRC that provides advocacy services to regional center consumers), Southern California Resource Services for Independent Living, University of California Los Angeles, and California State University, Los Angeles, and individuals and professionals with disabilities. Panelists engaged in a dialogue with each other and parents on topics including access to education, work, and community living and barriers to access including discrimination, and stigma. Panelists also discussed their vision of the true integration of all people with disabilities.<p>2. Training for Program Staff on June 8, 2016 DRC provided a training to a group of advocates, case managers, and education and employ
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
1
0
9228
53
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On-line Information/Outreach<p>DRC disseminates information about CAP and related topics on its website, both in English and Spanish. These sites provide CAP related publications in various languages (see section III-G), links to the DORs website and application process, and information about DRC services. Publications are available in the following threshold languages: Arabic, Armenian, Cambodian, Hmong, Korean, Russian, Tagalog, Chinese, Vietnamese, and Spanish. There have been 6,419 unique hits to the CAP home page and 2,900 hits to the CAP publications page for a total of 9,319 hits. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
1. Bill to protect workers with disabilities from discrimination signed by governor, LGBT Weekly, http://lgbtweekly.com/2016/09/27/bill-to-protect-workers-with-disabilities-from-discrimination-signed-by-governor/, 9/27/2016 <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
156
563
719
27
113
B. Problem areas
110
105
360
103
0
156
1
14
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
619
0
55
9
16
7
706
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
245
379
5
5
1
38
6
3
15
9
0
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<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
522
17
5
9
52
63
14
23
1
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<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
24
65
186
403
41
719
B. Gender
361
358
719
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
185
8
35
167
7
275
15
27
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
24
20
10
4
6
9
43
5
52
31
4
17
24
16
1
6
1
9
11
22
185
6
5
8
16
120
0
4
0
51
3
2
2
2
719
E. Types of Individuals Served
183
15
522
7
18
4
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
Disability Rights California has been working with the Department of Rehabilitation, the California Department of Education, and the Department of Developmental Services to increase competitive integrated employment for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and to develop an agreement consistent with Californias &quot;Employment First&quot; policy and other laws to make employment in an integrated setting, at a competitive wage, for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD) its highest priority. During the current fiscal year, the state agencies and DRC reached an agreement about the language for the Blueprint agreement which call for the cessation of placement of people with ID/DD in sheltered workshops and other segregated settings, increasing commitment to placing people with ID/DD in integrated, competitive employment settings, and resources to effectuate the change. The Blueprint details systemic changes to occur over the next five years; DRC will monitor the Blueprints implementation. Although CAP funding was not used for this activity, it will have impact on CAP eligible individuals. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
CAP did not engage in any class action or individual representation litigation during the reporting period using CAP funding, but provided direct representation to individuals in the administrative hearing with the DOR. The following are examples of DRCs representation of individuals in administrative hearings. <p><p>1.Monte is a mid-career and well-respected Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT). He works with high school youth experiencing crises, and with survivors of trauma. Monte has quadriplegia and uses a power wheelchair. He needed a new vehicle with complex modifications in order to keep his current jobs and advance in his career. The DOR denied his request for a modified vehicle. <p><p>DRC represented Monte at a DOR fair hearing in April 2016. The Administrative Law Judge (ALJ)s decision was unfavorable, but left an opening for further negotiation. DRC continued negotiating, and the DOR agreed to pay for a mobility evaluation along with Montes vehicle modifications, worth approximately $100,000. DRC then represented Monte in a Request for Reconsideration with the Social Security Administration. Based on the DORs agreement to pay for the modifications, SSA approved a previously-denied Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) for him to fund a vehicle purchase. At his Fair Hearing, Monte testified that losing his job would be the greatest loss of his life since his spinal cord injury as a teenager. Thankfully, with funding secured for a vehicle and modifications, he can keep doing the important work he does for our community. In fact, he has recently started supervising Marriage and Family Therapist interns, and will be able to advance in his career. <p><p>2.Monica is a physician with quadriplegia. She is currently in a residency program. She is a client of the Department of Rehabilitation. DRC staff represented her in informal negotiations with the DOR regarding the development of an appropriate Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) which would include vocationally-related personal assistant services, 24 hour per day, seven days a week. After the DOR denied reimbursement for her out-of-pocket costs related to personal assistance services (caused by the DORs delay in developing her employment plan), DRC represented her at mediation and then at an administrative hearing. The Administrative Law Judge ordered the DOR to amend her IPE to reflect her entitlement to full time personal assistance services and to reimburse her for her out-of-pocket costs for personal assistance services that she had already incurred. <p><p>3.Dante is a person with HIV. In 2010, the DOR agreed to provide Dante with educational training for the vocational goal of Marketing Manager. Specifically, the DOR agreed to fund the cost of Dantes tuition, books, and education-related expenses while he attended a graduate program at a private university. <p><p>He began his program in 2011. However, the DOR delayed in making several payments
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights California
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
CAP services were provided by professional staff of 8.33 PTE with 7.59 years and clerical staff of 2.41 PTE with 1.94 years. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
1. DRC Helps Client Obtain Assistive Technology to Support Independent Employment <p><p>Kristina is a client of the DOR who contacted CAP seeking assistance because the DOR had not developed an Individualized Plan for Employment during the required timeline. Although Kristin had expressed a goal of becoming a production assistant on set in television or film, and was actually engaged in some temporary work, DOR staff tried to dissuade her from this goal and convince her to develop an IPE with a goal of administrative or secretarial work in the entertainment industry. Additionally, when asked about a mobility evaluation, Kristina was told the DOR would only fund the service if 1) she was pursing employment as a chauffeur. They suggested that she continue to pay for the lift when she needs to travel for work. The DOR delayed creating her Individualized Plan for Employment, requiring Kristina to participate in a vocational assessment and requesting medical records many months after Kristina first approached the DOR for assistance. This resulted in Kristina being denied potential employment. <p><p>DRC successfully represented Kristina at a hearing where the administrative law judge ordered the DOR to provide her with a mobility evaluation as well as other needed services. Kristina is quite excited to be scheduled for her mobility evaluation and a future of self-reliance and independence. <p><p>2.Client Able to Attend the College of His Choice with DRC Help <p><p>Renaldo is a 32 year-old man with a congenital heart condition that requires extensive open heart surgeries. Renaldo is currently a freelance videographer but wants to pursue advanced training in cinematic arts so he can expand his skills and eventually teach others. He turned to the DOR for assistance in reaching his employment goal. <p><p>The DOR developed an Individualized Plan for Employment which included funding for a 4 year college degree. Renaldo was accepted to multiple 4 year universities, one of which offered a major that would provide him the training he required to reach his employment goal, but was farther from his home and would require that he move. The DOR wanted Renaldo to attend the university closer to his home. <p><p>Renaldo contacted DRC seeking assistance with obtaining DOR funding for housing at the school of his choice. DRC negotiated on Renaldos behalf with the DOR. Ultimately, the DOR agreed to pay for his dormitory and on-campus meal plan, in addition to tuition for his Bachelors and Masters Degrees and for his teaching credentials. Renaldo was thrilled with the outcome and began attending classes at his chosen university in August.<p>3. DRC Advocates for DOR to Support Clients Chosen Employment Goal <p><p>Jan, a 54 year old African American woman with physical and mental health disabilities, had an Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) with the DOR that did not match her desired employment goal of cosmetologist. Although Jan had been accep
Certification
Approved
Catherine Blakemore
Executive Director
2016-12-12
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