RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #912

Washington
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Client Assistance Program
2531 Rainier Avenue South
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Seattle
WA
98144
http://washingtoncap.org
(800) 544-2121
(888) 721-6072
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
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Additional Information
Jerry Johnsen
Jerry Johnsen
(206) 721-5996
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
846
32
40
81
176
539
1714
B. Training Activities
61
638
1.Presentation to Seattle Public School Districts: <p><p>Topic: Vocational Rehabilitation agencies and their role in working with transition students, and changes with WIOA legislation. <p><p>Purpose: Explain, clarify and answer questions regarding VR services and role of VR in the transition process, including changes for students with disabilities under WIOA. <p><p>Description of attendees: Special Education Coordinators <p><p>Two presentations, for a total of 15 persons. <p><p>2.Presentations to WorkSource staff: <p><p>Topic: Workforce staff and their role in providing services to persons of disability and other resources for customers needing disability related assistance. Vocational Rehabilitation resources in our state and CAPs role. <p><p>Purpose: To increase partnerships and better serve job seekers with disabilities. To engage and educate WorkSource staff to increase awareness and appropriate referrals to VR agencies. <p><p>Description of attendees: All levels of WorkSource staff. <p><p>Five presentations, 20 staff each, for a total of 100 persons. <p><p>3.Presentation to general VR agency local units: <p><p>Topic: Role and purpose of the Client Assistance Program within both state VR systems to provide advocacy and address clients rights and remedies throughout their VR process. <p><p>Purpose: To engage VR Counselors, VR support staff and VR Supervisors, throughout the state to build relationships, strengthen partnerships and promote open communication and transparency with the Client Assistance Program. <p><p>Description of attendees: VR Counselors, Supervisors and Rehabilitation Technicians. <p><p>Seven presentations to units of VR staff, for a total of 90 persons. <p><p>4.Presentations to General and Blind State Rehabilitation Councils: <p><p>Topic: Updates on CAP role and interventions with VR agencies. <p><p>Purpose: Educate council members on relevant aspects of VR agency policy, systemic issues impacting the delivery of VR services, and WIOA updates. <p><p>Description of attendees: Council members, representatives from community agencies and concerned citizens. <p><p>Four presentations to General Agency State Rehab Council (SRC) members, one presentations to Blind Agency State Rehab Council (SRC) members = 5 presentations, for a total of 105 persons. <p><p>5.Presentations to State Independent Living Council (SILC): <p><p>Topic: CAPs role in both policy and individual advocacy, WIOA legislation and challenges around Independent Living (IL) services. <p><p>Purpose: Provide CAP updates to the SILC, discuss IL challenges in the VR process, educate about WIOA, and build relationships with new SILC members. <p><p>Description of attendees: SILC Council members and representatives from Independent Living Centers, community agencies, and concerned citizens. <p><p>Three presentations to SILC members for a total of 60 persons. <p><p>6.Presentations to Governors Committee on Employment and Disability
C. Agency Outreach
CAP is located, as a tenant, in a large WorkSource located in the most diverse zip code in the state. We work closely with our workforce partners providing information and referral to their staff and customers. <p><p>CAP also continues to reach out to school districts and special education providers to help them, their transition youth, and families understand services under WIOA. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
15000
7
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In addition to the above outreach, CAP has worked closely with the State Independent Living Council (SILC), both General and Blind Agency SRCs, and the Governors Committee on Disability and Employment to provide information on our advocacy services across the state. CAP has also disseminated over 15,000 brochures to its rehabilitation partners and clients. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
N/A <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
48
160
208
0
16
B. Problem areas
31
58
74
29
0
131
2
6
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
35
41
111
10
11
0
208
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
50
91
37
5
5
5
5
0
10
0
0
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E. Results achieved for individuals
65
6
18
6
66
28
18
1
0
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<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
11
36
87
66
8
208
B. Gender
111
97
208
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
35
13
12
45
5
83
10
5
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
17
6
3
1
6
4
10
2
9
0
1
7
12
6
4
0
1
1
2
7
37
9
3
0
6
25
12
0
0
10
1
0
6
0
208
E. Types of Individuals Served
60
0
138
6
25
3
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
4
1.Education on, and implementation of WIOA. Shaping the future through collaboration. <p><p>CAP has been very involved with our State Vocational Rehabilitation agencies and State Rehabilitation Councils (SRCs) to understand and implement the new mandates under WIOA. After the release of the CFRs, CAP was invited to be a part of a WIOA workgroup at the General VR agency. Blind VR agency staff also participated. The workgroup reviewed the entire law providing an opportunity not only to understand the law, but to shape its rollout to VR staff. CAP will continue to partner with VR as they develop training around the legislation, as well as developing our own training to outreach to the community. <p><p>2.Placement of our general VR agency. <p><p>CAP continues to work in partnership with our general agency State Rehab Council (SRC) to address the placement of VR within Designated State Agency. It has been our contention that because our VR Director does not report to, or have direct access to, the Director of the Designated State Agency, that we are out of compliance. It is also our concern that the Designated State Agency creates an environment that is not healthy to promoting employment of persons with disability and creates obstacles to the smooth flow of services. <p><p>3.Case closures too severely disabled without use of Trial Work Experience (TWE). <p><p>CAP continues to work with VR staff on understanding the need to do a Trial Work Experience (TWE) on cases closed as too severe to benefit. This is less problematic at the Eligibility phase that it is for those closed post-Eligibility. In many cases doctors, CRPs and other practitioners make the unemployable decision without clear and convincing evidence. <p><p>4.Timely intake and eligibility determination. <p><p>CAP has been discussing when the clock starts ticking with the General VR Agency for some time as customers experience inconsistent wait times prior to being given an application. This concern has been highlighted by the new 90 days to Vocational Plan requirement as the 60 days to Eligibility has become a case management tool, delaying access to the VR Application and preventing prompt Eligibility decisions. CAP has heard complaints about lack of timely progress with VR services and process from customers CAP is serving as well as receiving this as consistent feedback VR customers at SRC forums. CAP feels these upfront delays and inconsistencies in the intake process rob clients of their momentum and dampen their enthusiasm about participating in the rehabilitation process. CAP is working with VR to develop a more universal and accessible intake process reflecting access mandates for all WIOA customers. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<P><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-other nonprofit agency
Client Assistance Program
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
1.0 Director 0.75 Rehabilitation Coordinator <p><p><p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
Interesting case (1) <p><p>Catherine is a 37 year old woman with MS who contacted CAP because she was denied further college training. Although Catherine was currently working part time (2/3 FTE ) as a job placement counselor, the work was not full time and her health was deteriorating. She also felt her employer was not being honest with her about her future role in the company. She was well liked and appropriately accommodated. <p><p>Catherine felt if she completed her BA degree (she had 2 years left) she would be much more marketable, especially as her MS worsened. <p><p>Her VR counselor was a bit defensive when talking with CAP when CAP initially contacted her. The counselor felt she and Catherine had a great relationship. The VR counselor had gotten her placed in her current job and purchased an accessible van. <p><p>The VR counselor had a number of concerns about supporting more training. Primarily, she felt Catherine did not have the stamina to go to school and work. She also her current employment was a good fit and did not want to jeopardize her job by working less hour or having to quit for school. She is also concerned about VR agencys policy discouraging summer school support. <p><p>CAP pulled together a meeting with Catherine, her VRC counselor, and the VR supervisor. CAP met with the VR counselor prior to the meeting to obtain more candid feedback from the counselor and to provide CAP perspective on creating opportunities, working to capacity, future job security and concerns about VR summer school policy. We also met separately with Catherine to help her articulate her desires and concerns. <p><p>When we all met together, the meeting was very open, positive and productive. It was decided that school made sense. Catherine should have a long work life ahead of her, and that the job she was in was a good fit for social services, her desired employment field. Catherine is bilingual and getting a degree opened the door to many more opportunities. Catherine and her counselor made a date to write a new plan for school with the supports needed for her success. <p><p>CAP, in the spirit of WIOA continues to challenge VR to look towards employment goals that will maximize employment opportunities and provide customers with livable wages and benefits. <p><p>Interesting case (2) <p><p>Bill is a 24 year old man whos disability was due to autism. Bill was referred to CAP by his Mother. DVR had closed his case because they determined his disability too severe to benefit from services. After CAP investigated we found that the counselor had made this determination based on a report from a CRP who had said he was unemployable. The CRP and the counselor had called it a Trial Work Experience, (TWE). CAP challenged the TWE informing DVR that what they called a TWE did not provide clear and convincing evidence nor did it allow Bill to demonstrate his abilities. CAP staffed the case with the unit supervisor and they agreed i
Certification
Approved
Jerry Johnsen
CAP Director
2016-12-14
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