RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #904

Puerto Rico
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTORICO
PO BOX 41309
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SAN JUAN
PR
00940-1309
http://www.oppi.gobierno.pr
(800) 981-4125
(787) 725-4012
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
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Additional Information
ROSA I. DÍAZ-HERNÁNDEZ
CORALIS BONILLA-AVILÉS
(787) 725-2333
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
761
126
0
180
718
638
2423
B. Training Activities
62
1977
CAP staff provided trainings in different schools, universities, public and private agencies, to instruct about state and federal laws, including the Rehabilitation Act, and the program services in Puerto Rico and the States. The Rehabilitation Act protects the rights of applicants and clients who receive services from the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration and the Client Assistant program (CAP), established in section 93-112, as amended. Some of the organizations that received trainings are mentioned below: Technology Institute of San Juan Bank and Commerce Institute The Corporate Source (YAI) PARES Puerto Rico Down Syndrome Foundation University of the East at Carolina University Carlos Albizu in San Juan Interamerican University of PR at Cupey, Barranquitas, and at the Law School at Hato Rey Metropolitan University at Bayam&Oacute;n Hotel School at San Juan Cambridge Technical Institute at R&Iacute;o Piedras CEVI in San Juan MAVI at San Juan and R&Iacute;o Grande Department of the Family at R&Iacute;o Piedras, Cata&Ntilde;o and San Juan Department of Education, Central Offices at San Juan Mita Congregation at Hato Rey School Angel P. Mill&Aacute;n in Carolina Vocacional School Carlos F. Daniels in Carolina <p><p>During these activities CAP disseminated information and educational material about the program services, and other topics related to the Rehabilitation Act, and the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration. The trainings provided were as follow: <p><p>1. Client Assistant Program (CAP): services, population served, applicants and clients of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, program jurisdiction. <p><p>2. Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended: Section 112 and all the related topics. <p><p>3. Rights and Responsibilities of the Vocational Rehabilitation Consumer. <p><p>4. Who and How can access rehabilitation services? <p><p>5. How to request Technological Assistance Services? <p><p>6. Transition to Postsecondary Education <p><p>7. Job promotion <p><p>8. Reasonable accommodation for college students <p><p>9. Employment Individualized plan <p><p>The purpose of these trainings was to create awareness about CAP program services, and impact a greater number of individuals with disabilities, and potential consumers of the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (VA). <p><p>Some of the participants that were impacted during these trainings, included students from: <p><p>High schools Vocational Schools Universities Technical institutes <p><p>Also, CAP provided orientation to clients of the Independent Living Centers, and community rehabilitation programs, and service providers, which are subsidized through funds that belong to the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (VA), and entities that served people with disabilities and their relatives. These are some of the organizations that collaborated with individuals with disabilities and their families: <p><p>Puerto
C. Agency Outreach
1.Collaboration with the P&A: CAP staff participated in conferences and trainings of the Protection and Advocacy System of Puerto Rico (PR P&A) across the island. The program coordinated, provided conferences and disseminated educational material about CAP program and P&A services to individuals with disabilities and their families. Also, CAP staff offered workshops about federal and state laws, and equal treatment toward persons with disabilities. <p><p>2.Collaboration with other federal programs: CAP personnel participated in workshops and chats provided by the P&A programs: <p><p>PADD PATBI PAIMI PAIR HAVA PAAT PABSS <p><p>The purpose of these collaborative workshops was to reach more individuals with disabilities and orientate them about CAP services and each one of the P&A programs. <p><p>3.Participation in Service, Health and Employment Fairs: CAP staff participated in 20 service, educational and job fairs. On this events participated 1,133 individuals, including persons with disabilities and general public. <p><p>4.Dissemination of information about CAP- The program distributed 4,802 educational materials in the different activities held in different parts of Puerto Rico. The materials and documents distributed were as follow: <p><p>What is CAP?- PROGRAM AND SERVICES Consumers rights and responsibilities Employment Individualized Plan Printed presentations about: Transition, Technological assistance and reasonable accommodation for college students. <p><p>5.Distribution of Information about the P&A- A total of 17,981 educational materials about the P&A programs (PAIR, PADD, PAIMI, PAAT, PATBI, HAVA y PABSS), were distributed in various events across the island. <p><p>6.Media: CAP personnel participated in 4 radio stations: Radio Atenas in Manat&Iacute; (North), Radio Sol in San Germ&Aacute;n (South/West) y Radio WIPR in Hato Rey (North). Information about CAP and the P&A was transmitted during the radio programs. <p><p>The outreach strategies implemented by the program impacted a greater quantity of individuals with disabilities in poorly served municipalities, who were unaware about CAP services and Puerto Ricos Protection and Advocacy System (PR P&A). The media is a valuable resource that allows people with disabilities to gain knowledge and skills to defend their rights, and where to request the services they need. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
39
0
0
4802
98
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0 <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
The Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities has a web page that provides information about CAP services and the other P&A programs. During this fiscal year, 14,261 individuals accessed the webpage searching for CAP information. <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
114
91
205
16
89
B. Problem areas
1
4
111
26
0
58
1
4
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
10
36
57
6
4
3
116
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
74
2
8
5
0
14
1
0
12
0
0
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0 <p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
39
9
16
2
37
4
7
1
1
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0 <p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
42
76
47
36
4
205
B. Gender
106
99
205
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
205
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
3
6
1
1
1
0
4
0
5
7
0
1
11
6
0
0
3
1
5
11
38
1
2
4
13
33
0
1
1
36
5
4
0
1
205
E. Types of Individuals Served
39
0
159
1
6
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
0 <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
0 <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF PUERTORICO
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
As of September 30, 2016, the Client Assistance Program staff included; (1) CAP Coordinator 7% of time dedicated to the Program activities, (2) Advocates that are full time within the program, at the Central Office. At the Regional Offices, Advocates performing CAP activities are paid using our Cost Allocation Plan distribution. <p><p>In kind contribution includes the payments of he services of the following suport personel on a ten percent (10%) time basis: the information System Director, (2) Attorrneys, a Budget Director, Payroll Official, Bookkeeper, Accounting Assistant, General Services Director, Conductor/ Messenger, Contracts Register Officer, Front Desk Personnel, Human Resources Personnel, Proprietorship Official, Purchase Official, Payables Official, 3 secretaries for an estimated cost 72,914.59 including benefits. <p><p>Sources of funds expended Federal funds $131,917 State funds (In-kind contribution) $72,914.59 All other funds $0.0 Total from other sources $ 204,831.59 <p><p>B. Budget for Current and Following Fiscal Year Personnel Services Regular Positions Current Fiscal Year 2016 - $63,084.07 Next Fiscal Year 2017 89,872 Social Security $ 4,962 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $9,860 Retirement Fund Current Fiscal Year 2016 8,995.41 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $20,010 State Insurance Fund Current Fiscal Year 2016 $ 1,431.56 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $ 2,643 Group Health Insurance Current Fiscal Year 2016 $ 4,103.68 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $4,104 Christmas Bonus Current Fiscal Year 2016 $2,405 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $ 2,405 Professional Services (Single Audit and other services) Current Fiscal 2016 $127.59 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $0.00 Total Personnel Services Current Fiscal Year 2016 $85,109.31 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $128,894 Other Operating Expenditures Travel and Mileage Current Fiscal Year 2016 $ 1,726.00 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $ 0.00 Insurances Current Fiscal Year 2016 $ 1,726.00 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $0.00 Other General Expenditures Travel and Mileage Current Fiscal Year 2016 $ 1,726.86 Miscellaneous Services (subscriptions, meals and NAPAS fees) Current Fiscal Year 2016 $4,101.19 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $0.00 Program Announcements and publication Current Fiscal Year 2016 $ 2,545.98 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $0.00 Materials Current Fiscal Year 2016 $2,945.74 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $ 0.00 Office Spaces Rent Current Fiscal Year 2016 $ 25,150.7 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $ 2,795.00 Equipment Purchase Current Fiscal Year 2016 $6,942 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $0.00 Telephone Current Fiscal Year 2016 $1,341 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $0.00 Indirect Costs Current Fiscal Year 2016 $818.32 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $0.00 Total Operating Expenditures Current Fiscal Year 2016 $130,681.1 Next Fiscal Year 2017 $131,689 <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
CASE NUM. 1 A 20 year old client, with right vertebral arterial congenital hypoplasia, contacted CAP regarding her transition from the Education Department to the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (VA). She argued that her condition limits her performance because of mobility issues, constant dizziness, and lack of oxygen. For this reason, the client studied in the Home Bound Program of the Education Department. Home Bound is a homeschooling program that allows people with disabilities to study in the commodity of their homes. <p><p>The client requested a transition from the Education Department to the VA, because she graduated from high school, and wants to pursue a college degree. In order to complete the transition, the client required the Education Department to lend the technological assistance equipment she used while studying in the Home Bound Program, until the VA provides her with new equipment. The technological assistance equipment was bought by the ED, and consisted of a laptop, printer and a scanner. <p><p>The client requested a reunion with all the parties involved, at her home, because of her mobility issues. VA did not agree to attend the reunion, because it was going to be at the clients house. The clients father filed a complaint against VA and solicited CAP assistance. CAP staff contacted the VA counselor and agreed to participate in the meeting. <p><p>The meeting was held in May 4 of this year in the clients house. In the meeting participated the clients Teacher and Assistant from the Education Department, the Transition Analyst from the VA, Movement for the Achievement of Independent Living (MAVI), CAP staff, the clients parents, and the client. During the meeting the eligibility issue was discussed, and the parties agreed to complete the transition with the necessary equipment, to provide the client the opportunity to compete in equal conditions. <p><p>Thanks to the CAP intervention the outcome was successful. The client completed the transition to the VA and started to receive their services. The Education Department agreed to provide the technological assistance equipment for one year, until VA purchase the new equipment. CAP contacted the VA regarding the buying of the equipment and confirmed that the process is almost completed. The client and her relatives were satisfied with the outcome, and no further assistance or intervention has been requested. <p><p>CASE NUM. 2 A 43 year old client with osteoarthritis filed a complaint on February 2016, requesting CAP assistance, because since 2012 hasnt received the initial equipment to establish his horticulture business. In 2012, the client completed all the documentation, and became eligible for the Vocational Rehabilitation Administration (VA) services, including the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). <p><p>According to the investigation the VA did not complied with the clients petition. CAP sent the notification of the complaint, and requeste
Certification
Approved
Coralis Bonilla-Aviles
Grants Manager
2016-12-30
OMB Notice

OMB Control Number: 1820-0528, approved for use through 07/31/2023

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