RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #898

North Carolina
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Department of Health and Human Services
2801 Mail Service Center
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Raleigh
NC
27699
http://nc.dhhs.gov/dvrs/
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Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Department of Health and Human Services
2801 Mail Service Center
{Empty}
Raleigh
27699
{Empty}
{Empty}
http://nc.dhhs.gov/dvrs/
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{Empty}
Additional Information
John Marens
John Marens
(919) 855-3600
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
470
69
0
4
300
338
1181
B. Training Activities
18
245
Training efforts were targeted to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services offices within the state that had been identified as having either multiple consumer complaints and/or had a high number of newly hired counselors. The training was an overview of the Client Assistance Program and information on due process. <p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
NCCAP engages in a number of outreach efforts. Our efforts are intended to reach professionals that deal with underserved/unserved populations and to the public. CAP staff consistently exhibit at conferences where those who serve individuals who are identified as potentially underserved/unserved can be educated about both CAP and the VR agencies services. This year this includes: the Addiction Professionals of NC Annual Conference, Substance Abuse State of the Art Annual Conference, Autism Society Annual Conference, National Association for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) Conference, Brain Injury Conference, the Annual TEACHH Autism Program Conference, and the Annual National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Conference. <p><p>CAP has also been attending the North Carolina Developmental Disability Council (NCDD) quarterly meetings where both professionals and consumers attend. We regularly attend and exhibit at the Annual NC Rehabilitation Association and Assistive Technology (NCRA-GREAT) Conference which is open to the public. CAP regularly exhibits at the NC Vocational Evaluators, Work Adjustment Specialists Annual Conference. This is of interest as many graduate students in rehabilitation counseling usually attend. All these conferences are held in different parts of the State so that CAP reaches across the geography of the State in its efforts. <p><p>CAP participates in both the General VR and the DSB Public Forums across the State to reach consumers, including those in rural areas. To reach the transition population, NCCAP exhibits at the NC Annual Exceptional Childrens Conference which parents and teachers attend, the NC Works Conference and the NC Division on Career Development and Transition Conference as well as local Transition Conferences when invited. The CAP Director participates in the quarterly Statewide Independent Living Council meetings staffed by persons with disabilities and the Directors of the Centers for Independent Living to educate members on CAP activities and services. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
500
0
15000
21
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<P><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<P><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
22
69
91
0
21
B. Problem areas
0
11
59
8
0
13
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
14
12
43
0
0
1
70
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
52
9
3
0
1
1
2
0
2
0
0
{Empty}
<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
12
4
1
0
43
7
3
0
0
{Empty}
<P><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
2
12
16
54
7
91
B. Gender
58
33
91
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
0
30
0
39
0
1
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
2
0
1
2
2
4
0
3
4
0
2
5
8
0
2
0
2
0
2
16
3
0
2
7
16
2
1
0
1
0
0
1
1
91
E. Types of Individuals Served
5
0
55
10
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
<P><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
1.This case along with two others dealing with the same issue came to the attention of the CAP within a short time of each other. This case focused on a consumer who was not receiving rent / room & board payments in a timely manner while he was attending college as part of his IPE, resulting in his being threatened with eviction. Several other cases were opened, which focused on other types of VR agency sponsored financial services that were not being met in a timely manner. This case and others brought to the CAPs attention that significant delays in payments were occurring to consumers and to vendors for work provided, such as home modifications. These ongoing and repeated delays caused significant stress in the lives of VR consumers and in some cases brought services to a halt, when current vendors refused to work with the VR agency. Investigation led to the States DHHS Controllers Office as the major source of the delays. The CAP Director worked with the VR Fiscal Services office, the SRC, and the VR administration to find a solution. As a result, a meeting with the Controllers Office was scheduled and attended by several Controllers Office staff, the Director of the State VR agency, VR Regional Directors, the VR Fiscal Services Director, and the CAP Director. Due to the efforts of all parties, the issue was finally resolved and a new system was created in the payment process. This consumers rent was paid and he avoided eviction. Calls to the CAP office decreased significantly related to this problem. <p><p>2.This client initially contacted the CAP office on 01/27/2016. She reported a significant delay in services, as she had been waiting well over a year for van modification on a new van that she had purchased. She was currently employed and needed the vehicle to get back and forth from work. The CAP investigated her concern and worked with the Chief Engineer to get services moving. Along the way, her old van, with over 100,000 miles, blew a head gasket and she could not get to work. The CAP negotiated with the VR agency to help her with the cost of the repair, but the process took too long and the client had to proceed on her own. The CAP then successfully mediated with the VR agency to reimburse her. This action helped the client to continue to work, but then her old van stopped functioning, and became too costly to repair. The CAP advocated on her behalf and the VR agency agreed to assist her with private transportation to get back and forth to work until her new van was ready. In May 2016, the client reported that she was traveling to Georgia to get the fittings done on the modifications for her new van. In June 2016, the CAP verified that the client had received her van <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
Internal to the State VR agency
NC Department of Health and Human Services
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
CAP Director Two Client Advocates Processing Assistant <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
1.A consumer with hearing impairments and mental health issues contacted the Client Assistance Program (CAP) with various concerns: she did not like her Vocational Rehabilitation Services (VRS) counselor, did not want to go to the local community rehabilitation program (CRP), and wanted to know what policy stated about working and going to school at the same time. When CAP contacted her at a later date to find out what assistance she needed from CAP, she stated that she did not like the way her counselor made decisions for her and she would like a new counselor. She also wanted to change her vocational goal from customer services representative to food service worker. CAP suggested that she contact the unit manager and discuss her concerns and provided her with contact information for the unit manager. She agreed to call CAP back after she had spoken with the unit manager and let CAP know the outcome of their conversation. CAP did not hear from her again; however, the CAP Director later received a letter from Disability Rights of North Carolina (DRNC) stating that they were representing the consumer and wanted him to investigate her concerns with VRS which were numerous and included discrimination, retaliation, and failure to provide her with choices to help her reach her vocational goal. CAP contacted the consumer to find out if she wanted CAP intervention to help her resolve her problems with VRS. She stated she wanted CAP to contact DRNC and let them explain her issues with VRS. The CAP Director then sent the consumer an email detailing CAPs function and letting her know she would need to make a choice regarding her representative with VRS since it was not feasible for both CAP and DRNC to serve as her advocates. The consumer chose to utilize the services of DRNC. Based on her decision, there was nothing more CAP needed to provide; however, her CAP case was kept open so that she could contact CAP if she needed assistance with preparing for the administrative review/appeals hearing. The administrative review was conducted and the reviewers recommendations were conveyed to the consumer and her advocates. The consumer decided to accept the recommendations and cancel the appeal hearing. Since there was no further need for CAP intervention, the CAP case was closed 2.The social worker for a consumer who is blind contacted the Client Assistance Program (CAP) with the concern that the consumer was not being served by the Division of Services for the Blind/Independent Living Program (DSB/ILP) because he could not get a referral from the social worker for the blind. He was seeking mobility training to be able to better navigate his home and his neighborhood. With the receipt of the consumers signed releases, CAP contacted his social worker and was informed that the consumer still had not been able to get a referral to the DSB/ILP because there was no social worker for the blind in his county. CAP contacted the DSB/ILP to get more
Certification
Approved
Tara Myers
Director
2016-11-22
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