RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #884

Hawaii
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER
1132 Bishop Street
Suite 2102
Honolulu
HI
96813
(800) 882-1057
(800) 882-1057
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
HAWAII DISABILITY RIGHTS CENTER
1132 Bishop Street
Suite 2102
Honolulu
96813
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(800) 882-1057
(800) 882-1057
Additional Information
Louis Erteschik
Ann E. Collins
(808) 949-2922
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
0
0
0
0
0
74
74
B. Training Activities
19
201
<p>This year, CAP activities were focused on the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and transition planning for 504 and IEP eligible high school students. In a collaborative effort with DVR and their transition section, a WIOA and CAP presentation was given to over 120 individuals, including transition teachers in the DOE and Special Education teachers and school and DOE administrators, Department of Human Service staff, Department of Health Division of Developmental Disabilities case managers and administrative staff, Adult Mental Health Division case managers and non-profit agency administrators. Meetings are scheduled on a quarterly basis this next fiscal year. CAP gave 22 presentations to DVR applicants at orientation. The State Rehabilitation Council was in transition this year with 7 outgoing and 6 incoming members. New members included the head of the of Workforce Development Division, Department of Labor, and Special Education, Department of Education. Quarterly meetings with CAP and DVR were held to discuss issues that included WIOA plans, 14 (c) certificates, DVR funding, Order Of Selection, and CAP cases needing to be resolved. CAP also participated in both NDRN and RSA webinars on WIOA. On 9/27/16 and 9/28/16, The CAP representative in the SRC attended an RSA training in Sacramento, CA., as well as a WIOA Technical Assistance Center (WINTAC) meeting.</p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
<p>COFA event on October 24, 2015 at Waipahu Middle School:</p><p><p>A large gathering of Micronesians was held at Waipahu Middle School from 10-2 on Saturday. It was organized under the direction of Hui for Health and spearheaded by, Barbara Tom, a former Public Health Nurse who specializes with folks from COFA, the Republic of the Marshalls, and others from the area who identify themselves as Micronesians.</p><p><p>I would estimate that about 400 attended this event including a large number of folks who identify as Marshallese. There was also a large number of Chuukese. I saw none from Kosrae, Pohnpei, or Yap. The number of disabled folks was quite large with 20 or so folks who were in wheelchairs. The age of those attending was older with quite a few who were 50 or older. Large numbers of The Marshallese were limited in their ability to communicate in English. The bilingual brochures were helpful but I ran out of Marshallese brochures and even our English brochures. Near the end I was giving out business cards and Chuukese brochures to the Marshallese as It had our contact information.</p><p><p>Events such as this normally attract maybe a hundred or so but even the organizer was surprised by the turnout. The numbers of Chuukese living in Waipahu was expected but the Marshallese numbers were surprising. The numbers of folks who have disabilities was great and many were encouraged to call HDRC for possible services.</p><p><p>Disabilities included diabetes, stroke, missing legs, undiagnosed issues that sounded like mental illness and general medical issues that were not understood by the population in attendance. It appears that many doctors are not utilizing interpreters so the clients understand their medical issues. This is a problem.</p><p><p>Fortunately several service providers attending had bilingual staff who understood Chuukese and Marshallese. That was quite helpful as the client could explain their medical problems in front of me and I could offer them information on how to contact HDRC with some of these issues. I expect that we might receive quite a number of requests for assistance during the next few months from this underserved population.</p><p><p>CAP staff attended the islands state Pow-Wow of Native American Indians and CAP brochures were made available. It was estimated that over 300 individuals attended the annual event.</p><p><p>CAP staff participated in the Filipino Fiesta, an annual event held at Fil-Com Center in Waipahu, Oahu. The event was widely covered by the television, newspaper and radio and it was estimated that over 1,500 were in attendance.</p><p><p>Additionally, CAP continues to provide aggressive outreach to all targeted locations, including Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Education, Department of Human Services, Department of Health, and service providers serving qualified persons with disabilities.</p><p><p>CAP outreach and education will continue this fiscal year to unserved and unders
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
1126
14
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<p>CSC Hawaii: https://vimeo.com/164495447</p><p><p>ThinkTech Hawaii: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QctfWw7Yvgk</p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
<p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
28
29
57
1
15
B. Problem areas
3
7
15
28
0
10
1
1
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
19
7
14
0
1
0
41
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
23
7
1
0
0
2
2
0
6
0
0
{Empty}
<p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
7
6
3
1
8
10
2
4
0
{Empty}
<p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
18
12
12
14
1
57
B. Gender
25
32
57
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
2
0
13
1
3
13
26
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
2
0
0
0
1
0
7
0
5
0
0
0
10
0
0
0
0
2
1
5
15
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
57
E. Types of Individuals Served
12
31
3
0
10
4
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
<p>CAP regularly gives an overview of CAP along with DVR orientations for new applicants at DVR branch offices. CAP</p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Hawaii Disability Rights Center
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
<p>Type of Position - Number of persons - Number of FTEs</p><p><p>Professional Full-time - 13 - 1.3</p><p><p>Professional Part-time - 5 - .5</p><p><p>Administrative Full-time - 2 - .2</p><p><p>Total - 20 - 2.0</p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
<p>A 53 year-old male who lived on a Neighbor Island and who was working full time contacted CAP when he was found to be ineligible for Department of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). He required assistive technology equipment to allow him to maintain his employment. When the CAP advocate was assigned the case, he investigated and was told by the DVR Counselor that the client was found ineligible not because he didnt have a qualifying disability, but because he was not at risk of losing his job. Upon further questioning of the DVR Counselor, the CAP advocate was informed that the Counselor had not spoken to the clients supervisor nor was a memo or email of inquiry sent to the supervisor. The CAP advocate easily contacted the clients supervisor, however and expressed surprise that she was not contacted. The CAP advocate held a conference call with the client, the Counselor and the DVR Supervisor and the Counselor agreed to contact the clients work supervisor. The very next day, the client called the CAP supervisor to say that he had been found eligible for DVR services and a meeting was scheduled for the client to develop an Individual Plan for Employment. The client was very happy with CAP advocacy.</p><p><p>FB is a 30 year old Filipino male who is deaf. He came to HDRC because he had applied for VR services twice in two years and was determined ineligible. He had applied at the Deaf Services Section (DSS) on Oahu. He was encouraged by a community college counselor to try to apply again. He contacted VR Deaf Services to start the process again, but they did not get back to him. He was puzzled why Deaf Services was not contacting to him and why he was denied services twice already.</p><p><p>FB was attending a community college. He had chosen military science, which was a difficult match due to his deafness. Hearing the orders and marching chants even with an American Sign Language interpreter was difficult. He failed one class and received a D in another military science class. He was in remedial English classes because of his challenge with English as a second language. FB found a job while attending school to pay for his education and his living expenses. He could have applied for SSI, but he knew he was able to work and did not want to collect benefits.</p><p><p>The HDRC advocate contacted the VR Deaf Services Section Supervisor and the Oahu Branch Administrator to ask why FB had been denied services twice and the reason for not following up on his third application for services. It was obvious to the advocate that FB had impediments to employment and also needed vocational counseling.</p><p><p>Advocate and FB met with the staff at Oahu Branch. They claimed because FB was able to obtain his temporary employment on his own, he would not qualify for services. This temporary employment was not a job that matched his future goals. He chose to work instead of collecting SSI and it certainly appeared he was being punished for this.</p><p><p>The
Certification
Approved
Louis Erteschik
Executive Director
2016-12-30
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