RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #875

Arkansas
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Disability Rights Arkansas, Inc.
400 West Capitol Avenue
Suite 1200
Little Rock
AR
72201
(800) 482-1774
(800) 482-1174
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Disability Rights Arkansas
400 West Capitol Avenue
Suite 1200
Little Rock
72201
Arkansas
(800) 482-1174
(800) 482-1174
Additional Information
Tom Masseau
Susan Pierce
(501) 492-5760
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
6
1
0
0
0
3
10
B. Training Activities
3
73
1) Employment Network Recruitment Meeting a) Topics: The P&A system, CAP and the relationship between the P&A and WIPAs. b) Purpose: To educate attendees about the P&A system and the relationship between the P&A and WIPAs. c) Description of Attendees: Employee network staff. <p><p>2) Youth Leadership Forum a) Topics: The P&A system, with some emphasis on WIOA, post-secondary education and employment opportunities. b) Purpose: To educate youth leaders from across the state about P&A and CAP services, about vocational rehabilitation services and about WIOA and post-secondary education/employment. c) Description of Attendees: School-age youth participating in the leadership forum. <p><p>3) VA Psycho-Social Rehab Social Workers Presentation a) Topics: The P&A system, including the CAP and its services. b) Purpose: To educate and inform professionals who work with veterans with mental illness about Disability Rights Arkansas (DRA), including CAP, and ways in which DRA can assist the population they work with. c) Description of Attendees: Social workers employed by the VA. <p><p>4) New Student Orientation at the Arkansas Career Training Institute (ACTI). This training was conducted for eight new classes (approximately 150 students total) during FY16. a) Topics: The CAP advocate provided training on the CAP program during new student orientation at the ACTI. b) Purpose: To ensure students of this state residential vocational rehabilitation program know about the CAP and how it can assist them. c) Description of Attendees: Students residing at the ACTI. <p><p>
C. Agency Outreach
Disability Rights Arkansas (DRA) participated in 2016 Cinco de Mayo Health Fair at McArthur Park in Little Rock. DRA arranged for an interpreter to be present, and provided DRA brochures in both Spanish and English.<p>DRA also conducted some research in preparation for developing an outreach plan to the Marshallese community in Arkansas, obtaining information about the communitys needs, contact information and ideas for outreach. It was determined DRA would collaborate with partners (the Developmental Disabilities Council and the University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities) on this project as part of a five-year plan. <p><p>
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
975
15
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Disability Rights Arkansas also disseminated CAP brochures during new student orientations at ACTI, and provided extra brochures to be displayed around the ACTI campus and at regional Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) offices. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
N/A. CAP is housed within the Arkansas P&A. Sometimes other agencies request additional CAP brochures to hand out to their clients; we distributed approximately 200 CAP brochures in this manner. <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
4
18
22
3
4
B. Problem areas
1
13
5
3
0
2
0
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
6
0
0
14
2
0
22
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
11
4
0
1
0
5
0
0
1
0
0
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<P><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
2
1
0
2
4
8
0
1
0
{Empty}
There were four &quot;others&quot;; all of these were cases in which DRA was unable to contact the client and had to close the cases as &quot;unable to contact client&quot;. <p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
0
9
6
7
0
22
B. Gender
8
14
22
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
0
0
0
12
0
9
1
0
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
10
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
4
22
E. Types of Individuals Served
10
0
12
0
0
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
1
In FY2015, the CAP advocate addressed the restrictive policies in place for the students of the Arkansas Career Training Institute (ACTI), a residential vocational rehabilitation program run by the state of Arkansas through Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS). After negotiating with the director of ACTI, the CAP advocate secured the following: students will be allowed to keep food in their rooms, and they will no longer be subject to curfews or room checks. Rather than staff having full access to student rooms at any time, staff now must have probable cause to enter a students room. Interestingly, during this process, the administration of ACTI did enlist the student government organization to assist in crafting some of these rule changes, which revitalized this organization and resulted in students now more actively engaging with the ACTI administration when issues arise. <p><p>This is unlikely to impact other agencies, since no other agency in the state runs a program comparable to ACTI; however, with the capacity to accommodate up to 320 residential students at any given time, and in serving over 500 students per year at this facility, these policy changes impact literally hundreds of students annually. <p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
No individuals were represented via litigation activities in the CAP program this year. <p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-Protection and Advocacy agency
Disability Rights Arkansas, Inc.
No
N/A
B. Staff Employed
Professional staff: utilized 42% of the CAP grant <p><p>Full-time: 12 staff Part-time: 2 staff <p><p>Average time employed by the P&A: 9.81 years <p><p>There were no professional positions left vacant, although there was a vacancy in an advocate position for a little less than two months, which was the time between an advocate leaving and a new advocate being hired. <p><p>Clerical staff: utilized 23% of the CAP grant <p><p>Full-time: 5 staff Part-time: 0 staff <p><p>Average time employed by the P&A: 4.98 years <p><p>No clerical positions were vacant for any time in FY16. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
1) A CAP-eligible client sought assistance for issues involving accessibility and accommodation at the Arkansas Career Training Institute (ACTI). This student has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair. She was not being given an accommodation regarding the &quot;rule&quot; that students are required to make their own beds each day and, in fact, was being threatened with disciplinary action for not making her bed. She was also unable to use the top loading washers and dryers that students used, and she was being forced to use a manual wheelchair when going places because of a non-functioning lift. A CAP advocate met with the director of the facility, and gained the following concessions: the student was able to request assistance from others to make her bed, the facility did purchase a front loading washer and dryer, and the lift was repaired. <p><p>2) A CAP-eligible client wished to participate in an Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS) program called Project Search, which is an international, one-year internship program for adults with disabilities who aspire to have a job. The program provides real-world work experiences, in addition to job coaching skills, to the interns. The client is from an under-served part of the state and would be the first person from her area to participate in Project Search. The clients vocational rehabilitation counselor advocated for her to receive the following, as she deemed them all to be necessary for the client to participate in Project Search: attendant care as prescribed, rent and utilities in Little Rock, and transportation to and from Project Search every day. ARS stated they would not approve the rent and utilities costs, since the client could stay at ACTI in Hot Springs, free of charge, and access transportation to and from Little Rock every day (a distance of approximately 60 miles). Additionally, ARS did not commit to providing any other services to permit client to attend Project Search. The client requested an administrative review, wherein ARS agreed to pay the HUD average rental rate ($768) for Little Rock, which does not include utilities. Again, other services were not considered. At this point, the client requested assistance from CAP. A CAP attorney requested mediation, but an agreement was not reached. The attorney then attended a hearing with the client at ARSs Little Rock office. The impartial hearing officer ultimately awarded the client $1,200.00 per month in rent, $500.00 per month in utilities, 24/7 attendant care if needed, a clothing and food allowance, and transportation. ARS did not appeal the decision. <p><p>3) A CAP-eligible client requested assistance with getting ARS to secure accommodations for a math class the client is required to take for her degree, and for ARS to pay for this math course. ARS was reportedly working on the accommodation issue for a long time, and communication between the client and the ARS counselor was not consistent. With CAP
Certification
Approved
Susan Pierce
Director of Policy and Planning
2016-12-29
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