RSA-227 for FY-2016: Submission #873

Massachusetts
9/30/2016
General Information
Designated Agency Identification
Massachusetts Office on Disability
One Ashburton Place #1305
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Boston
MA
02108
http://www.mass.gov/mod
(800) 322-2020
(800) 322-2020
Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)
Massachusetts Office on Disability
One Ashburton Place #1305
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Boston
02108
{Empty}
http://www.mass.gov/mod
(800) 322-2020
(800) 322-2020
Additional Information
Naomi Goldberg
Naomi Goldberg
(617) 727-7440
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Part I. Non-case Services
A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)
307
326
0
423
2702
247
4005
B. Training Activities
90
2334
CAP provided multiple trainings during FFY2016. Consistent with CAPs outreach plan for the year we focused on reaching transition students to inform them of vocational rehabilitation and independent living services that are available in Massachusetts and how CAP can assist applicants and clients in receiving and retaining those services (VR/IL/CAP training). CAP conducted VR/IL/CAP trainings at seven high schools. Three of those trainings were conducted at specific transition events where parents attended in addition to students and school staff. The attendees at the remaining four school trainings were teachers and administrators. Six of the high schools were large public schools with substantial numbers of students with disabilities, one was a vocational technical high school, and one was a private school for students with cognitive disabilities. Other outreach to youth in transition included VR/IL/CAP trainings to two regional Easter Seals Youth Leadership groups with parents and youth in attendance, to a parent information network meeting for an agency serving adolescents with psychiatric disabilities, and to five separate regional groups of affiliated care providers that serve adolescents with psychiatric disabilities. At the annual SILC conference CAP gave a workshop titled, Vocational Rehabilitation Services in Massachusetts and How CAP can Help. The workshop offered tips for working successfully with VR agencies and advocacy tips for resolving issues of concern. CAP presented the VR/IL/CAP training and a Title I training to two different classes of students at Independence College, a college certificate program for self-advocates with developmental disabilities. The VR/IL/CAP training was also presented to adults participating in a vision rehabilitation program at the Carroll Center for the Blind and to staff of an agency contracted to provide benefit counseling to SSI/SSDI beneficiaries. CAP also presented a VR/IL/CAP training to a regional group of professionals that provide job development and job placement to individuals with disabilities some of whom are already VR clients. Finally, CAP provided seven trainings on CAP services to staff from area offices of Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission and Massachusetts Commission for the Blind and two trainings at local independent living centers. The goal and focus of the CAP training to VR agencies and IL center is to ensure that VR/IL staff understand CAPs role in resolving issues and to encourage staff to use CAP as a resource. <p><p>During FFY16 MOD provided twenty-one trainings on Title I of the ADA. These trainings were presented to state agencies, municipalities, institutes of higher education, a casino, and an organization of farmers. The remainder of the trainings that the agency conducted included the following topics; Titles II and III of the ADA, Section 508 and technology usability, emergency preparedness, service animals, and architectural access. The at
C. Agency Outreach
In planning outreach for the year CAP seeks to identify populations that have been identified as unserved and underserved by the two vocational rehabilitation agencies in Massachusetts. CAP cast a wide net in its outreach efforts during FFY16 contacting the states Recovery Learning Centers, the Childrens Behavioral Health System of Care, a key employment contact within the states Department of Development Services, the Bureau of Transitional Planning for the state, and nonprofit educational organizations that are active in transition issues. <p><p>CAP uses standard methods of outreach; first identifying schools, state agencies, and disability related organizations that would most benefit from connecting with VR/IL/CAP and then contacting them via mail/email or by phone to introduce CAP and to arrange a meeting or training. CAP also does a great deal of outreach through networking at various disability-related events that occur during the year throughout the state. MOD is routinely asked to staff exhibitor tables at disability related events that occur throughout the state. If the event is employment related or independent living related CAP will staff the table. Often times these interactions with the larger community produce opportunities to interact with individuals with disabilities, their family members, and agencies/organizations that are not aware of VR/IL and would benefit from more information. These interactions often result in an individual contacting CAP for direct assistance with a VR/IL issue, an agency contacting CAP for technical assistance or information at a later time, or an organization requested that CAP provide an in-service training. <p><p>During FFY16 through CAP and MOD, CAP materials were distributed at a wide range of disability related events and conferences including trainings presented by MOD. In many cases these outside events provided CAP access to individuals who are not otherwise connected or are minimally connected to disability related agencies/organizations or are individuals with whom CAP would not have otherwise interacted through our traditional outreach methods. In many instances these events were attended by individuals representing diverse populations as well as individuals living in more remote locations in the state. MOD staff has numerous opportunities to network with individuals with disabilities and providers when representing the agency on various boards and committees and when attending events and conferences throughout the state. Some of the events at which CAP exhibited during FFY16 included; Mass Office on Disability Employment Conference, Consumer Conference, Abilities Expo, Annual Legislative Breakfast Massachusetts Developmental Disabilities Council, People with Disabilities and Wounded Warriors Hiring Event, Boston ADA day. <p><p>CAP has attempted to connect with unserved/underserved individuals with disabilities by identifying and contacting multi-service agencies that ass
D. Information Disseminated To The Public By Your Agency
0
0
0
68941
12
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The CAP program was highlighted in the summer edition of Mass Office on Disabilitys newsletter which is distributed to over 2000 individuals. <p><p>
E. Information Disseminated About Your Agency By External Media Coverage
CAP routinely provides CAP materials to the VR agencys area offices and to the independent living centers for distribution to their clients/consumers. <p><p>
Part II. Individual Case Services
A. Individuals served
18
76
94
0
23
B. Problem areas
1
40
48
13
2
40
2
0
C. Intervention Strategies for closed cases
24
34
11
0
2
0
71
D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files
19
1
40
1
1
4
1
1
3
0
0
{Empty}
<p><p>
E. Results achieved for individuals
41
4
1
3
5
11
0
6
0
{Empty}
<p><p>
Part III. Program Data
A. Age
4
10
26
48
6
94
B. Gender
47
47
94
C. Race/ethnicity of Individuals Served
12
1
3
16
0
61
0
1
D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served
6
2
0
0
0
5
6
1
5
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
5
18
1
1
5
10
9
0
0
0
10
0
2
1
1
94
E. Types of Individuals Served
13
3
75
2
1
0
Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation
A. Non-Litigation Systemic Activities
0
CAP consistently monitors all CAP cases as well as all VR/IL information and referral calls that may reveal potential systemic problems. During FFY16 CAP continued to see the same two issues of concern that we noted during the previous year. The first involves what appears to be a failure of some VR staff to explain services clearly and consistently to clients and the second involves the limited choices available to VR clients with respect to vendors. With regard to the first issue, we understand that establishing specific communication protocols is complex when dealing with very nuanced situations in a program that offers very individualized services. Nevertheless, we address the issue with VR agencies at every training and have discussed it informally during routine interactions with administrators of the VR programs over the course of the year. CAP has not pursued the vendor issue during FFY16 as we understand they are in the process of expanding community partners. CAP will continue to monitor this issue as individual cases arise. <p><p>During FFY16 CAP drafted Consumer Guide to Vocational Rehabilitation Services a comprehensive manual explaining consumer rights in the VR context and advocacy tips. The guide has not yet been implemented. CAP also offered extensive comments on the WIOA Combined State Plan during FFY16. <p><p>CAP is a member of the SRC for both VR agencies and a member of the SILC. In the case of the larger VR agency, CAP has just been appointed to chair a newly formed policy subcommittee. CAPs intention is to ensure that the SRC is providing routine focused feedback on both policy and VR service related issues. <p><p>While none of CAPs activities appear to have resulted in a systemic change, we will continue to monitor patterns and will address systemic issues when possible. <p><p><p><p>
B. Litigation
0
0
0
<p><p>
Part V. Agency Information
A. Designated Agency
External-other public agency
Massachusetts Office on Disability
No
None
B. Staff Employed
CAP employed three full time employees for the entire FFY16. <p><p>
Part VI. Case Examples
Case Examples
A client with mental health disabilities sought to create a small business because found it extremely challenging to engage in a regularly scheduled work week. She is an artist that works in various areas including music, painting and most recently jewelry. She was seeking assistance to continue and grow a small online jewelry business. More specifically, she was looking for money to market the business in a variety of ways and to buy supplies needed to create more pieces to sell. She was also looking for tutoring/mentoring to assist her in learning the skills needed to run a business, specifically budgeting/business math and social media marketing. By the time the individual contacted CAP she had already written and submitted a business plan which was denied by VR because they felt that her business plan did not demonstrate that she would be making a competitive wage once the business was running. They also had concerns because she referred to it as a non-profit. She was appealing VRs decision to deny assistance and wanted CAPs help through the appeal process. CAP worked with the individual to update the business plan so that it reflected her previously identified goal of making a competitive wage and provided the individual with contacts for local community organizations that could provide support as she rewrote her plan. CAP assisted the individual to prepare for the appeal by helping her come up with some examples of providers for the types of assistance she was looking for such as a small business media marketing coach and classes at a local community college in social media marketing. We also helped her find small business resources and a math tutor. The client was ultimately successful in overturning VRs decision to deny her assistance by showing her projected income per piece was going to provide her with a competitive wage and that her business was actually for profit but she was interested in eventually donating a portion of her earnings towards a non-profit fund. She was granted monies to be put towards supplies including packaging and the separate pieces needed to create a bracelet. She was connected with a math/business tutor to help her develop her budgeting skills and also with several individuals that worked with her on social media marketing skills. The individual has an up and running online business and continues to expand her marketing audience and promote her brand of jewelry. <p><p>An individual with a brain injury and some physical limitations had been a VR client in the past and had recently gone back to the agency again for assistance in finding employment. The individual has a broad range of interests and experiences in a variety of career fields including cosmetology, culinary arts and in creating physical art (i.e. jewelry and paintings). In the past the individual had been looking for assistance in several different career fields including culinary arts and cosmetology. The VR agency had provi
Certification
Approved
Massachusetts Office on Disability
Naomi Goldberg
2016-12-29
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