ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Washington State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2013 (submitted FY 2012)

1.1 The Washington Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Washington Department of Social and Health Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Interim Director

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Interim Director

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Andres F. Aguirre

Title of Signatory
Interim Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/14/2012

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2013
Yes

Comments:

WDVR assures RSA that it will conduct a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA) on a triennial basis, having last performed the statewide assessment in FY 2009 as required by Section 101(a)(15)(A) of the act and 34 CFR 361.29 a CSNA will be completed by September 30, 2013.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Andres F. Aguirre

Title of Signatory
Interim Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/14/2012

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Washington Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

 2013 State Plan Attachment 4.2(c) Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council; Response of Designated State Unit; and Explanation of Input or Recommendations

This attachment addresses input and or recommendations provided by the Washington State Rehabilitation Council to the Washington State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (the Designated State Unit) and to the Department of Social and Health Services (the Designated State Agency) from October 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011.

Recommendations by the Washington State Rehabilitation Council (Supporting the Achievement of Our Mandate Under Title 1, Section 105 [c] [3])

Under Title 1, Section 105, (c) (3), the Rehabilitation Act requires the Washington State Rehabilitation Council took the following actions:

Meetings between the WSRC and DSHS/DVR Leadership

The WSRC and DSHS/DVR’s Senior Leadership Team meet on a regular basis to discuss emerging issues. Because assuring ongoing communication is the basis of having the necessary access to offer guidance or recommendations, and because DSHS/DVR has been increasingly open and available to communicate with the Council the following is documented to commend their commitment to dialogue:

WSRC Employer and Rehabilitation Partnerships Committee recommendations to DSHS/DVR:

 In 2010, the WSRC’s Employer and Rehabilitation Partnerships Committee focused on learning more about the approach DSHS/DVR was taking to building relationships with employers. On March 17, 2011 we provided our analysis of the approach and offered recommendations. The text of our analysis and recommendations is excerpted below:

We respectfully recommend that DSHS/DVR:

1. Develop and sustain ongoing dialogue with CRP partners for the purpose of analyzing specific practices and assessing whether the employer contacts DSHS/DVR pays for, lead to job offers for customers.

2. Develop and implement outreach strategies targeting mid-sized and smaller employers on an ongoing basis.

3. Develop and implement tracking tools to quantify outputs and outcomes of all employer outreach activities and contacts.

4. Define a narrow and streamlined role for local DSHS/DVR staff which encourages them to take an active role in connecting customers and employers.

5. Give positive recognition and reinforcement to local counselors who develop the skills and relationships needed to connect customers with employers (during unit meetings, statewide management team meetings, publications, and during performance reviews).

6. Develop a revised organization-wide infrastructure for sustaining an outcome-based approach to building relationships with small, mid-sized, and large employers to implement at the first sign of economic recovery.”

 DSHS/DVR Response:

All of the above recommendations were accepted and supported by DSHS/DVR; they align with goals and priorities already established by the division. However, due to the state hiring freeze and other restrictions imposed by DSHS on filling vacant positions, the division was unable to devote sufficient staffing to implement these recommendations. During the past two years the division was only permitted to fill the most critical directs service positions. Now that these restrictions have been lifted the division will renew a focus on employer relations and seek to implement the WSRC’s recommendations for targeting and better tracking employer outreach activities during FFY 2013.

 Meetings between the WSRC and DSHS Leadership

The WSRC Chair and Executive Director meet quarterly together with the Interim DSHS/DVR Director, and the Director of the Designated State Agency. During these meetings we discuss emerging issues within DSHS/DVR.

 

Meeting Date

Key Issues Discussed

Actions

January 24, 2011

Introduction to WSRC’s 2011 priorities

 

 

March 17, 2011

Extended unfilled vacancies

Approval of DSHS/DVR’s hiring plan eight weeks after the meeting

 

December 13, 2011

Customer Satisfaction Survey Results

 

 

 

Recommendations to the Department of Social and Health Services (the designated state agency 1. On March 17, we recommended that DSHS approve DSHS/DVR’s hiring plan. 2. Washington State’s General Vocational Rehabilitation Program has the longest serving Interim Director in the country. We began urging the designated state unit to hire a permanent director in March.

 DSHS/DVR Response

The DSHS Chief of Staff approved a DSHS/DVR Hiring Plan for the period July 2011 through June 2012 that permits the division to fill all frontline service delivery positions that become vacant or are established during this period. In addition, the plan includes filling select administrative and program management positions.

The DSHS Secretary has decided not to appoint a permanent DSHS/DVR Director because Governor Gregoire’s term in office will end this year. The Secretary has chosen to maintain the DSHS/DVR Interim Director so the new administration can make a permanent appointment to the position.

Other points of collaboration between the Washington State Rehabilitation Council and DSHS/DVR within the reporting period

The Council Met Four Times During the Reporting Period (Title 1, Section 105 [4] [f])

The Rehabilitation Act requires that the Council meet four times a year. During the reporting period we met on October 14-15, 2010 in Spokane. In 2011, we met January 20-21, in Olympia; April 20-21, in Bellingham; July 21-22 in Tacoma.

In addition to making formal recommendations the WSRC made a point of seeking technical assistance from Paul Dziedzic, Coordinator of the Center for Continuing Education in Rehabilitation. Funding from the Technical Assistance Continuing Education grant afforded our Council the opportunity to identify shared priorities with DSHS/DVR which would guide our relationship in 2011. Those priorities are:

  1. Establishing common understanding with DSHS/DVR about data points for program evaluation;
  2. Educating decision makers about comparable benefits;
  3. Conducting a survey to obtain customer input about how to improve vocational rehabilitation services; and, (Title 1, Section 105 [4][B])
  4. Advocating for the budgetary and programmatic integrity of DSHS/DVR.

The Customer Satisfaction Survey (Supporting the Achievement of Our Mandate Under Title 1, Section 105 [4][B])

Within the reporting period the Council made the following progress on the mandate:

 Defined what it wished to learn from customers;

  1. Defined what it wished to learn from customers;
  2. Evaluated previous survey instruments to discover if any previously asked questions should be included in the survey instruments;
  3. Developed a project plan and received DSHS/DVR’s support for the project;
  4. Defined with DSHS/DVR which customers would be surveyed;
  5. Drafted survey questions for DSHS/DVR’s input;
  6. Selected to conduct the survey by phone;
  7. Contracted with the Research & Data Analysis Unit of DSHS to conduct the survey; and,
  8.  Commenced with data collection.

 DSHS/DSHS/DVR Response:

 DSHS/DVR collaborated with the WSRC in developing the Customer Survey and is committed to giving full consideration to its results and the final recommendations the Council is expected to bring forth in response to the survey.

 Customer Forum Summaries Provided by the Washington State Rehabilitation Council to DSHS/DVR (Supporting the Achievement of Our Mandate Under Title 1, Section 105 [h]) and [f])

To achieve our mandate under Title 1, Section 105 (h) and (f) the Council sponsored three customer forums in the reporting period. The forums were held:  October 15, 2010. In 2011, we sponsored forums on January 21, Olympia; April 28, Bellingham; and July 21, Tacoma. During the reporting period received comments made in-person from 95 members of the public within the reporting period. We provided DSHS/DVR’s Senior Leadership Team and local supervisors with a written summary of the comments made at each forum. We included the numbers of people who attended and made comment and identified themes in the comments. The WSRC sent summaries on October 22, 2010, and in 2011 on Feb 4, May 26, and August 5th.  

 The Washington State Rehabilitation Council Contributed to the Development of DSHS/DVR’s FFY 2012 State Plan Update within the reporting period:

  1. On March 24, 2011 the WSRC submitted a memo to DSHS/DVR entitled, “Comment on the State Plan Update from the Washington State Rehabilitation Council.” Within the memo the Council offered recommendations about how DSHS/DVR might approach the process of completing the update while being short staffed. 
  2. The Council’s Executive Director facilitated three State Plan Forums in 2011:  One in Lacey; One in Spokane; and one in Lynnwood during May and June 2011.
  3. The Council submitted Section 4.2 (c) of DSHS/DVR’s State Plan Update. 

DSHS/DVR Response:

DSHS/DVR approached its update of the FFY 2012 State Plan in manner consistent with the WSRC’s recommendations. In addition, the division collaborated closely with the Council in conducting State Plan Forums and appreciates the WSRC Executive Director’s role in facilitating these events. This practice is being replicated for the FFY 2013 State Plan Forums.

Progress Made by the Washington State Rehabilitation Council on other activities (pursuant to Title 1 Section 105, [C] [8])

The Washington State Rehabilitation Council undertook historic advocacy within the reporting period. On January 18, 2011the National Disability Rights Network (NDRN) released a report entitled, “Segregated and Exploited: The Failure of the Disability Service System to Provide Meaningful Work.” Within the report NDRN argues in favor of abolishing “sheltered workshops” and “sub-minimum wages” for people with disabilities. 

The Washington State Rehabilitation Council was the only national entity to succeed in getting the industry organization for Washington State’s Community Rehabilitation Programs, The Community Employment Alliance; Washington State’s General Vocational Rehabilitation program, and a State Rehabilitation Council to sign a letter to NDRN expressing support for the recommendations in the report. The letter was sent to NDRN on April 1, 2011.

 DSHS/DVR Response:

 DSHS/DVR appreciates the advocacy role played by the WSRC in support of the NDRN recommendations.

 This concludes the summary of input and recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council. 

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Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs (WSDVA)

DSHS/DVR and WSDVA have procedures for referring DSHS/DVR customers with military service to WSDVA to determine whether the individual is eligible for any state or Federal Veterans’ benefits. If so, WSDVA assists the individual to obtain available benefits. This collaboration has increased the use of Veterans’ benefits as comparable services in cases where DSHS/DVR customers experience military-connected disabilities.

United States Veterans Administration (USVA)

DSHS/DVR is collaborating with the regional USVA to establish a cooperative agreement to facilitate improved service delivery for customers receiving USVA benefits by formalizing referral procedures, designating local referral liaisons, and coordinating services that contribute to the Individualized Plan for Employment.

Washington State Department of Social & Health Services

Washington DSHS/DVR is housed within the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) which is an umbrella agency for Medicaid services, alcohol and substance abuse recovery, long term care and disability services, children’s services, and economic assistance services. DSHS/DVR continues to work closely with the following DSHS programs.

• Community Services Division (CSD) The CSD administers the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) Program and the Aged, Blind, Disabled (ABD) Program [formerly known as the General Assistance – Unemployable (GAU) Program], both of which provide time-limited income assistance and other support services to low-income families and individuals. Washington DSHS/DVR continues to have an interagency agreement with the CSD that defines mutual roles and practices for serving joint customers.

• Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery (DBHR). DBHR combines the former Division of Alcohol and Substance Abuse, referred to as DBHR –Chemical Dependency (DBHR-CD) with the Mental Health Division, referred to as DBHR – MH (DBHR-MH). DBHR-CD contracts with counties for the delivery of outpatient chemical dependency treatment and directly contracts for residential treatment services. DBHR-MH contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals. The following are examples of our strong partnership: o DSHS/DVR maintains active referral relationships with treatment providers at the local level that are funded through DBHR-CD contracts with each County in the state.

o DBHR-MH contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals. o DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH have jointly conducted cross-training between VR Counselors and mental health practitioners at locations across the state to highlight the key elements of both service delivery systems and support better coordination on the employment needs of MH consumers.

o Using Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding the DBHR-MH created and led a “Willing Partners” employment project in which DSHS/DVR plays a key ongoing role. The project has been expanded to provide intensive technical assistance to 6 Regional Support Networks [North Sound, King, Pierce, Peninsula, Clark and North Central (Grant County)] that are committed to improving employment services to MH consumers.

o DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH continue a mutual collaboration to explore ways that mental health agencies can effectively become Employment Networks and build a revenue stream from the Ticket to Work Program that will fund extended services for those mental health consumers who require a supported employment model.

o DSHS/DVR has assigned liaison VR Counselors that work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies across the state. A VR Counselor works from the mental health center at least one day per week, facilitating access to VR services for mental health consumers.

• Division of Developmental Disabilities The DSHS Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD) is the primary agency that funds extended services for individuals with developmental disabilities who require supported employment. DDD contracts for these services with Washington counties, and counties sub-contract with community rehabilitation programs to provide the direct services.

DSHS/DVR has continued working to strengthen and improve its coordination with DDD this year. DSHS/DVR and DDD leadership meet on a regular basis, and are co-sponsoring several initiatives aimed at improving employment outcomes for transition youth with developmental disabilities and advancing the skills of community rehabilitation programs that serve joint DSHS/DVR and DDD customers.

DSHS/DVR is represented as a member of the Washington State Developmental Disabilities Council.

• Aging & Disability Services Programs (ADSP) Washington DSHS/DVR coordinates very closely with attendant care services provided through the ADSP for customers who require personal assistance. This includes coordination of attendant care services required by individuals in both school and employment settings.

• Health Care Authority (HCA) All individuals served by Washington DSHS/DVR who receive Medicaid obtain their services through MPA. DSHS/DVR coordinates closely with MPA to assure that individuals receive medical services necessary to achieve their employment goal.

• Office of Deaf and Hard of Hearing (ODHH)

DSHS/DVR’s Statewide Deaf Services Coordinator participates on the ODHH Advisory Committee as DSHS/DVR’s representative. This position strengthens the division’s partnership with ODHH. DSHS/DVR is working to implement the nationally recognized model state plan for serving individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, or hearing impaired. ODHH manages the Sign Language Interpreter Contract and values feedback from all sources to improve the quality of interpreter services. ODHH is also going to be the managing agency for DSHS/DVR’s contract for Video Relay System (VRS) and Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) technologies. DSHS/DVR and ODHH continue to collaborate to increase communication access for the staff who serve this population and to provide greater accommodations for rural customers.

• Health Care for Workers with Disabilities (HWD) The HWD is a Medicaid Buy-in Program administered by DSHS. Washington DSHS/DVR coordinates closely with HWD to assist qualified individuals in continuing to receive medical benefits after they become employed.

Tribal Programs

DSHS/DVR and the Department of Services for the Blind have a joint memorandum of understanding with Washington’s eight Tribal 121 programs that outlines how these parties and their employees work together to ensure effective communication, collaboration, coordination and cooperation in serving individuals with disabilities who are tribal members in Washington State. The agreement, updated in 2009 and 2010, outlines procedures for referrals, joint cases, financial responsibility, shared training opportunities, information sharing and communication. Tribal 121 Directors meet annually with DSHS/DVR and DSB Directors in a government-to-government collaboration to promote partnership, to maximize resources, and to ensure high quality services for individuals with disabilities who are tribal members. DSHS/DVR continues to provide data to its Tribal partners to assist in provision of services and collaboration.

At the DSHS level, the division continues its cooperative working relationships and service delivery commitments with all Federally Recognized Washington tribes, including those that do not operate Federally funded Tribal VR programs. DSHS/DVR participates as a member on the DSHS Indian Policy Advisory Committee.

Governor’s Committee on Disability Issues and Employment

The DSHS/DVR Director participates as a member of the Governor’s Committee and partners with the Committee on various efforts.

DSHS/DVR also partners with the Governor’s Committee on a one-week youth with disabilities leadership camp conducted each year at The Evergreen State College.

Centers for Independent Living

DSHS/DVR currently contracts Title VII, Part B funds to four independent living centers throughout Washington State. Centers use Part B funds to enhance and expand core independent living services with a focus on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, IL Centers have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas including disability groups, minority groups and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment for youth with disabilities to be able to feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies who support disabilities by enhancing youth in understanding IL philosophy, how to successfully self advocate, and how to talk with legislators about disability issues.

Washington State Business Leadership Network (WSBLN) The WSBLN is a network of employers who educate and support businesses to hire, retain, and improve customer service for people with disabilities.

Community Employment Alliance

The Community Employment Alliance is a membership organization comprised of community rehabilitation programs. DSHS/DVR participates in meetings to share information, hear concerns and collaborate on issues affecting employment services for individuals referred to providers by the Division.

Traumatic Brain Injury Strategic Partnership Advisory Council

In the late 1990s, DSHS/DVR was the primary sponsor of a demonstration grant to identify gaps in providing services to individuals who sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI). DSHS/DVR continues to be a represented member of the TBI Strategic Partnership Advisory Council. This group discusses TBI-related policy issues, system development, and/or the need for services to meet the needs of TBI survivors, family members, prospective employers and community members. The TBI Strategic Partnership Advisory Council has identified gaps in housing, a lack of resources and a need for support group facilitator training. This Council has successfully encouraged the Washington State Legislature to pass legislation that adds fees to traffic violations, like negligent driving and speeding because these offenses tend to lead to injury accidents and TBIs. These collected fees are used to help fund TBI-related programs and resources. DSHS/DVR continues to be an active partner in addressing the needs of individuals in Washington State who have been, or will be impacted by traumatic brain injuries in the future.

University of Washington Rehabilitation Program

Since 2006, DSHS/DVR and the University of Washington Rehabilitation Counseling Unit have collaborated to maintain an on-site Rehabilitation Medicine-DSHS/DVR liaison role. This mutually beneficial relationship improves inpatient and outpatient care at the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) by providing UWMC patients with direct access to DSHS/DVR services during their hospital treatment. Early introduction in the medical setting provides DSHS/DVR with comprehensive insight into patient needs and makes the referral process more efficient and seamless. This relationship provides UWMC patients with additional resources for education, support, and funding. The DSHS/DVR liaison works to coordinate DSHS/DVR orientation and intake procedures for individuals referred from UW Rehab Medicine; determines eligibility for DSHS/DVR services; provides information and referral; participates in UWMC team staffing to coordinate DSHS/DVR services with the interdisciplinary team treatment; upon release from the hospital, assists with transitioning the individual to a VR Counselor near their home; learns about extensive medical and other resources available through the UW Medical School; and shares resources with other DSHS/DVR counselors.

US Department of Agriculture

DSHS/DVR has not entered into agreements with programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

State Use Contracts

DSHS/DVR has not entered into agreements related to state use contracts.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2012 4:53PM by sawahansenp

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

DSHS/DVR updated its agreement with the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) in 2008 to reflect the changes passed in amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The agreement outlines each agency’s overall role and responsibilities relating to the provision of transition services to high school students with disabilities. This agreement provides for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment (IPE) before each student determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if DSHS/DVR is operating under an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting. Under this agreement, DSHS/DVR routinely consults with and provides technical assistance to high schools and educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post school activities, including vocational rehabilitation services. DSHS/DVR’s agreement with OSPI also states that DSHS/DVR will coordinate services with students’ Individualized Education Plans (IEP). The Interagency Agreement lays the groundwork for DSHS/DVR’s roles and responsibilities.

DSHS/DVR’s primary services while a student is in high school are outreach, information and referral, counseling and guidance to plan for post-school services and activities. DSHS/DVR authorizes and pays for any services needed to establish a transition student’s eligibility for DSHS/DVR services and only funds services outside the scope of the school district’s FAPE (free appropriate public education) responsibility.

The DSHS/DVR/OSPI agreement lists several procedures that are to be used to increase the number of students identified as needing transition services as well as ensuring that the services are provided as soon as possible. Some specific procedures include:

• An OSPI representative is a member of the State’s Rehabilitation Council.

• Assigning a VR Counselor liaison to each high school.

• Developing a system to exchange and disseminate data and information.

• Working with county/community councils to provide training and technical assistance relating to transition services.

• Providing DSHS/DVR outreach to increase education about DSHS/DVR services to underserved populations and students with disabilities.

Implementation of these elements of the agreement continues to be a “work in progress.” Personnel turnover at OSPI has eroded DSHS/DVR’s relationship with the state education agency. New linkages must be established to effectively carry out our working agreements. This continues to be a focus for 2013.

In addition, the agreement sets the expectation that DSHS/DVR will assign a VR Counselor as a liaison to every public and tribal high school in the state where there is staff capacity. A list of liaison assignments is available on several education-related web sites, as well as the DSHS/DVR and the OSPI web sites. DSHS/DVR transition liaison counselors conduct periodic outreach and ongoing consultation to teachers, students, families and others in the education community.

The DSHS/DVR Customer Services Manual provides guidance to the VR Counselor that the IPE is to be coordinated with the IEP and development of the IPE should begin, if feasible, prior to the student leaving the school setting.

The DSHS/DVR Area Managers have responsibility for working with counseling staff to ensure quality transition services are provided.

DSHS/DVR intends to carry out the following new strategies to further improve coordination of education referrals and to better serve transition youth:

• Develop Inter-Local agreements with specific local school districts to better define the services and responsibilities that high schools and DSHS/DVR will respectively provide to jointly serve youth with disabilities as they transition into the world of work. These agreements will include steps that will provide better referral linkages for high school students with disabilities in both special education and regular education to apply for DSHS/DVR services before they graduate.

• Engage other partners, including the State Rehabilitation Council, the State Independent Living Council, Centers for Independent Living (CIL), Family Policy Council, DSHS partners and Workforce Development partners in designing an improved service delivery model. This model will develop stronger partnerships with Workforce Development Youth Councils, high schools, community colleges and other training and education programs.

• Participate in a student drop-out prevention work group with the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Department of Social and Health Services.

• Collaborate more closely with Tribal VR Programs to better serve Tribal youth.

• A statewide Transition Conference will be co-sponsored by DSHS/DVR, the DSHS Division of Developmental Disabilities, Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Washington Initiative for Supported Employment, and the Center for Change in Transition Services to promote cross-system training and disseminate best practices among vocational rehabilitation and education partners.

• Publish and distribute the DSHS/DVR Guide for High School Transition Students and improve distribution of the DSHS/DVR High School Transition DVD.

Below are some examples of specific transition projects that DSHS/DVR continues to be involved with in local communities across the state. These examples reflect the general relationship DSHS/DVR has developed with schools in most communities.

• In Snohomish County DSHS/DVR participates on a countywide “Transition Council.” The Transition Council meets once a month. The council is comprised of Snohomish County DD, the various schools (transition teachers and school psychologist), DSHS/DVR (transition counselor and work source liaison), many Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and interested parents. DSHS/DVR has made presentations on various topics as well as planned events (transition fairs for example). Sometimes many of the special education directors will attend to help DSHS/DVR address specific service needs.

• One of the DSHS/DVR Supervisors in Spokane is the Chair for the Workforce Development Council’s Youth Council. The Youth Council has been involved in hosting “Youth Career Fairs” for high school students from the Spokane area. Additionally the Youth Council opened a new “Next Generation Zone” and has worked to develop a website for youth, www.nextgenzone.org.

• “Passport to Success” is a program utilized through DSHS/DVR’s staff at WorkSource Yakima to assist disabled youth to utilize job seeking services. The program connects DSHS/DVR WorkSource Yakima, Davis High School, and Disability Navigators from Provident Horizon Services. The classroom instructor uses the Magellan program to assess students who then go to the WorkSource to attend a Modified Job Hunter series tailored to youth. DSHS/DVR is involved in the classroom presentations as well as helping with orientation to WorkSource.

• DSHS/DVR is involved with the Yakima County Transition Council. This committee is comprised of DSHS/DVR, the Division of Developmental Disabilities, Yakima County Developmental Disabilities, Special Education Directors, the Educational Service District 105 Transition Coordinator, a parent representative, a CRP provider, Workforce Development Council (WDC) Youth Contractors, and WDC Transition staff. The group works together to improve transition services and post-school outcomes for county disabled youth. The group has come up with five core outcomes of concentration for transition youth: employment, post secondary education, post secondary training, agency links, and engagement. The group feels it is imperative for youth to have activities geared toward one of these five outcomes.

• King County School-to-Work is a cooperative program between King County School-to-Work and DSHS/DVR. The purpose of the program is to provide developmentally disabled students with vocational services and experiences that culminate in employment prior to their exit from the school district transition program. The intent of the program is to achieve paid employment by June 30th of the exit year. At the very least the program secures linkages with DSHS/DVR and CRPs well before the student’s exit from the transition program. Services typically begin in the summer school to work program.

• Vendor linkages are typically made in the spring of the year prior to the last year of the transition program. Vendor linkages are a joint venture between the family and King County School to Work.

• In Whatcom County DSHS/DVR is involved with the “Transition Team Road Show.” This is a collaborative team effort involving a DSHS/DVR Transition VRC, the Whatcom County Developmental Disabilities coordinator, the lead DD case manager, and ARC of Whatcom County. This team has created trainings on topics of interest to parents, teachers, and students that have been delivered to all 12 high schools in Whatcom County. Training topics include: Understanding Benefits, Navigating Agencies and Systems, Next Steps After High School, Goal Setting & Career Choices, Person Centered Planning, Building Community Supports, and Disability Resources.

• In Skagit County DSHS/DVR is involved with the “Monthly Transition Round Table.” This is a monthly meeting open to all interested Transition Service Providers in Skagit County. Resources, events, trainings, and activities are shared at this monthly meeting. This forum has also been used to strategize how to build transition services and outreach to areas and schools in the county where transition services are limited.

DSHS/DVR also maintains a strong liaison relationship with the Center for Childhood Deafness & Hearing Loss to refer deaf and hard of hearing students to DSHS/DVR for services and the Washington School for the Deaf (WSD). Each fall the Statewide Coordinator of Deaf Services (SCD) contacts WSD for a list of junior and senior students and distributes this information to the students’ hometown Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf (RCD). The local RCD then assumes responsibility for arranging a meeting with the student to begin the application process. SCD follows up in the spring with WSD and the local RCDs to facilitate any additional transition needs. DSHS/DVR maintains a presence on the campus of WSD through participation in the annual transition fair and periodic communications by the SCD with WSD.

Additionally, DSHS/DVR continues to focus of its Title VII, Part B funding by contracting with five Centers for Independent Living throughout Washington State to enhance and expand core independent living services with a focus on youth with significant disabilities. In addition to core services, IL Centers have been focusing on outreach to increase services in unserved or underserved geographic areas including disability groups, minority groups and urban or rural populations with the focus on youth with significant disabilities and 504 plans. The goal is to create a safe environment for youth with disabilities to be able to feel comfortable and confident when talking to allies who support disabilities by enhancing youth in understanding IL philosophy, how to successfully self advocate, and how to talk with legislators about disability issues.

This screen was last updated on Jun 26 2012 3:08PM by sawahansenp

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Washington DSHS/DVR currently contracts with Private Nonprofit VR Service Providers to provide services in accordance with DSHS/DVR’s Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) contract. Contracts are procured through an open Request for Qualifications (RFQ) process. The RFQ defines the services, expected outcomes of service delivery, payment systems, uniform fees, and the qualifications that a prospective contractor is required to meet in order to be granted a DSHS/DVR CRP Contract. DSHS/DVR does not currently limit the number of Nonprofits responding to the RFQ and Nonprofits choose which of the contract services to provide.

The services identified and defined in the contract are:

• Vocational Evaluation: one or more types of standardized vocational tests used to obtain objective information from the DSHS/DVR customer in response to specific questions presented by a DSHS/DVR Counselor about a customer’s work-related strengths and limitations;

• Trial Work Experience: contractors are responsible for arranging a real work setting(s) and assessing whether a customer is able to benefit from VR services. The results of the TWE are used to determine eligibility based on clear and convincing evidence whether the individual’s disability is too significant to benefit from VR services;

• Community-based Assessment: contractors are responsible for finding and securing positions in realistic work settings to help assess work interests and abilities and identify any employment barriers a customer may face. This process will assist in collecting information needed to determine eligibility or for identifying the nature and extent of support(s) and accommodation(s) needed for the customer to obtain and maintain competitive employment;

• Job Placement: location of and placement of a customer into a paid and integrated employment position, as mutually defined and agreed to by the DSHS/DVR Counselor, customer and CRP;

• Intensive Training (available for individuals having a Supported Employment plan): one-on-one job skills training and support provided at the supported employment job site to enable a DSHS/DVR customer to: 1) attain job stabilization in on-the-job performance, with job supports; 2) meet their employers’ expected levels of work productivity; and 3) transition to long-term Extended Services as provided by an entity other than DSHS/DVR;

• Job Retention (for individuals not having a Supported Employment plan): individualized training and support services that enable a DSHS/DVR customer to learn the essential functions of a job, meet the employer’s expected level of job performance, and retain their employment for ninety (90) calendar days past the point of Job Placement.

Some of the services in the contract are provided at various levels of intensity. Trial Work Experience, Community Based Assessment, Job Placement, Intensive Training, and Job Retention are available in three levels of intensity. The level of intensity is determined by universal and unique barriers presented by the customer that are impeding the customer from obtaining and/or maintaining employment.

All services in the contract are outcome based. This means payments are made for actual delivery of the expected result or outcome of service rather than paying for “service” as a free-standing process through a unit-of-service basis. The expected outcome is specific to the service as indicated in the definition with a report detailing the activities associated with the provision of service and outcomes attained. Incentives to pay bonus for customer employment outcomes under certain circumstances are included in the contract.

DSHS/DVR will establish a workgroup with CRP and DSHS/DVR staff to build a CRP evaluation model that includes both quantitive information and quality of outcomes and process.

• The evaluation model will be tested, improved and adopted.

• A DSHS/DVR “scorecard” will be developed to capture CRP evaluation results to share with staff, customers and CRPs.

Also, a DSHS/DVR workgroup is being developed to establish “best practices” for VR staff to work more effectively with CRPs, including the development of training for DSHS/DVR staff and CRP staff. Additionally, the workgroup will recommend specific DSHS/DVR supported training for CRP partners to help them more effectively serve DSHS/DVR customers.

As relevant policy changes are updated in the DVR Policy Manual, they will be shared not only with DSHS/DVR staff but also with CRPs. In addition, DSHS/DVR plans to conduct regular meetings and information sharing with CRPs at the local level to improve communication, support service delivery coordination and enhance services to customers. These meetings will assure that DSHS/DVR follows consistent practices at the local level and keeps CRPs regularly informed of relevant policy or program changes. DSHS/DVR will continuously evaluate the CRP contract model to ensure it supports high performance at a reasonable cost for both DSHS/DVR and providers.

This screen was last updated on Jun 26 2012 3:13PM by sawahansenp

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Washington DSHS/DVR primarily provides Supported Employment services to individuals with developmental disabilities and individuals with mental illness. Of these two customer groups, individuals with developmental disabilities represent the vast majority of Supported Employment outcomes. While we continue to work with the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery – Mental Health to identify resources for supported employment, the state has limited capacity at this time to provide extended services except in a small number of communities. This limited capacity continues to make it difficult to provide Supported Employment services to individuals with mental illness.

Diligent efforts continue to facilitate extended services for individuals with mental illness through natural supports, employers and self-pay. However, very often individuals with significant mental health disabilities require more intensive support than is available through these resources.

Efforts continue to promote and expand resources for extended services to individuals with mental illness. Washington DSHS/DVR is working in collaboration with the Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery – Mental Health, the Mental Health Consortium, and the Washington Community Mental Health Council to expand the availability of extended services through alternative resources and innovative approaches. The intended result of this effort will be to establish cooperative agreements with all Regional Support Networks responsible for the delivery of community mental health services at the County level by the end of FFY 2013.

In light of the changes to the Social Security Administration Ticket to Work/Employment Network regulations, DSHS/DVR continues to promote the use of Ticket to Work as a potential income source for developmental disability (DD), mental health (MH), and traumatic brain injury (TBI) service providers to build their capacity for providing extended support services.

DSHS/DVR also will renew written agreements with County Developmental Disabilities Programs and Mental Health Regional Support Networks by the end of FFY 2013 to clarify roles and responsibilities for their provision of extended services to joint customers. Efforts to renew these agreements have been ongoing since FFY 2009 and have proven to be extremely challenging. County Developmental Disabilities Programs and Mental Health Regional Support Networks are reluctant to sign any agreements for the provision of extended services due to the instability of their funding.

During FFY 2013 DSHS/DVR will meet with each County Developmental Disabilities Program and Mental Health Regional Support Network in attempts to develop a cooperative agreement for the provision of extended services. In addition, DSHS/DVR will request the DSHS Division of Developmental Disabilities and DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery to enter in to state level activities that will facilitate more successful efforts to develop local agreements.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2012 4:57PM by sawahansenp

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

DSHS/DVR’s response to Attachment 4.10 questions follow each question below and are preceded by “DSHS/DVR response.”

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

(1) Qualified personnel needs

(A) The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR employs a total of 267 field service personnel to serve approximately 13,000 individuals per year. Personnel providing direct VR services to individuals are employed in the classifications listed below.

(B) The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category;

DSHS/DVR response: In addition to current field staff vacancies, the Washington State Legislature as a budget savings measure mandated a 3 per cent salary reduction through June 30, 2013. To offset the salary reduction, staff are awarded 5.2 hours of paid leave per month. DSHS/DVR currently needs to fill vacancies within the following personnel classifications as listed below in order to be at a full staffing level.

(C) Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR projects a personnel attrition rate of approximately 10% per year over the next five years. It is projected over this period that approximately 12,000-13,000 individuals per year will be served. Based on these projections, it is anticipated the number of positions listed below will need to be filled during this period.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 VR Counselor 1 4 0 4
2 VR Counselor 2 53 10 25
3 VR Counselor 3 75 3 38
4 VR Counselor 4 4 1 1
5 Rehabilitation Technician 1 76 3 38
6 Rehabilitation Technician 2 14 0 7
7 VR Supervisor 23 2 12
8 Assistive Technology & Assessment Practioner 3 1 1
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

(2) Personnel development

(A) A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program:

DSHS/DVR response: Western Washington University is the only graduate program in the State of Washington that directly prepares vocational rehabilitation professionals.

(B) The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program:

DSHS/DVR response: Western Washington University presently enrolls 46 students per year in the Masters of Rehabilitation Counseling program.

(C) The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

DSHS/DVR response: In FFY 2011 Western Washington University’s Rehab Counseling program graduated 15 students. All of these graduates hold the credentials for certification as a Rehabilitation Counselor.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Western Washington University 46 2 10 15
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation, and retention of qualified personnel.

Describe the development (updated on an annual basis) of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection. The plan provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between DSHS/DVR and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare, and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR’s FTE allotment remains capped at 320.5 FTEs until June 30, 2013. The division is able to recruit all field service vacancies as they occur, but may not exceed the FTE cap. During the previous two years a statewide hiring freeze was in effect for all non-emergent state programs which significantly restricted DSHS/DVR’s recruitment activities. Since the hiring freeze ended in July 2012, the division has resumed regular recruitment activities. However, approval by the DSHS Secretary is required to fill any administrative or program management positions as an ongoing budget savings step.

DSHS/DVR continues using the following strategies to fill vacant positions with qualified personnel.

DSHS/DVR has well established recruitment linkages with the following institutions of higher education that offer Rehabilitation Counseling Programs:

• Western Washington University

• University of Idaho

• Portland State University

• Western Oregon University

• San Diego State University

• Fresno State University

• Utah State University

DSHS/DVR will concentrate its recruitment efforts on institutions in adjacent states. Recruitment announcements will continue to be sent nationally to institutions of higher education.

Recruitment of qualified candidates in sufficient numbers to fill Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor positions is a continuing challenge. The national shortage of qualified VRC applicants has significantly impacted DSHS/DVR’s ability to fill vacancies in a timely manner, especially in rural locations. To address this challenge, DSHS/DVR has broadened the list of master’s degrees that qualify for a VRC position to include a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling, psychology, counseling, or a field related to vocational rehabilitation (such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities). While the division has broadened the qualifying master’s degrees for a VRC position, the competencies that a VRC applicant is required to demonstrate have not been modified.

Up to last year, the division also had been recruiting VRC positions on an “in-training” basis when there was not an adequate pool of qualified applicants. Individuals were hired in to these positions as Rehabilitation Technicians and then provided education, educational leave, and work experience to move in to a VRC position. This has been discontinued because DSHS administrative policies and the 2011-13 Collective Bargaining between the State of Washington and Washington Federation of State Employees curtailed the provision of paid educational leave and eliminated the use of Rehabilitation Technician experience as a qualifying experience for a VRC position. DSHS/DVR has suspended its “in training” positions until new procedures have been developed.

DSHS/DVR is establishing a compensation workgroup to build the foundation required to reclass the Rehabilitation Technician (RT), Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) and Vocational Rehabilitation Supervisor (VRS) series at a higher level of salary compensation to enhance recruitment and maintain the qualified professional staff needed to serve DSHS/DVR customers.

A particular focus of recruitment continues to be aimed at attracting candidates with Latino and American Indian backgrounds, since these are individuals who are presently under-represented among DSHS/DVR personnel. Targeted recruitment will continue to be conducted in collaboration with a wide range of Latino community-based organizations, American Indian VR Programs and other Tribal organizations, as well as African-American community based organizations.

To assure that new employees get off to a successful start, DSHS/DVR has developed a comprehensive “New Employee On-Boarding Guide” that will be implemented in FFY 2013. This guide will be used by all supervisors when new employees are hired to assure that individuals receive adequate orientation and training to perform their roles and responsibilities.

DSHS/DVR continues to offer opportunities for staff interested in advancement and will adopt a formal succession plan by the end of FFY 2013. This plan will include a number of elements that encourage staff to prepare and compete for future advancement opportunities within the division, such as: leadership training, introductory courses on supervision, mentoring and networking activities.

 

(c) Personnel standards

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that DSHS/DVR professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

(1) Standards consistent with any national or state-approved or -recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR will continue applying state-based registration requirements as the basis for satisfying CSPD personnel standards. These requirements are maintained by the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries as registration standards for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors.

All current DSHS/DVR counseling personnel (Field Services Administrator, Area Managers, VR Supervisors, and VR Counselors) hold credentials that are consistent with either the state-based VRC registration requirements or the national certification standards of the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC).

DSHS/DVR will continue to apply minimum qualifications for new hires into VR Counselor and VR Supervisor positions that require the following credentials:

A master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, Psychology, Counseling, or a field related to vocational rehabilitation (such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities), or

CRCC Certification, or

A master’s degree in a closely related field, plus 18-quarter (12-semester) credit hours in specified rehabilitation counseling courses at the graduate level.

(2) To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the State Plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the timelines for taking each step.

DSHS/DVR response: This requirement is not applicable to DSHS/DVR since existing standards for all personnel are based on the highest requirements in Washington State.

(3) The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

(A) Specific strategies for retraining, recruiting, and hiring personnel;

(B) The specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

(C) Procedures for evaluating the designated state unit’s progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

(D) The identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

DSHS/DVR response: This requirement is not applicable to DSHS/DVR since existing standards for all personnel are based on the highest requirements in Washington State.

 

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures, and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

(1) A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement, and rehabilitation technology.

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR completes an annual Performance and Development Plan (PDP) with each employee that covers the period October 1 – September 30.

The PDP is a standard tool used with all State of Washington employees to evaluate job performance and emphasize individualized staff development needs. Specific development and/or training needs are identified for each employee that should be addressed during the following year. In addition to determining individual employee training activities, these needs are compiled and used as a basis for planning overall training and developmental priorities to be conducted division-wide. While specific priorities vary year-to-year, a consistent theme continuously addresses the areas of assessment, VR counseling and vocational planning, job placement, as well as assistive and rehabilitation technology.

In addition, DSHS/DVR requires all VR Counselors to participate in required in-service training on an ongoing basis that also covers these same topics. A “Rehabilitation Academy” is conducted for this purpose that features standard training modules. All VR Counselors participate in the Rehabilitation Academy as follows:

Basic Curriculum – required for all VR Counselors within twelve months of being hired:

1. Vocational Rehabilitation Process

2. Special Programs

3. Employment Outcomes

4. Benefits Planning

5. Rehabilitation Law Review

6. Motivational Interviewing

Advanced Best Practices – Offered to field staff on an annual basis to address specific issues identified through audits, Fair Hearings and customer complaints. The curriculum is revised each year to address new topics.

DSHS/DVR continues implementation of a focused initiative to train all staff in Motivational Interviewing (MI). All field service staff have been trained and are receiving ongoing coaching to practice MI skillfully in their interactions with customers as well as one another. The use of MI skills is proving to be an important addition to the overall counseling methods used by vocational rehabilitation counselors and other staff to assist customers in making informed choices and deciding how to best achieve the employment goal.

Additionally, DSHS/DVR has expanded its staff training capacity by installing video conferencing equipment at 21 office locations across the state. This technology permits larger numbers of staff to receive more timely training without the expense and logistics of travel and lodging.

DSHS/DVR will establish a workgroup to complete a comprehensive review of all training requirements. The workgroup will review all core training curriculum and make recommendations for improvements and strategies for consistent state wide implementation. This workgroup will also establish a protocol for maintaining accurate staff transcripts including CRC requirements.

(2) Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessional’s significant knowledge from research and other sources.

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR continues to regularly incorporate significant rehabilitation research findings and similar information related to advances in state-of-the-art VR practices in all facets of in-service training. In addition, DSHS/DVR actively collaborates with the Center for Continuing Education in Rehabilitation (CCER) which is the umbrella organization for Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) and serves on the TACE Board. This, combined with similar involvement with the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) as well as University Affiliated Research and Training Centers, assures awareness and use of the most current research.

 

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR continues to assure full communication access for all individuals with limited English proficiency by contracting with appropriate spoken and written language interpreter and translation service providers. All forms and publications are available on a regular basis in the following languages: Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, Laotian, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese. Translations in other languages are provided as needed.

Individuals who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing may communicate with DSHS/DVR staff at all locations via TTY and/or voice relay service, and in some cases video relay. American Sign Language (ASL) Interpreters, real-time captioning, and/or augmentative listening devices continue to be provided when needed for any in-person meeting or event.

DSHS/DVR also continues to employ personnel in certain locations who pass proficiency tests and are fluent in ASL and various other spoken languages.

 

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit’s comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

DSHS/DVR response: DSHS/DVR continues to work closely with the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) to coordinate personnel development activities and has an interagency agreement with OSPI to address mutual issues. The DSHS/DVR-OSPI agreement is at the state level and sets general parameters for collaborative service delivery to students with disabilities. These activities are aimed at cross-training DSHS/DVR and education personnel on service delivery methods and best practices that better assist students with disabilities in achieving employment outcomes after completing high school. For example, DSHS/DVR shares information about the vocational assessment process with schools and in 2011 DSHS/DVR and OSPI implemented a High School Transition Conference.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 10:47AM by sawahansenp

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Attachment 4.11(a) – Results of Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of the Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with Disabilities and Need to Establish, Develop, or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs

DSHS/DVR conducted a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA) in FFY 2009 and updated it in FFY 2010. In FFY 2013, DSHS/DVR will conduct a new CSNA as the basis for future goals and priorities.

For the past two years DSHS/DVR has focused its goals and priorities on the following results from the CSNA that was updated in 2010:

Employer Survey

More than 2,000 employers completed either a hard-copy survey mailed to their business or an online survey.

Three different employer groups were targeted:

1. Employers that had hired DVR customers in the past 14 months

2. Employers from a Department of Labor and Industries data base in sectors that DVR is targeting for potential development (technology/business/science, education, health and social services and government)

3. Employers that are members of the Association of Washington Businesses

DVR Employee Survey

All DVR employees received a web link survey asking about DVR needs and priorities with a response rate of approximately 55%.

DVR Customers

RDA contacted 111 DVR customers by telephone to conduct a survey regarding their satisfaction with services and perceived needs.

Findings

The findings from this comprehensive assessment are being reviewed by agency leadership and will be considered in the development of DVR’s stated goals and priorities. Predominant themes from the findings of the overall assessment appear to be consistent and point to the following needs:

• Customers need to be served more quickly and efficiently

• Improved relationships between DVR and employers

• More resources for effective job development and placement activities, both internal and external

• Greater access to higher paying jobs with benefits for customers.

Supported Employment

INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS

As part of DVR’s 2006-2009 comprehensive needs assessment, focus groups were conducted in partnership with the State Rehabilitation Council. That activity provided DVR with feedback from individuals with mental illness, both individuals receiving services from DVR and individuals who were not. Feedback generally conveyed that individuals with mental illness need ongoing supports to maintain employment.

DVR is aware, through ongoing communication with the State’s Mental Health Division, that there continues to be a growing need for ongoing supports for employment maintenance of customers with mental health disabilities. This has been evident particularly over the past year as resources for mental health services have decreased. The Mental Health Transformation Grant, with the DVR Director as a member, has created a platform to address this service gap. Today, many steps are being taken to establish employment as an expectation and to create a funding structure that will make supported employment available on a more consistent basis.

INDIVIDUALS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES

As a continuance of DVR’s 2006-2009 comprehensive needs assessment, the State Rehabilitation Council conducted focus groups with individuals with developmental disabilities. Results of these groups provided DVR with feedback about what individuals with developmental disabilities want from DVR and what they need to achieve employment. Based on that information, DVR has taken steps to share what we learned with DDD, county DD agencies, and DVR field leadership and agree upon steps for improving collaboration.

HIGH SCHOOL TRANSITION

Ongoing communication with the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) throughout the past FFY has emphasized the need for better coordination between DVR and local high schools to jointly serve customers with Individualized Education Plans and 504 students. These students are not all receiving consistent access to information and services from DVR to assist in their progress toward graduation and transition to adulthood and employment. In FFY 2009 DVR has started a project in collaboration with OSPI to collect information to identify and understand the needs of 504 students statewide and to develop a more consistent and effective way of working collaboratively with schools to serve these customers.

COMMUNITY REHABILITATION PROGRAMS

DVR is currently reviewing community rehabilitation program outcome data to assess the quality and effectiveness of services. Throughout 2010, DVR will be engaging community rehabilitation programs to identify needs and to develop strategies for improvement. DVR will also use this input to renegotiate its contract with community rehabilitation programs in FFY 2010 to ensure the contract supports high quality services and outcomes.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2012 5:03PM by sawahansenp

DSHS/DVR anticipates applications will slightly decrease from the prior year. This is a result of implementing a referral tool to assist partners in referring individuals who are ready for vocational rehabilitation services. Self referral tools were also implemented to assist individuals in determining whether they are ready for vocational rehabilitation services. Outreach activities will be conducted to broaden the population of individuals with disabilities being served by DSHS/DVR.

The number of eligibility determinations increased in FFY 2009 by 33%. Eligibility determinations increased in 2010 by 5.4% and decreased in 2011 by approximately 12%. We expect the number of eligibility determinations made in 2012 will continue to decrease by approximately 9%. Of all individuals determined eligible between 10/1/10 and 3/31/11, 37% were determined to be the most significantly disabled which is consistent with the 37% we experienced in 2010.

The Division has adequate funds to serve all 3,790 individuals currently eligible for DSHS/DVR services and 7,230 in plan status. The division also has adequate funds to cover the cost of expected eligibility determinations and post-employment services.

For the current FFY 2012, the average cost to support a successful rehabilitation is $5,729. This is consistent with $5,727 in FFY 2011. This average considers the total costs over the life of a case from application to closure for all cases closed with an employment outcome during the Federal Fiscal Year. Over the past few years DSHS/DVR has decreased this average by strengthening partnerships, implementing referral tools so that customers are referred to DSHS/DVR when they are ready for VR services, implementing motivational interviewing practices, providing more services internally, increasing the use of comparable services and benefits, and expanding best practices in case management and fiscal training. DSHS/DVR plans to continue to use these and other strategies to maximize DSHS/DVR resources and serve the greatest number of eligible individuals possible.

The division carried over approximately 7,580 Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs) into FFY 2012. This is slightly down from the 7,870 IPEs carried over into FFY 2011. The division has set a target of 4,628 new plans in FFY 2012 based on anticipated staff resources. With an average expenditure per IPE per year of approximately $1594, IPE costs will total approximately $19,802,793. This will leave the division with sufficient funds to pay for costs incurred in pre-plan and post-plan services at the current rate of 27.7% of the total expenditures. To achieve 4,628 new plans, the division will continue to build the caseload of open IPEs throughout 2012 to align the number of open plans that can be supported with available financial and staff resources. DSHS/DVR will continually monitor expenditures and caseload movement to ensure the division continues to have the resources to effectively serve all eligible individuals.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Not applicable Title I $30,000,000 23,500 $1,276
Not applicable Title VI $460,000 275 $1,672
Totals   $30,460,000 23,775 $1,281

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2012 5:19PM by sawahansenp

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

To collect feedback and identify goals and priorities, DSHS/DVR conducted meetings and public forums throughout the state with DSHS/DVR customers, employees, partners, providers, Rehabilitation Council members, the Client Assistance Program (CAP), tribal program representatives, school representatives and others. DSHS/DVR also completed a comprehensive needs assessment that included surveys to employers, customers, and DSHS/DVR staff. DSHS/DVR met with the State Rehabilitation Council to solicit feedback and the Council co-sponsored three public forums. Over 65 people attended the public forums.

The goals and priorities established for the 2010-2013 State Plan reflect a priority on customer services and outcomes, staff development and organizational systems, partnerships and enhancing employer relations.

To ensure DSHS/DVR remains a vital, healthy organization building strong partnerships throughout the state and in local communities continues to be a major goal and priority.

GOAL 1: Provide timely, individualized services to DSHS/DVR customers that result in employment outcomes that meet the customer’s needs.

Goal 1 reflects DSHS/DVR’s focus on improving its service delivery to customers by providing quality services that are timely and meet the individual needs of the customer. The priorities that follow respond to needs assessment findings and stakeholder input related to the need to improve timeliness and consistency in the provision of services throughout the state. To achieve this goal, DSHS/DVR establishes the following priorities:

• Increase DSHS/DVR’s ability to assist customers achieve higher wage jobs with health benefits.

• Enhance and improve the statewide consistency of timely, individualized services to customers who have a broad range of needs and capabilities.

• Develop and implement strategies to increase the number of customers who achieve an employment outcome after beginning an Individualized Plan for Employment, so that DSHS/DVR maintains a rehabilitation rate at least equivalent to the Federal standard.

• Develop and implement strategies to increase the number of customers who retain their employment after achieving an employment outcome.

• Improve the organizational culture to focus even more on customer service, cultural sensitivity, and addressing each individual’s impediments to employment throughout the VR process.

Performance goals for the next two fiscal years

FFY 12 Basic Grant:

- IPE’s per VRC: 40

- IPE’s Statewide Goal: 4,650

- Rehabs per VRC: 23 (17 for new VRC)

- Rehabs Statewide Goal: 2,550

- Rehab Rate: 60%

FFY 13 Basic Grant

- IPE’s per VRC: 40

- IPE’s Statewide Goal: 4,650

- Rehabs per VRC: 23 (17 for new VRC)

- Rehabs Statewide Goal: 2,550

- Rehab Rate: 60%

• Improve and expand services to enhance earnings, employee benefits and career advancement for customers with the most significant disabilities, including individuals served through supported employment.

• Expand the availability of the DSHS/DVR WorkStrides career preparation workshop to all customers by engaging an array of partners to help deliver the workshop on a regular basis.

• Conduct annual statewide case record reviews of case service practices to determine consistency and adherence with Federa/state requirements.

• Use case review results to identify and implement improvements in quality and consistency of services.

• Develop a systematic approach to implementing program improvements in a timely, consistent and planful way, including a process for clearly communicating changes to employees and partners.

• In light of the limited and highly competitive job market, make more use of available labor market and post-secondary training information to improve vocational assessments and assist customers in better selecting employment goals that match the availability of real jobs.

• Increase collaboration within the “WorkSource One-Stop system” to improve services to unemployed workers with disabilities who are eligible for DSHS/DVR services by better leveraging DSHS/DVR services with Workforce Investment Act and other workforce development programs.

• Play stronger roles on state and local Workforce Investment Boards to assure that DSHS/DVR customers and other individuals with disabilities are even better served by the “WorkSource One-Stop system.”

• Increase collaboration with the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) to improve coordination of DSHS/DVR services with SBCTC Workforce programs and Adult Basic Education programs.

GOAL 2: Strengthen DSHS/DVR’s workforce and improve its overall organizational systems.

Goal 2 reflects DSHS/DVR’s commitment to making organizational effectiveness a high priority by establishing systems and methods to better develop, support and promote DSHS/DVR staff and improve overall retention as well as improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organizational systems used by staff. Priorities include:

• Improve and maintain the consistency of policy interpretation, implementation and casework practices through a comprehensive quality assurance program.

• Review the 2011 DSHS/DVR Employee Survey and conduct discussions with staff about the survey results to determine what issues will be addressed to improve the effectiveness and function of DSHS/DVR. An action plan in response to the survey results will be submitted to the DSHS Executive Leadership Team and will be implemented by DSHS/DVR during Federal fiscal year 2013.

• Make service delivery improvements that are transparent, involve the right employees and partners and are based on evaluation methods that provide DSHS/DVR with timely, useful information and data.

• Enhance and utilize Information Technology resources and tools to improve or streamline service delivery.

• Deliver high quality training and support to provide staff with the knowledge and skills needed to perform effectively.

• Recognize and appreciate staff throughout the Division for their contributions to DSHS/DVR’s success.

• Use information technology to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of DSHS/DVR’s organizational systems.

Performance goals for the next two fiscal years

• Continue to update and deliver Advanced Best Practices training to field staff statewide to provide ongoing skill development in key service delivery operations and practices, including a strong focus on customer service, cultural sensitivity, and better addressing each customer’s impediments to employment.

• In accordance with the DSHS/DVR Cultural Competency Plan, appoint a total of four individuals to VRC positions from minority groups: one each who is African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic. Appoint one individual to a VRC position who is a Disabled Veteran and one who is an individual with a disability.

GOAL 3: Distinguish DSHS/DVR’s role in the disability and employer communities and leverage partnerships to maximize resources and support for DSHS/DVR customers and other individuals with disabilities.

Goal 3 is intended to help DSHS/DVR increase its visibility in the community and strengthen its connection to other programs that serve individuals with disabilities as well as employers. DSHS/DVR must clearly communicate to others what it can do well, who we can serve and how we can work collaboratively with others to achieve greater outcomes for people with disabilities. This goal responds to needs assessment findings and stakeholder input that point to a need for improved collaboration between DSHS/DVR and existing partner agencies as well as outreach to potential partner agencies. Priorities include:

• Enhance and build partnerships that advance opportunities for individuals with disabilities to rapidly obtain employment, including supported employment.

• Develop relationships with employers to create opportunities for customers to gain work experience through internships and obtain regular jobs that pay well with benefits.

• Market DSHS/DVR to employers by categorizing the similar employment goals of customers and strategically targeting employers in corresponding occupations.

• Increase understanding and awareness of DSHS/DVR services in local communities.

• Maximize DSHS/DVR local-level knowledge of community programs and services that could benefit DSHS/DVR customers.

Performance goals for the next two fiscal years

• Collaborate with disability and employment partners to sponsor events that focus on disability recruitment, hiring and retention issues such as mentoring, disability awareness, reasonable accommodation, customized employment, transportation, independent living, benefits issues, etc.

• Bring together employers, DSHS/DVR staff and other workforce partners on a regular basis at the local level to update trends in the job market and maintain a good understanding of employer needs, so that customers are given useful guidance and current information.

• Support the DSHS/DVR Employer Services Team in developing ongoing employer relationships and providing job placement assistance to customers, including participation in the nationwide employer network sponsored by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation.

• Serve on local WorkSource Business Service Teams to market DSHS/DVR job seekers to employers.

• Conduct regular meetings and information sharing with community rehabilitation programs at the local level to improve communication and better support service delivery coordination.

GOAL 4: Increase outreach to improve and strengthen DSHS/DVR’s connection and relationship with employers.

Goal 4 addresses agency needs assessment and stakeholder input that consistently pointed out a need for more frequent, consistent, and effective outreach, education to and relationship maintenance with employers statewide in order to better position customers to obtain access to employment. Priorities include:

• Increase DSHS/DVR’s visibility with and connection to Washington employers

• Continue to expand the network capabilities of DSHS/DVR’s Employment Services Team.

• Actively participate in the national employer relations model sponsored by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, and integrate these activities into state-level initiatives.

Performance goals for the next two fiscal years

• Increase the number of customers who participate in internships in community based employment that lead to competitive employment.

• Actively use the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation NET system for developing employer relationships and increasing employment opportunities.

• Market DSHS/DVR to employers by attending local employment expos, job fairs, employer association meetings, and employment events or conferences.

• Increase the number of DSHS/DVR customers placed into state or Federal government jobs.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 11:50AM by sawahansenp

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2009 12:21PM by sawavertreesp

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Specify the state’s goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

DSHS/DVR received approximately $460,000 in Title VI, Part B funds in FY 2011. These funds were distributed in case service allotments to fund supported employment services under individualized plans for employment (IPEs). It’s unclear at this time what level of funds DSHS/DVR will have for the FFY 2012 grant year. If grant funds remain at the FFY 2011 level, DSHS/DVR’s goal for the use of Title VI, Part B funds in FFY 2013 will be to serve approximately 275 individuals and to achieve approximately 200 successful rehabilitations.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2012 5:45PM by sawahansenp

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

Attachment 4.11(d) – State’s Strategies and Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

Strategies to Achieve Goals and Priorities in Attachment 4.11(c) (1)

A. DSHS/DVR’s Goal 1 is to provide timely, individualized services to DSHS/DVR customers that result in employment outcomes that meet the customer’s needs.

The following strategies support improving DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.1.

• Better utilize results from an ongoing study that tracks the long term employment of DSHS clients to increase the number of DSHS/DVR customers who retain employment beyond case closure, and compare their employment retention rates to the workforce as a whole. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.6)

• Implement an on-line Self-Assessment Tool and Self-Referral Tool to increase the customer’s ability to make an informed choice when deciding whether or not to self refer for DSHS/DVR services and to assist community partners when making referrals. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3)

• Use results of the annual case review to

o Determine where additional guidance and training are required;

o Improve guidance in the policy and procedure manual; and

o Emphasize specific areas of need in the Advanced Best Practices curriculum. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4)

• Continue to expand the availability of the DSHS/DVR WorkStrides career preparation workshop to all customers by engaging an array of partners to help deliver the workshop on a regular basis. The division will enlist Department of Social and Health Services partners, workforce development partners, community and technical colleges, mental health providers and other community based organizations that share customers with DSHS/DVR to present the WorkStrides workshop within their organizations. DSHS/DVR will train partners to deliver the WorkStrides workshop and develop agreements for the number of DSHS/DVR customers they will present the workshop to. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.6)

• Continue to broaden the population of individuals with disabilities being served by DSHS/DVR through outreach to increase the representation of underserved or unserved populations. Outreach, education, and marketing efforts will be targeted to individuals with disabilities who are already working to retain or progress in employment, previous DSHS/DVR customers who may have lost employment to become reemployed, college students nearing completion of their academic programs and other groups who are identified as underserved. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR will identify ways to improve and expand services to enhance earnings, employee benefits and career advancement for individuals with the most significant disabilities, including individuals served through supported employment. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR continues to play a DVD that has been produced for customers in each of its office reception areas so that individuals waiting for appointments are reminded of the vocational rehabilitation services available to them, including information about the basics of the vocational rehabilitation process. Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1,1.2, 1.3)

• A full-time Assistive Technology Assessment Practitioner (ATAP) continues to be available in each of DSHS/DVR’s three geographic Areas to provide AT assessment, consultation and support to Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors statewide in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services. This expertise and support is provided, based on the identification of assistive technology needs resulting from a standardized assessment at the time of eligibility or based on information obtained throughout the rehabilitation process. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4)

• DSHS/DVR uses foreign and sign language translation and interpreter services available on contract to communicate with individuals who are limited English speaking. DSHS/DVR has a Statewide Coordinator for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing as well as Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors for the deaf, deaf-blind, and hard of hearing population. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 2.1)

• DSHS/DVR will identify ways to work more closely with WorkSource partners so that more DSHS/DVR customers benefit from services provided through the one-stop workforce development system. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3)

• DSHS/DVR will more clearly define the role for its staff who have primary liaison relationships with WorkSource Centers to assure that DSHS/DVR customers and other individuals with disabilities are even better served by the WorkSource one-stop system. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3)

A. DSHS/DVR’s Goal 2 is to strengthen DSHS/DVR’s workforce and improve its overall organizational systems.

The following strategies support improving DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.1.

• DSHS/DVR will develop and implement an action plan to address results of the 2011 DSHS/DVR Employee Survey. The action plan will reflect conversations with staff and identify follow through activities to improve the effectiveness and function of DSHS/DVR. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.4)

• DSHS/DVR will develop staff training focused on customer service, cultural sensitivity, and impediments to employment to meet the customer’s VR needs from application to case closure. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR will develop staff training to improve counseling to meet the needs of customers with both episodic and chronic mental illness. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR will develop a workgroup to establish a communication protocol for DSHS/DVR. The protocol will address the Who, What, Where, When and Why of all communication and will establish clear roles of accountability, timelines and follow up for all necessary communication. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2)

• DSHS/DVR continues to enhance staff counseling skills by providing training to staff at all levels in the agency in Motivational Interviewing (MI). (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2)

• DSHS/DVR continues to implement Advanced Best Practices training designed to provide instruction related to effective approaches to case management and service delivery for VRCs. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.4)

• DSHS/DVR continues targeted recruitment efforts to increase the ethnic and cultural diversity of qualified DVR applicants as stated in the DSHS/DVR Cultural Competency Plan outlined in Attachment 4.11(c)(1). Key positions throughout DSHS/DVR are designated as requiring specific language competencies (including foreign and sign languages) to meet the needs of the local population. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 2.1)

• DSHS/DVR continues to implement staff recognition and appreciation practices throughout the agency. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2.)

• All DSHS/DVR Supervisors will complete Clinical Supervisor Training to improve management of VR counselors and service delivery outcomes. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4)

• DSHS/DVR continues to support supervisors to promote accountability by providing intensive coaching and direction to staff who need to develop or improve counseling skills to achieve qualitative case measures or productivity standards. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2)

• DSHS/DVR continues to provide supervisors with the tools needed to deliver effective, ongoing coaching for their staff. A structured coaching process has been implemented to require supervisors to review monthly performance and provide VRCs with specific feedback and support and to submit progress reports to Area Managers. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2)

• DSHS/DVR continues to use the Learning Management System for all personnel to better track the training needs and training records of DSHS/DVR staff. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2)

• DSHS/DVR continues to increase its capacity and use of technology for communications; e.g., video conferencing, video phones and long-distance learning programs, etc. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2)

• DSHS/DVR continues to enhance and grow its capacity related to data analysis by adding analytical tools to assist in developing data supported business decisions (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2)

B. DSHS/DVR’s Goal 3 is to distinguish DSHS/DVR’s role in the disability and employer communities and leverage partnerships to maximize resources and support for individuals with disabilities.

The following strategies support improving DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.1.

• DSHS/DVR will develop and sustain ongoing dialogue with CRP partners for the purpose of analyzing specific practices and assessing whether the employer contacts DSHS/DVR pays for, lead to job offers to customers. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR will refine the role that local staff play which encourages them to take a more active role in connecting customers and employers. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR participates in local community organizations and events, including organizations representing diverse ethnic and disability populations, for the purpose of outreach, education and partnership building. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 2.1)

• DSHS/DVR provides educational and marketing information in accessible formats and/or conducts outreach to organizations throughout communities that serve populations who might benefit from DSHS/DVR services. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 2.1)

• DSHS/DVR continues to partner with WorkSource operators (aka “One-Stop” system) to improve and expand the services available to individuals with disabilities. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.3, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR partners with the State Rehabilitation Council and local disability service organizations to educate and inform legislators about services and outcomes of VR and other programs. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1)

• DSHS/DVR continues to expand its knowledge and use of labor market information as well as its education and training capacity to ensure the number of customers trained in an industry matches the number of expected job openings. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR continues to negotiate contractual relationships with tribal programs to assist the agency in providing culturally competent, reservation-based VR services to common customers. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 2.1)

C. DSHS/DVR’s Goal 4 is to increase outreach to improve and strengthen DSHS/DVR’s connection and relationship with employers.

The following strategies support improving DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 2.1.

• Conduct outreach to potential employers to increase awareness and educate them about the potential benefits of employing individuals with disabilities and partnering with DSHS/DVR. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1)

• Conduct outreach and marketing within DSHS and other state agencies related to supported employment, internships and competitive employment in state government. DSHS is launching an initiative to employ greater numbers of individuals with disabilities throughout the department; DSHS/DVR will play a key role in contributing to this effort and will assist customers in competing for these job opportunities. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6)

• Create and maintain a DSHS/DVR employer network with strategies and incentives to increase opportunities for customer employment. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR will develop and implement outreach strategies targeting mid-sized and smaller employers on an ongoing basis. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6)

• DSHS/DVR will develop and implement tracking tools to quantify outputs and outcomes of all employer outreach activities and contacts. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1)

• Develop and focus the efforts of a statewide DSHS/DVR employment services team on increasing employer awareness, building on our partnerships with Work Source Centers and internal job development staff. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standards and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1)

• Collaborate with employer organizations such as the Association of Washington Business, the Society of Human Resource Management, and The Net (Council of State Administrators for Vocational Rehabilitation) to expand business relations and partnerships for internships and placements. (Supports DSHS/DVR’s performance on standard and indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 2.1)

Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

During FFY 2012 - 2013, DSHS/DVR is funding the following innovation and expansion activities:

A. Expand a high school transition model that DSHS/DVR has established with the King County Division of Developmental Disabilities to other County Developmental Disability Programs across the state. Under this model, DSHS/DVR contracts with the County instead of individual Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to place supported employment transition customers with developmental disabilities in to permanent employment when they complete high school. The County funds designated subcontractors a monthly fee to provide community based assessment, job placement, and job coaching services to a customer. When the customer is placed into employment and transitions to extended services, DSHS/DVR pays the County an outcome fee of $8500.00. This fee is approximately $3,000.00 less than what DSHS/DVR would pay to a CRP for the same outcome. All of the County subcontractors are CRPs; the advantage for them is they receive a monthly service delivery fee from the County that is not outcome-based instead of a fee from DSHS/DVR that is paid only when an outcome is achieved.

B. Fund the Washington Initiative for Supported Employment (WISE) to produce, launch and maintain a comprehensive series of web-based on-demand training modules for CRP Supported Employment Specialists that will increase the knowledge and skills. CRP staff attrition is very high and frequently new Supported Employment Specialists are hired with little or no experience. This significantly slows service delivery and often reduces successful outcomes. The suite of on-demand training modules that WISE produces will be created in partnership with the Center for Continuing Education in Rehabilitation, DSHS Division of Developmental Disabilities, DSHS Division of Behavioral Health & Recovery, and a number of other supported employment partners.

C. Implement an agreement for DSHS/DVR to purchase job placement services from the Employment Security Department (ESD) that includes an on-the-job training (OJT) agreement with the employer. DSHS/DVR is testing a model in six locales where ESD will place a customer in to permanent employment and prepare an OJT agreement and training plan that is signed by the employer, customer, and VR Counselor. DSHS/DVR pays an OJT training fee directly to the employer who provides monthly written training reports; ESD monitors progress of the OJT by maintaining contact with the customer and employer at least every two weeks.

D. Provide training to DSHS/DVR customers and VR Counselors on the effective use of social media to enhance job search success. The Association of Washington Business will provide this training.

E. Develop and provide DSHS/DVR customers with training that will build their “soft skills,” including an assessment tool for VR Counselors to determine if an individual requires training to build their skills or some type of mental health or other clinical treatment.

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2012 5:10PM by sawahansenp

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Attachment 4.11 (e) (2) – Evaluation and Report of Progress in Achieving Identified Goals and Priorities and Use of Title I funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

(A) Provide an evaluation of the extent to which the goals and priorities were achieved.

GOAL 1: Provide timely, individualized services to DSHS/DVR customers that result in employment outcomes that meet the customer’s needs.

Through Goal 1, DSHS/DVR assisted 2,763 individuals with disabilities to achieve gainful employment in Federal Fiscal Year 2011. This was an increase in rehabilitation outcomes of 87 (3.3%) over the previous year.

In FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR developed 4,858 new individualized plans for employment which was a decrease of 787 (14.0%) from those developed in the prior FFY 2010.

During FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR accepted 11,198 applications which was a decrease of 1,304 (10.4%) from applications accepted during FFY 2010.

During FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR determined 9,753 individuals eligible for VR services, which was a decrease of 1,212 (11.0%) from the number of individuals determined eligible in FFY 2010.

Since FFY 2006, DSHS/DVR has implemented a number of steps to reduce average costs and serve more individuals. In FFY 2006, the average case cost of a rehabilitation closure was $8,898.00; by FFY 2010 this cost was reduced to $5,727.00, and in FFY 2011 this was further reduced to $5,637.00. This cost reduction was achieved by maximizing employee strengths, implementing referral tools so that customers are referred to DSHS/DVR when they are ready for VR services and want to work, increasing comparable services and benefits and implementing more cost effective contracts with community rehabilitation programs. DSHS/DVR continues to closely monitor its fiscal resources to assure maximum case service capacity is maintained.

The reduction in applications and eligible individuals during FFY 2011 is attributed to decrease in the number of state Aged, Blind, Disabled (ABD) clients referred by the DSHS Community Services Division (DSHS/CSD) to DSHS/DVR. Beginning in FFY 2009, DSHS/CSD started requiring significantly greater numbers of ABD clients to apply for DSHS/DVR services in order to continue receiving ABD benefits. The vast majority of these individuals applied for VR services only to retain these benefits, not because they wanted VR services to achieve an employment outcome. While most were determined eligible for VR services, the majority did not follow through beyond eligibility determination and resulted in case closure prior to development of an individualized plan for employment.

In FFY 2010, DSHS/DVR and DSHS/CSD collaborated in developing an online assessment tool used by Aged, Blind, Disabled (ABD) Case Managers and revised referral practices so that ABD clients were referred only when they wanted to apply for VR services to achieve employment. This resulted in a significant decline of ABD referrals throughout FFY 2011. Outreach activities will be conducted to broaden the population of individuals with disabilities being served by DSHS/DVR.

DSHS/DVR established the following two priorities to achieve Goal 1:

• Priority 1: Increase DSHS/DVR’s ability to assist customers achieve higher wage jobs with benefits.

Result: In 2009, the average wage earned by rehabilitated customers was $11.69 per hour. In 2010, the average wage earned by rehabilitated customers was $12.16 per hour; this decreased slightly in FFY 2011 to $12.06 per hour.

• Priority 2: Enhance and improve the statewide consistency of timely, individualized services to customers who have a broad range of needs and capabilities.

Result: The number of days from application to plan in FFY 2009 was 172; in FFY 2010, this number was decreased to 132 days, and in FFY 2011 it increased slightly to 152 days.

In FFY 2010, the number of cases exceeding DSHS/DVR’s 120 day guideline for plan development was approximately 1,200; this number increased in FFY 2011 to approximately 1500.

A case management tracking tool implemented in FFY 2009 to assure consistent and timely service delivery continued to be utilized throughout FFY 2011. Additionally, more efficient referral processes were used including the development and use of an online self-referral form posted on DSHS/DVR’s webpage, as well as the development and use of an online assessment and referral tool used exclusively for referral of Aged, Blind, Disabled (ABD) clients to DSHS/DVR.

Communication continues with DSHS/DVR partners and the general public to promote a better understanding of the services DSHS/DVR provides by supplying them with information about VR eligibility and criteria, and more clearly emphasizing that individuals who are referred to DSHS/DVR will be expected to want to work. Efforts also continue to better educate new applicants about DSHS/DVR services by continuously playing a DVD in the reception area of every field office that explains all facets of the VR program.

DSHS/DVR’s goal in FFY 2011 was to serve approximately 275 customers in supported employment and to achieve approximately 200 successful rehabilitations. This goal was exceeded by achieving 222 supported employment rehabilitations in FFY 2011.

GOAL 2: Strengthen DSHS/DVR’s workforce and improve its overall organizational systems.

Under Goal 2, DSHS/DVR continues to implement a number of strategies designed to enhance the organizational infrastructure and skills of its staff in providing high quality VR services.

Throughout FFY 2010, DSHS/DVR continued an initiative to train all employees on the use Motivational Interviewing (MI) skills. While MI is not intended to replace other counseling skills or methods, it has proven to be a promising practice for assisting individuals to make well informed choices when they are ambivalent or uncertain about whether they want to pursue an employment goal or how to most effectively participate in the VR process. Other staff training continues to provide a series of modules that includes Basic and Advanced Best Practices, Rehabilitation Law Review, a Rehabilitation Technician Training Academy, as well as other VR topics.

A DSHS/DVR team of internal job developers continues working to enhance individualized job development and placement for customers.

DSHS/DVR has continued to provide events that recognize employees for the provision of high quality VR services.

The DSHS/DVR 2011 Employee survey was conducted with a 95.0% participation rate; results are being utilized to identify areas of strength and areas that need improvement to enhance staff support and the provision of quality services.

A Senior Rehabilitation Team, with representatives from all levels of the division’s staff, continues to provide input and feedback on policy development, organizational efficiencies and changes within the division.

DSHS/DVR completed negotiations in FFY 2011 with the Washington Federation of State Employees to expand external capacity to deliver the WorkStrides workshop to customers statewide as a contracted service. These negotiations resulted in an agreement that DSHS/DVR employees may continue delivering the workshop at locations with sufficient staff capacity. However, at the same time, DSHS/DVR will contract with qualified vendors to deliver the workshop at locations where there is insufficient staff capacity. These workshops provide individuals with more in-depth information about their strengths, interests, and capacities, enabling them to make better decisions about a suitable vocational goal and contributing to a higher rehabilitation rate.

DSHS/DVR continues to utilize an electronic case review tool for VR Supervisors and includes the requirement for Supervisors to review two cases per counselor per month. The results of these reviews are rolled up to the Area and Statewide level to monitor trends and identify training needs. DSHS/DVR also continues to perform a statewide case review process conducted by a team of field and state office staff. This process further enhances the ability of the agency to review and monitor compliance with Federal VR regulations, trends in case services, and areas in which training or other action is needed. The reviews are indicating substantial improvement in quality and consistency of case service practices throughout the division.

To improve performance reporting and accountability DSHS/DVR continues to use the GMAP (Government Accountability Program), an extensive array of near real-time data reports that are available to all staff. This includes a set of Dashboard reports that provide a snapshot of four key performance indicators reported statewide, by area, unit and office that is easily accessible and available to all staff on our intranet web site. Additionally, staff use the technology available through iDVR SharePoint (an intranet application) to share information, communicate and collaborate about best practices, training and other related job activities.

GOAL 3: Distinguish DSHS/DVR’s role in the disability and employer communities and leverage partnerships to maximize resources and support for DSHS/DVR customers and individuals with disabilities.

To accomplish Goal 3, Washington DSHS/DVR has taken numerous steps to build and strengthen partnerships that maximize resources and enable DSHS/DVR to serve more people.

In FFY 2009, DSHS/DVR expanded “Say Hey” employer networking events from the original location in Olympia to several other communities, including Seattle, Spokane, Tacoma, Vancouver, Bremerton and Everett. “Say Hey” events have been co-sponsored with other organizations, such as Chambers of Commerce and Business Leadership Networks. However, there was a sharp decline in participation by employers at “Say Hey” events in FFY 2010, largely due to the declining job market, which led to the events being put in hiatus. No “Say Hey” events were held in FFY 2011.

DSHS/DVR continues to assist counseling staff to better communicate the role of the agency to customers, partners, employers, and others. A “DVR Guide to Services” and informational DVDs have been posted on DSHS/DVR’s webpage as well as YouTube. In addition, DSHS/DVR continues playing the informational DVD about VR services continuously in the reception area of every field office.

DSHS/DVR continues to reach out to several agencies with populations who have not been served or have been underserved for the past several years. DSHS/DVR has strengthened its collaboration with various DSHS programs. Efforts continue at the regional level to establish streamlined referral procedures and to conduct cross-training.

DSHS/DVR continues efforts to build partnerships with the DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery – Mental Health (DBHR-MH), a state agency that contracts with regional entities for the delivery of community mental health services and directly operates two state psychiatric hospitals.

• DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH staff continue to work together to jointly conduct cross-system training when requested to emphasize key elements of both service delivery systems and to support better coordination of the employment needs of mental health consumers.

• DSHS/DVR and DBHR-MH continue a mutual collaboration to explore ways that mental health agencies can effectively become Employment Networks and build a revenue stream from the Ticket to Work Program that will fund extended services for mental health consumers who require a supported employment model.

• Across the state, liaison DSHS/DVR counselors continue to work itinerantly from several Mental Health agencies at least one day per week to facilitate access to VR services for mental health consumers.

DSHS/DVR continues to implement collaborative efforts with the Gates Foundation and Building Changes organization with a primary focus on better serving individuals with disabilities who face homelessness and poverty. These two non-profit organizations are working in partnership to implement several pilot projects in Washington State to assist homeless families in obtaining permanent housing and employment. DSHS/DVR has been invited to join this partnership to assist in serving eligible individuals with disabilities who are members of these families. A special project has been implemented in King County to serve the homeless.

DSHS/DVR implemented a model of service delivery in partnership with the King County Division of Developmental Disabilities (KCDDD), Snohomish County Division of Developmental Disabilities (SCDDD) and three Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) that targets supported employment services to individuals with developmental disabilities who had been in the past determined “unemployable” and not worked before. The model is based on collaborative job placement by the three CRPs. While a customer is served by a “primary” CRP, the individual is effectively served by all three CRPs working collaborative under a concerted job placement strategy. Each CRP coordinates job development activities, shares job leads, and jointly staffs each customer’s progress towards job placement with DSHS/DVR. When a customer becomes employed the individual receives ongoing support services from their “primary” CRP before transitioning to extended services provided by KCDDD. The model has resulted in a 50.0% - 60.0% placement rate.

GOAL 4: Increase outreach to improve and strengthen DSHS/DVR’s connection and relationship with employers.

To accomplish Goal 4 DSHS/DVR has forged partnerships with the Washington State Chapter of the Society of Human Resource Managers and Association of Washington Business to increase its visibility and connection with Washington employers. The DSHS/DVR Employment Services Team has continued to be active in marketing customers to local employers, attending job fairs, and participating on WorkSource (“One-Stop”) Business Services Teams.

(B) Identify the strategies that contributed to the success of the Goals.

Goal 1:

• Encouraging staff to achieve counselor expectations for Individual Plans for Employment (IPE) and rehabilitations

• Expanding WorkStrides

• Strengthening partnerships and use of comparable services and benefits

• Increasing staff skills and recognizing accomplishments

• Developing and using enhanced performance tracking tools and reports

Goal 2:

• Continued to redesign the basic training modules to increase quality and efficiency of rehabilitation practices.

• Quarterly meetings with the Senior Rehabilitation Team for communication and input from employees representing all positions and geographic areas around program priorities and changes.

• The Chief of Field Services continued touring field offices regularly to listen to concerns and answer questions.

• Continued to utilize a statewide case review process.

• DSHS/DVR will initiate the use of Lean, as applicable, to identify concerns and design strategies to address them.

• Continued posting near real-time performance dashboards on DSHS/DVR’s intranet for easy access by all DSHS/DVR staff.

Goal 3:

• Conducted public meetings to listen to partners and elicit feedback for DSHS/DVR planning and priorities.

• Continued to refocus partnerships with the DSHS Division of Developmental Disabilities and DSHS Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery- MH (DBHR-MH) to create employment opportunities that result in higher wage jobs for individuals with disabilities.

(C) Factors that impeded achievement of the goals.

Goal 1:

Throughout all of FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR was slowed in filling vacant positions due to a state government hiring freeze through June 30, 2011 mandated by the Washington State Legislature because of worsening economic conditions. Even after the hiring freeze was lifted all programs within DSHS had to receive approval from the DSHS Secretary to fill vacant positions. During this period, DSHS/DVR has been able to fill only the most critical vacancies.

Because of the recession and the state’s high unemployment rate which only just recently dropped to 8.3%, it has continued to be very difficult to assist customers in obtaining jobs that pay mid-to-high wages. However this remains a priority and continues to be a strong focus as the job market slowly improves.

Goal 2:

Throughout FFY 2011 DSHS/DVR continued to face challenges in maintaining its workforce and keeping morale high. During this period, a state hiring freeze made it impossible to fill vacant positions except for the most critical. At the same time, all state employee pay raises have been frozen and the Washington State Legislature, as a budget savings measure, mandated a three per cent salary reduction through June 30, 2013. To offset the salary reduction, staff are awarded 5.2 hours of paid leave per month. As a result of these circumstances, workloads have remained high. A number of offices have been short of staff for extended periods as job vacancies are not easily filled. Even with these challenges, DSHS/DVR continued to provide timely services to customers in FFY2011, which means that employees did the same or more work in less time and for less pay. In spite of these challenges, DSHS/DVR employees achieved even higher performance in FFY 2011 than FFY 2010 and all other recent fiscal years which continued to be a tribute to DSHS/DVR staff dedication, skills and resiliency.

Goal 3:

DSHS/DVR was able to accomplish all of the priorities identified in Goal 3 without any major difficulty.

(D) Assess the performance of the state on the standards and indicators.

Standard and Indicator 1.1: The number of individuals achieving employment outcomes during the current performance period compared to the previous performance period.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved 2,763 employment outcomes, 86 outcomes over the number needed to pass this standard.

Standard and Indicator 1.2: The percentage of individuals receiving services under an individualized plan for employment who achieve employment outcomes.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved a rehabilitation rate of 52.6% in FFY 2011. That was below the standard of 55.8% required to meet this standard; however, it was above the FFY 2010 level of 51.41%. Even though new applications from Aged, Blind, Disabled (ABD) clients declined throughout FFY 2011 due to improved referral practices, there continued to be a significant number of ABD clients with existing cases that were closed before achieving an employment outcome. The rehabilitation rate for this population remained at approximately 9.0% which impacted the overall rehabilitation rate.

Standard and Indicator 1.3: Competitive employment outcomes as a percentage of all employment outcomes.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved this standard with 98.55% of employment outcomes as competitive employment outcomes.

Standard and Indicator 1.4: Competitive employment outcomes for individuals with Significant Disabilities as a percentage of all employment outcomes.

For FFY 2011, 97.10% of DSHS/DVR’s competitive employment outcomes were individuals with Significant Disabilities.

Standard and Indicator 1.5: The ratio of the average VR Hourly Wage to the Average State Hourly Wage.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved a wage ratio of 0.518 which was slightly below the standard of 0.52.

Standard and Indicator 1.6: The percent of individuals achieving Competitive Employment Outcomes who report their own income as Primary Source of Support at Closure as compared to application.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR passed the Federal standard by achieving 61.8%.

Standard and Indicator 2.1: Access to services for Minorities as measured by the ratio of the Minority Service Rate to the Non-Minority Service Rate.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved a service ratio of 0.92 which was well above the Federal standard of 0.80.

 

Identify supported employment goals.

If funding remains consistent with prior levels, DSHS/DVR will continue to serve approximately 275 individuals in IPEs with a supported employment goal and to achieve approximately 200 supported employment outcomes per year.

 

Assess the performance of the state on the standards and indicators.

Standard and Indicator 1.1: The number of individuals achieving employment outcomes during the current performance period compared to the previous performance period.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved 2,763 employment outcomes, 86 outcomes over the number needed to pass this standard.

Standard and Indicator 1.2: The percentage of individuals receiving services under an individualized plan for employment who achieve employment outcomes.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved a rehabilitation rate of 52.6% in FFY 2011. That was below the standard of 55.8% required to meet this standard; however, it was above the FFY 2010 level of 51.41%. Even though new applications from Aged, Blind, Disabled (ABD) clients declined throughout FFY 2011 due to improved referral practices, there continued to be a significant number of ABD clients with existing cases that were closed before achieving an employment outcome. The rehabilitation rate for this population remained at approximately 9.0% which impacted the overall rehabilitation rate.

Standard and Indicator 1.3: Competitive employment outcomes as a percentage of all employment outcomes.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved this standard with 98.55% of employment outcomes as competitive employment outcomes.

Standard and Indicator 1.4: Competitive employment outcomes for individuals with Significant Disabilities as a percentage of all employment outcomes.

For FFY 2011, 97.10% of DSHS/DVR’s competitive employment outcomes were individuals with Significant Disabilities.

Standard and Indicator 1.5: The ratio of the average VR Hourly Wage to the Average State Hourly Wage.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved a wage ratio of 0.518 which was slightly below the standard of 0.52.

Standard and Indicator 1.6: The percent of individuals achieving Competitive Employment Outcomes who report their own income as Primary Source of Support at Closure as compared to application.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR passed the Federal standard by achieving 61.8%.

Standard and Indicator 2.1: Access to services for Minorities as measured by the ratio of the Minority Service Rate to the Non-Minority Service Rate.

For FFY 2011, DSHS/DVR achieved a service ratio of 0.92 which was well above the Federal standard of 0.80.

 

Provide a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

During FFY 2011 DSHS/DVR reserved funds for funding of the State Rehabilitation Council and State Independent Living Council; however, no Title 1 grant funding was allotted for any innovation and expansion activities because funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act were utilized for this purpose.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2012 6:01PM by sawahansenp

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Washington DSHS/DVR continues to provide supported employment services primarily to individuals with developmental disabilities and individuals with chronic mental illness. While supported employment service delivery to individuals with developmental disabilities is well established, there continue to be significant systemic challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the delivery of supported employment services to individuals with mental illness. In addition, further 2011-2013 Washington State budget reductions in both the Developmental Disability and Mental Health service delivery systems continue to erode extended service availability. Other sources of long term support continue to be explored, such as “natural supports,” Social Security work incentives, peer support groups, and Wellness Recovery Action Plans.

Washington DSHS/DVR continues to recognize there are other individuals with most significant disabilities who require supported employment services besides those with developmental disabilities or mental illness, such as individuals with traumatic brain injury or other severe cognitive impairments. Longstanding systemic challenges within Washington State’s delivery of human services have prevented supported employment services from being provided extensively to these other populations because of inadequate resources for extended services or natural supports. These systemic challenges are being exacerbated by further reductions to the 2011-2013 state budget in program areas that might otherwise offer supported employment extended services to these other populations. DSHS/DVR’s Community Relations Administrator serves on the Statewide Traumatic Brain Injury Council as a general council and executive committee member and continues to explore opportunities for increased extended and natural supports for employment of people with a traumatic brain injury within the Council’s annual funding prioritization, public/private partnerships, and related brain injury support organizations.

Washington DSHS/DVR will continue seeking ways to expand the availability of extended services for all individuals who require supported employment by maintaining close collaboration with sister programs within the Department of Social and Health Services as well as local adult service providers. DSHS/DVR continues to work with various agencies to explore the option of becoming an Employment Network so they may utilize resources from Ticket-To-Work to provide extended services. This will be aimed at individuals who require supported employment but who traditionally have not had any source of extended services or natural supports.

In all cases where Washington DSHS/DVR provides supported employment services, the transition to extended services occurs within 18-months of the individual’s job placement (unless a longer period is necessary) at the point stable performance has been achieved on the job.

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2012 6:43PM by sawahansenp

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Last updated by sawakrulichk

Completed on 08/28/2012 at 2:54 PM

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Published on 09/11/2012 at 12:55 PM

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