ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Published February 16, 2017.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Utah State Office of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Utah State Office of Education (USOE) [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Executive Director of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Executive Director of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at https://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryRussell J Thelin

Title of SignatoryExecutive Director, USOR

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)02/20/2015

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2015Yes

Comments:

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryRussell J Thelin

Title of SignatoryExecutive Director USOR

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)02/20/2015

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Utah State Office of Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

ATTACHMENT 4.2 (c) Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council; Response of the Designated State Unit; and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) maintains a State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17. The designated state unit jointly with the SRC develops, agrees to and reviews annually state goals and priorities and jointly submits to the commissioner annual reports of progress in accordance with the provisions of Section 101(a)(15) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.29 and subsection 4.11 of this State Plan. The SRC meets 10 times per year. USOR regularly consults with the State Rehabilitation Council regarding the development, implementation and revision of state policies and procedures of general applicability pertaining to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services. USOR includes in the State Plan and in any revision to the State Plan a summary of input provided by the State Rehabilitation Council, including recommendations from the annual report of the council described in Section 105(c)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(5) the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction described in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4), and other reports prepared by the council and the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations, including explanations for rejecting any input or recommendation; and transmits to the council: (A) all plans, reports and other information required under 34 CFR 361 to be submitted to the commissioner; (B) all policies and information on all practices and procedures of general applicability provided to or used by rehabilitation personnel in carrying out this State Plan and its supplement; and (C) copies of due process hearing decisions issued under 34 CFR 361.57, which are transmitted in such a manner as to ensure that the identity of the participants in the hearings is kept confidential. The following is a summary of the SRC’s recommendations made from May 2013 until May 2014 and USOR’s response and actions taken in regards to these recommendations. SRC RECOMMENDATION 1: In May of 2013 the SRC received a presentation about the PROMISE grant which is a grant that has been received by USOR to do outreach for youth who receive SSI. The Council voted to recommend that USOR proceed with acceptance and use of the grant as described.USOR RESPONSE 1:Utah’s ASPIRE project funded by a PROMISE grant is moving forward and they hope to begin identifying possible participants by the end of May 2014.SRC RECOMMENDATION 2: The SRC voted to add a question to the Client Satisfaction Survey specifically on the survey sent to unsuccessful closures. The SRC made a formal recommendation asking for USOR assistance since USOR prints and sends the questionnaire on behalf of the SRC.USOR RESPONSE 2:USOR added the additional question to the document, presented a draft to the SRC which was approved, and the new version is being printed at this time to be sent in the next survey cycle as requested.SRC RECOMMENDATION 3: The SRC recommended that USOR sign a proposed MOU with the Ute Mountain Ute 121 program. USOR RESPONSE 3: USOR has signed a new MOU with the Ute Mountain Ute 121 program and is working on agreements with other tribes as wellSRC RECOMMENDATION 4:The SRC recommended that USOR proceed with the State Plan submission following a presentation of the draft State Plan.USOR RESPONSE 4:USOR submitted the State Plan as presented to the SRC to RSA in June, 2013.SRC RECOMMENDATION 5:The SRC recommended that USOR implement a new VR Client Transportation Policy as presented to the SRC in draft form.USOR RESPONSE 5: USOR implemented the new Transportation Policy in October of 2013.SRC RECOMMENDATION 6:The SRC recommended that USOR go forward with implementation of a new Identity Verification Policy after a draft of the policy was presented to the SRC.USOR RESPONSE 6:USOR implemented a new Identity Verification Policy in November, 2013.SRC RECOMMENDATION 7:The SRC recommended that USOR proceed with changes to policy covering authorization payments make directly to clients.USOR RESPONSE 7:USOR implemented policy changes related to authorizations made directly to clients as presented to the SRC.SRC RECOMMENDATION 8:The SRC recommended that USOR’s Client Service Manual be made available to the public on the USOR public website.USOR RESPONSE 8:The USOR Client Service Manual is now available to the public through a link on the agency home page.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 9:

In a meeting held December 22, 2014 the SRC approved the draft plan for Order of Selection as it existed at that time. The SRC recommended that the plan be sent to RSA for approval

USOR RESPONSE 9:

USOR moved forward with sending the OOS plan for approval to RSA.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 10:

In a meeting on January 28, 2015 the SRC voted to approve the revised OOS plan from USOR to be sent to RSA. The SRC indicated that they preferred the previous plan which included 5 priority categories (students with disabilities being listed as priority one) based on their interpretation of WIOA but that they understood that RSA had rejected that plan and that they would “acquiesce” to the direction of RSA to resubmit a plan with 3 priority categories.

USOR RESPONSE 10:

USOR revised the plan as directed by RSA and submitted the new plan for approval on 2/2/15.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 11:

Also at the January meeting the SRC recommended that USOR closely monitor both fiscal resources and staffing available when deciding to open categories so as to ensure timely and efficient service provision.

USOR RESPONSE 11:

USOR will consider both fiscal and staffing resources when deciding to open categories as part of OOS.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 12:

The SRC recommended that USOR continue agency realignment and ‘rightsizing’ to make an effort to free up fiscal resources in order to serve all eligible individuals as soon as possible

USOR RESPONSE 12:

USOR continues its efforts to ensure that all resources are allocated appropriately and to realign/reduce expenses wherever possible to assure that all eligible individuals will once again be served by USOR as soon as possible.

This screen was last updated on Feb 11 2015 2:59PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on May 26 2009 11:27AM by sautwalkerk

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(1)

Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has developed and maintains cooperative agreements where necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system. USOR maintains a cooperative agreement with “AgrAbility”, a program carried out under the authority of the Undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture which includes a fee for service arrangment. Additionally USOR maintains cooperative agreements with the Utah Department of Workforce Services (DWS), Utah State Office of Education (USOE), Utah System of Higher Education (USHE), Utah Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Utah Department of Community and Culture (UDCC), and the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED).

As required by Utah State legislation USOR has developed a MOU and coordinated plan with DWS and DSPD (Utah’s DD agency) to carry out services related to employment for persons with significant disabilities. Additional agreements exist relevant to the "Employment First" initiatives in Utah. USOR also maintains cooperative agreements with all local public education school districts, the Veterans Administration (VA), local mental health organizations, and other entities involved in workforce development services including shared projects with the Department of Health.

USOR also participates in the statewide workforce investment system through participation in statewide and local workforce investment boards.

In addition, as part of its strategic plan beginning in FY 2014 USOR is working to improve relationships with Native American Tribes who’s boundaries cross into Utah. USOR will also maintain a liaison relationship with the Utah Office of Ethnic Affairs (UOEA) as well as individual minority groups in an effort to educate the office staff about VR programs and services, to coordinate activities with 121 programs which extend into Utah, and in an effort to establish referral sources within these communities. USOR recently signed a MOU agreement with the Ute Mountain Ute 121 program and other agreements are pending. Details about these and other outreach activities can be found in later attachments which outline progress of USOR’s 3 year state plan goals, strategies, and activities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 16 2014 3:19PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(2)

Coordination with Education Officials

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has long established plans, policies, and procedures for coordination between USOR and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation. USOR is structurally positioned within the Utah State Office Of Education (USOE) under the authority of the State Board of Education, as such functional relationships exist between administrative staff of both offices.

USOR maintains cooperative agreements with each of the 41 local school districts that include provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. USOR has assigned transition liaisons with each local school district who serve on transition roundtables with special educators and administrators, provide outreach to students and parents, and provide VR orientations to students. Every high school in Utah has a transition counselor who is assigned to cover referrals and questions from that school.

USOR maintains a cooperative agreement with the USOE Department of Education program. This agreement was modified and expanded in January of 2013 to provide improved guidance for both agencies and to clarify expectations on both sides. The agreement defines terms, defines financial responsibilities and states in writing the commitments made by both sides. Similar to past agreements it provides for consultation and technical assistance to assist USOE and local districts in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post school activities, including vocational rehabilitation services. The cooperative agreement also provides for joint transition planning coordination by USOR and USOE staff for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and specifies the roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, includes provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and describes procedures developed for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services. A representative of USOE Special Education sits on the State Rehabilitation Council, and a representative from USOR sits on the Utah Special Education Advisory Panel providing consultation and assistance.

Additionally, USOR is represented on local school district transition councils where they exist, the statewide transition council, and the Workforce, Education and Economic Development Alliance (WEEDA) committee which bridges collaborative efforts between the USOE, DWS, USOR, GOED, and Higher Education.

In 2013 USOR hired a ’transition specialist’ who has responsibilities such as improving the quality and consistency of transition services from USOR counselors to students and improving collaboration and coordination. Further information about specific transition goals and activities can be found in the attachment which updates the progress of USOR on its 3 year goal plan.

This screen was last updated on Jun 16 2014 3:23PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(3)

Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

USOR has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by USOR that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

USOR has established fee-for-service agreements (specifically outcome payment agreements for SE services) with private non-profit entities providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout Utah in accordance with the requirements of 5.10(b) of this state plan. Entities providing services include, but are not limited to: The Parent Center, Deseret Industries, Turn Community Services, Homeless Veteran’s Fellowship and Columbus Community Center. USOR also maintains vendor relationships with other agencies providing supported job based employment services that include a fee for service agreement and participation in job coach training activities. As indicated above in January 2011 USOR moved to an outcome based payment system for the provision of Supported Employment services and Supported Job Based Training services. USOR continues efforts to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, to expand the availability of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) offering supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of this state plan. In the past 3 years USOR has signficantly increased the flexibility and design of job coaching services to allow counselors to design a specialized set of services unique for each individual. Service types and categories are expanded as needed and changes are made each year as USOR and its vendors adapt to the newer payment system. It is hoped that this increased flexibility and expanded range of service types encourages more CRPs to become vendors in order to increase choices available to USOR counselors.

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services was expanded to a targeted population through Utah House Bill 45 in 2009. This bill provided on going funding for extended supported employment services to a targeted number of individuals who had previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. Although discontinued at one time this funding was restored last year and USOR continues to work with DSPD to identify eligible individuals based on the priorities set in the cooperative agreement to be served by these reserved funds.

This screen was last updated on Jun 16 2014 3:27PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(4)

Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with entities providing supported employment services throughout Utah in accordance with the requirements of the state plan. Three years ago USOR began paying all providers under an ’outcome’ payment method. These entities include Ability and Choice Services, Cache Employment and Training, Castle Valley Center, Performance LLC, Turn Community Services, Dixie Advantages, Family Matters, Optimus Services, Oasis House, Miles Employment Service for the Deaf, DDI Vantage, RISE Inc., Danville Employment Services, Choices Supported Employment, Alpine Transition and Employment, Phoenix Services, Chrysalis Utah, Danville Employment, Alliance House, Pioneer Adult Rehab Center, Enable Industries, Valley Services, Homeless Veterans Servies, Jordan Valley, Covenant Employment Services and other agencies providing supported job based employment services. USOR has continued to revise their payment system to give more SE/SJBT choices to consumers and their counselors, allowing them to customize a set of services from a provider(s) unique to the needs a a particular client. USOR continues efforts to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, with other supported employment entities. These efforts are coordinated by the USOR Supported Employment Specialist who conducts efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan. USOR has recently formed a committee of staff members to provide ongoing input and suggestions regarding the provision of services, the policies around SE/SJBE, and approval of service providers. Most recently a committee of USOR employees recommended several additional changes to the payment options and schedule which are currently pending final approval. More information about the duties of this new committee can be found in the attachment which describes state strategies.

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services have been expanded to a targeted population through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. These funds are available to provide long term services for up to 175 individuals per year. These funds are designed to support individuals who have previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. The money is now designated as ongoing funding.

This screen was last updated on Jun 16 2014 4:30PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development This attachment describes the Utah State Office of Rehabilitations (USOR) policies, procedures, and activities which ensure an adequate supply of qualified professionals and paraprofessionals to provide vocational rehabilitation services statewide. These policies and procedures were developed in coordination with the State Rehabilitation Council. (a) Data system on personnel and personnel development. The USOR has developed and maintains a computerized record system for personnel needs, resources, and training. The computerized personnel needs data system is maintained by the USOR Training Coordinator and provides annual analysis of: (1) Qualified personnel needs. (A) The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category. At the writing of this document the system includes 110 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (VRC) and 25 Supervising Counselors (SC) within the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), and 7 VRC within the Division of Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DSBVI). Both divisions combined to serve 30,884 individual during FY 2013 for a counselor/consumer ratio of 1:217. Also included in the database from DRS are 10 District Directors, 4 Field Service Directors, and 1 Case Service Director, 7 Vocational Evaluators (VE) (down from 14 last year), 18 Rehabilitation Technicians (RT), 65 Office Specialists (OS), 9 Choose to Work Employment Specialists (CTW) and a DSBVI VR Case Service Director all of whom work in support of the VR program. (b) The following is a breakdown of the number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category and a projection of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in 5 years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors (see projections below). In 2008 USOR adopted a plan to reduce turnover. Due in large part to that program turnover dropped significantly from 2008 to 2010. More recently however turnover has steadily been rising. Since October 1, 2013 USOR has already trained 20 new counselors (one more from this time last year) and 3 more new counselors are scheduled for training in the next 30 days. It is expected at the current pace USOR would have an additional 3 or 4 new counseling staff by the end of the fiscal year. If turnover continues at this pace an estimate of yearly turnover at this point would be about 27 counselors per year which is significantly higher than just a few years ago. If turnover stays steady and if one additional counselor is added per year for possible agency expansion and in order to maintain current service ratios (the USOR formula is one counselor and one-half time secretary for each 20,000 individuals in the general population and USOR tries to add counselors when approved by the State legislature) the USOR will need a total of at least 135 new counselors and as many as 40 supervising counselors over the next 5 years. The USOR replaced just 2 District Directors in the past year (the same as last year) and 11 supervising counselors (up slightly), however some of those were based on reassignment and promotion. Based on past history but considering the recent increase in turnover it is estimated that there might be 40 supervisor openings and 10 district director openings over the next 5 years.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Counselor 109 3 135
2 Supervising Counselor 25 0 40
3 District Director 10 0 10
4 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Utah only has one Master’s Program in the field of Vocational Rehabilitation within the state located at Utah State University. This program prepares MS degree, CRC eligible VR counselors. The program also contains a very small doctoral program. The Executive director of USOR and the USOR Human Resource Developer/Trainer sit on the USU advisory council. The program empahsizes degrees given through distance education and contains mostly individuals already employed by public VR agencies across the country. Due to this makeup of students only a small on-campus class, usually 5 or 6 students, are available each year to recruit as new hires for USOR vacancies. In the distance program last year 8 students graduated who were employees of USOR at the time of their graduation. An additional 4 USOR employees were students taking limited classes to qualify under certain categories for the CRC (Category R for example.)

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Utah State University 86 20 8 8
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Plan for Recruitment, Preparation and Retention of Qualified Personnel During FFY 2008 USOR implemented a comprehensive recruitment program designed to make USOR more attractive as an employer, cut turnover by retaining current qualified staff, and increase the number of qualified applicants for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor vacancies. This effort, and subsequent efforts resulted in a significant drop in staff turnover through 2010. Unfortunately due to multiple circumstances the turnover rate has once again been increasing. USOR is in the process of completing a study looking at turnover to try and decide what might help again reduce the turnover rate. USOR continues to offer flexible schedules, an incentive program which gives Administrative Leave for above average performance, generous educational assistance, and a competitive starting salary. In addition USOR has given a one-time payment/bonus to those who obtained the new state licensure to help offset the costs of that licensure and reward those who obtained it. USOR was also able to use discretionary funds given by the legislature for state fiscal year 2015 to increase salaries of those who hold state licensure .5%. It is a small amount but USOR is committed to continue to find ways to increase the salaries of those who maintain licensure. As indicated in a previous attachment USOR has trained 20 new counselors since October 1, 2013 which is the highest number seen in several years. 3 openings exist right now for counselors and it is likely at least 3 more will occur before the end of the year. Although turnover continues to rise USOR has still seen an increase in the skill and expertise level of those applying for vacant positions. USOR seems to be hiring some individuals who meet CSPD at hire and has hired several with counseling degrees and previous experience. In addition several staff members returned to USOR this year after leaving in past years to seek other employment. It is hoped that that turnover rates will again stabilize but as in previous years estimates for staff needed in the next 5 years were done with a ‘worst case scenario’ mentality. The USOR actively recruits at all colleges and universities in Utah to attract both undergraduates and potential graduate students. The USOR uses a hiring option through Human Resources that allows individuals who report having a disability to skip the competitive process and be hiring on a trial basis which leads to permanent employment if the person is successful. The USOR also builds relationships with other out of state colleges. For example, approximately 4 current USOR staff are attending the CORE accredited program at Virginia Commonwealth University in the past year and one USOR employee is a student at the University of Wisconsin Stout. USOR actively recruits to fill Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor positions throughout the year by participating in university and college career fairs and by presenting at on-campus classes at the Utah State University Rehabilitation Counselor Education (RCE) program. Additionally, USOR has developed and maintained a recruitment brochure that details the benefits of employment within the state agency and introduces potential applicants to careers in VR. USOR also works with the USOE Human Resources Office to increase the distribution of recruitment announcements nationwide. USOR staff serves on the Advisory Board for the USU RCE program, and work closely with the University of Northern Colorado Technical Assistance and Continuing Education program in efforts to attract graduates and increase the number of students engaged in these training programs. USOR staff is very active in the state chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association (NRA) and USOR uses that relationship to recruit qualified professionals and to further develop the qualifications of agency staff through additional training, support, and career development. For example, monthly ‘brown bag training seminars’ are presented through the USOR video training system and co-sponsored by the Utah Rehabilitation Association (URA) and USOR supports twice yearly conferences of URA. These coordinated efforts are designed to recruit, prepare, and retain personnel who are qualified, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

 

Personnel Standards USOR has established hiring preferences and personnel policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that USOR professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained. In January, 2010 the State of Utah began issuing a new State Licensure for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. This new State Licensure necessitated a change in our agency CSPD standard to make sure that Utah VR counselors adhere to the highest standard existing in Utah. As the Utah requirement gives 5 years from the date of hire for staff to meet CSPD It is anticipated that all current staff will meet the CSPD expectation by June 30, 2019. The policies and procedures related to CSPD are described below: (1) CSPD Standard The USOR has established the following policy to ensure that professionals providing services are appropriately and adequately trained consistent with or prepared to meet the Utah State Licensing Requirement that applies to the area in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services. The purpose of this policy is to ensure that all Rehabilitation Counselors, Supervising Counselors, Vocational Evaluators and District Directors employed by USOR meet the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) standard required in law, federal regulations, and the state plan. This standard is designed to guarantee that Rehabilitation Counselors are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained to provide quality effective vocational rehabilitation services. The USOR CSPD standard requires that those employees identified above meet one of the following criteria: (1) Hold a Utah State Licensure in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling or (2) Meet the criteria to obtain a Utah State Licensure in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling which includes holding a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or related field as outlined in the Utah State licensing regulations, obtaining 4000 hours of supervised experience under a Licensed Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and having taken and passed the CRC exam (national certification exam) Employees who hold a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field will be considered to have met the CSPD if they have completed the required 4000 hours of supervised work under the supervision of an LVRC and have completed and passed the CRC national exam. Plan for all staff to meet new CSPD standard: Although the USOR standard is consistent with Utah state standards, the Utah state licensure is new, and the standard has been recently revised. The grandfathering clause which allowed an acceptance of a variety of degrees as well as experience in lieu of the CRC has expired and the list related degrees accepted is now smaller and the CRC is required. This, combined with the fact that USOR must sometimes underfill counseling positions due to a lack of applicants meeting the standard at hire means that not all USOR staff meet CSPD at this time. CSPD status is tracked for counselors, supervising counselors, vocational evaluators, and district directors. In addition, the CSPD database contains information on various area directors, administrators and program specialists such as Choose to Work staff within DRS that are expected to meet and maintain the CSPD standard. As of this date (June, 2014) the database contains information on 185 staff members, 142 of which meet the standard (either licensed or eligible to be licensed). 137 of those listed have the Utah State LVRC license. 43 staff are not considered to yet meet the standard and are working on their 5 year plans as described above to meet CSPD. Each of those 43 staff members has a plan in place to meet the standard within 5 years of hire (or 6 years in special cases where the standard changed mid plan, see below). As indicated earlier all current staff are expected to meet the CSPD requirement on or before June 1, 2019. All counseling and vocational evaluation staff who were hired before January 1, 2010 and have a signed CSPD plan already on file using the prior CSPD standard will be expected to complete the terms of that initial agreement but have also been given an additional 12 months beyond the initial expected date of completion to complete the added requirements of the new CSPD standard which includes taking and passing the national certification exam (CRC). Counselors and evaluators hired since January 1, 2010 wrote a CSPD plan based on the new CSPD standard and will have 5 years from their date of hire to complete the requirements as outlined above to meet the standard. Those counselors who do not meet CSPD upon hire and will require additional graduate level education are expected to successfully complete at least one graduate level class and to apply for admission into a graduate program during their probationary period with the agency (first 12 months of hire). (3) Strategies, timelines, monitoring and qualifications. (A) The USOR makes every effort to recruit and hire individuals who meet the USOR’s CSPD standard as outlined above, and supports the training of existing employees who do not meet the CSPD standard. The USOR offers ongoing educational assistance for those needing additional education to meet the CSPD standard. The USOR also offers a pay increase when counselors successfully obtain national certification (CRC). For those employees hired without a Master’s degree in a counseling field, USOR will assist with funding for graduate level education. A graduate degree specific to Rehabilitation Counseling is preferred by the USOR and is considered to be directly related to the job requirements of a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor. For this reason employees who choose to attend a CORE accredited Master’s degree program will be eligible for 100% educational reimbursement of tuition and books. The CORE accredited program chosen must be eligible to grant an RSA scholarship to offset the costs of tuition, fees, and books. All employees attending these programs must apply for the RSA scholarship. In the rare instance where an approved graduate program may have exhausted all available scholarship monies for a given semester, employees will be eligible to request from the USOR 100% reimbursement of tuition, fees, and books. Reimbursement requests must be submitted prior to the beginning of each semester. These requests must be accompanied by a letter of scholarship denial which states that the reason for such denial was due to lack of available funding from the approved graduate program. Employees completing required internship and practicum experience from a CORE accredited program will be accommodated by the USOR at the employee’s request. For those employee’s who choose to attend a Master’s degree program in a counseling field which meets the requirements for a related degree under the rules for obtaining a Utah State VRC license will be eligible for standard educational reimbursement of 50% of tuition, fees, and books, up to the rate of a comparable public program. Comparable public programs are considered to be those found at the University of Utah. All such coursework must be directly related to the employee’s job requirements. Employees must be accepted and matriculated into a graduate program in a related counseling discipline. All requests for USOR educational benefits will be considered contingent upon available funding and employees will be notified of approval prior to enrollment for each semester. All related educational expenses and time required to complete any graduate program will be the responsibility of the employee. In some cases employees who currently meet the CSPD standard may choose to pursue an additional advanced degree program. Educational benefits outlined in the Human Resources Guide will apply in these instances. While it is the intention of the USOR to establish and maintain funding necessary to allow all employees to meet the CSPD requirements, exceptional and unforeseen circumstances may arise that prohibit such funding. Should funding become unavailable, the employee will be allowed an adjusted time frame to accomplish the standard when such funding becomes available. The USOR establishes priorities of funding for CSPD requirements as follows: (1) Priority One: Employees in a supervisory position and employees hired under the expectation of meeting the standard as indicated in their letter of hire. (2) Priority Two: All other employees. Counseling staff who obtain the CRC certification will be refunded 50% of the test fee, and will receive a 5% selective salary increase to offset the costs of maintaining the certification unless they are in longevity. Individuals in longevity who obtain certification will receive a one time bonus. Counselors must continue to maintain CRC certification or they will lose the salary increase. The USOR has instituted a hiring preference in order to encourage the hiring of staff who already meets the CSPD standard. Hiring preference is as follows: (1) Individuals who hold the Utah State Licensure for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. (2) Individuals who meet the USOR CSPD standard but have not yet obtained State Licensure. (3) Individuals enrolled in a Commission on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredited program to obtain a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling. (4) Individuals who hold a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field as outlined in the state licensing law. (5) Individuals who hold a Bachelor’s degree in a related social service field such as counseling, psychology, social work, etc. and who have three or more years of counseling employment experience. (6) Individuals who hold a Bachelor’s degree in a related social service field with less than three years of counseling experience (are hired as a Rehabilitation Counselor Trainee). All new counselors receive a notification attached to their letter of hire indicating their current CSPD standing and the requirements they must meet within their first year of hire, and subsequent 5 years of hire to meet the standard. Direct supervisors create CSPD plans within 30 days of hire for new employees and they are required to track the progress of the employee in meeting the CSPD standard and to make sure that the requirement to meet CSPD is included in the counselor’s performance plan and evaluation. All Rehabilitation Counselors who do not meet the standard as outlined above are required to meet the standard within five (5) years of their date of hire (6 years in some cases, see earlier explanation). Counselors who do not have a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field upon hire will be required to enter a Master’s program, and obtain the needed degree and national certification to meet the five (5) year deadline. Staff who do not make adequate progress within the timelines described may be terminated. It is anticipated that all current staff should meet the CSPD standard by June 1, 2019. Progress of the USOR as a whole is monitored through the data system. Staff employed as Rehabilitation Counselors, Supervising Counselors, Vocational Evaluation and District Directors must meet the CSPD standards and are tracked through this system. New employees hired who do not meet the standard at hire will be monitored by both supervisory staff and training staff. Each new counselor hired must complete a USOR Qualification of Personnel Standard form. For those staff who meet the standard at the time of their hire and for those who will meet the standard within five (5) years of hire with additional work experience and national certification (those hired with an a Master’s degrees in an approved counseling field), no additional documentation is required except verification of passing the CRC exam and/or verification of State licensure. For those counselors who need additional education in order to meet the standard, sections will be added to their performance plans with the heading of Professional Development. These sections must include a plan describing how the counselor will meet the standard, by obtaining the required Master’s degree and National Certification, within five (5) years of the date of hire. These plans shall be submitted to the USOR Training Coordinator with the USOR Qualification of Personnel Standard form within thirty (30) days of hire, and must be signed by the employee, the supervisor, and the District Director. Minimum requirements for the first year of the plan for those staff who do not hold a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field will include completing the application process for an approved graduate program and satisfactory completion of two (2) semester hours of coursework required in the approved program. Satisfactory completion means courses are completed in a timely manner at a performance level to meet the graduate school requirements. Progress sufficient to meet the CSPD plan requirements will be monitored in each subsequent year as set forth in the employee’s Performance Plan. The Performance Plan will be reviewed as required by the supervisor. If an employee has not satisfactorily completed all activities outlined for the year of review, they will receive an unsatisfactory rating in the Professional Development section and be placed on corrective action. A corrective action plan will be written with short term goals established to remediate the lack of progress toward their CSPD plan. The corrective action plan will establish three (3) and six (6) month reviews. If the corrective action is not successful, disciplinary action will result which may include termination based upon non-compliance with USOR agency policy. Normal supervisory review procedures will apply and be available to the employee. New employees who do not make the outlined progress in the first year of probationary status will be terminated from the agency in probationary status with no recourse for the employee.

 

Staff Development USOR has established policies, procedures, and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training in terms staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement, rehabilitation technology; and procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources. These training opportunities and activities include: (1) The USOR Human Resource Development Program provides for attendance at workshops, conferences, formal course work at institutions of higher education, as well as agency developed and conducted training sessions. Training is offered in the areas of counseling; informed choice; medical, psychological, and vocational assessment; assistive technology; culturally sensitive practices; job placement and development; ethics; proposed reauthorization, as well as other topics relevant to Rehabilitation Counselors. Specialized topics from the last 6 months include eligibility, classification, case file review, Utah Transit Authority services, Affordable Care Act, Suicide Prevention, CPT (medical billing) codes, Department of Workforce Services training Programs, New policy training including changes to purchasing policies, Utahs Work Incentive Programs, ethics, and the new case management system preview (AWARE). Extensive training on the new case management system is scheduled for later this year along with case review instrument training and additional training in ’necessary and appropriate’ expenditures. The USOR provides monthly in-service trainings via high definition video conferencing to offices throughout Utah, as well as by web-streaming training content. The USOR has consistently exceeded the required training hours required to maintain national certification and has also provided counselors with the training hours required to maintain state licensure this past year. (2) The USOR has established procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources. These procedures include providing training opportunities, encouraging professional memberships in organizations which offer professional journals, as well as having a close relationship with the Utah State University Rehabilitation Counselor Education program, and the Region 8 TACE center. Additionally USOR has established a cooperative relationship with the National Clearinghouse On Rehabilitation Materials at Utah State University.

 

The USOR has worked to ensure the availability of personnel who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals. The USOR has established Spanish speaking caseloads that are staffed by professionals who are fluent in Spanish. USOR also maintains a caseload where the counselor must speak Navajo. Most USOR materials including brochures and preprinted materials from the case management system are available in Spanish. Additionally USOR has established a number of deaf and hard of hearing caseloads statewide that are staffed by professionals fluent in American Sign Language. Applicants are tested prior to selection for these positions and receive a pay increase for these skills. USOR can provide interpretation through staff members, through Interpretype machines, and through outside staff services purchased per state contract.

 

The USOR has established procedures and activities to coordinate the comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. These include maintaining the cooperative agreement between the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation with the Utah State Office of Special Education for a project of systematic transition for Utah’s youth with disabilities. This agreement is described in more detail in a previous section. Individual agreements are signed with all school districts in Utah and goals relevant to Transition and coordination with School officials are contained in the Goal and Strategy attachment.

This screen was last updated on Jun 26 2014 4:42PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

ATTACHMENT 4.11(a)

Statewide Assessment (a) Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR), in cooperation with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), conducts a comprehensive statewide needs assessment every three years to identify the rehabilitation needs of those individuals residing in Utah with disabilities. The latest assessment was completed in April of 2013. USOR contracted with the Center for Public Policy and Administration, located at the University of Utah, to conduct this assessment and it follows the model of the last assessment by USOR. USOR is now completing the first year of goals/activities related to this new assessment. The executive summary of the assessment is again included at the end of this section. The entire report can still be found under the publications link at www.usor.utah.gov. As a reminder, this study surveyed Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) clients, counselors and partners to identify needs and to assess the current VR system’s capacity to meet identified service needs. USOR chose to replicate the design of the assessment done three years prior in part to help measure the impact of activities conducted over those three years. Because the new assessment found fewer areas where there was a large gap between needs with a high priority and the ability to provide and/or purchase that service USOR is confident that the activities for the last three years have increased counselor skills and knowledge as well as system capacity. USOR once again developed goals and strategies to meet identified needs from area of ‘service capacity gaps’ and ‘unserved/underserved populations’. In addition to those two areas USOR developed goals related to other internal assessments and areas for improvement. USOR developed a three year plan with goals and focused activities planned for each year that was originally submitted in last years State Plan. Goals are again listed later in this State Plan in attachment 4.11(c) (1) and specific strategies and activities are identified in attachment 4.11 (d). The needs of individuals with disabilities in Utah identified by the assessment that USOR is focusing on for this three year period are: Need for Service vs. Availability/Capacity Gaps (1) Improving self-advocacy skills (2) Obtaining life skills training such money and time-management, or getting along with people (3) Finding and paying for a place to live Needs related to unserved/underserved populations (1) Increased outreach and service provision individuals with substance abuse related disabilities (2) Increased outreach and service provision to transition aged youth and individuals with developmental disabilities (3) Increased outreach and service provision to ethnic and racial minority groups

Executive Summary, CSNA Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Prepared for the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation by Cathy Chambless, PhD, MPA Sara McCormick, MPA Malia McIlvenna, MPP May 8, 2013 CSNA COMPREHENSIVE STATEWIDE NEEDS ASSESSMENT OF INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES IN UTAH EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Center for Public Policy & Administration conducted a comprehensive assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in Utah at the request of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation. The purpose of the study is to provide information for development of a three year vocational rehabilitation state plan. The needs assessment and state plan are requirements of the federal Rehabilitation Act. Seven research questions guided the study:

1. What are population estimates and characteristics of individuals with disabilities in Utah? 2. What are estimates and characteristics of individuals who receive Social Security disability benefits (SSDI and SSI) in the State? 3. How do the processes and outcomes of Utah Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services compare with other peer states? What are the anomalies and are these of concern? 4. What do vocational rehabilitation clients perceive as their unmet needs and barriers to successful outcomes? 5. What do rehabilitation providers perceive as unmet needs and barriers to successful outcomes for their clients? How do providers’ perceptions of needs and barriers compare with the clients’ perceptions? 6. What individuals with disabilities appear to be unserved or underserved by VR services? What are the unmet service needs of these groups? 7. What are barriers and special service needs of individuals with disabilities from racial and ethnic minority populations?

POPULATION ESTIMATES AND SOCIAL SECURITY DATA

Analysis of U.S. Census American Community Survey data shows Utah has a lower percentage (9%) than the nation as a whole (12%) of people who state they have a disability according to the 2008?2010 American Community Survey. In Utah the proportion of males and females with disabilities is nearly equal; while nationwide there is a slightly larger proportion of females with disabilities than males (0.95 to 1). According to Census data the employment rate of individuals with disabilities in Utah (44%) is significantly higher than in the U.S. (36%).

According to USOR, the agency served 28,537 clients in 2010. This is 12% of Utah’s disability population using the American Community Survey definition of disability. Looking at all USOR clients, 55% are male, 45% are female. This is in contrast to Utah’s disabled population which is evenly split with 50% male and 50% female.

A smaller percentage of Utah’s population receives SSDI and SSI benefits than nationally. In 2010 approximately 2.8% of Utahns received SSDI compared to 4.5% nationally, and 1.0% received SSI compared to 2.6% nationally. VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

An analysis of vocational rehabilitation caseload data shows how Utah’s program compares with six peer states (Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and West Virginia). In terms of types of disability, Utah has the highest percentage of psychosocial impairments and lowest percentages of clients with visual, communicative, and other mental impairments compared with the six peer states. Among the peer states Utah had the median “successful employment” rate in FY 2010 ? 67% of all individuals whose cases were closed in FY 2010 after receiving services were employed but this is still well above the national average employment rate of 51%. During the same year, Utah had the highest successful employment rate (71%) for transition?age clients (16?24 years of age) compared to the peer states. The Utah Vocational Rehabilitation program had the highest successful employment rate for clients with cognitive impairments (69%), and mental and emotional disabilities (66%) compared to the peer states.

The Utah vocational rehabilitation program was able to accomplish this excellent performance despite having a lower than average staff size (269 in 2010) compared with its peer states. Additionally, Utah’s staff size as a percentage of cases closed (5.2%) is second lowest (behind Kansas at 4.0%) of peer states and below the national average for combined agencies (6.3%). CONSUMER SURVEY

The purpose of the consumer survey was to assess what vocational rehabilitation clients perceive as their unmet needs and barriers to successful employment outcomes. In October 2012, surveys were sent to 3,730 individuals in Status 10. These individuals had been determined eligible for the program but had not begun receiving services under an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE). Completed surveys were received from 318 respondents which represented an 8.5% response rate. The survey asked individuals to check which services they needed from a list of 31 items. The survey then asked open?ended questions for individuals to list barriers they have in becoming successfully employed, and other service needs not listed elsewhere. Administrative data obtained from USOR included age, gender, race, ethnicity, education level, significance of disability designation, SSDI and SSI, TANF, and GA status at application, and primary disability. Survey data were matched with the administrative data in order to analyze the survey results by demographic indicators.

Respondents were representative of the overall Status 10 population in gender, age, and racial status. However, there were several characteristics of the respondents that differed statistically from the Status 10 population. There were fewer Hispanic?Latino survey respondents compared to the overall Status 10 population. This difference was significant at the .05 level, with 12% of the population classified as Hispanic/Latino and only 5% of the respondents. The respondents were slightly more educated than the overall Status 10 population, and individuals with primary disabilities of mental and cognitive responded less than their proportion in the Status 10 group. Individuals identified as having most significant disability were more likely to have responded. Also, respondents were significantly more likely to be receiving SSDI or GA at application than the overall Status 10 group.

SERVICES NEEDED – CONSUMER SURVEY

The following list of needs is the top ten service needs identified by USOR clients in 2012. 1. Locating employers with suitable job openings (76%) 2. Paying for a school or training program, including books or tools (74%) 3. Learning what jobs are available (69%) 4. Choosing a suitable job (67%) 5. Learning what programs and/or benefits they are eligible for such as Social Security or health care benefits (66%) 6. Understanding how work will impact benefits (62%) 7. Understanding health benefits and finding providers (59%) 8. Job coaching including short term on-the-job training or help with problems on the job (57%) 9. Choosing a school or training program (57%) 10. Writing a resume and preparing for job interview (55)

The service need responses were analyzed by subgroups to see if consumers with certain characteristics differed from the other consumer respondents. The characteristics examined were most significant disability status, transition age (16to24 years old), and primary disability. Subgroup comparisons were made using a ChiSquare statistical test to determine whether differences between the measures were statistically significant. The results of the ChiSquare tests are reported for the variables that have significant difference at a 95% confidence level. Significant results are reported as a p value of less than .05.

The following need areas were higher for individuals coded as most significantly disabled (statistical significance levels are noted).

• Writing a resume and preparing for a job interview (p<.01) • Job coaching (p<.05) • A wheelchair, scooter, or other mobility device (p<.05)

It was also found that fewer individuals coded as most significantly disabled needed assistance with finding and paying for a place to live (ChiSquare p<.05).

The older age group (25 and older) indicated they needed help significantly more than younger respondents in two areas: • Obtaining prescription drugs (p=<.01) • Assistance with car maintenance, repairs or gasoline (p=<.05)

The younger age group (16?24) indicated they needed help significantly more than older respondents in one area: • Finding and paying for a place to live (p<.01)

The following service needs are those that showed differences that were significantly higher than expected or lower for the specific primary disability. • Pursuing self employment – Physical (higher)Choosing a school or training program – Sensory (lower) • Paying for school or training program – Sensory (lower) • Improving self advocacy skills – Cognitive and Mental (higher) • Understanding health benefits and finding providers – Physical (higher); Sensory (lower) • Obtaining mental health and substance abuse counseling – Mental (higher) • Assistance with car maintenance, repairs or gas – Physical and Mental (higher) • Visual aids – Sensory and Physical (higher) • Hearing devices – Sensory (higher) • Wheelchair, scooter or other mobility device – Physical (higher) INDIVIDUALS WITH MOST SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES

The service needs expressed by individuals coded as most significantly disabled were compared with the needs of the remaining consumers. Individuals who were coded as most significantly disabled expressed higher frequency of needs in the areas of: writing a resume and preparing for a job interview (p<.01); job coaching (p<.05); and a wheelchair, scooter, or other mobility device (p<.05). In contrast, consumers coded as most significantly disabled had lower needs for finding and paying for a place to live (p<.05). The rank order of the needs list was very similar between groups.

TRANSITION AGE CONSUMERS

The needs of transition age consumers (16?24 years old) were compared with respondents 25 years and older. Results of the ChiSquare analysis found three services in which age groups differed significantly in the degree they felt they needed help. The older age group (25 and older) indicated they needed help significantly more than younger respondents in two areas: obtaining prescription drugs (p=.01); and assistance with car maintenance, repairs or gasoline (p=.05). The younger age group (16?24) indicated they needed help significantly more than older respondents in finding and paying for a place to live (p<.01).

PRIMARY DISABILITY

Respondents identified as having mental disability comprised 42% of the total, physical 30%, cognitive 23%, and sensory 6% of the total number of respondents (n=318 ). The following service needs are those that showed differences that were significantly higher or lower for the specific primary disability. ChiSquare tests are reported in Table 4.13.

• Pursuing self employment – Physical (higher) • Choosing a school or training program – Sensory (lower) • Paying for school or training program – Sensory (lower) • Improving self advocacy skills – Cognitive and Mental (higher) • Understanding health benefits and finding providers – Physical (higher); Sensory (lower) • Obtaining mental health and substance abuse counseling – Mental (higher) • Assistance with car maintenance, repairs or gas – Physical and Mental (higher) • Visual aids – Sensory and Physical (higher) • Hearing devices – Sensory (higher) • Wheelchair, scooter or other mobility device – Physical (higher)

BARRIERS TO EMPLOYMENT

Consumers listed barriers to employment in response to an open?ended question: “What are the top three factors that cause you the most difficulty in becoming successfully employed?” Their responses were grouped into 34 different categories. The following categories represent the most common barriers expressed: • Physical limitations and health concerns (33% of respondents) • Mental health issues including bipolar, depression, anxiety, ADD/ADHD, depression (28%) • Transportation issues including those related to employment such as cannot take bus, do not have car, no driver license (23%) • Lack of education or skills training, including computer (20%) • Soft skills training needed including interpersonal/social skills, interview skills, money and time management; decision making (18%) • Cognitive issues (13%)

PROVIDER SURVEYS

Three groups of service providers were surveyed to assess their perceptions of rehabilitation needs of the individuals they serve: Utah State Office of Rehabilitation employees (n=123), Department of Workforce Services’ (DWS) employees (n=81), and employees of other community agencies serving people with disabilities (n=62). The third group, referred to as All Other Providers, included employees of Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation, Deseret Industries, the Worker’s Compensation Fund of Utah, and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities. The invitation email was also sent to members of the Utah Association of Community Services, and the Utah Behavioral Health Network, which represent community providers of day, habilitation, mental health, and rehabilitation services for people with disabilities. These organizations were encouraged to forward the invitation email to their members. Surveys were conducted during September 2012 and December 31, 2012; a total of 266 responses were received from all groups.

Providers were asked to rate on a 4 point scale the level of clients’ needs for each of 31 different services. A mean score for each need rating was calculated and then ranked from the largest mean as number 1 rank to the smallest mean as number 31. The rankings were compared across the three provider groups (USOR, DWS, and All Other Providers).

Then questions were asked about the availability of each service for the same list of needs, also using a 4 point scale. A mean for the availability rating was calculated and then ranked from largest mean (i.e., most available) as number 1 to least available as 31. The level of need for the service was defined as “demand” for a service and the level of availability was defined as “supply” of the service in the community. The differences between demand and supply rankings were also compared across provider groups. If the demand for a service is much larger than the supply, this is an issue that needs attention. For this survey, researchers chose to use a difference of 10 or more points between demand and supply to indicate an area that deserves further consideration.

SERVICES IDENTIFIED BY PROVIDERS

Of the list of 31 service needs on the survey, the top ten (upper third) identified by USOR employees of their clients were:

1. Learning what jobs are available 2. Choosing a suitable job 3. Assessing client’s interests and abilities 4. Locating employers with suitable job openings 5. Writing a resume and preparing for a job interview 6. Understanding their health benefits and finding providers 7. Improving self advocacy skills 8. Learning what programs and/or benefits they are eligible for (such as Social Security and health care) 9. Paying for a school or training program including books or tools 10. Understanding how work will impact benefits

The rankings of DWS employees were compared with those of USOR. There was only one need which showed significant difference between USOR and DWS. Improving self advocacy skills was ranked number 7 by USOR, while DWS ranked it number 22.

AVAILABILITY OF SERVICES

Provider ratings of service availability resulted in three service needs identified by USOR with a gap of 10 or greater between demand and supply. This is a marked change from the prior needs assessment survey in 2009 for which USOR rankings showed twice as many service needs (i.e., 6) with a 10?or?more point gap. The researchers divide the rankings into upper third, middle third, and lower third to differentiate the highest from the medium from the lowest requested needs.

Only one of the needs identified by USOR this time was in the upper third group of services:

• Improving self advocacy skills (Demand rank 7, Supply rank 22)

Two other needs with a 10 point or greater gap was in the middle third of rankings: • Obtaining life skills training such as money and time management, or getting along with people (Demand rank 13, Supply rank 23) • Finding and paying for a place to live (Demand rank 17, Supply rank 29)

Department of Workforce Services rankings displayed three service needs with more than a 10 point gap between demand and supply. Two of the needs were in the middle third, and one was in the lower third of the rankings:

• Finding and paying for a place to live (Demand rank 11, Supply rank 21) • Maintaining or repairing a home (Demand rank 15, Supply rank 25) • Environmental controls (enable hands free control of lighting, heating and air conditioning, and other devices within the home or office) (Demand rank 8, Supply rank 28)

The All Other Providers group had two service needs that showed a 10 point or greater gap between demand and supply. This could be shortage of capacity, lack of training, or difficulty in accessing the services. Both needs were in the upper third of the All Other Providers rankings:

• Locating employers with suitable job openings. (Demand rank 4, Supply rank 16) • Understanding their health benefits and finding providers. (Demand rank 5, Supply rank 12)

BARR IERS PERCEIVED BY PROVIDERS COMPARED WITH CONSUMERS

The survey asked providers an open-ended question: “What are the top three barriers that prevent your clients from achieving successful outcomes?” The barriers listed by providers were coded into the same 34 categories as the consumer barriers. See the complete report for a comparison between the top ten rankings of consumers with the top ten rankings of providers.

UNSERVED AND UNDERSERVED GROUPS AS IDENTIFIED BY PROVIDERS

The providers were asked to identify groups that may be unserved or underserved by the rehabilitation system. The largest number of responses (16% of all responses) listed people with mental illness and substance abuse as unserved or underserved groups. Tied for second rank were students in transition from high school, and individuals with developmental disabilities (9% each). Racial and ethnic minorities were listed in fourth place with 8%. Individuals who are homeless were tied for fifth place with individuals who are not aware of vocational rehabilitation services at 7%.

RACIAL AND ETHNIC MINORITIES

An analysis was done to compare the responses of consumers who indicated they were racial and ethnic minorities with responses of non-minority consumers. The percentages of minority consumers indicating “I need help” are higher than non?minorities in all 31 need areas. The higher need for services was statistically significant for this group in seven areas: • Understanding how work will impact benefits • Writing a resume and preparing for a job interview • Maintaining or repairing a home • Assessing my interests and abilities • Finding and paying for a place to live • Assistance with car maintenance, repairs or gasoline

CONCLUSION

The purpose of this comprehensive needs assessment is to call attention to perceptions and concerns of individuals who are most involved in receiving and providing rehabilitation services. This attention can then be directed toward remediation of these concerns through Utah’s next three-year Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan.

This screen was last updated on Jun 23 2014 5:39PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

In FFY-2015 USOR plans to serve 29,107 individuals with an expected outcome goal of 3,100 successfully rehabilitated clients. The projected program cost of client services is $18,162,355.00 in both federal and state funds. In addition to Title I funds, Title VI-B funds will be utilized to serve 200 eligible individuals in Category 1 (MSD). The table below projects FFY-2015 related outcomes and goals for Utah State Office of Rehabilitation by Priority Category.

Priority CategoryNumber of Individuals to be servedEst. Number of Individuals Successfully Employed after receiving servicesEst. Number of Individuals Closed Unsuccessfully after receiving servicesTime within which goals are to be achievedCost Per Individual ServedCost of Services
Category 15,3655584063 to 6 Months$954.86$5,122,835.85
Category 219,8842,4181,9746 to 9 Months$619.85$12,325,024.95
Category 33,858214509 to 12 Months$185.19$714,494.20
Totals29,1073,1002,430$18,162,355.00
Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Category 1 (MSD) Title I $4,822,835 5,165 $933
Category 2 (SD) Title I $12,325,024 19884 $619
Category 3 (D) Title I $714,494 3858 $185
MSD Supported Employment Title VI $300,000 200 $1,500
Totals   $18,162,353 29,107 $623

This screen was last updated on Feb 20 2015 8:29AM by Ken Schellenberg

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

ATTACHMENT 4.11 (c)(1) Goals and Priorities(1) Based on the results of the 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs and the performance of USOR in the past year, USOR met with the State Rehabilitation Council to jointly review the results, recommendations, and to jointly establish goals and priorities for program improvement. In collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council, the following goals and priorities have been established: RSA PERFORMANCE INDICATOR FFY13 Performance/ FFY14 GOAL/FFY 15 GOAL1.1 Change in Employment Outcomes 3665/3666/36671.2 Percent of Employment Outcomes 58%/58%/59%1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes 96.5%/97%/97.51.4 Significance of Disability 98.95% / 95.5%/90.951.5 Earnings Ratio .568/.57/.581.6 Self Support 66.13%/67%/68%2.1 Minority Served Ratio .949/.96/.97In addition, USOR has identified the following goals related to both the most recent Statewide Comprehensive Assessment (see attachment 4.11 (a) and other internal evaluations in coordination with the State Rehabilitation Council. Goals beginning with the number 1 are the focus of this first year of the three year plan (October 2013 to September 2014), those numbered 2 will be the focus in year 2 (October 2014 to September 2015) and those beginning with the number 3 will be the focus in the year 3 (October 2015 to September 2016).Goal 1.1: Assist clients to develop self-advocacy skillsGoal 1.2: Increase the number of individuals served who are transition age and/or have developmental disabilities.Goal 1.3 USOR will establish a culture of client-centeredness, world-class transformational rehabilitation services, and highest level professionalism Goal 2.1: Assist clients with developing life skills such as money and time management and getting along with peopleGoal 2.2: Increase the number of individuals served from ethnic and racial minority populations Goal 2.3: USOR will review and revise policies and procedures regarding the support of clients seeking a goal of self-employment in order to facilitate the provision of appropriate services and assist clients to obtain appropriate employmentGoal 3.1: Assist clients with finding and paying for a place to liveGoal 3.2: Increase the number of individuals served with substance abuse related disabilitiesGoal 3.3: USOR will revise and improve the service delivery model for SE/SJBT services

This screen was last updated on Feb 11 2015 3:04PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

The USOR Executive Director has determined resources are not available to provide vocational rehabilitation services to all eligible individuals through the program year. Consistent with state and federal law and regulations, the Director has established restrictions regarding priority categories for selecting the order in which otherwise eligible individuals will be served.

Effective upon approval the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation will initiate an Order of Selection as there is a lack of adequate financial and personnel resources to provide services to all eligible clients. The following chart demonstrates the historical VR revenue trend:

FFY

Basic VR Award

ARRA

Reallocation

Federal Awards

Match Required

MOE Required

200726,821,02726,821,0277,259,05810,680,211
200828,030,43928,030,4397,586,38310,585,935
200931,788,8346,006,64237,795,4768,603,58511,247,126
201031,672,9476,000,00037,672,94710,196,10911,158,019
201131,874,3436,000,00037,874,34310,250,61611,271,388
201230,873,4936,000,00036,873,4939,979,73811,158,106
201330,529,0687,000,00037,529,06810,157,16811,275,157
2014 est31,164,1828,000,00039,164,18210,599,70911,160,102
2015 est31,690,616--31,690,6168,577,00316,309,960

The chart below lists lists expenditures of federal funds and State MOE expenditures and makes the assumption that all MOE is spent in the first year of the grant.

FFY

Federal VR Expenditures

State MOE Expenditures

200725,266,85211,247,126
200828,655,94711,158,019
200931,236,63211,271,388
201035,671,24311,158,106
201141,987,28511,275,157
201240,674,22811,160,102
201347,765,94116,309,960
2014 est39,852,84411,106,102
2015 est39,852,84411,106,102

This next chart compares funding available with expenditures including anticpated shortfall.

FFY Federal & State Funds Federal & State Expenditures % Change from PYDifference
200737,501,23836,513,978987,260
200838,616,37439,813,9669%(1,197,592)
200949,042,60242,508,0207%6,534,582
201048,830,96646,829,34910%2,001,617
201149,145,73153,262,44214%(4,116,711)
201248,031,59951,834,330-3%(3,802,731)
2013

FFY Federal & State Funds Federal & State Expenditures % Change from PYDifference
200737,501,23836,513,978987,260
200838,616,37439,813,9669%(1,197,592)
200949,042,60242,508,0207%6,534,582
201048,830,96646,829,34910%2,001,617
201149,145,73153,262,44214%(4,116,711)
201248,031,59951,834,330-3%(3,802,731)
2013
48,804,225

64,075,901

24%

(15,271,676)

2014 est

50,324,284

50,958,946

-20%

(634,662)

2015 est

48,000,576

50,958,946

0%

(2,958,370)

USOR projects that serving all eligible individuals in Utah will result in expenditures exceeding revenue. This would result in a budget deficit in FFY 2015. USOR is not in a position to accept reallocation dollars at levels in preceding years due to issues with state match requirements and legislative intent. RSA information indicates that Utah has $3 million carryover from FFY 2014, however these funds are fully obligated but have not been expended awaiting invoicing and payment processes.

The following tables demonstrate historical VR growth in program demand and VR Counselor staffing trends. USOR has been unable to add program staff to meet the growing demand on the program. The first table below lists the average VR counselor to client ratio over the past several years.

VR Counselor to Client Ratio

FFY

Ratio

FFY

Ratio

FFY-00

215:1

FFY-01

210:1

FFY-02

221:1

FFY-03

226:1

FFY-04

224:1

FFY-05

217:1

FFY-06

184:1

FFY-07

176:1

FFY-08

187:1

FFY-09

214:1

FFY-10

228:1

FFY-11

238:1

FFY-12

230:1

FFY-13

230:1

FFY-14

223:1

The next table lists the number of available VR counselors within the VR agency over the past several years:

Number of VR Counselors

FFY

Counselors

FFY

Counselors

FFY-00

110

FFY-01

110

FFY-02

112

FFY-03

112

FFY-04

112

FFY-05

112

FFY-06

118

FFY-07

118

FFY-08

118

FFY-09

120

FFY-10

125

FFY-11

125

FFY-12

134

FFY-13

134

FFY-14

133

The final table shows the growth in the number of clients served across those same federal fiscal years:

Total Clients Served

FFY

Total Served

FFY

Total Served

FFY-00

21,684

FFY-01

23,075

FFY-02

23,663

FFY-03

22,892

FFY-04

24,874

FFY-05

24,064

FFY-06

21,952

FFY-07

20,584

FFY-08

21,997

FFY-09

30,853

FFY-10

28,515

FFY-11

30,170

FFY-12

30,853

FFY-13

30,884

FFY-14

29,679

USOR will close all Priority Categories and place all eligible individuals not in plan on a waiting list. Factors contributing to this lack of adequate resources include:

1. *Limited state funds to match available federal VR funds.

2. *Increased number of referrals, applications and clients served. USOR went from serving 20,584 clients in FFY 2007 to 29,679 in FFY 2014; which is a 44.18% increase.

3. *Inadequate staff coverage to meet the needs of clients. Between FFY 2007 and FFY 2014, the client-to-counselor ratio increased from 176:1 to 221:1.

4. *Increased expenditures. From FFY 2007 to FFY 2014 client expenditures increased approximately 49% due to both the increased number of clients served and increases in the cost of services such as diagnostic, medical, restoration and training services.

5. Based on USOR fiscal projections current funding and staffing levels will not meet the demands of all eligible individuals.

 

Description of Priority categories

Description of Priority Categories

In accordance with Section 101(a)(5)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended by the 1998 Workforce Investment Act, USOR has designated that individuals with disabilities will receive vocational rehabilitation services in the following order of priority:

Category 1: Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities

Category 2: Individuals with Significant Disabilities

Category 3: Individuals with Disabilities

Definitions:

I. Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities:

a. Has a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits two or more functional capacities (such as mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome;

b. Will require multiple (three or more) vocational rehabilitation services; and

c. Will receive those services for an extended period of time (at least 6 months).

II. Individuals with Significant Disabilities

a. Has a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits one or more functional capacities (such as mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome;

b. Will require multiple (three or more) vocational rehabilitation services; and

c. Will receive those services for an extended period of time (at least 6 months).

III. Individuals with Disabilities

a. Has a physical or mental impairment that constitutes or results in a substantial impediment to employment;

b. Can benefit in terms of an employment outcome through the provision of vocational rehabilitation services; and

c. Will require vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for, enter, engage in or retain gainful employment.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Effective when all required approvals are in place and when management deems necessary, USOR will close all categories and place all eligible individuals not in plan on a waiting list. USOR will also place all subsequent applicants who are determined eligibility for VR services on the waiting list. USOR will only provide services to eligible individuals who currently have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and for whom services have been initiated. As resources become available individuals will be taken off of the waiting list in chronological order based on priority category and application date. Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities will be the first category served.

Order of Selection Administrative Process

I. When setting up the Order of Selection, USOR will take into consideration all eligible individuals and prioritize them individually.

II. The Order of Selection will be implemented statewide with the same priority levels in all areas of the state.

III. Prior to implementation USOR will submit the Order of Selection Plan for public review and comment. USOR will also consult with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) regarding the decision to implement an Order of Selection and solicit input regarding the plan.

Order of Selection Implementation Procedures

I. When the Executive Director of USOR invokes an Order of Selection to prioritize the provision of VR services each eligible individual will be classified into one of the three priority categories. If necessary, further prioritization within a category will be done by application date.

II. All applicants, including individuals in trial work exploration status (06) and eligible without IPE status (10), shall be notified in writing of the Order of Selection and their subsequent priority classification. Included in the written notification will be their right to appeal the determination of their priority classification and the availability of the Client Assistance Program (CAP).

III. Servicesnecessary to determine eligibility, including services in extended evaluation, shall not be impacted by the Order of Selection.

IV. Individuals who are found to be eligible but whose priority category is closed at the time of eligibility determination shall be placed in Order of Selection Deferred Status (04).

V. USOR will ensure eligible clients who are not assigned to an open Order of Selection categories will have access to services provided under the Information and Referral system (Section 1010(a)(5)(D) of the Act). Information and referral services include:

a. Providing VR information and guidance to assist the individuals to achieve employment, and

b. Appropriately referring individuals to other Federal and State programs, including the statewide workforce investment programs through the Department of Workforce Services, that are best suited to meet the individuals’ specific employment needs.

VI. Individuals in Order of Selection Deferred Status (04) shall be contacted at least once in the first 90 days after being placed in deferred status and periodically monitored as long as they remain in that status if they request follow up. Contact and monitoring lists will be computer generated with minimal efforts required of staff. USOR will also maintain the individual’s client records to include documentation on the nature and score of any information and referral services provided.

Order of Selection: Change in Priority Levels

I. USOR will open and close priority categories as needed in Federal fiscal year 2015 and beyond, so long as the order of the categories is maintained and the continuity of services to all individuals selected for its services is assured.

II. USOR will use the individual’s date of application to rank individuals within a priority category. This equitable and reasonable factor provides a method of selecting individuals from a waiting list when USOR has enough resources to serve some, but not all, individuals in that priority category.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Services and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved.

In FFY-2015 USOR plans to serve 29,107 individuals with an expected outcome goal of 3,100 successfully rehabilitated clients and at a cost of $17,862,355 for all priority categories.

The table below projects FFY-2015 related outcomes and goals for Utah State Office of Rehabilitation by Priority Category.

Priority

Category

Number of Individuals

to be served

Est. Number of Individuals

Successfully Employed

after receiving services

Est. Number of Individuals

Closed Unsuccessfully

after receiving services

Time within

which goals are

to be achieved

Cost Per Individual Served

Cost of Services

Category 15,3655584063 to 6 Months$954.86$ 5,122,835.85
Category 219,8842,4181,9746 to 9 Months$619.85$ 12,325,024.95
Category 33,858214509 to 12 Months$185.19$ 714,494.20
Totals29,1073,1002,430$ 18,162,355.00

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 5,365 558 406 3 to 6 months $5,122,836
2 19,884 2,418 1,974 6 to 9 months $12,325,025
3 3,858 214 50 9 to 12 months $714,494

This screen was last updated on Feb 19 2015 4:42PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

ATTACHMENT 4.11 (c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds (4) The goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B funds are based on the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) comprehensive assessment which includes analysis of supported employment, providers, consumers and VR counselors who use supported employment. USOR, in conjunction with the Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Legislature successfully piloted a program designed under House Bill 31, the Supported Employment Pilot Program for the Provision of Services for People with Disabilities beginning in 2006. This pilot was successful and was funded long term only to be de-funded in the economic crisis. Funding has recently been restored and increased and beginning July 1, 2011 an additional 175 individuals were eligible to receive assistance with long term support through DSPD (175 - 200 total). As USOR had hoped SE services/numbers have increased likely due at least in part to this project. For example the number of 26 closures coded in FY2011 as SE was just 38 compared to 59 closures in FY2012 and 62 successful closures in FY 2013. USOR has set a goal of 250 served for FY 2014 and USOR is hopeful the number of SE successful closures will again increase in 2015. Unlike last year however the USOR has not already distributed FFY 2014 funding received under section 622 of the Act for supported employment services identified in the IPEs of individuals who have been determined eligible for services under the policies of Title VI, Part B (about 70% has been encumbered) but as indicated above, USOR has seen an increase in the demand for SE service and USOR has always been able to distribute all funds allocated under Title VI and has never returned unspent funds to RSA. Goal 3.3 listed in the 3 year plan is specifically designed to continue to assess and improve the provision of SE services and appropriate distribution of funds and work is currently being done on that goal (see goal update attachment).

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 1:46PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

ATTACHMENT 4.11 (d) Strategies for FFY 2014 through FFY 2016 As outlined in Attachment 4.11 (c) the USOR has chosen in its Strategic Plan for FY 2014 to FY 2016 to focus on 3 specific need vs. resources gaps identified in the last Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) (see 4.11 (a). USOR has also chosen to add 3 additional goals/strategies related to increasing outreach and service to those populations identified as unserved/underserved by providers surveyed in the CSNA and 3 additional goals related to other assessments and agency issues identified USOR. Several activities are related to the innovation and expansion activities identified in 4.11 (e). The entire Strategic Plan is outlined by year below. Progress on each of these goals and activities is contained in Attachment 4.11 (e) (2) (1) Strategies were developed with the goals of increasing staff knowledge and skills, increasing capacity in relation to needed resources, and increasing access to and knowledge of existing programs and available resources. The USOR is committed to a cycle of continuous evaluation and improvement and is evaluating these strategies over the 3 years looking to expand, revise and improve this plan where appropriate. (A) Methods to be used, including activity descriptions are included as part of each strategy listed below. Several of these activities will expand/have expanded and improve access to services for individuals with disabilities, including the provision of assistive technology to individuals at each stage of the process; (B) Several activities focus on increasing procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities and minorities and those with the most significant disabilities including those who may have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; (C) Goal 3.3 and several activities are designed to increase the availability, success and scope of Supported Job Based Training (SJBT) and Supported Employment (SE) services, and community rehabilitation programs are often providers of those services; (D) All strategies are designed with the intent of improving the performance of the USOR staff in terms of federal evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act. For example, strategies are designed to increase service to and success of minority populations (S and O 2.1) and improve services to individuals seeking assistance with self-employment goals to increase successful job outcomes (S and O 1.1). (E) Strategies include reference to collaboration and cooperation with other components of the workforce investment system in order to improve the service by all agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities. (2) The USOR will use the developed strategies listed specifically below to: (A) Address need/resource gaps identified by the CSNA (see 4.11 (a) ) and these strategies are designed to help the USOR reach the goals identified in Attachment 4.11 (B) Support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.11 (e). For example strategies are related to serving individuals who are transitioning from high school (including the COURIER program and increase in social media listed in 4.11 (e), and strategies to increase client skills in money management (including projects like the Self-Reliance Pilot listed in 4.11 (e) (C) Overcome any identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

YEAR ONE Goal 1.1: Assist clients to develop self-advocacy skills Strategy 1.1 (A): Increase counselor skill and materials to help them teach clients self-advocacy. Activity A.1: Form a USOR Horizons group to (1) Contact Disability Law Center, Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities, Office of Education partners and others to identify tools and curricula being used by others, (2) Survey counselors to find tools and techniques used successfully now within the USOR to develop client self-advocacy skills and (3) Contact regional TACE center or other federal partners to ask for training resources and technical assistance related to teaching clients self- advocacy . Activity A.2: Evaluate tools identified and expand use and availability of those determined to be most useful Activity A.3: Design and implement two pilot projects within VR (one targeted to transition aged youth and one targeted to general client base) using VR staff to teach self –advocacy skills to clients. Strategy 1.2 (B): Increase counselor knowledge about other resources to help clients learn self-advocacy skills Activity B.1: Contact Independent Living Centers, Disability Law Center, Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities, Office of Education partners and CRPs to identify programs that might be appropriate for vocational rehabilitation client participation Activity B.2: Disseminate information about available programs Activity B.3: Evaluate opportunities to partner with other agencies to expand or adapt opportunities for vocational rehabilitation clients to learn self-advocacy skills.

Goal 1.2: Increase outreach, partnerships and counselor skills in order in increase the number of individuals served by USOR who are transition age and/or have developmental disabilities. Strategy 1.2 (A): Increase outreach to individuals who are transition aged youth and/or who have developmental disabilities Activity A.1: Increase the availability of information about services through expansion of social media. Activity A.2: Develop a specific web page to outreach to transition age youth including targeted information for students, parents, and teachers as well as counselor liaison assignments for each school Activity A.3: Increase counselor involvement in schools by increasing involvement at IEP meetings as well as providing job club interventions and in-person trainings in the schools for youth and families Activity A.4: Utah’s new COURIER program (Child Outreach – Utah’s Referral, Information and Education Resource) will provide targeted outreach services to students with special health care needs, students in special education, and students served under Section 504. Strategy 1.2 (B): Improve and expand partnerships with agencies that serve individuals that are transition aged youth and/or have developmental disabilities Activity B.1: Amend USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements at both the state and local level to be more descriptive and comprehensive about the expectations on both sides. Activity B.2: Identify at least 2 programs serving this population and increase partnerships at a local level with VR counselors. Examples include PEERS Connections (youth with autism), SWEET (provides work experiences), WhyTry Youth program, and others. Activity B.3: Continue partnership with DSPD called the Supported Work Incentive (SWI) designed to provide long term supports for individuals with developmental disabilities who are on the DSPD wait list who would not otherwise receive Supported Employment Service and assist DSPD with record keeping and legislative efforts to possibly increase funding. Activity B.4: Expand presence in the community of Transition Counselors by supporting travel to conferences and providing booth space and outreach materials as needed. Strategy 1.2 (C): Improve counselor skills to better serve individuals who are transition aged youth and/or have developmental disabilities. Activity C.1: Provide statewide training at least twice per year for all agency Transition Counselors and those serving individuals with Developmental Disabilities. Topics will be designed to improve counselor skills and assure consistency in the types of services provided across the state. Activity C.2: Form a USOR Transition Council which will have representation from across the state, will meet at least 4 times per year and will provide ideas to evaluate and improve services to the Transition/DD population. Activity C.3: Add resources for counselors serving transition aged youth on the webpage described above (Strategy 1.2, (A). Activity C.4: Hold at least one Transition Counselor Conference per year to provide opportunity for discussion, training and goal planning with local education officials. Goal 1.3: USOR will establish a culture of client-centeredness, world-class transformational rehabilitation services, and highest level professionalism Strategy 1.3 (A): USOR/DRS will gather information about core principles, patterns, attitudes, approaches, vision and values consistent with this culture which have been identified over the past 3 years in various leadership meetings and trainings Activity A.1: USOR will form a study group to compile information about core principles, patterns, attitudes, approaches, vision and values as described above Activity A.2: The study group will compile this information into a single guidance document known as the ‘blue book’ Activity A.3: Opportunity will be given for staff and the SRC to contribute to this document Strategy 1.3 (B) USOR will use the document for the training of staff about USOR expectations and to facilitate enculturation of the identified core principles, patterns, attitudes, approaches, vision and values.

YEAR TWO Goal 2.1: Assist clients with developing life skills such as money and time management and getting along with people Strategy 2.1 (A) Expand the availability of and counselor access to life skills training for clients by increasing capacity and removing any barriers to access Activity A.1 Evaluate results from current service providers by analyzing who is using the service and asking if results are successful. Activity A: Evaluate outcomes and cost of pilot group *Pending Activity A.2: If feedback is positive regarding current vendors DRS will identify additional vendors willing to provide similar services. Strategy 2.1 (B): Identify additional resources which offer life skills training Activity B.1: Survey partners such as DWS and DSPD about possible resources Activity B.2: Evaluate use of service category entitled “Disability Adjustment and Life Skills Restoration Services to see if services are meeting need and/or resources need to be expanded Activity B.3: Continue to approve any additional vendors as appropriate

Goal 2.2: Increase the number of individuals served from ethnic and racial minority populations Strategy 2.2 (A) Increase outreach to and partnerships with Native American Tribes within Utah Activity A.1: Finalize the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal 121 Program by October 1, 2014 and begin providing technical assistance, outreach and training, and on-going coordination of client services (per the MOU). Activity A.2: Work to coordinate a basic VR presentation to the chairs and/or chiefs of the Paiute, Navajo, Goshute, Northern Shoshone, and Ute tribes of Utah Activity A.3: Schedule follow-up presentations to the tribal councils, Indian health, welfare, and employment services to promote VR services for Native Americans with disabilities. Activity A.4 Assign an agency liaison to each Native American tribe and/or band to provide outreach and referral, cement relationships and remove barriers to assure that all potentially eligible individuals can access VR services. Strategy 2.2 (B) Increase outreach to and improve relationships with to individuals in the Asian community *note: USOR included a similar goal/strategy in the last three year plan along with activities targeting two other minority groups. Despite documented attempts outreach appears to have been least successful with this group compared to the other two and USOR believes there is continued need for improvement. USOR has therefore decided to include similar activities in the plan for the upcoming three years with the goal of continued improvement Activity B.1: Identify 2 additional groups with relationships to the Asian population in Utah Activity B.2: reassign a liaison to meet with and offer education to these two groups Activity B.3: Assign a liaison to coordinate referrals from these groups if appropriate Activity B.4: Assign liaison to work with contacts to develop training for counselors if appropriate Goal 2.3: USOR will review and revise policies and procedures regarding the support of clients seeking a goal of self-employment in order to facilitate the provision of appropriate services and assist clients to obtain appropriate employment Strategy 2.3 (A): USOR will develop a new model of service provision using Self-Employment Teams (SET) to deliver services related to self-employment Activity A.1: USOR will establish a study group to review existing policies and develop the new model. The group will establish expected pathways, clear roles, responsibilities, and expectations of the Self Employment Team that consists of the Client, VR Counselor, Self-employment Specialist, and Self-Employment Benefit Specialist. Activity A.2: The study group will develop tools, documents, and a desk reference for VR Counselors that will help them work with clients with a self-employment goal, including how to determine and triage a client’s appropriateness for self-employment exploration, help shape client expectations, timelines, and policy understanding. Activity A.3: The group will, with input from administrative staff and the SRC, rewrite the USOR Self-Employment Client Service Policy to better fit the SET model and provide clarity in roles, responsibilities, procedures, and processes. Activity A.4: The group will design a Self-Employment training curriculum for all VR Counselors statewide designed to achieve consistency and understanding of the policy, roles, responsibilities, and processes.

YEAR THREE Goal 3.1: Assist clients with finding and paying for a place to live Strategy 3.1 (A) Increase counselor knowledge of resources available to clients to help them locate affordable housing and assist them with housing expenses Activity A.1: Identify available resources in the community to help clients locate affordable housing and assist them in paying for housing expenses Activity A.2: Present at least one training to all counselors about available resources in their area Activity A.3: Assign an agency liaison to obtain information from other agencies about available housing resources and add the information on the USOR/DRS staff website and public website Goal 3.2: Increase the number of individuals served with substance abuse related disabilities. Strategy 3.2 (A): Increase collaboration between outside agencies and individuals who serve individuals with substance abuse disabilities and VR Activity A.1: Identify at least 10 treatment centers which treat individuals with substance abuse disabilities Activity A.2: Assign a liaison to each treatment center to provide training and accept direct referrals from the treatment center Strategy 3.2 (B): Increase counselor knowledge and skills regarding serving individuals with substance abuse disabilities Activity A.1: Review and revise (if appropriate) DRS policies to provide clear guidance about the appropriate referral of and services provided to individuals with substance abuse disabilities Activity A.2: Send at least 10 counselors to the University of Utah Drug and Alcohol Treatment School Activity A.3: Train all counselors (1 to 2 distance trainings) about the policies described above and other relevant information. The counselors who attended the U of U School will be expected to take a role in creating and delivering the training Goal 3.3: USOR will revise and improve the service delivery model for SE/SJBT services. Strategy 3.1 (A) USOR will form a committee with counselors and administrative representation to review and revise the service delivery model for SE/SJBT service Activity A.1: The committee will review existing practices including seeking input from counselors and providers. Activity A.2: The committee will provide recommendations about changes and or additions to the model to improve customer choices and successful outcomes. Activity A.3: The committee will help to revise policies as appropriate and create training for counselors and outreach to providers to explain any changes to the model.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

USOR continues to make sure that individuals with disabilities are provided appropriate Assistive Technology. USOR and DRS continually evaluate the effectiveness of the current service and referral system and make improvements as necessary. New counselors receive presentations about AT and counselors receive ongoing training when applicable at agency events, open houses etc. As previously mentioned some of the goals and activities listed (such as those related to financial planning) may involve the provision of AT services and an employee from the Utah Center for Assitive Technology (UCAT) was included on the committee that developed resources for counselors to teach clients self-advocacy. USOR also has successfully advocated many years now for one time funds from the state legislature to provide Independent Living with money for AT because USOR believes clients who receive such technology and become more independent at home are more likely to eventually become clients of the VR system and decide to seek employment. The USOR was once again successful in receiving one time money for AT which will become available on July 1, 2014.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

Several of the goals/activities above are specific to outreach and service to individuals who are minorities and who have been identified as unserved or underserved. Several activities are also targeted toward individuals with the most significant disabilities, in particular activities related to improving and expanding the provision of SE and SJBT services.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Some of the goals/activities described above are designed to develop and improve provision of SJBT/SE services within the state including those provided by CRPs. CRPs will also likely play a role in the provision of life skills training and possibly teaching clients self-advocacy skills. CRPs have been involved in the ongoing improvements being made to the system of provision of SE/SJBT services by the USOR.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

All strategies are related to improving the performance of the state related to standards and indicators. Expanding services, meeting needs, outreach, training and many others are related to improving performace on 1.1 as well as many others. All goals are created with the idea of better service from counselors, more appropriate service provision for clients and outreach to appropriate populations with the goal of creating successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Many strategies above reach out to other agencies and partners to share information, provide training, combine resources and avoid duplication of services.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

There is a description above about how strategies are related to goals in previous attachments and how some goals relate to I and E activities/programs. There are also specific strategies and supporting activities related to equitable access and multiple goals related to barriers identified and needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment.

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 4:04PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The USOR believes it has made great progress toward meeting the goals set forth last year. In addition to passing all required standards and indicators for 2013 (specifics contained in another attachment) the USOR has carried out specific activities related to the goals listed in Attachment 4.11(c)(1). Below is an update for each goal listed including specific strategy and activity updates regarding work done in the past 12 months toward meeting those goals. GOALS FOR YEAR ONE (FY 2014) Goal 1.1: Assist clients to develop self-advocacy skills Strategy 1.1 (A): Increase counselor skill and materials to help them teach clients self-advocacy. Activity A.1: Form a USOR Horizons group to (1) Contact Disability Law Center, Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities, Office of Education partners and others to identify tools and curricula being used by others, (2) Survey counselors to find tools and techniques used successfully now within the USOR to develop client self-advocacy skills and (3) Contact regional TACE center or other federal partners to ask for training resources and technical assistance related to teaching clients self- advocacy. UPDATE: The USOR Horizons Taskforce on Self-Advocacy completed the defined objectives of outreach to community partners, surveying VR Counselors and contacting the regional TACE center to identity tools, curricula and resources relating to teaching clients self-advocacy tools. The deliverables of this taskforce include a resource guide, training materials and a Self-Advocacy informational pamphlet for clients. Activity A.2: Evaluate tools identified and expand use and availability of those determined to be most useful UPDATE: The USOR Horizons Taskforce on Self-Advocacy evaluated the identified tools and submitted recommendations to the USOR Executive Team defining the most useful and beneficial resources and activities. Several of these resources have been disseminated to VR Staff via agency email and to the public through the USOR Facebook Page. USOR intends to add a tool list of resources and activities to the website. Activity A.3: Design and implement two pilot projects within VR (one targeted to transition aged youth and one targeted to general client base) using VR staff to teach self –advocacy skills to clients. Strategy 1.2 (B): Increase counselor knowledge about other resources to help clients learn self-advocacy skills Activity B.1: Contact Independent Living Centers, Disability Law Center, Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities, Office of Education partners and CRPs to identify programs that might be appropriate for vocational rehabilitation client participation UPDATE: The USOR Horizons Taskforce on Self-Advocacy completed outreach to the identified partners and CRPs. A complied list of appropriate programs for clients to learn self-advocacy skills was included in the taskforce’s resource guide. Activity B.2: Disseminate information about available programs UPDATE: Information regarding several Self-Advocacy programs was disseminated to staff via agency email and to the public through the USOR Facebook Page and Twitter Account. In addition, several districts host regional vendor fairs, attended by USOR Staff, which provides an opportunity to engage with providers of these programs. Also, a statewide staff training on the information and resources gathered by the taskforce is scheduled for Fall 2014. Activity B.3: Evaluate opportunities to partner with other agencies to expand or adapt opportunities for vocational rehabilitation clients to learn self-advocacy skills. UPDATE: USOR continues to seek-out, evaluate and leverage opportunities for partnership and collaboration with other agencies and service providers to enhance opportunities for clients to learn self-advocacy skills. This includes sharing information and utilizing services through the Utah Parent Center, Utah Independent Living Centers, the Disability Law Center and various state-wide Community Rehabilitation Programs.

Goal 1.2: Increase outreach, partnerships and counselor skills in order to increase the number of individuals served by USOR who are transition age and/or have developmental disabilities. Strategy 1.2 (A): Increase outreach to individuals who are transition aged youth and/or who have developmental disabilities Activity A.1: Increase the availability of information about services through expansion of social media. UPDATE: The USOR Teen Welcome Video is on the public USOR website via YouTube and shared in the community for anyone to be able to access. USOR created a Facebook Page and Twitter account to increase awareness of and access to information regarding VR services.

Activity A.2: Develop a specific web page to outreach to transition age youth including targeted information for students, parents, and teachers as well as counselor liaison assignments for each school. UPDATE: A webpage specific to Transition was developed and added to the public USOR site. The webpage includes a search engine that provides the name and contact information for the VR Counselors assigned to all public and charter schools

Activity A.3: Increase counselor involvement in schools by increasing involvement at IEP meetings as well as providing job club interventions and in-person trainings in the schools for youth and families UPDATE: During the last year USOR has focused on providing multiple statewide, regional and district level trainings to build and strengthen the relationship between VR Counselors and Educators. As a result, USOR is seeing an increase in referrals for transition-age youth; VR Counselor participation in IEP meetings is also increasing. In addition, several transition counselors are providing Job Club Interventions in local schools. A Job Club Taskforce was also commissioned to develop curriculum and materials.

Activity A.4: Utah’s new COURIER program (Child Outreach – Utah’s Referral, Information and Education Resource) will provide targeted outreach services to students with special health care needs, students in special education, and students served under Section 504. UPDATE: The Utah Parent Center completed their second year of the COURIER program. They are providing multiple presentations and opportunities to families and schools to learn about VR services. The COURIER program is also focused on identifying Section 504 students and students with Special Health Care Needs. Strategy 1.2 (B): Improve and expand partnerships with agencies that serve individuals that are transition aged youth and/or have developmental disabilities Activity B.1: Amend USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements at both the state and local level to be more descriptive and comprehensive about the expectations on both sides. UPDATE: The USOR/USOE Interagency Agreements have been updated and revised to clarify expectations and support the development of local-level transition goals.

Activity B.2: Identify at least 2 programs serving this population and increase partnerships at a local level with VR counselors. Examples include PEERS Connections (youth with autism), SWEET (provides work experiences), WhyTry Youth program, and others. UPDATE: USOR has renewed the cooperative agreements to extend the PEERS, SWEET and WhyTry Programs. In addition, several local level agreements have been established to assist with summer employment and incentives for youth with disabilities.

Activity B.3: Continue partnership with DSPD called the Supported Work Incentive (SWI) designed to provide long term supports for individuals with developmental disabilities who are on the DSPD wait list who would not otherwise receive Supported Employment Service and assist DSPD with record keeping and legislative efforts to possibly increase funding.

UPDATE: USOR continues to partner with DSPD in support for the SWI Program. During the last year, more than 50 new SWI Participation agreements were signed. 62% of the total active participants (since July 2010) have established employment. USOR is also actively collaborating with DSPD on the Employment First Initiative and establishing a pathway for Customized Employment.

Activity B.4: Expand presence in the community of Transition Counselors by supporting travel to conferences and providing booth space and outreach materials as needed. UPDATE: USOR continues to support Transition Counselors in presenting, attending training and conferences, as well as having booths in the community to share information. Transition Counselors regularly participate in agency fairs, parent teacher nights, Utah Parent Center conferences etc.

Strategy 1.2 (C): Improve counselor skills to better serve individuals who are transition aged youth and/or have developmental disabilities. Activity C.1: Provide statewide training at least twice per year for all agency Transition Counselors and those serving individuals with Developmental Disabilities. Topics will be designed to improve counselor skills and assure consistency in the types of services provided across the state. UPDATE: USOR continues to provide an Annual Transition Conference and multiple statewide transition trainings. In addition, USOR collaborates with USOE and other educational entities to facilitate and host training summits for counselors and educators. There are also multiple district level trainings provided as needed.

Activity C.2: Form a USOR Transition Council which will have representation from across the state, will meet at least 4 times per year and will provide ideas to evaluate and improve services to the Transition/DD population. UPDATE: In evaluating the efforts and outcome of the USOR Transition Council, we elected not to continue with a formalized group. However, the agency’s Transition Specialist was sanctioned with implementing several informal transition meetings, discussions, task forces and focus groups across the state. This has led to a higher level of participation and engagement among a broader group of transition counselors and supervisors to evaluate the effectiveness of transition services. Also, there are several regional transition councils for counselors to work together in their respective communities.

Activity C.3: Add resources for counselors serving transition aged youth on the webpage described above (Strategy 1.2, (A). UPDATE: USOR added resources specific to transition on to the website, which is available for counselors to access. These resources include the Transition Action Guide (TAG), Roles and Responsibilities Worksheets and additional web resources. Other resources have been distributed to Transition Counselors via agency email. Activity C.4: Hold at least one Transition Counselor Conference per year to provide opportunity for discussion, training and goal planning with local education officials. UPDATE: Since 2012, USOR has hosted an Annual Transition Conference for counselors and their supervisors. This conference includes training, technical assistance, resources and goal planning specific to transition. In addition, USOR Transition Counselors participate in the Annual USOE Transition Summit/Institute, which includes local-level strategic planning and goal setting with their LEA counterparts.

Goal 1.3: USOR will establish a culture of client-centeredness, world-class transformational rehabilitation services, and highest level professionalism Strategy 1.3 (A): USOR/DRS will gather information about core principles, patterns, attitudes, approaches, vision and values consistent with this culture which have been identified over the past 3 years in various leadership meetings and trainings Activity A.1: USOR will form a study group to compile information about core principles, patterns, attitudes, approaches, vision and values as described above UPDATE: The Rehab Way Horizons Taskforce, comprised of agency employees, was commissioned to compile information about the agency’s organization culture and core principles, vision and values. The taskforce successfully completed their assignment and complied their findings into the “Blue Book” guidance document. Activity A.2: The study group will compile this information into a single guidance document known as the ‘blue book’ UPDATE: The USOR Horizon’s taskforce completed their chartered objective of creating The Rehab Way “Blue Book.” This guidance document provides staff with an introduction and overview for the organizational culture of USOR. It also provides useful strategies for helping staff to align themselves with The Rehab Way. Activity A.3: Opportunity will be given for staff and the SRC to contribute to this document UPDATE: The Rehab Way Horizons Taskforce successfully sought out and obtained feedback from USOR Staff and SRC members during the research and development of the “Blue Book.” Strategy 1.3 (B) USOR will use the document for the training of staff about USOR expectations and to facilitate enculturation of the identified core principles, patterns, attitudes, approaches, vision and values. GOALS FOR YEAR TWO (FY 2015) Goal 2.1: Assist clients with developing life skills such as money and time management and getting along with people Strategy 2.1 (A) Expand the availability of and counselor access to life skills training for clients by increasing capacity and removing any barriers to access Activity A.1 Evaluate results from current service providers by analyzing who is using the service and asking if results are successful. Activity A: Evaluate outcomes and cost of pilot group *Pending UPDATE: USOR is currently engaged in various pilots, targeting adults and transition-aged youths to provide different aspects of Life Skills Training. These pilots include Financial FITNESS (money management, personal budgeting), WhyTry (decision making, coping skills, work behaviors, etc.,) and SWEET (work behaviors, social/interpersonal skills). In addition USOR will evaluate the utilization of Life Skills by reviewing and analyzing statewide authorization of these services in correlation to successful client employment outcomes. Activity A.2: If feedback is positive regarding current vendors DRS will identify additional vendors willing to provide similar services. UPDATE: Currently Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) are approved to provide life skills training for VR clients. Pending the feedback, DRS will explore diversifying the options for appropriate and qualified vendors to provide similar life skills training services. Strategy 2.1 (B): Identify additional resources which offer life skills training Activity B.1: Survey partners such as DWS and DSPD about possible resources UPDATE: USOR will assigned its Statewide Director of Strategic Alliances and Statewide Transition Specialist to survey community partners, such as DWS and DSPD and educational agencies regarding additional resources which offer life skills training. Activity B.2: Evaluate use of service category entitled “Disability Adjustment and Life Skills Restoration Services to see if services are meeting need and/or resources need to be expanded UPDATE: As noted in activity section A.1. USOR will evaluate the utilization of Life Skills by reviewing and analyzing statewide authorization of the service. USOR will also review feedback obtained from the case management system’s facilities survey, in addition to surveying VR counselors for feedback.

Activity B.3: Continue to approve any additional vendors as appropriate

UPDATE: USOR will continue to review and approve, as appropriate, new vendors for Life Skills Training through the facilities application process. Activity B.3: Continue to approve any additional vendors as appropriate Goal 2.2: Increase the number of individuals served from ethnic and racial minority populations Strategy 2.2 (A) Increase outreach to and partnerships with Native American Tribes within Utah Activity A.1: Finalize the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal 121 Program by October 1, 2014 and begin providing technical assistance, outreach and training, and on-going coordination of client services (per the MOU). UPDATE: The MOU has been finalized and the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe is verifying information in terms of the appropriate tribal leader signatures as part of the agreement. A formal signing of the documents has not been scheduled at this time but is recommended. The in-person signing (Towoac, Colorado) would allow for additional technical assistance, outreach planning and training, and coordination of services to occur. The partnership agreement with the Tribal 121 program (including the White Mesa area in Southeastern Utah) also includes membership on the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) for Utah.

Activity A.2: Work to coordinate a basic VR presentation to the chairs and/or chiefs of the Paiute, Navajo, Goshute, Northern Shoshone, and Ute tribes of Utah UPDATE: Formal presentations have been made to several of the tribes individually, and a presentation to the state Tribal Council (representative leaders from each of the Native American tribes and bands in Utah) was made in Wendover, Utah. A follow-up meeting with the Tribal Council is scheduled for August 2014, and meetings with the individual tribes (including social service and employment programs) will be scheduled (including VR district representation) to ensure that needs are being addressed and that VR services are available.

Activity A.3: Schedule follow-up presentations to the tribal councils, Indian health, welfare, and employment services to promote VR services for Native Americans with disabilities. Update: As discussed in Activity A.2. these meetings will be scheduled by the Director of Statewide Strategic Alliances and Initiatives (in coordination with the representative VR District Director from the area served) for as soon as possible. Working directly with respective Indian health, welfare, employment and other social services allows regular contact with the VR counselor and/or VR leadership from the area and establishes greater trust and rapport with the tribal partner. The buy-in from each tribal council on the activities of these partnerships will be critical for sustained efforts.

Activity A.4 Assign an agency liaison to each Native American tribe and/or band to provide outreach and referral, cement relationships and remove barriers to assure that all potentially eligible individuals can access VR services. UPDATE: The USOR District Directors from each of the impacted tribal areas/reservations will become the contact liaisons in strengthening the partnerships/Memorandums of Understanding in terms of outreach, referral, and VR service provision. The Director of Statewide Strategic Alliances and Initiatives will continue serve as a liaison to both the tribal leaders/governments, as well as the Director of the Utah Division of Indian Affairs. Strategy 2.2 (B) Increase outreach to and improve relationships with to individuals in the Asian community Activity B.1: Identify 2 additional groups with relationships to the Asian population in Utah UPDATE: USOR has identified the Asian Association of Utah, the Utah Asian Chamber of Commerce and the University of Utah Student Union Association as groups we will focus on to cultivate relationships and expand our outreach and education efforts. Activity B.2: reassign a liaison to meet with and offer education to these two groups UPDATE: USOR has assigned a VR Counselor in our Downtown District as the liaison to meet with and offer education regarding VR services to these groups. Activity B.3: Assign a liaison to coordinate referrals from these groups if appropriate UPDATE: The assigned liaison has successfully established a collaborative relationship with the Asian Association of Utah. The liaison attends bi-monthly staff meetings at the AAU to provide information on VR services and to coordinate referrals to local VR offices. During the next year the liaison will focus on establishing relationship with the other two designated groups. Activity B.4: Assign liaison to work with contacts to develop training for counselors if appropriate UPDATE: As the designated liaison, the assigned VR Counselor provides information, updates and assistance to both sides of the partnership to facilitate consistency in the referral pathway and the ongoing collaborative relationship. Goal 2.3: USOR will review and revise policies and procedures regarding the support of clients seeking a goal of self-employment in order to facilitate the provision of appropriate services and assist clients to obtain appropriate employment Activity A.1: USOR will establish a study group to review existing policies and develop the new model. The group will establish expected pathways, clear roles, responsibilities, and expectations of the Self Employment Team that consists of the Client, VR Counselor, Self-employment Specialist, and Self-Employment Benefit Specialist.

UPDATE: The Self Employment Team has now met on a monthly basis for six months. An initial survey of self-employment issues was conducted and its results reviewed. The SET project team has been broken down into an executive group that consists of regional directors, a home office staff, and a benefits specialist has assumed responsibility for the primary policy re-write and initial tool acquisition. A second group of staff from across the state is tasked with tool review and resource compilation for a future website which is to be developed.

Activity A.2: The study group will develop tools, documents, and a desk reference for VR Counselors that will help them work with clients with a self-employment goal, including how to determine and triage a client’s appropriateness for self-employment exploration, help shape client expectations, timelines, and policy understanding.

UPDATE: A set of guidelines, decision pathways, and questionnaires for both the counselor and client to do assessment of self-employment preparedness have been designed. Additional external location and regional resources are being compiled through an ongoing process for listing on a future website.

Activity A.3: The group will, with input from administrative staff and the SRC, rewrite the USOR Self-Employment Client Service Policy to better fit the SET model and provide clarity in roles, responsibilities, procedures, and processes.

UPDATE: An initial draft of the new Self-Employment Policy Chapter is in final review. It will serve as an interim document for 6 months while a full chapter update is completed and submitted to the SRC for review.

Activity A.4: The group will design a Self-Employment training curriculum for all VR Counselors statewide designed to achieve consistency and understanding of the policy, roles, responsibilities, and processes. UPDATE: The Self Employment Team is currently designing a roll-out training to review the policy changes, as well as the initial assessment tools available. This training will be conducted over the statewide Visions system with further, follow-up training conducted at Regional Client Service meetings. District Directors will receive more intensive startup training to work more effectively on review panels and to serve as site trainers for their supervisors.

GOALS FOR YEAR THREE (FY 2016) Goal 3.1: Assist clients with finding and paying for a place to live Strategy 3.1 (A) Increase counselor knowledge of resources available to clients to help them locate affordable housing and assist them with housing expenses Activity A.1: Identify available resources in the community to help clients locate affordable housing and assist them in paying for housing expenses UPDATE: As available housing resources are identified, USOR distributes information to staff on a statewide and local level. This information is distributed via email, district lobby monitors and the USOR public social media pages (Facebook and Twitter). Activity A.2: Present at least one training to all counselors about available resources in their area UPDATE: USOR will coordinate a statewide training for VR Counselors and related staff on available housing resources. Activity A.3: Assign an agency liaison to obtain information from other agencies about available housing resources and add the information on the USOR/DRS staff website and public website UPDATE: The DRS Director of Statewide Strategic Alliances has been assigned as the agency liaison to research, identify and distribute information from other agencies regarding available housing resources. Goal 3.2: Increase the number of individuals served with substance abuse related disabilities. Strategy 3.2 (A): Increase collaboration between outside agencies and individuals who serve individuals with substance abuse disabilities and VR Activity A.1: Identify at least 10 treatment centers which treat individuals with substance abuse disabilities UPDATE: USOR currently has assigned liaison with several substance abuse treatment centers, which include Odyssey House, Alliance House, House of Hope, Haven and St. Mary’s. Over the next year, USOR will identify at least 5 additional treatment centers throughout the state and assign specific liaisons to each. Activity A.2: Assign a liaison to each treatment center to provide training and accept direct referrals from the treatment center UPDATE: As noted above in Activity A. 1, USOR will assign liaisons to the identified treatment centers. As with the collaborative relationships that have already been established with the first five treatment centers, the liaisons will follow the model of providing outreach, education on VR Services and accepting direct referrals. Strategy 3.2 (B): Increase counselor knowledge and skills regarding serving individuals with substance abuse disabilities Activity A.1: Review and revise (if appropriate) DRS policies to provide clear guidance about the appropriate referral of and services provided to individuals with substance abuse disabilities UPDATE: Effective January 2014, USOR removed a policy from the Client Service Manual that outlined the use of the Inappropriate Referral Form-74 for individuals with alcohol and other drug dependencies. Interpretations of this memo had resulted in clients being refused application and/or services due to an active or sole diagnosis of Substance Dependence/Abuse. DRS will continue to review and revise policies regarding individuals with substance abuse, and the provision of related services, as appropriate. Activity A.2: Send at least 10 counselors to the University of Utah Drug and Alcohol Treatment School UPDATE: USOR Continues to support VR Counselor attendance at the University of Utah Drug and Alcohol School. For the 2014 session 20 VR Counselors were approved to attend. Activity A.3: Train all counselors (1 to 2 distance trainings) about the policies described above and other relevant information. The counselors who attended the U of U School will be expected to take a role in creating and delivering the training UPDATE: In January 2014, USOR provided a training to staff regarding the revised substance abuse policy (as noted in Activity A.1). This training addressed considerations for making eligibility determinations and the provision of services for individuals with substance abuse related disabilities. USOR will continue to provide current and relevant trainings to staff regarding substance abuse disabilities. In addition, counselors who attend the U of U School will still be expected to create and deliver trainings, within their respective districts, regarding information and content obtained program.

Goal 3.3: USOR will revise and improve the service delivery model for SE/SJBT services. Strategy 3.1 (A) USOR will form a committee with counselors and administrative representation to review and revise the service delivery model for SE/SJBT service Activity A.1: The committee will review existing practices including seeking input from counselors and providers.

UPDATE: The DRS Community Rehabilitation Program Committee was established and tasked with the assignment of reviewing the current Milestone policy for SE/SJBT Services. This committee is comprised of VR Counselors, Counseling Supervisors and District Directors. A Field Service Director serves as the committee chair.

Activity A.2: The committee will provide recommendations about changes and or additions to the model to improve customer choices and successful outcomes.

UPDATE: The committee formulated recommendations to improve the referral process, address gaps in the current milestone services, and develop consistent expectations and definitions of services. These recommendations were brought to all approved CRP’s in a state-wide meeting for their feedback. Feedback was received over a one month period and the CRP committee is in the process of finalizing their recommendations for presentation to administration.

Activity A.3: The committee will help to revise policies as appropriate and create training for counselors and outreach to providers to explain any changes to the model.

UPDATE: Upon administrative review by the Client Service Director, the policy changes will be finalized and updated in the Client Service Manual. The CRP Committee will participate in creating and delivering a statewide trainings for staff to explain the changes to the model. The tentative implementation and training date is August/September 2014.

 

USOR hoped to increase the number of individuals served under SE, possibly up to 250 individuals in SE in 2013 and USOR may be on track to meet that goal. SE successful closures increased from 59 in FY 2012 to 62 in FY 201 and USOR continues to improve system choices and options however SE spending is down from this time last year so the news is mixed. It is hoped that continued improvement to the service delivery system in conjunction with more reliable long term funding in the past 2 years will help the USOR to continue to increase the number of SE cases served each year.

 

Indicator 1.1 increased by 238 met indicator Indicator 1.2 percent 58 minimum 55.80 met indicator Indicator 1.3 percent com. employment 96.51 minimum 72.60 met indicator Indicator 1.4 percent SD 98.95 minimum 62.40 met indicator Indicator 1.5 ratio wage to state wage .568 minimum .52 met indicator Indicator 1.6 self supporting difference 66.1 minimum 53 met indicator Indicator 2.1 Minority ratio .949 minimum .800 met indicator USOR met 6 of 6 standards in category 1 and also met standard 2.1 for FY 2013

 

USOR has completed many activities and projects in the 12 months related to I & E. Some of these activities have been mentioned elsewhere in this document. They include: 1. The new SWEET Program (Summer Work Experience and Education Training) helps transition aged youth get work experiences to gain practical experience and vocational skills. 2. The USOR has published a series of Professional Development Issue Briefs to give guidance and instruction to staff on topics such as documentation and other topics related to best practices. Topics include things like BASIC-ID and Drive Notes (supporting good documentation), Clinical supervision and professional development, and crisis resolution. Briefs are written by a variety of staff sharing their specific expertise in a format that can be kept and used for ongoing training. 3. The USOR converted a staff position to a ’Strategic Alliances Coordinator’ who now manages and improves USOR relationships with other agencies with a focus on collaboration, sharing of information, and effective use of comparable benefits. 4. The USOR continues to invest in a new case management system. Significant progress has been made this last year with data conversion and customization of this new system. The new system should be implemented by January of 2015. 5. The USOR redesigned the position of Program Evaluation Specialist and hired an full-time auditor this past year. These changes are helping the USOR to significantly increase knowledge and capacity regarding budgeting, program evaluation, resource management and strategic planning and will help the USOR better meet new challenges and utilize available opportunities. 6. The USOR entered into a fee-for-service agreement with a Community Rehabilitation Program, Innovative Harbor, targeting youths attending Alternative High Schools, in the Foster Care System, Juvenile Justice System and transition-aged clients on probation and parole. This pilot, called the WHYTry Program, is directed at helping clients improve their behavior, life skills, social skills and work ethic in order to complete their secondary education, participate in any necessary and appropriate post-secondary training programs and engaging in meaningful employment. 7. The USOR partnered with a doctoral dissertation researcher from Utah State University to conduct a research experiment on the use and efficacy of using group counseling techniques in a vocational rehabilitation setting. Several teams of VR Counselors have spent considerable time being trained on group counseling techniques and have developed a curriculum that is VR focused. The intent for participating in this experiment is to see if group counseling can be added to traditional individual sessions to increase the frequency of VR Counselor-Client interactions, take advantage of peer mentoring opportunities, and possibly create innovative new practices. 8. USOR chartered a taskforce to develop a standardized job club curriculum and training materials that can be used by VR Counselors in various school and VR office settings across the state when serving transition aged youth. The job club topics and activities focus on career exploration, goal planning, life skills, social skills, work behaviors, self-determination skills and the VR process/experience. The Job Club materials will be available for all VR Counselors to use in Fall 2014.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 1:36PM by sautcummingss

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

ATTACHMENT 6.3

Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

This attachment describes the quality, scope, and extent of supported employment (SE) services provided to consumers of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) vocational rehabilitation program under Title VI, Part B of the Act. (a) Quality of SE services USOR maintains high quality SE services by: (1) The establishment and application of SE program standards for USOR SE vendors. These standards prescribe minimum consumer outcomes and identify program procedures which must be followed in order for a provider to receive funds from USOR. These standards are in compliance with Title VI, Part B of the Act. (2) USOR assisted in the establishment and provision of a Supported Job Base Training and Supported Employment Job Coach training and certification program. This program was moved in FY 2008 to the University of Utah. All job coaches must be certified within 6 months of hire at approved vendors providing SE services. Staff who are not approved after 6 months may not provide services to VR clients. (3) The monitoring of SE services and service providers is conducted by the USOR Facilities Specialist, and the Coordinator of Case Service. This monitoring is conducted by assessing the application of USOR program standards and outcomes. It includes a review of any complaints received and the results of surveys completed by counselors using the program for clients. These surveys are compliled by the electronic case management system. The Case Service Coordinator provides ongoing technical assistance and monitoring to SE service providers through regularly scheduled contacts with approved service providers. A new committee has been formed within USOR to review SE and SJBT practices, to review current providers and create updated, standardized expectations and a provider manual, and to provide input on milestone descriptions and payment processes. Details about this process are included in other attachments. (b) Scope of SE services The following services are provided with Title VI, Part B funds either through contract or on a fee-for-service basis (based on achievement of milestones) by SE service providers: functional assessment of clients to perform in supported employment (supplemental to the assessment conducted by the counselor for purposes of establishing eligibility with Title I funds); life skills training, job development, job analysis and client job matching; training by a job coach in job skills and behavioral expectations at the job site; training and support away from the job to ensure work performance; family support; and support to the employer to ensure client job retention. The same scope of services is provided by the extended service agency. Target populations in supported employment include persons with the most severe disabilities who qualify for ongoing support from the Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities (DSPD), or the Division of Mental Health (DMH), or individuals who have ongoing support available from other sources, including Social Security and/or natural supports. (c) Extent of SE services Specific SE services are provided to eligible individuals according to their needs. Services are provided for a period not to exceed 18 months, unless under special circumstances a longer period to achieve job stabilization has been jointly agreed to by the individual and the VR Counselor and established in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE).

(d) Timing of transition to extended services A Status 26 closure for individual placement is allowable when the USOR VR Counselor places a case in Status 22 after the job trainer’s intervention time, (on or off job site as recorded on the monthly intervention time sheet), has stabilized at 20%*, or less, of total hours worked. As long as intervention hours are above 20%, the USOR counselor considers the individual still in training. The counselor also needs to notify both the consumer and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities or Mental Health program staff via Form 58 of the intention to close the case. For clients not involved with Division of Services for People with Disabilities or Mental Health, the counselor will, along with the job trainer, inform the clients, employer, or others providing natural supports, of their intention to close the case. * 20% is defined as: Hours Worked by Intervention Hours by Client per Week Job Trainer per Week 20 hrs. 4 hrs. or less 25 hrs. 5 hrs. or less 30 hrs. 6 hrs. or less 35 hrs. 7 hrs. or less Wthe intervention hours reach 20% of total work hours, or less, the counselor can transfer responsibility to the extended service provider agency or begin carrying out the plan for extended natural supports. The case must remain in Status 22 for 90 days from the day this transfer is initiated. The purpose of keeping the case open after the transfer is to insure the stability of the placement. A counselor will pay a milestone payment when the job trainer’s time reaches 20% of total consumer work hours or less. A consumer can still receive other types of paid services under Section 110 (e.g., bus pass, glasses, etc.) even though the job trainer services are no longer paid for by USOR. It is USOR policy to transition eligible individuals from SE to extended services based upon individual assessment and need. Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

This screen was last updated on Jun 25 2014 12:55PM by sautcummingss