ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Published February 16, 2017.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Vocational Rehabilitation is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Human Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Director, Vocational Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Director, Vocational Rehabilitation

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at https://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryStephaine Parrish Taylor

Title of SignatoryDirector of Vocational Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/30/2014

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2015No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Vocational Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

INPUT 1 Due to implementation of the Governor’s Executive Order 13-04, creation of Coordinated Care Organizations (CCO’s), and other possible changes in service delivery for vocational rehabilitation consumers; there exists opportunities for Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) to collaborate in information sharing about consumer referral sources with these CCO’s and other community partners, e.g. county health departments, that serve many of the same consumers and have a shared interest in providing quality services to people with disabilities.

Are there ongoing efforts by Oregon VR to engage these new community partners, and if so, what are those efforts?

SRC recommends that Oregon VR pursue efforts to establish collaborative relationships with new agencies to maximize resources that may be available and through that collaborative process, provide support and cooperation for the organizations and entities that contribute to successful employment outcomes for people with disabilities.

VR RESPONSE The Program, through an extension of the Competitive Employment Project/Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, conducted in partnership with the Governor’s Office a two year project, Closing the Employment Gap (CEG), which focused on populations, including people with disabilities, who historically have been under- and un-served by the workforce system. An initiative under CEG focused on building partnerships with local CCOs. To date the effort has met with mixed results. We anticipate continuing that work and expect as the focus of the Oregon Health Authority and the CCOs shifts away from the implementation of the Affordable Care Act that there will be more opportunities for engagement.

One strength of the Program is its partnerships with a variety of programs inside and outside of government. As staff resources allow, the Program will continue to establish new partnerships that strengthen the likelihood of success for VR clients.

INPUT 2 The SRC continues to be interested in the performance based job development process from two perspectives: outcomes of individuals served and availability of qualified service providers. In regards to outcomes, the SRC is also particularly interested in placement statistics for those with the most significant level of disability, including individuals who have I/DD. Typically these individuals receive placement services under the Customized-Supported rating. The SRC requests from VR: 1. Monthly data on the total number of successful job placements, both hires and retentions for the following groups: a. Standard job placements b. Customized job placements c. Outcomes for individuals with I/DD

2. Quarterly updates on the status of the job developer’s report card.

3. The development of an easy-to-use format on the VR website to gather feedback from stakeholders involved in the job development process. This may include but not be limited to: job developers, vocational rehabilitation counselors, consumers, personal agents, county case managers, and family members.

VR RESPONSE The Program accepts this recommendation.

INPUT 3: The SRC recognizes there are many complexities surrounding youth in transition, especially as it relates to: Intellectual/Developmentally Delayed (I/DD) students, Special Education (SpEd) students, and students with disabilities in transition. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services(ODDS), Oregon Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), Oregon Department of Education (ODE), and the Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD) suggests VR counselors attend and participate in Individualized Education Plan, (IEP) meetings. The SRC requests an opportunity to discuss with VR these complexities of youth in transition and challenges for effective service delivery, to help SRC understand all of the issues and then be able to focus on the most pressing issue(s) in the coming year.

VR RESPONSE: The Program accepts this recommendation and looks forward to working with the SRC to develop the content and format of these discussions.

INPUT 4: The SRC continues to work with VR in policy issues. In order to ensure the SRC is able to provide timely input on significant policies and issues, the Council expects VR to partner with the SRC to develop and maintain a process that ensures the SRC is included at the beginning of the policy process.

VR RESPONSE: The Program recognizes that it has not always been timely in including the SRC in policy discussions. The Policy and Program Manager will work with staff to ensure more and more timely engagement in policy development and review.

INPUT 5: The SRC strongly supports the development of highly qualified vocational rehabilitation counselors with certification and advanced degrees. Oregon has two CORE accredited programs of Rehabilitation Counseling offering a Master’s degree. Several students in these programs receive tuition assistance from RSA Long-Term Training Grant funding, which also requires their internship training in public VR agencies. As part of the Master program, each student must complete 600 hours of internship (approximately 20-32 hours a week) during their final school year under qualified counselor supervision. Currently there are more rehabilitation counseling interns than space and supervision support in VR branches. SRC understands that there is a time and effort commitment entailed with over-seeing an intern. At the same time, it seems vital that new staff be cultivated to replace those dedicated staff who retire or advance to other opportunities. SRC urges VR administration to provide the support and directive necessary to ensure placement of more interns. SRC recommends that VR administration provide the support, direction and inspiration needed for each branch to take on a qualified intern where one has been made available.

VR RESPONSE: VR has a history of working with the State’s rehabilitation counseling training programs and providing advanced practicums paid internships. While we recognize the value and benefit for both student and the program, there are challenges in creating these opportunities. We are currently looking at a strategy to sustain a quality experience for interns; it is not likely that we can commit to an intern in every branch. In some instances we lack space to take on additional staff. Additionally, our budget is not set for the 2015-17 biennium, and so our fiscal ability to support interns is not evident at this time.

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 3:24PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

Waiver of Statewideness Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) requests a continuation of its waiver of statewideness for its Youth Transition Program (YTP). Through this program, transition age youth with disabilities are provided with enhanced activities and services that lead to employment or career-related post-secondary education or training.

Background VR recognizes youth with disabilities as a priority service group. VR actively works in coordination with state and local education officials to assist students with disabilities, who are eligible or are applicants for VR services, in pursuit of their employment goals and to facilitate their transition from school to employment, higher education or vocational training. This occurs on regular and continuing basis as part of delivery of individualized vocational rehabilitation services to youth with disabilities.

In addition, VR assists youth with disabilities in pursuing their employment goals through YTP, an enhanced transition program that VR operates in partnership with school districts located throughout Oregon, the Department of Education and the University of Oregon. Every two years, VR solicits proposals and awards grants though cooperative agreements to school districts that wish to participate in YTP and are selected through a competitive process. The agreements provide districts with the funding needed for staffing and delivering YTP activities; and the districts providing matching funds to VR.

YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, post-secondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies in assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work.

YTP’s enhanced transition activities, services and supports are initiated with youth while they are in high school and continue until one year after post-employment or until one year after youth exit YTP. (In order to participate in YTP, students must be applicants for VR services or have been determined eligible for VR). Services and activities are coordinated by a collaborative team comprised of a school transition specialist, a VR vocational rehabilitation counselor, and students and their families. “Core” YTP activities, services and supports have included:

          • Individualized planning with a focus on post school goals and employment.           • Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills.           • Career development activities.           • Exposure and connections to paid employment.           • Information and referral to VR and other sources of vocational assistance.           • Follow-up support for one year after leaving the program.

Over the Oregon 2013 – 2015 biennial budget cycle (July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2015), a new iteration of YTP is being delivered. It is known as YTP 2.0. In addition to providing the Core YTP activities, services and supports, school districts participating in YTP 2.0 are responsible for:

  • Utilizing “motivational interviewing” to assist students in understanding what motivates them and in making informed choices as they plan and engage in activities that are likely to affect their future employment and education. (Motivational interviewing is a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication with particular attention to the language of change. It is designed to strengthen personal motivation for and commitment to a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.)
  • Refining the processes that schools use to provide VR with information about students in order to determine their eligibility and assist VR in identifying and addressing students’ vocational goals and supports.
YTP 2.0 is administered and overseen by VR’s YTP/Transition Coordinator. The University of Oregon, College of Education, under a separate agreement with VR, will operate a team that provides training and technical assistance to participating school staff and VR field staff. The Oregon Department of Education also provides support and advice through its Secondary Transition Specialist.

YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements for 2013 – 2015 Subject to approval of this waiver, 39 school and educational service districts (representing 85 school districts, consortia of districts, and educational service districts) have entered into cooperative agreements with VR to operate local YTP 2.0s for the July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2015 period. (Hereafter, these cooperative agreements are referred to as the “YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements for 2013-2015”). In instances involving multiple districts, the districts involved are required to have agreements with each other in order to ensure that the YTP 2.0 program is appropriately and effectively carried out. A list of all districts that intend to participate in YTP 2.0 can be found at the bottom of this Attachment.

Under the terms of the 2013-2015 YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements, districts participating in YTP 2.0 are responsible for providing the Core YTP and other activities, services and supports described above. Provision of these activities, services and supports are subject to VR’s approval prior to implementation and any and all applicable requirements of VR’s State Plan. In addition, the 2013-2015 YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements:

  • Specify that participating districts are to provide matching funds equal to one-third (1/3) of the grant awarded by VR to a district for carrying out the agreement. Moreover, the match must be from a district’s cash funds; and, neither federal nor “in-kind” district resources, including donations or contributions of property or services may be applied towards the match.
  • Specify that districts may only use funds received under YTP 2.0 agreements to serve VR-eligible students and students who are applying VR services.
  • Require that services provided pursuant to agreements will be provided in accord with the Order of Selection under which VR operates, as long as the Order remains in effect.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS, CONSORTIA AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICE DISTRICTS THAT INTEND TO OPERATE YTP 2.0s IN 2013-2015

Greater Albany Public School District 718 7th Ave Albany, OR 97321

Baker School District Also representing: North Powder, Imbler, Union, Cove, and Elgin School Districts 2090 4th St. Baker City, OR 97814

Bandon School District 455 9th St. SW Bandon, OR \97411

Bethel School District 4640 Barger Drive Eugene, OR 97402

Brookings Harbor School District 629 Easy St. Brookings, OR 97415

Canby School District 1130 S Ivy Street Canby, OR 97013

Central Linn School District 331 E. Blakely Ave. Brownsville, OR 97327

Dallas School District 111 SW Ash St. Dallas, OR 97338

Estacada School District 255 NE 6th Estacada, OR 97023

Eugene School District 200 N. Monroe St. Eugene, OR 97402

Gladstone School District 17789 Webster Rd. Gladstone, OR 97027

Grant Union School District 401 N. Canyon City Blvd. Canyon City, OR 97820 Harney School District 550 N. Court Burns, Oregon 97720

Hillsboro School District 3083 NE 49th Place Hillsboro, OR 97124

Hood River School District 1011 Eugene St. Hood River, OR 97031

Jefferson School District Also representing: Crook County School District and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs 445 SE Bluff St Madras, OR 97741

Lane Education Service District Representing: Cottage Grove, Crow-Applegate-Lorane, Fern Ridge, Lowell, Marcola, McKenzie, Oakridge and Pleasant Hill School Districts. 1200 Highway 99 N. Eugene, OR 97402

Linn Benton Lincoln Education Service District Representing: Alsea, Harrisburg, Monroe, Santiam Canyon and Scio School Districts 905 SE 4th Ave, Albany, OR 97321

Malheur Education Service District Representing: Adrian, Harper, Huntington, Jordon Valley, Nyssa, Ontario and Vale School Districts 363 “A” Street West Vale, OR 97918

North Clackamas School District 4444 SE Lake Rd Milwaukie, OR 97222

North Wasco School District 3632 W 10th St, The Dalles, OR 97058

Northwest Regional Education Service District Representing: Astoria, Jewell, Knappa, Seaside and Warrenton-Hammond School Districts 3194 Marine Dr. Astoria, OR 97103

Oregon City School District 14268 S Maple Ln Ct, Oregon City, OR 97045

Philomath School District 535 S. 19th St. Philomath, OR 97370

Rainier School District 28168 Old Rainier Rd. Rainier, OR 97048

Reynolds School District 1204 NE 201st Ave Fairview, OR 97024 Salem/Keizer School District 2450 Lancaster Dr NE 100, Salem, OR 97305

Oregon Trail School District 36525 SE Industrial Way P.O. Box 547 Sandy, OR 97055

Sherwood School District 23295 SW Main St, Sherwood, OR 97140

South Coast Regional Education Service District Representing: Coquille, Gold Beach, Marshfield, Myrtle Point, North Bend, and Pacific City School Districts 1350 Teakwood Avenue Coos Bay, OR 97420

Southern Oregon Education Service District Representing: Ashland, Armadillo Technical Institute, Butte Falls, Central Point, Eagle Point, Medford, Prospect and Rogue River School Districts 101 North Grape Street Medford, OR 97501

Springfield School District 525 Mill Street Springfield, OR 97477

St Helens School District 474 North 16th St. St Helens, OR 97051

Tigard/Tualatin School District 6960 S.W. Sandburg St. Tigard, OR 97223

Tillamook School District Also Representing: Neah Kah Nie and Nestucca School Districts 2510 1st Street Tillamook, OR 97141

Wallowa Education Service District Representing: Enterprise, Joseph and Wallowa School Districts 107 S.W. First St. Enterprise, OR 97828

West Linn/Wilsonville School District 22210 SW Stafford Rd Tualatin, OR 97062

Willamette Education Service District Representing: Amity, Dayton, Sheridan, Willamina, and Yamhill Carlton School Districts 2611 Pringle Rd SE, Salem, OR 97302 Footnote: Such third-party cooperative agreements are known as intergovernmental agreements in Oregon. The State of Oregon utilizes contractual terminology in a way that differs from RSA. As used throughout this Plan, the RSA term “cooperative agreement” can include a variety of terms that are used in Oregon Administrative Rules to describe arrangements that are substantively in conformance with RSA requirements, including the following arrangements. “Cooperative agreements”, as defined by Oregon rules, are used to memorialize roles and responsibilities agreed upon between two or more parties in carrying out a project or plan where there is no payment for services or goods. “Interagency agreements” are used to memorialize agreements solely between state officers, boards, commissions, departments, institutions, branches or agencies of the state. “Intergovernmental agreements” are used for agreements between an agency and a unit of local government (such as a school district), a United States governmental agency or an American Indian tribe or agency. “Contracts” are used in Oregon when there will be payment for specific services or goods upon delivery of distinct units of work (such as a contractor’s time, delivery of products and fee for services) or as reimbursement for expenditures tied to performance of work measured against benchmarks specified in the contract. Grants in Oregon provide funding to support or develop a program or activity. In Oregon, grants include expected outcomes or performance standards for the program, but disbursement of funds is not tied directly to delivery of distinct units of work.

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 3:39PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

COOPERATION WITH AGENCIES THAT ARE NOT IN THE STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM AND OTHER ENTITIES In addition to its partnerships with other members of Oregon’s workforce system, VR works in partnership and collaboration with other Department of Human Services (DHS) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs, other state and local governmental agencies and programs, and numerous non-governmental organizations. Key among these are those outlined below.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS Oregon’s developmental disability system includes:

  • Developmental Disability Services (DDS). DDS is the state program that coordinates and oversees Oregon’s publicly-funded county and community-based DD programs and providers.
  • County operated and funded DD and case management programs.
  • Non-governmental DD service brokerages and service providers.
  • The Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD). The council advises the Governor and policymakers about the needs and interest of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).
VR works closely with DDS and the other I/DD organizations and programs to address systems and program issues, and coordinate and deliver services. Both VR and DDS are a part of the Department of Human Services (DHS) and their directors and management teams interact on a number of levels. Both directors are members of DHS’ executive team and the directors and other managers and staff serve on formal and informal committees and workgroups, including those described below. At a local level, VR’s branch managers develop and maintain relationships with their local I/DD service system counterparts; and VR’s counselors regularly interact with county case managers, support services brokerages, rehabilitation service providers and advocates in coordinating and providing services to individuals with I/DD.

The most significant development in I/DD services in recent years has been DDS’s adoption of an Employment First policy. The policy calls for employment to be the first priority in developing services and supports for adults with I/DD. VR worked closely with DDS, OCDD and stakeholders in drafting the policy. Since its adoption, VR and DDS have worked closely together in planning and rolling out the policy, organizing and providing informational and training events at a state and local level, developing program capacity and coordinating services. The current focus is on implementing an executive order that was issued by Governor John Kitzhaber in April 2013 (EO13-04). The order directs DHS (including DDS and VR) and the Department of Education (ODE) to take numerous and specific steps to carry out the Employment First policy and significantly increase integrated employment of persons with I/DD. This effort is the responsibility of a cross-agency project team that is led by a senior DDS manager and VR’s director and guided by a cross-agency steering committee of senior managers and staff; and includes cross-agency workgroups that are responsible for addressing specific areas related to the EO and the Employment First policy, including policy and innovation, data and research, training and quality assurance.

Going forward, DDS and VR will seek to expand the availability of supported employment services to persons with I/DD through agency, partner, and staff participation in transformation, transition, and pilot activities, including:

  • Working with provider sites to build stronger community placement and assessment activities.
  • Working with counties on seamless youth transition to community employment with a focus on developing best practices to implement around the state.
  • Working with eight cross discipline Employment First Teams to pilot supported employment activities with a focus on developing best practices to implement across the state.
On a related basis, VR has revised its supported employment policy to facilitate EO. VR anticipates its agenda in this area will include cross-program training and team building with DDS and members of the state’s I/DD system.

VR, DDS, ODE and OCDD have an MOU and charter for serving youth with I/DD as they transition from high school to employment or higher education. As a part of the MOU and charter, data is gathered and tracked to monitor the progress and inform the partners so that adjustments and changes may be made to better coordinate services and achieve desired outcomes.

MENTAL HEALTH PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS Oregon’s mental health system is comprised of:

  • Addictions and Mental Health (AMH), the state program responsible for coordinating and overseeing the Oregon’s public mental health system. AMH is a part of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).
  • Community-based mental health programs. These are the county-operated and/or county-funded agencies, organizations and programs that deliver mental health services in Oregon.
  • The Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), a statewide resource center that provides training and technical assistance to community mental health program and VR field staff on providing IPS. VR interacts with Oregon’s mental health system at management and systems level, and on a local level on behalf of individual clients. AMH is part of the Oregon Health Authority, which formerly was a part of DHS and is co-housed with the department. VR’s Director is a member of the state mental planning and advisory council. Over the years, VR has worked closely with AMH on a number of initiatives to increase employment of individuals with psychiatric disabilities, including those described below. VR Field Managers develop and maintain working relationships with their community mental health counterparts; and VR field staff work closely with mental health providers in assisting clients in addressing their vocational and mental health needs and achieving their vocational goals.
A primary effort of AMH and VR has been and continues to be expansion of the availability of Individual Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence-based approach to supported employment for individuals with psychiatric disabilities. For over 15 years, AMH and VR have worked to increase the number of county mental health organizations that provide IPS. This effort has included developing and utilizing OSECE to provide local mental health programs and VR staff with needed training and technical assistance on IPS. As of the end of federal year 2013, 21 community mental health programs in 29 counties were providing IPS services, a four-fold increase since 2005. Recently, OHA decided that Community Care Organizations, the regional entities responsible for implementing the federal Affordable Care Act in Oregon, will be responsible achieving IPS outcomes. With implementation of this requirement, IPS should be available throughout Oregon in the foreseeable future.

On a related basis, VR partners with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance (EASA) to assist youth with psychiatric disabilities in pursuing their desired employment goals. Through EASA, an evidence-based practice, clinical mental health teams seek to identify young people who are experiencing psychosis and provide them with the information, services and supports they need to continue on their life path. At present, 18 counties have an EASA team. In partnership with Portland State University, VR has helped create and works with a center for excellence that provides technical assistance to EASA teams throughout the state.

SECONDARY AND HIGHER EDUCATION ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS VR partners, collaborates and interacts with secondary and higher education agencies, organizations and programs in providing transition services and supports to youth with disabilities, including the Oregon Department of Education (ODE), school districts and high schools, and Oregon’s public universities, colleges and community colleges.

VR’s collaboration with its education partners includes and is supported and facilitated by:

  • An interagency agreement between the Department of Education and VR. The agreement builds on memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the ODE, DDS, OCDD and VR. The MOU commits the partners to jointly assisting youth with I/DD in transitioning from school into integrated, community employment or a post-secondary education. The MOU establishes a state-level Transition Agency Coordinating Team (TACT) to coordinate implementation of the agreement’s provisions and facilitate review of state policies and procedures to identify where improvements can be made to strengthen and align roles, practices and funding mechanisms. TACT also address training and communication activities needed to advance the overall goal of successful transition. The MOU can be found at: http://www.dhs.state.or.us/dd/supp_emp/docs/mou.pdf
  • A full-time Youth Transition Program Coordinator. The position leads VR’s transition efforts, which includes serving as the program’s liaison to ODE, the State Advisory Council on Special Education and its Transition Advisory Committee, Oregon’s university system, and Oregon’s secondary education system. The coordinator is responsible for leading and coordinating VR’s Youth Transition Program (see below). The coordinator and other VR staff also work with Oregon’s community colleges, as well as youth, workforce and foster care programs on transition and service coordination issues. On a related basis, the Department of Education has a secondary transition specialist that is a member of the State Rehabilitation Council, VR’s policy-making partner.
  • Youth Transition Program. VR – in partnership with local school districts and high schools, the Department of Education and the University of Oregon – operates the Youth Transition Program (YTP). YTP is a state level and local program that provides enhanced transition activities, services and supports to youth while they are in high school and continues until one year after post-employment or until one year after youth exit YTP. At a state level, YTP consists of an administrative team that includes VR’s YTP/Transition Coordinator, a representative of the Oregon Department of Education and University of Oregon Technical Assistance (T/A) Team training, technical assistance and evaluative support team. In turn, VR provides small grants to local school districts to operate local YTP. The services and activities of locals YTP are coordinated by a collaborative team comprised of a school transition specialist, a VR vocational rehabilitation counselor, and youth and their families. At present, VR has cooperative agreements with 39 school and educational service districts, representing 85 school districts, consortia of districts and educational services districts, to operate local YTPs in conjunction with VR. Because YTP is not present in every district, VR has a statewideness waiver for the program.
  • VR Branch Managers establish and maintain relationships with local school officials to facilitate referral of eligible students to VR and coordinate delivery of VR services.

    In addition to the above cooperative arrangements with educational organizations, VR has:

  • Cooperative agreements between VR, the Oregon Commission for the Blind (OCB) and Oregon’s 17 community colleges. The agreement promotes collaboration and linkages through regional teams comprised of community college, OCB and VR representatives. This framework provides an ongoing forum for the exchange of information about issues of common concern, policy issues and process improvements to further the goals of the agreement.
  • Historically, VR and OCB have also entered into a cooperative agreement with the Oregon University System (OUS), similar in purpose and scope to the agreement with the community colleges. This agreement covered all Universities in the state of Oregon. Due to education reform in Oregon, that system has changed. Currently, the university system under the Chancellor’s office is now considered: Eastern Oregon University, Oregon Institute of Technology, Southern Oregon University, Oregon State University, and Western Oregon University. The University of Oregon and Portland State University are no longer part of that system and are single entities. VR is working on three separate agreements, one with the Chancellor’s office, one with the University of Oregon and one with Portland State University. It is anticipated that agreements will be in place by September 2014. Under the terms of the agreement:
    • There is a systems cooperative workgroup that is responsible for facilitating implementation of the agreement, evaluating its effectiveness, recommending needed policy change and facilitating provision of related training.
    • Each universities’ disability services offices and OCB and VR field office have a designated liaison responsible for participating in regional meetings with the community college(s) in their area and exchanging information, fostering collaboration and addressing unique needs and issues.
      • Universities, OCB and VR are jointly responsible for:
      • Ensuring access to reasonable accommodations for OCB and VR clients enrolled in Oregon Universities.
      • Providing opportunities for counselors and institutional disability services representatives to interact and be informed about administrative and accommodative functions and issues.
In order to carry out VR’s responsibilities under the cooperative agreements with the community college system and University agreements, VR has designated VR staff person to serve as its state level liaison to these systems and organize regional team meetings; document regional and local needs and concerns, including those related to training; and presents information to the state-level workgroups.

STATE INDEPENDENT LIVING COUNCIL, CENTERS FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE ADVOCACY PROGRAMS VR coordinates and works with Oregon’s State Independent Living Council (SILC) and seven Centers for Independent Living (CILs) in a number of ways:

  • VR’s Director is an ex-officio member of the SILC; and the SILC is represented on the State Rehabilitation Council.
  • VR participates in the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL), including the SPIL needs assessment and developing SPIL goals/objectives. VR also participates in annual statewide Center for Independent Living program evaluations.
  • The CILs and VR’s field offices routinely interact with one another in making and accepting referrals of individuals needing employment or independent living services, and support and collaborate on other activities, including organizing job fairs and other employment-related events that are held for individuals with disabilities and their families.
  • VR uses Title I I&E funds to match state independent living funds, which are then utilized to fund the SILC Resource Plan.
  • VR contracts with six CILs for delivery of work incentives and benefits planning services to VR clients. The services are provided by Work Incentives Coordinators that are part of VR’s Work Incentives Network (WIN), and are trained and supported by a VR administrative unit (WIN Central).
  • VR maintains a half-time position to manage grants to CILs and conduct annual reviews of CIL compliance with RSA performance requirements. Staff travel to VR offices to promote independent living services, promote revision of policies guiding payment for IL employment related services, allocated funds for services and training and enhanced reporting.

VR has a continuing and productive working relationship with Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), Oregon’s rights protection and advocacy system for persons with disabilities.

  • DRO administers Oregon’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) Program. VR field and administrative staff interact regularly with CAP and other DRO staff in order to address and resolve client issues and concerns, and to respond to client disputes. VR staff routinely refer individuals in need of advocacy assistance to DRO, and VR administration and CAP staff meet to address systemic concerns.
  • VR’s WIN And DRO’s WIPA work closely in delivering work incentives/benefits planning services to individuals with disabilities. The two programs routinely refer individuals to each other in order to address eligibility and other limitations on their respective services. In addition, they engage in joint training and planning activities; and VR and DRO are continuing to seek long-term for funding sustaining and expanding the availability of benefits planning services in Oregon.
VR has working relationships with numerous other public and voluntary advocacy organizations and groups, Incight, Inc. Family and Community Together, the Arc of Oregon, Easter Seals of Oregon, United Cerebral Palsy of Oregon, and the Oregon Disabilities Commission.

TRIBAL 121 PROGRAMS Five of Oregon’s tribes have121 programs -- the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs, the Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon, the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians of Oregon and the Klamath Tribes. VR partners with the programs to provide services for American Indians with disabilities residing on or near program reservations. In order to formalize arrangements with the tribes for interagency referral, information sharing, sharing of resources, and provisions of joint planning, among other things, VR has developed and maintains cooperative agreements with each of the five 121 programs. Recent and continuing VR/Tribal program initiatives include:

  • Participation in VR training events. VR routinely invites Tribal program staff to VR trainings; and, Tribal program members often attend VR’s annual In-service, as well as VR’s five-day Counselor Training.
  • Adaption of Project ACCESS curriculum for use by Tribal youth. Through a no-cost grant extension of an RSA grant that VR has to implement Project ACCESS (a transition initiative that brings VRCs into the schools and engages youth with disabilities in their first or second year of high school), VR has arranged for the ACCESS curriculum to be adapted for use with Tribal youth with disabilities. It is VR’s hope that adaption of the curriculum will lead to a greater transition effort by the Tribal programs and VR.
RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS VR does not currently collaborate with Oregon programs carried out by the Undersecretary for Rural Development.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, TRAINING & CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS VR collaborates with and utilizes the services of Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE) at the University of Washington, the designated Disability Business Technological Center (DBTAC) for Region 10. A significant staff training initiative is presently under way with TACE. VR also collaborates with the Oregon DBTAC representative housed at the Lane Independent Living Center in Eugene.

CLOSING THE EMPLOYMENT GAP In 2005, VR was awarded a multi-year Medicaid Infrastructure Grant to develop and implement strategies to address systemic barriers and limitations to competitive employment of Oregonians with disabilities. Over the ensuing eight years, VR, other state agencies and programs, and a number of other public and private organizations partnered to carry out numerous initiatives. These culminated in a number of developments, including sustaining and expanding of Oregon’s Medicaid buy-in program, development and implementation of the Employment First policy, expansion of evidence-based supported employment for individuals with psychiatric disabilities, and creation of the Work Incentives Network, a benefits planning system administered by VR and carried in partnership with Oregon’s Centers for Independent Living.

Over the final two years of the MIG (which ended in December 2014), the Governor’s Office, DHS and VR utilized no-cost grant extensions of the MIG to lead a high-level Leadership Council and workgroups (comprised of leaders of state agency, community programs and stakeholder groups in developing and implementing Closing the Employment Gap), another strategic initiative to facilitate employment of individuals with disabilities and other historically disadvantaged groups. Current and anticipated activities include modernizing and streamlining Oregon’s Work Opportunity Tax Credit program in order to more effectively reward employers for hiring individuals with disabilities and other WOTC-covered persons; creating a Oregon WOTC-plus program that would provide incentives to employers who retain and provide WOTC-eligible individuals with competitive wages; and for making state government a model employer of persons with disabilities.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION DIVISION The Workers’ Compensation Division (WCD) is the state program responsible for regulating Oregon’s workers’ compensation system and administering the Preferred Worker Program (PWP), a return to work program for injured workers. Under a cooperative agreement between VR and WCD, VR has assisted PWP/VR eligible individuals in obtaining VR services and streamlining their access to WCD/PWP benefits; while WCD has provided funding to support staff and services. However, recent programmatic, policy, and data system changes at WCD have significantly reduced the number of PWP workers accessing VR services.

TICKET TO WORK PROGRAM In recent years, VR has refined its capacity to process Ticket to Work/Cost Reimbursement (TTW) claims under this Social Security Administration (SSA) program. As a result, VR is collecting modest amount of TTW funds on a continuing basis. VR’s TTW Coordinator facilitates VR’s Ticket to Work and Cost Reimbursement activities, which includes identification and processing of VR claims, and serving as “employment network” (EN) for a number of community mental health programs that provide evidence-based mental health supported employment services. Under contractual agreements that VR now has with 16 mental health programs across the state, the programs are responsible for initiating and maintaining contact with Ticket holders, ensuring Tickets are available for assignment to DHS, submitting Ticket data needed for Ticket assignment and Ticket payment claims, and promoting employment of persons with disabilities. On behalf of the community mental health programs, VR submits and tracks Ticket claims, collects and disburses Ticket payments, provides needed training and technical assistance, and promotes and monitors Ticket utilization. In exchange for these services, VR collect a small fee from the participating mental health programs. VR is exploring making similar arrangements with other community based programs with which it works, including service and supports brokerages that assist individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

COOPERATIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AND GROUPS VR has working relationships with many other organizations, programs and groups, including those with which VR contracts, utilizing innovation, expansion and other funds to provide services to VR clients.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 2:11PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) recognizes youth as a priority service group. VR actively works in coordination with state and local education officials to assist eligible students in pursuit of their employment goals and to facilitate their transition from school to employment, higher education or vocational training. This occurs on regular and continuing basis as part of delivery of individualized vocational rehabilitation services to youth. It necessarily includes development and approval of individualized plans for employment as early as possible during the transition planning process, but at the latest by the time each student determined eligible for VR services leaves the school setting (or in the event VR is subject to an Order of Selection and a waitlist for services is being utilized, before each eligible student able to be served leaves the school setting). In addition, VR works in coordination and collaboration with state and local education officials to assist youth in pursuing their employment goals through a number of enhanced VR programs and other processes, as outlined below.

Youth Transition Program Since 1990, school districts located throughout Oregon, the Department of Education, the University of Oregon, College of Education and VR have partnered to develop, implement and evaluate the Youth Transition Program (YTP). During the 2011-13 biennial cycle, 39 Intergovernmental agreements were in place, serving 55 school districts, with 115 high schools operating local YTPs in conjunction with VR. YTP’s enhanced transition activities, services and supports are initiated with youth while they are in high school and continue until one year after post-employment or until one year after youth exit YTP. Services and activities are coordinated by a collaborative team comprised of a school transition specialist, a VR vocational rehabilitation counselor, and youth and their families. “Core” YTP activities, services and supports presently include:

  • Individualized planning with a focus on post school goals and employment.
  • Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills.
  • Career development activities.
  • Exposure and connections to paid employment.
  • Information and referral to VR and other sources of vocational assistance.
  • Follow-up support for one year after leaving the program.
YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, post-secondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies for assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work.

Under YTP, VR is responsible for:

  • Administering and coordinating YTP.
  • Entering into YTP cooperative agreements (referred to as intergovernmental agreements in Oregon) with school districts that wish to participate in YTP and that are selected through a competitive process. The agreements provide districts with the funding needed for the staff that deliver a district’s YTP activities, services and supports.
  • Working with school district staff at the VR field/school level to provide YTP activities and services, and providing needed technical assistance and support.

School districts participating in YTP are responsible for providing the activities, services and supports outlined below; meeting specified performance outcomes; and, providing VR with a one-third match in exchange for the VR funding provided through the cooperative agreements. School transition specialists are responsible for working with VR counselors to assist YTP students and their families with:

  • Individualized career and transition planning, focused on post-school goals and self-determination, and help to coordinate plans with relevant adult agencies;
  • Paid job training while in the program and assistance to secure employment or enter post-secondary education upon leaving the program; and
  • Follow-up services after program completion to track progress and provide additional supports as needed. Under a separate agreement that VR has with the University of Oregon, the university’s College of Education operates a Technical Assistance (T/A) Team that provides training, technical assistance and evaluative support to school district YTPs and VR field staff.

Students participating in YTP:

  • Are enrolled in a school district’s high school or alternative program, although eligible youth who have left school prior to graduation may be included.
  • Are or have been entitled to services under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), or are receiving disability-related accommodations under Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act.
  • Must be applicants or have been determined eligible for VR’s services.
Historically, YTP services have been initiated when a student is in the 11th or 12th grade. But in recent years, VR has encouraged participating schools to engage students at an earlier age and grade, in recognition of evidence indicating that the earlier youth are engaged the better the outcomes for them as adults; and, based on the lessons that VR has learned through Project ACCESS, another VR transition initiative. For more about Project ACCESS, see below.

YTP 2.0 In the 2013-15 cooperative agreement cycle, VR and our state level and local partners developed and implemented the next generation of the Youth Transition Program – YTP 2.0. In addition to delivering core YTP activities, services and supports, participating districts are responsible for developing and implementing new and refined strategies and methods including:

  • Utilizing “Motivational Interviewing” to assist students in understanding what motivates them and in making informed choices as they plan and engage in activities that are likely to affect their future employment and education. (Motivational Interviewing is a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication with particular attention to the language of change. It is designed to strengthen personal motivation for and commitment to a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.)
  • Refining the processes that schools use to provide VR with information about students in order to determine their eligibility and assist VR in identifying and addressing students’ vocational goals and supports.

The University of Oregon YTP T/A Team is providing training and technical assistance to the districts that were selected for YTP 2.0 grants throughout the two year cycle. This included initial and focused training through summer academies and localized regional trainings in the fall for district and VR staff that are responsible for implementing YTP 2.0.

In addition to these changes:

  • VR invited school districts that were awarded YTP 2.0 grants that were interested in further refining their YTP 2.0 programs to apply to become “YTP 2.0 ‘ACCESS’” sites. In the 2013-15 cooperative agreement cycle five school districts were selected to become “YTP 2.0 ‘ACCESS’” sites. These sites are utilizing the approach and curriculum developed for Project ACCESS and the selected districts and VR field offices are working to increase VR’s presence in the school setting, in order to engage youth with disabilities in transition activities and planning at an earlier age and an earlier grade in their high school tenure. While VR is not providing additional funding to the five districts participating in ACCESS, district transition staff is receiving additional training and technical assistance. This has included participation in a summer academy on the ACCESS curriculum and methods as well as a winter academy where all five districts came together with the University of Oregon and updated their action plans for the implementation of “YTP 2.0 ‘ACCESS’”.
  • VR is exploring how to increase participation of youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and other youth with more significant disabilities in YTP 2.0 and YTP 2.0/ACCESS. On a related basis, VR has arranged for the ACCESS curriculum to be adapted for use by Oregon’s tribes with tribal transition youth (see Project ACCESS below for more).
Plan Development When a student is eligible to participate in YTP, he or she works with a school transition specialist and a vocational rehabilitation counselor to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that reflects the interests, strengths and abilities of the student, and which addresses the barriers to training or employment outcomes for the student. However, VR remains in an Order of Selection. At the present, VR is serving all eligible individuals and is not utilizing an Order of Selection waitlist. But should it be necessary for VR to reinstitute a waitlist, the scope of VR services and expected employment outcomes for all individuals served by VR, including YTP students, will be modified to comply with VR’s Order of Selection. For more on this, see “YTP and Order of Selection” below and Attachment 4.11.c.3, Order of Selection.

Recent YTP Outcomes Over the course of 2013, YTP served 1,371 students with disabilities in 135 urban and rural high schools. Of these students:

  • 632 developed individualized plans for employment.
  • 81 percent of those exiting school were either employed and/or enrolled in a post-secondary school.
  • 57 percent of those who exited the program were employed upon exit. They were working an average of 26 hours per week at an average wage of $9 an hour.
  • 59 percent were employed 12 months after completing YTP. They were working an average of 28 hours per week at an average wage of $9 an hour.
  • 29 percent were in post-secondary training or education. They were enrolled an average of 18 hours per week 12 months after leaving YTP.

VR Transition Staff VR has a full-time YTP/Transition Coordinator. The position is responsible for leading and coordinating YTP and more generally VR’s transition efforts, including serving as VR’s liaison to the Oregon Department of Education, the State Advisory Council on Special Education and its Advisory Committee on Transition; the Oregon university system; and, the state’s secondary education system and schools on transition issues. The coordinator and other VR staff work closely with Oregon’s community colleges and foster care, youth and workforce programs on transition and related service coordination issues. On a related basis, the Department of Education has a secondary transition specialist and this position is a member of the State Rehabilitation Council, VR’s policy-making partner. The YTP/Transition Coordinator and Department of Education transition specialist and the University of Oregon YTP T/A Team together comprise cross-agency YTP administrative team.

In addition, VR and its YTP partners:

  • Maintain a YTP website. The site (www.ytporegon.org) provides information on transition, YTP, special education and related services, research, training and links. The intended audience is school and VR personnel, youth and adults with disabilities, parents and other supporters of such individuals, and the public at large. The website is also used to transmit and report on YTP performance data.
  • Jointly sponsor and organize two statewide transition conferences, provide training on a regional basis throughout Oregon about transition, IDEA, modified diploma standards, and the VR process.
  • Serve as liaison to the Oregon Association of Vocational and Special Needs Personnel’s Board of Directors; and U of O and ODE representatives serve on the State Rehabilitation Council, VR’s policy making partner.
  • Survey staff participants on YTP. School district sites and VR field offices responsible for carrying out YTP are periodically surveyed about their experiences and whether the program is meeting their expectations. The results are reviewed by the YTP/Transition Coordinator, YTP Technical Assistance Team and VR management and are useful in determining how YTP might be refined or adjusted. Past results have shown that YTP is considered a value added service.
YTP 2.0 and Order of Selection VR continues to operate under an Order of Selection (effective January 15, 2009). Presently, VR is able to serve all individuals eligible for its services and there is no waitlist for services. But should VR have to resume use of an Order prioritized waitlist, YTP 2.0 will be comprised of the following activities:
  • All YTP 2.0 students who have authorized IPEs at the time a waitlist is imposed may and should continue to be served in accordance with their plans. This group of students will include those determined eligible under prior YTP grants and who have authorized IPEs; and those who have IPEs and have exited YTP. Those exiting YTP will be eligible for post YTP-engagement monitoring services.
  • All other students will be served in accordance with the waitlist as follows:
    • Students may apply for VR services. Students determined eligible for VR services will be placed on the waitlist and assigned a priority level based on severity of disability, according to the priority levels set forth in OAR 582-100-0040. Students participating in YTP 2.0 are to be provided with services consistent with their position on the waitlist.
    • While on the waitlist, students are to be provided with Information & Referral (I&R) services, including information about other state, federal, and local vocational and related programs. District Transition Specialists are responsible for providing these I&R services, although I&R activities may be carried out with the assistance of a VR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor.
    • Students released from the Order of Selection waitlist will be eligible to receive Individualized Plan for Employment development services and will subsequently enter into an Individualized Plan for Employment (as soon as possible thereafter but at the latest before they leave the school setting). VR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and District Transition Specialists will coordinate plan development, implementation and monitoring of YTP 2.0 students.

Project ACCESS Beginning in 2007, VR partnered with five high schools in Lane County and the University of Oregon to develop and implement Project Accelerated Career Counseling and Employment Support Services (ACCESS). Through this U.S. Department of Education, grant-funded pilot, transition services were provided to students, starting in the ninth grade. The pilot brought vocational rehabilitation counselors into the participating high schools where special education teachers and they jointly plan, engage and deliver transition services to students. Project ACCESS is built around a curriculum developed by the teachers, school administrators and VR staff participating in the project. The objective is to assist youth in achieving better employment and post-secondary education outcomes. ACCESS was prompted by research that indicated the earlier that youth are engaged in a meaningful transition program the better the outcomes they experience as adults. The U.S. Department of Education grant that supports Project ACCESS was scheduled to end on September 30, 2013 and the pilot projects ceased operating as pilots; but as noted above, VR is working to sustain the ACCESS efforts in the pilot schools and expand ACCESS to several other schools, with the intent of further expanding ACCESS practices in the coming years. On a related basis, VR sought and obtained a no-cost extension of the grant in order to carry unspent grant funds into the next grant year (October 1, 2013 – September 30, 2014). The primary purpose of the extension is to adapt the ACCESS curriculum for use by Oregon’s tribes in assisting tribal youth transition from high school to employment or higher education. VR has since contracted for development of the curriculum. Project ACCESS continues to be supported by a part-time coordinator. The position’s responsibilities are similar to that of YTP/Transition Coordinator in relation to YTP. As this position is grant-funded, it is not likely to exist beyond September 30, 2014.

Agreement with State Educational Agency The Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and VR have negotiated a new interagency agreement. It builds on a memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the Department of Education, Developmental Disability Services, Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities and VR. The MOU commits the partners to jointly assisting youth with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) in transitioning from school into integrated, community employment or a post-secondary education. The MOU establishes a state-level Transition Agency Coordinating Team (TACT) to coordinate implementation of the agreement’s provisions and facilitate review of state policies and procedures to see where improvements can be made to strengthen and align roles, practices and funding mechanisms. TACT will also address training and communication activities needed to advance the overall goal of successful transition. The MOU can be found at: http://www.dhs.state.or.us/dd/supp_emp/docs/mou.pdf

Other Transition Coordination Activities with Education Officials Other noteworthy transition coordination activities are described below. VR and the Oregon Commission for the Blind (OCB) established a formal statewide cooperative agreement with all 17 of Oregon’s community colleges in 2005. The original agreement ran from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2009, but it was subsequently extended to continue through June 30, 2014. The agreement promotes collaboration and linkages through regional teams comprised of community college, OCB and VR representatives. This framework provides an ongoing forum for the exchange of information about issues of common concern, policy issues and process improvements to further the goals of the agreement.

The goals of the cooperative agreement include a commitment to:

  • Work together to assure that qualified and eligible students with disabilities have full access to educational opportunities.
  • Understand, acknowledge, and respect the differing requirements and definitions among the partners for such terms as eligibility, documentation of disability, confidentiality (including protected documents within each of our systems), provision of services, and accommodations based on the differing missions of the partners.
In 2005, VR and OCB negotiated a cooperative agreement with the Oregon University System (OUS), similar in purpose and scope to the VR agreement with the 17 community colleges. That agreement ran from July 1, 2005 runs through June 30, 2009, but it also was subsequently extended to run through June 30, 2014. Under the terms of the agreement:

  • There is a systems cooperative workgroup that is responsible for facilitating implementation of the agreement, evaluating its effectiveness, recommending needed policy change and facilitating provision of related training.
  • Each university disability services office and OCB and VR field office has a designated liaison responsible for participating in regional meetings with the community college(s) in their area and exchanging information, fostering collaboration and addressing unique needs and issues.
  • VR, OCB and OUS are jointly responsible for:
    • Ensuring access to reasonable accommodations for OCB and VR clients enrolled in OUS institutions.
    • Providing opportunities for counselors and institutional disability services representatives to interact and be informed about administrative and accommodative functions and issues.

In order to carry out VR’s responsibilities under the cooperative agreements with the community college system and OUS, a designated VR staff person serves as the state level liaison to these systems and organizes regional team meetings; documents regional and local needs and concerns, including those related to training; and presents information to the state-level workgroups. Due to education reform in Oregon, the OUS has changed. Currently, the university system under the Chancellor’s office is now considered: Eastern Oregon University, Oregon Institute of Technology, Southern Oregon University, Oregon State University, and Western Oregon University. The University of Oregon and Portland State University are no longer part of that system and are single entities. VR is working on three separate agreements, one with the Chancellor’s office, one with the University of Oregon and one with Portland State University. At the time of the submission if this Plan Update, VR has updated agreements with seven colleges and universities that are in place until June 30, 2016. Agreements with the other colleges and universities are being worked on and are expected to be in place by September 1, 2014 and will last until June 30, 2016.

Through the ODE list serve all Oregon high school special education directors are reminded annually about VR services and the location and presence of VR offices in their area. Every Biennium the same list serve is used to notify all Oregon high schools about the opportunity to apply for a YTP grant. Branch offices work locally with all high schools seeking VR transition services.

ODE and VR have developed a Transition Resource Booklet titled “Transition Together”. The resource booklet covers many aspects of transition planning and one of the sections highlights agency partners and the role they can play in the transition planning process. Within this section, there is an overview of VR services and a directory of all VR offices throughout the state.

VR staff and ODE staff trained Special Education directors on the resource booklet throughout the state during ODE’s annual Systems Performance Review and Improvement (SPR&I) training events during the month of October of 2013. Physical copies of the Transition Resource Booklet were given to every district in the state and an electronic copy is hosted on their website at:

http://www.ode.state.or.us/search/page/?=3996

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 2:15PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

VR, in engaging in innovation and expansion activities, enters into cooperative agreements with non-profit organizations to provide a service or set of services to a specific group or groups of individuals. VR does this in two ways. To address the diversity of needs that local branches encounter in providing high quality services to consumers, VR branch managers have the ability to develop agreements at the local level. Central office staff develop cooperative agreements to address identified needs and gaps. In recommending and selecting proposals, the following criteria are utilized:

  • Addresses gaps in services identified by VR’s comprehensive needs assessment;
  • Number and quality of competitive job placements;
  • Wages earned by consumers;
  • Number of small business/self-employment outcomes;
  • Number of partnerships with state and local workforce investment boards, and private sector employers;
  • Program capacity for people with disabilities through partnerships with employers, schools and community agencies;
  • Number of employment partnerships with tribal entities, African-American, Hispanic and Asian populations;
  • Diversity of people served, staff, and service providers.
  • Quality of customer service; and
  • Use of technological tools that enhance performance.
In February 2009, VR revised the Oregon Administrative Rules governing the selection of its vendors. VR contracts with non-profit and for-profit vendors in order to ensure the availability of a full spectrum of vocational rehabilitation and related services tailored to the specific needs identified in the clients’ IPEs, or necessitated by the client’s participation in a vocational rehabilitation program. These individually provided services are arranged on a fee-for-service purchase order system or through a performance-based State contract. The revised rules provide for performance standards and qualifications applicable to the specific service in question, rather than attempting to standardize the vendorization process across types and disciplines of vendors. Standards for tutors, job coaches, assessment providers, qualified business experts (QBE’s) and vehicle modification providers are under development. Standards governing selection of job development, medical and psychological providers, training and educational providers, as well as child care providers have been established. The revised vendor selection rules also provide for a greater amount of flexibility so that clients in rural parts of the state, or where vendor resources are scarce, may still find qualified providers. The revised rules make clear that variables such as client choice, cultural competency, vendor past performance, and accessibility/availability are additional criteria that will drive the selection process. Under the revised rules and related procedures, approved vendors must first respond to the applicable Request for Qualified Applicants (RFQA) or otherwise demonstrate that they meet the standards VR establishes for the service in question before they will qualify for a State contract or placement on the statewide approved vendor list. VR maintains a statewide list of approved vendors in the Aware Oregon Rehabilitation Case Automation(ORCA) case management system that are available to field staff and clients for purchasing of goods or services that are under $5,000 and do not require a contract via State of Oregon Procurement rules. Vendors who provide services via State contract may also be listed on the statewide vendor list depending on the scope of their contract. The vendor approval process involves coordination between VR administrative staff, local field offices, and the DHS Office of Contracts & Procurement. Field staff will work with a client to identify a qualified vendor to provide goods or services. The Field Staff and client will first review the list of approved vendors in ORCA. If no approved vendor meets the need, a new vendor will be identified by the client and field staff. The field staff will do initial research of the vendor to ensure they exhibit basic qualifications, and then send a request for approval to VR Administration. VR Administration then completes the review of the vendor and adds them to the approved vendor list. In order to qualify for payment, a vendor must be on the approved list, and the services must be pre-authorized through a Purchase Order, that VR calls an Authorization for Purchase (AFP), which describes the service to be provided, the relationship between the service and the individual’s employment goals, the duration/frequency of the service and the negotiated cost of the service. Vendors who provide services under a specific State contract may also be subject to additional performance requirements or specific payment standards that are set forth in their contracts. For example, for job placement services, VR has moved to a system of milestone payments that are outlined in a specific performance contract.

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 7:08PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Supported employment (SE) is a major and continuing VR focus. VR’s SE program provides opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment in integrated settings with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR partners and collaborates with numerous public and private agencies, organizations and programs in providing, refining and expanding the availability of supported employment services. VR’s principal partners in supported employment are identified below.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS Oregon’s developmental disability system includes:

  • Developmental Disability Services (DDS). DDS is the state program that coordinates and oversees publicly-funded county and community-based programs and providers of services and support to persons with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD). DDS is a part of the Department of Human Services.
  • County operated and funded DD and case management programs.
  • Non-governmental DD service brokerages and service providers.
  • The Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD). The council advises the governor and policymakers about serving persons with I/DD. VR is represented on OCDD and has an active and ongoing relationship with the council.
VR partners with DDS and others, including county case managers, support services brokerages, rehabilitation service providers and advocates in providing SE services to persons with I/DD.

The most significant and important development in this area in recent years has been DDS’s development, adoption and implementation of its Employment First policy. The Employment First policy was the result of a multi-year effort involving:

  • The leadership and commitment of DDS
  • The efforts of disability advocates, most notably Oregon’s Council on Development Disabilities
  • The continuing support and collaboration of VR and OCEP at both a state and local level
VR’s focus over the last year has been on the implementation of Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber’s Executive Order (EO) 13-04 (April, 2014), which directs the Department of Education and the Department of Human Services, including DDS and VR, to take various steps and actions to further facilitate DDS’ Employment First policy and integrated employment of persons with I/DD. The following activities occurred:

  • Review of program’s supported employment and supported self employment policies by Cary Griffin. Griffin is a nationally recognized expert on I/DD and supported employment, including self-employment
  • A I/DD track was developed for annual statewide in-service and included presentations by national experts on job carving/finding, customized employment and supported employment
  • A multi-year work plan was developed to support the implementation of the Governor’s Executive Order
  • Continued enhancement of the program’s performance based job development strategy to better meet the needs of individuals with developmental disabilities
  • Legislative approval for eight additional counselors to serve individuals experiencing IDD and a policy analysis.
VR and DDS are actively partnering to expand the availability of SE services to persons with developmental disabilities through agency, partner, and staff participation in transformation, transition, and pilot activities, including:
  • Working with provider sites to build stronger community placement and assessment activities
  • Working with counties on seamless youth transition to community employment with a focus on developing best practices to implement around the state,
  • Working with eight cross discipline Employment First Teams to pilot SE employment activities with a focus on developing best practices to implement across the state
VR is in the process of revising its supported employment policy in order to facilitate the executive order. VR anticipates an aggressive agenda for FY 2015 that will include staff training; cross program training and team building with DDS and state’s I/DD system; and, piloting of new service delivery strategies for individuals with I/DD. The program will develop minimum qualifications, develop policy and establish a fee structure for job developers.

DDS and VR have worked with the Department of Education to develop an MOU and charter for serving youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities as they transition from high school to employment or higher education. Going forward, the MOUs and charters will be implemented, data gathered and tracked to monitor the progress made.

MENTAL HEALTH PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS The system includes:

  • Addictions and Mental Health (AMH), the state program that is responsible for coordinating and overseeing the Oregon’s public mental health system. AMH is a part of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA).
  • Community-based mental health programs. These are the county-operated and/or county-funded agencies, organizations and programs that deliver mental health services in Oregon.
  • The Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), a statewide resource center that provides training and technical assistance on provision of evidence based supported employment to community mental health programs and VR staff. VR provided the initial funding for OSECE and continues to work closely with OSECE at a field and state level.
VR interacts with Oregon’s mental health system on case-by-case basis and at state and systems level. VR field staff work closely with mental health providers in assisting VR clients with psychiatric disabilities in addressing their vocational and mental health needs and achieving their vocational goals.

A primary effort of VR and Addictions and Mental Health has been development expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR continues to partner with and utilize OSECE in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of federal year 2013, 21 community mental health programs in 29 counties were providing such services. Recently, the Oregon Health Authority decided that Community Care Organizations, the regional entities responsible for implementing the federal Affordable Care Act in Oregon, will be responsible achieving IPS outcomes. As a result, evidence-based supported employment services should be available throughout Oregon in the foreseeable future.

On a related basis, VR partners with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance (EASA) to assist youth with psychiatric disabilities in pursuing their desired employment goals. Through EASA, an evidence-based practice, clinical mental health teams seek to identify young people who are experiencing psychosis and provide them with the information, services and supports they need to continue on their life path. At present, 18 counties have an EASA team. In partnership with Portland State University, VR has helped create and works with a center for excellence that provides technical assistance to EASA teams throughout the state.

Going forward, VR will increase its focus supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers.

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT FOR PERSONS WITH TRAUMATIC BRAIN VR continues to provide SE services to persons with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Using the Center for Disease Control estimates, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR) calculates that there are over 72,000 individuals in Oregon living with a brain injury; that each year over 17,000 individuals in the state will sustain a brain injury; and that over 8,500 of these individuals will sustain a short-term disability or more.

OTHER VR works with the Employed Persons with Disabilities Program (EPD). EPD is Oregon’s Medicaid ’buy-in’ program. Through participation in EPD, eligible individuals may obtain employment or continue to be employed and receive Medicaid benefits. EPD is a part of the Oregon Health Authority.

QUALITY OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES In general, the quality of a VR SE plan is evaluated to ensure that it complies with defining criteria of SE:

  • Work is performed in an integrated setting that provides regular interactions with individuals who do not have disabilities, other than caregivers.
  • The individual is receiving a wage commensurate with non-disabled workers doing the same work.
  • The ongoing support needs and sources of support have been identified and secured.
  • Supported employment services provided to clients are for the maximum number of hours possible, based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.
  • Clients and employer are satisfied with placements.
Other Supported Employment Developments and Activities VR operates the statewide Work Incentives Network (WIN) in conjunction with the Oregon’s Centers for Independent Living, with which VR has contracts for Work Incentive Coordinators (WICs). The WICs provide information, referral and planning services to persons with disabilities on the use of federal and state benefits and work incentives in order to assist them in achieving their employment goals. Work incentives/benefits planning is an important element for many individuals who are utilizing or intend to utilize supported employment and data on benefits planning programs, including WIN, indicates that benefits planning is useful in facilitating employment. WIN was initiated through OCEP and jointly funded by VR and OCEP until the end of OCEP’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant. VR is presently funding WIN while seeking a stable and continuing source of funding for WIN.

Ongoing Supports Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long-term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow-along SE services. The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including:

  • AMH and community mental health programs
  • DDS community supports
  • County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages
  • Social Security work incentives
  • Employer-provided reasonable accommodations
  • Natural supports
  • Family or community sponsorship
TIMING OF THE TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES Generally, VR will not exceed its 18-month in-plan status with an SE case. This 18-month time-line can be extended for exceptional circumstances, if the counselor and client jointly agree to the extension. Job coaching and/or on the job training supports are usually structured into a much shorter time-frame, with long-term extended services being built into the plan as quickly as possible to ensure ongoing success when VR involvement ends.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 1:48PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

VR is a program of the Department of Human Services (DHS). VR is the designated state unit within DHS. Human resources or personnel functions are a part of DHS’ consolidated Administrative Services Unit.

During this annual update period, DHS and VR, like other units of state government with significant number of retirements, continue to face changes and challenges that impact VR’s Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD). The current status of this system and related future plans follows.

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development The Oregon legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including VR positions. The chart below indicates the type and number of positions allocated by the legislature for the state 2013-15 biennium (7/1/13-6/30/15), and the type and number of vacancies and projected vacancies over the next five years.

In the pool of 121 vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRCs), VR has 16 VRC specialist positions. The counselors in these positions provide training, technical assistance and caseload support to other field staff on a given area of focus, in addition to carrying a general caseload. The areas of focus include: autism, deaf and hard of hearing services, developmental disabilities, mental health, motivational intervention, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injury and workers’ compensation.

All VR field staff are provided with the supervision necessary to ensure that the position is providing the level of direct services or support services deemed necessary. Twenty hours of in-service training per VR employee per year has been established as a staff development benchmark. An in-service training grant, awarded to VR by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, provides VR with the resources to assist staff in achieving that benchmark. Managers meet annually with staff to address professional development needs for the upcoming year.

In FFY 2013 VR served 15,754 Oregonians with disabilities; in FFY 2012, VR served 15,214 Oregonians with disabilities; in FFY 2011, VR served 15,407 Oregonians with disabilities. In FFY 2013, the ratio of VRCs to clients served was 1 to 131; in FFY 2010, the ratio was 1 to 130.

The present and projected staffing level and configuration meet currently identified needs.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor 121 11 44
2 Human Service Assistants/Office Assistants 64 11 22
3 Field Services Managers 14 0 4
4 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Oregon has two institutions of higher education with graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling, Western Oregon University (WOU) and Portland State University (PSU). Both are working on expanding their programs to include Clinical Rehabilitation Counselor Education options, which will eventually increase the number of practitioners doing mental health-related personal counseling who not only have the clinical training to qualify for Licensed Professional Counselor credentials but who also have an in-depth understanding of physical, mental and cognitive disabilities and their impact on the individual’s ability to work and be an active member of their community.

Western Oregon University (WOU) has two Rehabilitation Counseling degree options:

  • The Rehabilitation Counselor for the Deaf (RCD), which was established in 1974 and is one of three deafness specialty programs in the United States. Students in this program plan to seek employment as counselors or consultants for culturally deaf people, recently deafened individuals and persons who are hard-of-hearing. The RCD option is available to up to ten new students a year. Unfortunately, due to the RSA long-term training grant not being available for application, there is no financial support for the RCD cohort this year. For the first time in the program’s 40 year history, there is no group of students studying toward this specialization. This will likely have a negative effect on VR’s ability to recruit qualified staff to serve this specialized population of consumers. Should this become a long-term issue, VR’s ability to appropriately serve Deaf/HOH consumers will become increasingly difficult.

  • The Rehabilitation Counselor (RC), which was authorized by the Oregon University system in 1991. Graduates of this option provide counseling and consultative services to the general population of persons who have disabilities. Entering students must be able to document two to three years of work experience and/or volunteer experiences with persons who have disabilities. The RC option is available up to ten new students a year.
Portland State University (PSU) offers a Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling, which consists of 77 credit hours. PSU’s Department of Counselor Education provides students with a balanced program of academic coursework and supervised clinical field experience in rehabilitation settings. Students specializing in rehabilitation counseling are provided with both the theoretical background and the practical skills that will enable them to function as rehabilitation counselors in a variety of settings. Students complete the course work in two and a half to three years of full-time enrollment. PSU accepts up to 13 new students a year.

Two other university rehabilitation programs exist in the northwest region.

Washington has one institution of higher education that offers graduate education in rehabilitation counseling, Western Washington University (WWU). The program consists of a combination of face-to-face and distance classes and takes two years to complete. For individuals who already have a master’s in counseling, WWU offers a Certificate in Rehabilitation Services, which allows a student to take the additional coursework needed to be able to apply for the CRC credentialing process.

Idaho also has a related graduate program. The University of Idaho, Counseling Program offers a program of study leading to either a Master of Education or a Master of Science in Counseling and Human Services, with an emphasis in Rehabilitation Counseling. The Rehabilitation Counseling emphasis is a blend of academic and field-based course work with an emphasis on supervised practicum and internship experiences in a variety of human service agencies.

Oregon VR actively partners with all four universities to offer internship placements for students, as well as to provide guest lectures and adjunct instructors from our staff to ensure that graduating students are effectively and comprehensively prepared to begin their professional careers.

In FFY 2013, five VR counselors earned Master’s degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling or related fields:

  • Four in Rehabilitation Counseling: 1 from Western Oregon University, 1 from University of Wisconsin-Stout, and 2 from Portland State University.
  • One in Education from Auburn University.
Also in FFY 2013, 5 VR counselors were hired:
  • Two with a Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling from Portland State University.
  • One with a related Master’s degree in Education from Auburn University.
  • One with a related Master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling from Southern Oregon University.
  • One with a Bachelor’s degree in an unrelated field: Hotel Management.
As of January 30, 2014, of VR’s 121 counselors:
  • Ninety one have a Master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling or a related field.
  • Twenty one have Bachelor’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling or a related field.
  • Nine have yet to complete an advanced degree in rehabilitation counseling or a related field.
  • Forty-seven have current CRC status.
VR will continue to:
  • Work with PSU, WOU, WWU and other education programs that provide opportunities for staff to meet our CSPD requirements.
  • Assist staff in obtaining CRC certification by paying for the registration fees for taking CRC exam preparation workshops.
  • Utilize distance learning Rehabilitation Counseling Programs, such as University of West Virginia’s to assist VRCs without Master’s degrees in obtaining Master’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling.
  • Encourage and assist VRCs who lack their undergraduate degrees to obtain those degrees and further advance.
For related information, see "Personnel Standards" below.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Western Oregon University 25 0 14 10
2 Portland State University 37 0 12 10
3 Western Washington University 37 0 15 10
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

VR continues its commitment to increase the diversity of its workforce in conjunction with DHS’ long-term plan to ensure that diversity goals are identified, supported, and achieved. VR continues to actively participate in the DHS Director’s Diversity and Equity Advisory Council VR continues to work closely with the graduate rehabilitation counseling programs at WOU, PSU and elsewhere in order to increase recruitment of minority applicants.

VR continues to actively partner with PSU and WOU’s Rehabilitation Counseling Programs to create additional opportunities for graduate student internships. For the 2012-13 school year, VR hosted six graduate interns. Due to budgetary limitations, VR was unable to provide stipends to graduate school and other intern stipends in the 2012-13 school year. The VR Administrator’s Stipend Program has helped VR attract and support interns, as well as develop a richer and more diverse pool of applicants for its VRC positions. VR hopes that the budgetary climate will allow the reinstatement of stipends in the future. Cooperative agreements between VR and public universities (referred to as interagency agreements in Oregon) offering graduate degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling are developed and implemented prior to disbursement of stipend funds.

VR staff members continue to serve on Rehabilitation Counselor Education Advisory Councils for programs in the region (WWU, PSU, and WOU). An increasing number of VR managers and VRCs and students are participating in the mock interviews held for students, as the event is becoming an annual exercise that aids student in preparing for VRC job interviews in a supportive and learning environment.

VR worked within DHS’ web content guidelines to keep internet information about VR and for job applicants, interns, consumers and the public current. VR continues to participate in CSAVR VR-NET and the RSA State Coordinators for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing/Deaf-Blind listserv.

In order to replace staff expected to retire or resign over the next three to five years, VR is projecting that it will need to hire approximately 44 additional VRCs, 22 additional Counselor Assistants/Human Services Assistants, and five additional Field Managers.

VR projects that it will be serving approximately 15,500 individuals annually at the end of five years and that approximately 12,865 or 83 percent will be individuals with significant disabilities. The projected retirements are based on the number of staff who will either reach age sixty-five or will have thirty years of service with the State of Oregon within the next five years.

 

VR continues to utilize an established set of standards to evaluate and select vocational rehabilitation counselors. These standards are based on a modified version of standards utilized by the Workers’ Compensation Division (WCD). The State of Oregon’s VRC classification is shared by WCD, the Oregon Commission for the Blind and VR. It requires that VRCs possess:

  • A Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling; or be certified by either the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC), the Certified Insurance Rehabilitation Specialist (CIRS), or the Certification of Disability Management Specialists Commission as a Certified Disability Management Specialist D (CDMS), and six months full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services; OR
  • A Master’s degree in psychology, counseling, or a field related to Vocational Rehabilitation (such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities) and 12 months full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services,
OR
  • A Bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities, and three years of full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services to individuals with disabilities. There is no direct experience substitute for a Bachelor’s degree.

VR has had and continues to have a goal that all employees classified as VRCs will hold a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or a closely related field. VR will continue to seek counseling staff with Master’s degrees, but VRC candidates with an appropriate Bachelor’s degrees and related work experience may be hired as an exception to VR’s policy of hiring counselors with Master’s degrees, with approval of VR’s Administrator.

A number of factors have made it difficult for VR to achieve its VRC standards and goal. These include:

  • An insufficient number of graduates from the nation’s university rehabilitation programs, compounded by the absence of federal funding of one of the four programs in the Northwest.
  • Financial disincentives for graduates interested in employment with VR. Until recently, staff have been required to take unpaid furloughs and salary increases were delayed.
  • Difficulty recruiting qualified staff in the rural areas of the state, where it is often a challenge to find candidates with Bachelor’s degrees, let alone candidates with graduate degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling.
VR did not attain its goal in this area in 2013. VR had two VRC counselors with master’s degrees and six with bachelor’s degrees in unrelated fields and one VRC who lacks a bachelor’s degree. These individuals were hired or promoted into their positions prior to adoption of the current standard and goal or because of the lack of more qualified candidates. VR has encouraged these individuals to obtain their degrees, and has offered assistance for them to do so. On a related basis, VR has been advised by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), which represents VR’s VRCs, of SEIU’s intent to litigate any personnel standards that would discharge, demote or displace any VRC with acceptable performance solely on the basis of a degree requirement.

These challenges notwithstanding, VR continues to support degree attainment by its counseling staff in order meet its VRC standards and goals, as well as to promote staff development and advancement, through flexible work scheduling that facilitates attending and completing a graduate degree in rehabilitation counseling with PSU, WOU or WWU, or through a distance learning program, such as the one at Assumption College.

VR continues to expect that all staff participate in appropriate professional development activities. The established benchmark is a minimum of 20 hours of training per employee per year and most staff continue to meet or exceed this number.

 

Staff Development In 2010, VR received a five-year in-service training grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration. VR’s’ in-service training plan, developed as part of the proposal for that grant, is designed to:

  • Address the recruitment and retention of qualified rehabilitation professionals;
  • Provide succession planning;
  • Develop leadership and build capacity; and
  • Provide training on the Workforce Investment Act; the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as reauthorized in 1998, including its regulations and related policy.
The In-Service Training Program assists VR in carrying out the mission of the State/Federal rehabilitation service program of increasing employment outcomes for people with disabilities through informed choice and career development. VR uses a series of processes to identify training needs. These include drawing applicable data from multiple sources, including: formal needs assessments, In-Service training participant evaluations, course evaluations, and strategic planning. Recently, the decision was made to transition the training needs assessment process from a single survey to a more comprehensive and distributed process, which is more in line with DHS’s commitment to on-going process improvement.
  • Periodic training needs assessment. The agency is currently underway to administer a more tightly focused management and staff training needs assessment survey, data from which will be integrated into our ongoing analysis and planning of training.
  • A three-year comprehensive statewide needs assessment of the rehabilitation needs of Oregonians with disabilities. In partnership with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), a comprehensive needs assessment was completed in 2013 (for more, see Attachment 4.11.a).
  • Continuing assessment of training needs through informal processes, including feedback from VR managers and staff, SRC, and clients, and information obtained through case file reviews.
During FFY 2013, VR continued to expect that all staff participate in appropriate professional development activities.

A key staff development activity in FFY 2013 was VR’s annual statewide in-service conference. Utilizing in-service training grant funds, VR uses this comprehensive staff training event to increase staff technical skills, as well as to showcase best practices. This past year’s in-service, “Thriving in a Climate of Change,” was held on August 14-15 in Salem. It included training for VRCs on counseling issues, case management processes and substantive and topical VR issues including:

  • Addressing Self-Employment Challenges, Assistive Technologies for individuals with cognitive disabilities and sensory issues, Coordinating change across education, VR and DD systems, Fundamentals of I/DD, Serving persons with personality disorders, Supported employment for individuals with intellectual-development disabilities, Working with persons with criminal histories
  • Job creation and job carving;
  • Motivational Interviewing & Motivational Interviewing for transition age youth;
  • The “New” Youth Transition Program (YTP 2.0 and ACCESS);
  • Utilizing career information systems;
  • Traumatic brain injury;
  • Person centered planning and informed choice;
  • Individual placement and support (IPS) and EASA;
  • Discovery and assessment;
  • Professional resilience;
  • Employment and Autism Spectrum Disorder;
  • Serving persons with mood and thought disorders;
  • VR and Centers for Independent Living working together;
  • Thomas Killmann Inventory (management training);
  • Facilitating groups (management training);
  • Advanced mediation skills (management training).
Dedicated “training” tracks” were provided for: Mental Health, and I/DD populations, as well as for management staff, human services assistants, the paraprofessional staff who assist and support our VRCs. More than 350 persons attended the 2013 in-service, including almost all of VR’s staff, as well as representatives of the many other agencies, vendors, providers and stakeholder groups that work with and support VR, including:
  • Oregon State Rehabilitation Council
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind
  • Oregon Centers for Independent Living
  • Oregon Developmental Disabilities Council
  • Vocational Rehabilitation programs from the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, Grand Ronde, and Klamath Tribes
  • Advocacy organizations and groups, including the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR), Oregon Technical Assistance Corporation (OTAC),
  • Local school district YTP specialists and the University of Oregon YTP Technical Assistance Team
  • Oregon Department of Veteran’s Affairs
  • Community rehabilitation providers, job developers, job coaching services and employers
  • University of Washington, Center for Continuing Education in Rehabilitation
  • Service brokerages for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities
  • County and nonprofit community mental health programs
  • Oregon Department of Human Services/Oregon Health Authority service delivery area representatives
  • Oregon Department of Human Services’ Developmental Disabilities Services representatives
  • Western Oregon University, Rehabilitation Counselor Education Program (including counselor interns and students)
  • Over 20 local vendors providing information, assistive technology and resources for rehabilitation professionals & individuals with disabilities
We continue to provide our five-day counselor training to new and continuing VRCs, and other appropriate staff. Over the past year, three sessions were provided and attended by over 40 VR staff and interns and Tribal VR partners. In addition to above described staff development and training events, a number of other staff development and training activities were provided. These included:
  • MI Mentor/MET Facilitator Training (5 sessions)
  • MI Techniques for Clients with Chronic Pain
  • OETA Conference
  • VR Counselor Training (Case Management and Ethics Portions) (4 sessions)
  • VR Employment Outcomes Professionals II Training (9 sessions)
  • Ethics and Dual Customers
  • Advanced Counselor Training Pilot
  • Work Incentives (Network) Partner Training (10 Sessions)
  • VR Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing, monthly sessions (5)
  • Online VR Policy Manual Self-Study Program (6 modules, ongoing)
  • Lives Worth Living Video – VR Administrators meeting
  • YTP Statewide Conference
  • Columbia River Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf Summit II (Ethics for RCD’s)
  • Staff Support Forums (4 sessions)
  • VR Peer to Peer Training (2-3 part modules, 6 sessions)
  • Revolutionizing Diagnosis and Treatment with the DSM-5)
  • Meet on the Mountain II Conference
  • OCASD Online Autism Module support training (9 sessions)
  • Clinical Supervision and Practice Management for VR Managers (Ethics and non-Ethics portions)
  • Dispute Resolution
  • Statewide Supported Employment (OSECE) Conference
  • DHS Diversity Training (multiple session types and offerings)
  • DHS Diversity Conference
  • WIN “Understanding SSA Benefits and Employment
In the case of most of the above referenced trainings, VRCs who completed the training were awarded with continuing education credits.

VR’s five-year basic in-service training grant supports VR’s In-Service Training Program and in particular the VR annual in-service conference. As part of the Training Program, VR’s management plans personnel development and training activities, utilizing inputs including state plan and agency goals and priorities/objectives, program and staff performance needs, needs assessment results and staff input. Looking ahead, personnel development and training activities will likely include:

  • Counselor Training, with modules and content on: intake, application and eligibility; order of selection; plan development; employment; supported employment; self-employment, counseling and case management; closure; and disability discrimination complaints
  • Basic and advanced and motivation intervention training and continuing support through staff mentors
  • Job development services and VR’s performance based JD model, processes and rates
  • Ethics for Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals
  • The most recent iteration of ORCA (VR’s automated case management system)
Other anticipated in-service training and personnel development activities include:
  • Continuation of the development of a new training needs assessment process
  • Review and as needed updating of the in-service training plan so that it aligns with needs assessment findings and any changes made to the state plan
  • A two-day annual in-service training conference for all staff and VR partners
  • Participation in DHS leadership initiatives and events, including DHS’ Transformational/Lean Leaders initiative, DHS Leadership Academy, Portland Metro Leadership Cohort, and regional leadership academies
  • Participation in the University of Washington TACE/CCER Emerging Leaders Series (depending on whether out of state travel limitations remain in effect)
  • Utilization of DHS and Department of Administrative Services’ training opportunities on leadership
  • Provision to staff of out-of-class work opportunities (when appropriate and feasible)
  • Staff recruitment, including:
    • Continued partnership with DHS, Office of Human Resources in recruiting new staff
    • Recruitment of staff at conferences and events
    • Support for career advancement within VR

 

VR employs a variety of approaches in communicating with persons who do not speak English or who have a limited proficiency in English.

VR continued to hire and retain staff capable of communicating with diverse populations. Currently VR has staff who are bilingual in the following languages: Spanish, Russian, Ukrainian and American Sign Language.

VR continued to develop and utilize training materials in alternate formats, including new counselor training materials, to meet the accommodation needs of VRCs who are blind. The training unit assisted staff and consumers who need accommodations for training events with assistive listening devices and qualified interpreters.

In specific geographic areas and for specific caseloads, VR engaged in targeted recruiting for job applicants with specific language skills.

VR staff who are not fluent in the native language of an applicant or a client have access to and training in the use of AT&T’s language service and access to qualified interpreters. In addition, the office has developed and utilizes outreach and application materials in alternate language formats, including Spanish and Russian.

DHS’ Director appointed a member of VR administrative unit to the Oregon Council on Healthcare Interpreters. DHS charged this council with creating and implementing minimum qualifications, evaluation and certification programs and renewal processes for contractors and staff providing spoken language interpretation services for DHS (now DHS/OHA) consumers across the state. The Council’s Bilingual Differential Pay Advisory Committee (to which an VR staff person is assigned) is working on similar standards and processes for DHS/OHA (including VR) staff who receive the 5% pay differential for bilingual skill use. This committee has submitted a draft policy to the DHS/OHA Cabinets for consideration.

VR continues to contract and collaborate with the Latino Connection in reaching out to and providing specialized job placements services to native Spanish-speaking individuals with disabilities. The focus of these services has been in Portland, Clackamas, Salem and Woodburn, which have large Latino communities. This program had a 71% rehabilitation rate in FFY2013. VR continued to implement its videophone pilot with DHS, as a means to provide accessible communication via Video Relay Services (VRS) and Video Remote Interpreting (VRI). The pilot is currently struggling with hardware and software issues related to DHS infrastructure. At this point over 90% of VR offices have fully functional videophone carts available for client use. VR’s State Coordinator for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (SCD) has been an active member of the national group of VR SCDs for several years and is working closely with other VR SCDs who have already guided their programs through the videophone utilization project.

VR presently maintains videophones for a number of staff who require ASL interpretation and to make it possible for a VRC counselor with a predominantly Deaf caseload to communicate directly with clients their native language. In addition, VR’s SCD utilizes a videophone in interacting with Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals, including Deaf student interns. In conjunction with the videophone pilot project, all staff with fluency in American Sign Language and serving Deaf clients have a webcam and videophone software on their desktop computers.

 

Through a variety of processes, forums and activities, VR coordinates with its education partners around training and development of VR and secondary school staff in order to serve VR-eligible youth with disabilities and address their transition needs.

  • VR has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Education, Developmental Disability Services and the Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities and a pending Interagency Agreement (cooperative agreement) with the Department of Education. Both agreements call for the development of professional development opportunities, joint service strategies and policies to improve transition and employment results for youth with disabilities.
  • VR’s Transition/YTP Coordinator and other staff interact with the Confederation of Special Education Administrators and the Coordinator represents VR on the State Advisory Committee on Special Education. In addition, VR’s Director and the Transition Coordinator regularly interact with education officials and staff in order to keep VR and Special Education staff up-to-date on statutory, procedural and programmatic changes that effect transition process, the educational system and VR.
  • In consultation and collaboration with the Department of Education, special education directors and high school transition staff and others, VR provides and participates in a wide variety of training and development events for VR and secondary school staff. This training is guided and informed by the above agreements and relationships. Training includes:
    • VR’s Annual In-service. This two-day training event, which is attended by most VR staff and many school transition staff, includes numerous presentations on relevant and current transition issues, processes and developments.
    • VR’s Annual Transition Conference. This one-day event, which is attended VR counselors and other staff with transition responsibilities, special education teachers and other school staff, including school YTP Specialists, provides education and training on delivery of transition services and supports.

    • New Counselor/Counselor Training. As a part of personnel development, new and existing VR counselors are provided training on the basic elements, purpose, and relationship between the Rehabilitation Act and IDEIA.
  • VR’s Transition/YTP Coordinator works with the Oregon Department of Education and their statewide special education monitoring (System Performance Review & Improvement or SPR&I) to develop materials, programs and systems that train teachers and administrators on how to best serve students with disabilities. SPR&I aligns with IDEIA General Supervision requirements and improvement planning.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 6:54PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

In Federal Fiscal Year 2013, the Vocational Rehabilitation, the State Rehabilitation Council and the Interwork Institute of San Diego State University collaborated to develop a comprehensive assessment of the vocational rehabilitation needs of persons with disabilities residing in the state of Oregon. Interwork subsequently administered the assessment, gathered and analyzed the results and provided VR and SRC with written and in-person reports on its findings. The needs assessment process, results and findings are summarized below. The findings were considered and addressed by VR and SRC in reviewing, updating and refining VR’s goals, priorities (objectives), strategies and activities.

The process that was developed for conducting the needs assessment involved four primary data-gathering approaches:

  • Telephone, electronic, and mail surveys conducted with four stakeholder groups (individuals with disabilities, representatives of organizations that provide services to persons with disabilities, employers, and VR staff);
  • Focus groups conducted with three stakeholder groups (individuals with disabilities, representatives of organizations that provide services to persons with disabilities, and VR staff);
  • Key informant interviews conducted with individuals identified as knowledgeable about the needs of individuals with disabilities in the state, workforce dynamics in the state, or both; and,
  • Analysis of existing demographic and case service data relevant to individuals with disabilities in the state of Oregon.
Through the data collection efforts, researchers solicited information from four primary stakeholder groups: (a) potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services located throughout the state; (b) representatives of organizations that provide services to individuals who are potential, actual, or former consumers of VR services; (c) VR staff; and (d) representatives of businesses. The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of VR including individuals who had not yet developed a rehabilitation plan, individuals with active rehabilitation plans, and individuals whose cases had been closed. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state (whether they are affiliated with VR or not). Likewise, the VR staff members that participated in key informant interviews, focus groups and surveys serve individuals with disabilities representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries.

Four hundred telephone interviews were completed with individuals with disabilities, 31 partner surveys were completed, 85 VR staff surveys were completed, and 98 business surveys were completed. A total of 80 persons participated in 12 focus group conducted in Eugene, Medford, Portland, and Redmond, while 25 individuals participated in the key informant interviews. The following summary highlights some of the most commonly cited needs associated with achieving employment goals and accessing VR services derived from the surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews.

Frequently Encountered Barriers to Achieving Employment Goals

Individuals with disabilities, representatives of partner organizations, and VR staff all identified the lack of available jobs as among the most frequently encountered barriers to achieving employment goals. Each of the respondent groups (individuals, partners, and VR staff) identified a different barrier most frequently, with individuals mentioning the need for more education and training, partners mentioning employers’ perceptions of individuals with disabilities, and staff mentioning mental health issues.

Key informants identified the following as the top barriers to employment encountered by people with disabilities:

  • Employers’ concerns about risks associated with hiring individuals with disabilities,
  • Employers’ concerns about accommodating individuals with disabilities,
  • Misperceptions about disabilities held by human services and education professionals,
  • Lack of job preparation, and
  • Lack of interpersonal or “soft” skills.
Frequently Encountered Barriers to Achieving Employment Goals for Individuals with Most Significant Disabilities A question about barriers to achieving employment goals for individuals with most significant disabilities was asked of partner and VR staff respondents. Both partners and VR staff identified (a) employers’ perceptions about employing persons with disabilities and (b) not having job skills among the most frequent barriers to achieving employment goals for persons with the most significant disabilities.

Key informant interview findings suggested that an additional barrier to employment for individuals with most significant disabilities may take the form of diminished expectations of work potential on the part of both employers and human service professionals. In addition, vocational rehabilitation staff may perceive these individuals as representing time-intensive cases and may be reluctant to provide the necessary services due to concerns about time demands.

Frequently Encountered Barriers to Achieving Employment Goals for Youth in Transition

Partners and VR staff members were asked about barriers to achieving employment goals for youth in transition. There was noteworthy agreement between partners and VR staff with respect to several of the most frequently cited barriers to achieving employment goals for youth in transition. Both groups identified not having job skills, a lack of education or training, and a lack of job search skills among the most frequent barriers to achieving employment goals for youth in transition.

The focus group research yielded data suggesting that there was a need to increase the emphasis upon and provision of transition services within the schools. The key informant interviews echoed this finding. Other transition needs identified through key informant interviews were improving transition services in rural areas, facilitating pursuit of higher education for transition students, providing job coaches in the high schools, providing work experiences while youth attend school, and increasing family awareness of disability and students’ potential.

Frequently Encountered Barriers to Achieving Employment Goals for Consumers who are Racial or Ethnic Minorities

Partners and VR staff members were asked about barriers to achieving employment goals for consumers who are racial or ethnic minorities. There was a substantial degree of congruence between partners and VR staff with respect to the most frequent barriers to achieving employment goals for consumers who are racial or ethnic minorities. Language barriers were identified most commonly, followed by lack of education or training, lack of job skills, and employers’ perceptions about hiring workers with disabilities.

The key informant interviews suggested that barriers encountered by individuals with disabilities from racial, cultural, or ethnic minority backgrounds included language and cultural barriers, as well as the lack of vocational rehabilitation outreach into communities where these individuals live.

Barriers to Accessing VR Services

Individuals with disabilities, partners, and VR staff were asked about barriers to accessing VR services. Partners and staff agreed that accessing training education services was prominent among the top barriers to accessing VR services. There was some agreement between individuals with disabilities, partners and VR staff that limited accessibility of VR via public transportation represented a barrier to accessing services.

Key informants identified specific populations that were encountering difficulties accessing VR services – individuals with developmental disabilities, transition age youth, individuals with significant disabilities, and individuals with disabilities who were homeless. The barriers described for these populations were related to eligibility determination, low employment expectations on the part of the counselors, and valid identification.

Employer Survey, Perceived Helpfulness of Employer Services

Employer survey respondents were asked to rate the perceived helpfulness of a variety of potential services provided to employers by VR. The survey items with the highest perceived helpfulness reported by respondents to the business survey were:

  • Providing workers with disabilities with the accommodations and supports they need to do the employer’s work;
  • If concerns arise, providing consultation with management, the workers, and co-workers to resolve the concerns;
  • Placing qualified individuals in internships at the business with full reimbursement of the employer’s expenses;
  • Providing training consultation and resources related to the provision of reasonable accommodations; and
  • Finding workers that meet the employer’s workforce needs.
The needs assessment in the State of Oregon is the result of a cooperative effort between Vocational Rehabilitation and the State Rehabilitation Council. These efforts solicited information concerning the needs of persons with disabilities from persons with disabilities, service providers, VR staff and businesses for the purpose of providing VR and the SRC with direction for addressing structure and resource demands. The needs assessment effort is based upon the contributions of approximately 700 individuals representing different stakeholder groups. It is anticipated that Vocational Rehabilitation and the State Rehabilitation Council will use this information in a strategic manner that results in provision of vocational rehabilitation services designed to address the current and future needs of individuals with disabilities who seek employment.

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 7:37PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

Annual Estimates The most recent U.S. Census/American Community Survey results on Oregon (2012) estimate that the state’s population between the ages of 18 and 64 is 2,428,162; and the number of individuals who reported having a disability 284,068 or 11.7% of Oregon’s population between 18 and. During FFY 2013, VR served a total of 15,745 individuals with disabilities with Title I and Title VI, Part B funding. Of these individuals, VR provided 1,414 clients with supported employment services and a total of 290 obtained employment outcomes. Of the 1414, 509 received supported employment services using Title VI, Part B funds. Annual Estimates of Individuals to be served with funds provided under Part B of Title I and Part B of Title VI of the Act VR projects that it will serve 15,750 persons in FFY 2015, including persons expected to apply for services, be determined eligible for services and/or receive services through Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs). In addition, VR estimates that it will provide supported employment services to 1,414 persons in this same time period and 509 of these persons will receive services funded by Title VI, Part B. VR anticipates that it will cost and VR will expend approximately $44,799,934 in federal and state funds to provide services at current service levels and with its existing program capacity. These service and expenditure projections are based on caseload projections, forecasted cost per case and anticipated revenue. The program has developed a five year fiscal plan to ensure that Match and Maintenance of Effort requirements are met and all federal dollars are expended in the required time frames. VR intends to remain in the Order of Selection in 2015 so that, if it becomes necessary to reinstitute a mandatory wait list, the program is able to do so expeditiously and so minimize the challenges and problems for clients, staff and the program. While VR is currently able to serve all individuals in Order of Selection wait list priority levels, at least factors argue for the continuation of the Order. VR served 7,753 individuals through IPEs in FFY 2013; VR projects this number will remain the 7,753 in FFY 2015 because it is now serving all individuals found eligible for services. VR estimates that in FFY 2015 the number of eligible individuals receiving IPE services by priority level will be: The estimated total cost of client services for individuals estimated to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services is $22,224,557. (This does not include the cost of staff, facilities, cost allocation and other non-client service costs.) For specifics, see the table below.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Priority 1 (3 or more limitations) Title I $12,021,185 4,264 $2,819
Priority 2 (2 limitations) Title I $5,869,822 2393 $2,452
Priority 3 (1 limitation) Title I $3,794,538 1258 $3,016
Priority 4 (all other eligible) Title I $539,012 168 $3,208
Totals   $22,224,557 8,083 $2,749

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 7:37PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Development of 2015 Plan Update The 2015 State Plan Update was developed jointly and agreed to by Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC).

Development began with a series of facilitated, day-long, planning retreats. The first involved the SRC and VR’s Executive Team and other senior staff. This retreat was held as part of the SRC’s winter quarterly (March 5) meeting. The second involved approximately 30 VR staff, representing all levels and positions of the program, and VR’s Executive Team. A subsequent planning meeting was held with VR’s Workforce system, Department of Human Services and Oregon Health Authority partners, including directors and lead staff from the Employment Department, Community Colleges and Work Force Development, the Governor’s Workforce Advisor, Oregon Business Development, Developmental Disability Services, Employment First Team, and Addictions and Mental Health.

The information and input obtained through these initial meetings was used to inform a series of joint VR-SRC workgroup and other meetings through which successive drafts of the Update were developed, reviewed, and refined. In turn, a draft Update was reviewed by the full SRC and VR administration at the SRC’s quarterly spring meeting (May ). Revisions were made from this meeting and the subsequent draft Update was made available for public review and comment (see summary below).

Thereafter, the VR Executive Team and SRC Executive Committee reviewed public comment and final refinements were made to the Update.

Over the course of the planning process, numerous revisions, refinements and additions were made to VR’s goals, priorities (“objectives”), strategies, and outcomes (including targets). The process included review of VR’s performance, current and anticipated challenges and opportunities and information from the 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment, as well as SRC, staff, stakeholder and public input.

Public Input The proposed Update was posted on VR’s public website for a 17 business day period in May and June 2014 along with information about the public hearings, and how to submit oral and written comments. Notice of the Update, the public hearings schedule, and how to submit comments was also posted in all VR field offices and sent to over 100 allied and stakeholder organizations, groups, and individuals for posting and input. Two hearings were held in Salem, and other hearings were held in Milwaukie, Medford, and Pendleton. ASL Interpreters were onsite in order to assist anyone desiring their services.

Notwithstanding these efforts, the only input received was in Medford. It pertained to supported self-employment and the concept of the State becoming a model employer. The commenter was in support of this movement with in the agency and encouraged VR to build on the supported self-employment work of Griffen and Hammis who are experts in this area. The commenter also encouraged VR staff to be aware of past attempts and failures to work with public entities as model employers when it comes to the I/DD population, and encouraged VR to learn from this past missteps. The input was considered when making final revisions.

STANDARDS AND INDICATORS In FFY 2013 VR successfully exceeded all of our federal standards and indicators. This is an accomplishment that VR and our partners are very proud to have achieved. Federal Indicator: 1.1 Change in employment outcomes

  • Federal Standard: 2033
  • VR Performance: 2331
Federal Indicator: 1.2 Percent of employment outcomes
  • Federal Standard: 55.80%
  • VR Performance: 59.8%
Federal Indicator: 1.3 Competitive employment
  • Federal Standard: 72.6%
  • VR Performance: 88.1%
Federal Indicator: 1.4 Significant disability
  • Federal Standard: 62.4%
  • VR Performance: 96.5%
Federal Indicator: 1.5 Earnings ratio
  • Federal Standard:.52
  • VR Performance: .56
Federal Indicator: 1.6 Self support
  • Federal Standard: 53
  • VR Performance: 71.3
Federal Indicator: 2.1 Access to services for minorities
  • Federal Standard: .80
  • VR Performance: .975

Goal I. Increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for all VR clients. Priorities:

  • A. Increase the number of adults with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) from sheltered workshops who apply for services
  • B. Increase the number of adults with I/DD who obtain employment outcomes
  • C. Increase the number of clients who obtain vocational training, certificates, two year and four degrees
  • D. Improve employment opportunities for clients seeking employment in state government
  • E. Increase the availability and quality of job placement services
  • F. Review and refine self-employment policy and procedures to create more successful and meaningful self-employment outcomes
  • G. Refine, expand and sustain the statewide Work Incentives Network (WIN)

Goal II. Increase the number of youth (ages 14-24) with disabilities who seek VR services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for them. Priorities:

  • A. Increase the number of youth (ages 14-24) with I/DD who apply for VR services
  • B. Increase the number of youth (ages 14-24) with I/DD who obtain employment outcomes
  • C. Increase the number of transitioning youth (ages 14-24) with psychiatric disabilities who obtain employment outcomes
  • D. Increase the number of transitioning youth (ages 14-24) disabilities from ethnically diverse communities who obtain employment outcomes
  • E. Increase the availability and quality of job placement services
  • F. Provide transition and enhanced transition services to transition age youth (14-24) with disabilities

GOAL III. Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes Priorities:

  • A. Increase collaboration and coordination with Workforce partners in order to maximize employment opportunities available to persons with disabilities
  • B. Sustain and enhance employer engagement initiatives and activities in order to create quality employment outcomes for VR clients

Goal IV. Through the use partnerships and collaboration achieve better service coordination and resource utilization to increase employment outcomes

Priorities:

  • A. Increase collaboration and partnership with Oregon Workforce partners
  • B. Increase collaboration and partnership with Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and local school districts
  • C. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Centers for Independent Living
  • D. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Developmental Disability Services and community-based I/DD system
  • E. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) and Oregon’s community-based mental health system
  • F. Partner with Access Technologies, Inc. (ATI) to provide needed assistive technology
  • G. Increase collaboration and partnership opportunities with programs and providers that serve special populations
Goal V. Continually improve the management of the program while insuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy. Priorities:
  • A. Utilization of DHS management processes
  • B. Continue to build on current data analysis to conduct program evaluation
  • C. Continue to ensure responsible fiscal management of the program
  • D. Develop and implement a permanent infrastructure for Work Incentives Network (WIN)

Goal VI. Ensure a highly trained workforce at every level of the organization. Priorities:

  • A. Ensure staff have the foundational skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency
  • B. Increase staff skills and knowledge in targeted area
  • C. Continue to recruit to meet the Rehabilitation Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and VR specific skill needs and engage in succession planning

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 12:14PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

It is the intent of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) to serve any and all persons in Oregon who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. Though it is likely that VR will be able to serve all eligible persons in Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2014, it will continue to operate under the Order of Selection which was invoked on January 15, 2009. VR’s decision to invoke the Order was based on caseload and cost per case projections; its decision to remain in the Order because of uncertainty about the availability of state and federal funding. Status of the Order of Selection From January 15, 2009 through June 30, 2009, VR’s services were limited to individuals who had authorized individual plans for employment (IPEs). Beginning in July 2009, VR had sufficient resources to begin taking Priority One individuals off of the Order waitlist. Over the ensuing twelve months, VR was able to successively remove individuals from the waitlist, as prioritized. As of July 2010, VR had taken all individuals off the waitlist and there has been no waitlist since then. This progress was achieved through use of a mix of ARRA funds, re-allocation dollars matched by state general funds over and above the amount required to match the state’s grant and Social Security reimbursement dollars. ARRA funds allowed VR to remove 2,654 individuals from the waitlist and 471 individuals to move directly into services. ARRA funds and re-allotment dollars are not available going forward. Justification for Continuation of the Order of Selection VR intends to remain in the Order of Selection in 2015 so that, in the event that it becomes necessary to reinstitute a mandatory wait list, the program is able to do so expeditiously and in a manner that minimizes the challenges and problems for clients, staff and the program. While we are currently able to serve all individuals in all Order of Selection wait list priority levels, at least these factors argue for the continuation of the Order. Parameters of the Order of Selection The Order of Selection was established to ensure that individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected first for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, those with significant disabilities second, and then all other eligible individuals. VR based the determination to invoke the Order on use of funds in the preceding year, projected funding, projected number and types of referrals, number of eligible individuals and counselor caseloads. The Order of Selection is statewide and does not select one disabling condition over any other disabling condition. VR does not base the Order on age, sex, marital status, religion, race, color, national origin, political affiliation, or the vocational goal of the individual with a disability. Elements that relate to the significance of disability are the only elements used in the Order. SRC and Public Input on Order of Selection Prior to the Order of Selection invoked on January 15, 2009, VR:

  • Met and consulted with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), the agency’s policy partner;
  • Met and consulted with Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), the state’s protection and advocacy system and Client Assistance Program (CAP); and
  • Informed the public - including clients and prospective clients and over 100 allied public and private agencies and stakeholder organizations and groups - about its proposed Order of Selection and the opportunity to obtain additional information and comment on the proposed Order at public hearings. VR subsequently held public hearings in three locations around the state - Portland, Roseburg and The Dalles.

VR continues to provide the SRC, DRO/CAP and other consumer, advocacy and allied organizations and groups with information and updates the status of its Order of Selection and related developments. In addition, should a waitlist be reinstituted, VR will provide quarterly updates to individuals on the waitlist about their status on the list.

 

Description of Priority categories

Priority One: Eligible Persons who meet all three of the following criteria shall be served first, in the order of each individual’s date of application:

  • (A) The individual is classified with a Most Significant Disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (22) (See FN1);
  • (B) The individual has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits three or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and
  • (C) The individual is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome
Priority Two: Eligible Persons not qualifying as Priority One who meet all three of the following criteria shall be served second, in the order of each individual’s date of application:
  • (A) The individual is classified with a Most Significant Disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (22);
  • (B) The individual has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits two or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and
  • (C) The individual is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome
Priority Four: All other eligible persons shall be served fourth in the order of each individual’s date of application

Footnotes: FN1: OAR 582-001-0010(22) provides as follows: "Individual with a most significant disability" refers to an eligible individual who: (a) Has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits two or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and (b) Is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome. FN2: OAR 582-001-0010(23) provides as follows: "Individual with a significant disability" refers to an eligible individual who does not qualify as an individual with a most significant disability as defined at OAR 582-001-0010(22); and (a) The individual is currently receiving Social Security Income or Social Security Disability Insurance payments; or (b) The individual: (A) Has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits one’s functional capacity (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and (B) Is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Order of Selection VR is required by federal law to implement an Order of Selection establishing priority levels for services to ensure the agency’s resources are devoted to serving individuals with the most significant disabilities first when the agency’s resources are insufficient to serve all eligible individuals. Under Oregon’s Order of Selection, VR assesses eligibility and assigns a priority level (based on the number of functional capacity limitations present, the number of vocational rehabilitation services required and the anticipated duration of service) for all individuals interested in obtaining vocational rehabilitation services. VR may reassess priority levels if an individual’s condition changes. Once VR assigns a priority level, the office places individuals on a statewide waitlist according to the individual’s priority level. When resources allow, VR removes individuals from the waitlist and provides service in the order their applications were received. Individuals receiving service sunder an IPE authorized prior to January 15, 2009 are not affected by the Order of Selection and will continue to receive the services agreed to in their IPEs. Former clients returning to VR for post-employment services are also not affected by the Order of Selection and may be provided appropriate post-employment services without being subject to the wait list. In accordance with the applicable federal regulations, the Oregon Administrative Rules setting forth the priority levels and related definitions were amended effective December 19, 2008 and provided as outlined here.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

  • VR does not presently have an OOS waitlist for services. All eligible individuals in all priority levels are being served.
  • The numbers in the “cost of services” column represent the estimated average cost of ‘client services’ per client. These costs do not include the cost of staff, facilities, cost allocation and other non-client service costs.
  • The numbers immediately below represent the estimated total cost of ‘client services’ per priority category.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 4,264 1,109 923 16.51 months $2,819
2 2,393 723 513 14.96 months $2,452
3 1,258 402 216 11.51 months $3,016
4 168 79 39 13.08 months $2,308

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2014 7:44PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

In FFY 2013, the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR):

  • Served 1,414 individuals in supported employment, of which 509 individuals were served utilizing Title VI, Part B funds.
  • Was allocated $300,000 in Title VI, Part B funds, of which it expended $253,174.
  • Closed 254 Title VI, Part B funded cases, of which:
    • 118 entered competitive employment in supported employment; and,
    • 114 cases were closed without entering employment.
VR anticipates expending in FFY 2015 approximately $253,174 in Title VI, Part B funds to provide plan services to clients needing supported employment services. Goal In FFY 2015, VR will seek to utilize Title VI, Part B funds to provide supported employment services to 509 individuals, and assist 290 individuals in obtaining competitive employment. Plans VR’s supported employment program is potentially available to any individual with a most significant disability who needs such services to be successfully and competitively employed. Title VI, Part B funds are utilized for the time-limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in competitive employment in an integrated setting. The counselor and the individual agree on the services to be provided to the client on an individualized basis. Services that may be part of a supported employment individual plan for employment (IPE) include:
  • Person-centered planning
  • Community-based assessment
  • Job development and job placement
  • On-site training for worker and/or co-workers
  • Long-term support development
  • Other services and goods
  • Post-employment service

This screen was last updated on Jun 27 2014 11:44AM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Goal I. Increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for all VR clients. Priorities:

  • A. Increase the number of adults with Intellectual/ Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) from sheltered workshops who apply for services
      I.A Strategies:
    • 1. Identify stable funding for benefits planning
    • 2. Develop and distribute informational material about VR services appropriate for sheltered employment settings
    • 3. Develop, sustain and enhance collaborative relationships with VR providers, I/DD service providers, county I/DD offices, and service brokerages
    • 4.Coordinate with I/DD system to get VR information out to parents and families of I/DD clients
  • B. Increase the number of adults with I/DD who obtain employment outcomes
      I.B Strategies:
    • 1. Develop and provide competitive employment training
    • 2. Develop and administer job coaching certification
    • 3. Develop and provide job coaching training
    • 4. Continue to provide job development training
    • 5. Develop and administer pay for performance fees for competitive employment services and supports
    • 6. Establish and administer job placement rates
    • 7. Develop and hold a training summit on I/DD supported employment
  • C. Increase the number of clients who obtain vocational training, certificates, two year and four degrees
      I.C Strategies:
    • 1. Review and revise training policy
    • 2. Review and revise college and university agreements
    • 3. Increase number of clients in occupational skills trainings (OST)
    • 4. Increase number of employer based trainings (OJT)
    • 5. Increase number of clients participating in apprenticeship programs
    • 6.Increase number of clients participating in Local Workforce Investment Board (LWIB) created Sectorial Trainings
    • 7. Increase number of clients obtaining National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC)
    • 8. Review and revise MOU’s with higher education
  • D. Improve employment opportunities for clients seeking employment in state government
      I.D Strategies:
    • Participate in a state level workgroup to establish the state as a model employer
  • E. Increase the availability and quality of job placement services
      I.E Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to provide opportunities for providers to learn about job placement, job carving, and customized employment strategies and techniques
    • 2. Continue to recruit job placement providers in areas that are under served.
    • 3. Begin to utilize job placement vendor report card
    • 4. Explore the feasibility of staff job developers
  • F. Review and refine self-employment policy and procedures to create more successful and meaningful self-employment outcomes
      I.F Strategies:
    • 1. Evaluate and refine the process for self-employment plans
    • 2. Create self-employment definitions for successful employment outcomes
    • 3. Create and implement a supported self-employment track for individuals with the most significant disabilities
    • 4. Continue to utilize Business Plan Committee in reviewing and approving self-employment plans

  • G. Refine, expand and sustain the statewide Work Incentives Network (WIN)
      I.G Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to contract with Centers for Independent Living to provide work incentive/benefits planning services through WIN-certified work incentives coordinators (WICs)
    • 2. Seek to expand provision of benefits planning services to targeted populations, including transition age youth
    • 3. Develop a Policy Option Package for ongoing funding of WIN
    • 4. Provide technical assistance to 121 tribal programs in developing capacity to provide benefits planning services to tribal members
    • 5. Continue to provide benefits planning outreach and education to parents and other caregivers of persons with significant disabilities
    • 6. Continue to evaluate effectiveness of WIN in increasing employment outcomes and reducing dependency on public benefits
    • 7. Continue partnering with Disability Rights Oregon’s Work Incentives Planning and Assistance program in delivering high quality benefits planning services

Goal I Outcomes and Targets:

  • Increase the number of employment outcomes (indicator 1.1) 2015 Target: 2600

  • Increase number of clients with I/DD served (Indicator 1.1) 2015 Target: 1100
  • Increase number of employment outcomes for supported employment clients (Indicator 1.4) 2015 I/DD Target: 350 2015 MH Target: 50
  • Increase number of employment outcomes for working age adults with I/DD (indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 140
  • Increase percent of supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 52%
  • Increase percent of supported employment clients with I/DD with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 62%
  • Increase percent of clients obtaining training certificates, two, and four year degrees and employment outcome 2015 Target: 78%
  • Increase number of minority clients served (Indicator 2.1) 2015 Target: 1600
  • Increase percent of minority clients obtaining employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.2) 2015 Target: 62%
  • Increase number of clients who are Deaf and hard of hearing with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 440
  • Increase self-employment outcomes(Indicator 1.1) 2015 Target: 40
  • Percent of SSI/SSDI employments that meet substantial gainful SGA at closure (Indicator 1.6) 2015 Target: 27%
  • Increase number of SSI/ SSDI recipients with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 700
  • Increase average hourly wage 2015 Target: $12.00
  • Increase average number of hours worked 2015 Target: 29

Goal II. Increase the number of youth (ages 14-24) with disabilities who seek VR services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for them. Priorities:

  • A. Increase the number of youth (ages 14-24) with I/DD who apply for VR services
      II.A Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to work with DDS and other partners to implement the Governor’s Executive Order 13-04 for Employment First
    • 2. Develop service delivery flowchart and associated FAQs
    • 3. Develop and deliver VR 101 for I/DD services and supports brokerages
    • 4. Provide supported employment training to I/DD brokerages
    • 5. Develop and disseminate VR brochure for brokerage clients
    • 6. Disseminate youth transition manual
    • 7. Create and participate in outreach activities for youth, their families, and guardians to inform them of VR services
    • 8.Continue to participate on Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD)
    • 9. Continue to provide benefits planning outreach and education to parents and caregivers of persons with significant disabilities
  • B. Increase the number of youth (ages 14-24) with I/DD who obtain employment outcomes
      II. B Strategies
    • 1. Develop and provide training on supported employment policy
    • 2. Develop and implement transition policy
    • 3. Develop and implement job coaching policy
    • 4. Develop and administer pay for performance fees for competitive employment services and supports
    • 5. Review and revise supported self-employment policy
    • 6. Continue to target youth in transition job fairs conducted in partnership with Oregon Commission for Blind and others
    • 7. Pilot I/DD Youth Transition Program model
    • 8. Support an “employment track” at statewide MEGA Conference
  • C. Increase the number of transitioning youth (ages 14-24) with psychiatric disabilities who obtain employment outcomes
      II.C Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to partner with the Early Assessment Support Alliance in providing employment-related services and supports to youth with who have experienced psychosis
  • D. Increase the number of transitioning youth (ages 14-24) disabilities from ethnically diverse communities who obtain employment outcomes
      II.D Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to partner with Oregon Tribes to develop and implement an ACCESS transition program for Tribal youth with disabilities
    • 2. Expand Latino Project services to work with transition age youth

  • E. Increase the availability and quality of job placement services
      II.E Startegies:
    • 1. Continue to recruit job placement providers for underserved regions and areas
    • 2. Re-establish job placement services forum
    • 3. Provide additional EOP II training
    • 4. Begin to utilize job placement vendor report card
    • 5. Provide competitive employment training
    • 6. Review job placement fees
    • 7. Develop and provide job creation/carving training
    • 8. Develop and implement strategies to recruit additional job developers
    • 9.Continue to utilize Job Placement Advisory Group
  • F. Provide transition and enhanced transition services to transition age youth (14-24) with disabilities
      II.F Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to refine and implement Youth Transition Program (YTP) 2.0 through development and implementation of biennial cooperative agreements with local school districts
    • 2. Continue to expand utilization of ACCESS Program
    • 3. Develop and implement an YTP I/DD Program
    • 4. Build interagency transition work teams and increase skill sets of transition staff
    • 5. Continue to operate YTP and ACCESS summer academies for school district and VR staff
    • 6. Continue to provide training on Summary of Performance
Goal II Outcomes and Targets:
  • Increase number of Youth with supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 120
  • Increase number of transition age youth with I/DD served 2015 Target: 1100
  • Increase percent of transition age youth with I/DD obtaining an employment outcome (Indicator 1.1) 2015 Target: 57
  • Increase number of youth with I/DD with supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 TARGET: 85
  • Increase percent of transition age youth with I/DD obtaining a supported employment outcome (Indicator 1.1) 2015 Target : 56%
  • Increase number of transition age Deaf youth (18-24) and youth who are hard of hearing with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 35
  • Increase number of transition age youth served 2015 Target: 2,500
  • Increase percent of transition age youth obtaining an employment outcome (Indicator 1.1) 2015 Target: 62%
  • Increase percent of transition age youth who obtain a post-secondary degree or certificate and an employment outcome (Indicator 1.2) 2015 Target: 62%
  • Increase average youth wage (Indicators 1.3 and 1.5) 2015 Target: $10.25
  • Increase number of hours worked 2015 Target: 25
  • Increase number of students who are SSI/SSDI recipients who obtain an employment outcome (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 200
  • Increase number of transition age youth served 2015 Target: 2,500
  • Maintain number of Youth Transition Program 2.0 Sites 2015 Target: 39

GOAL III. Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes Priorities:

  • A. Increase collaboration and coordination with Workforce partners in order to maximize employment opportunities available to persons with disabilities
      III.A Strategies:
    • 1. Refine and implement strategies with Workforce partners to increase access to services and outcomes for VR clients
    • 2. Support Local Workforce Investment Boards in creating local compacts to ensure quality services for VR clients
    • 3. Utilize HIRE Gauge to increase employer awareness of the benefits of hiring persons with disabilities
    • 4. Market increased utilization of WOTC tax credit to employer community
    • 5. Support effort to make state a model employer of people with disabilities
  • B. Sustain and enhance employer engagement initiatives and activities in order to create quality employment outcomes for VR clients
      III.B Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to inform and educate employers about employing people with disabilities
    • 2. Maintain and expand partnerships with employers to increase access of VR clients to job applicant pools
    • 3. Create and utilize a statewide employer data base to more effectively communicate with employers
    • 4. Create and deliver local training on a standardized employer outreach strategy that is customized to local offices
    • 5. Develop plan to actively engage federal contractors in complying with the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) guidance for hiring individuals with disabilities, including the use of MOU’s with employers
    • 6. Explore and implement one or more new models of employer outreach
    • 7. Support one or more employer recognition events
Goal III Outcomes and Targets:
  • Number of compact entered into with LWIBS 2015 Target: 7
  • Increase the number of employers who attend employer education sessions 2015 Target: Establish baseline
  • Increase number of hires from postings that employers post with VR 2015 Target: Establish baseline

Goal IV. Through the use partnerships and collaboration achieve better service coordination and resource utilization to increase employment outcomes

Priorities:

  • A. Increase collaboration and partnership with Oregon Workforce partners
  • B. Increase collaboration and partnership with Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and local school districts
  • C. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Centers for Independent Living
  • D. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Developmental Disability Services and community-based I/DD system
  • E. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) and Oregon’s community-based mental health system
  • F. Partner with Access Technologies, Inc. (ATI) to provide needed assistive technology
  • G. Increase collaboration and partnership opportunities with programs and providers that serve special populations
Goal V. Continually improve the management of the program while insuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy. Priorities:
  • A. Utilization of DHS management processes
      IV.A Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to participate on the Oregon Workforce Investment Board
    • 2. Implement compact with the Oregon Workforce Investment Board (OWIB) and Workforce Partners
    • 3. Continue to participate on the Workforce Policy Cabinet
    • 4. Continue to collaborate with the Workforce partners in assessing and addressing the disability related training needs of WorkSource Oregon staff
    • 5. Collaborate with Workforce staff to disseminate information about Workforce initiatives including Work Ready Communities and Sector Strategy approaches
  • B. Continue to build on current data analysis to conduct program evaluation
      IV.B Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to partner with the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and local education agencies throughout Oregon to address the needs of transition age adults and youth as outlined in the ODE/VR interagency agreement.
    • 2. Update and implement related MOU work plan with ODE, DDS and Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD)
    • 3. Cross train state and local education agency and VR staff to better deliver comprehensive services
  • C. Continue to ensure responsible fiscal management of the program
      IV.C Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to work with Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to identify services that support and improve employment outcomes
    • 2. Continue to contract with CILs to provide benefits planning services
    • 3. Continue to participate on the State Independent Living Council
  • D. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Developmental Disability Services and community-based I/DD system
      IV.D Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to partner with DDS to provide training and technical assistance to community-based developmental disability programs
    • 2. Continue to utilize internal resources and the Northwest Technical Assistance and Continuing Education center in providing staff with needed training on serving I/DD persons
    • 3. Continue to participate on OCDD
  • E. Increase collaboration and partnerships with Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) and Oregon’s community-based mental health system
      IV.E Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to partner with AMH, community mental health providers and the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) in delivering and expanding utilization of Individual Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence-based supported employment model
    • 2. Continue to partner with the Early Assessment Support Alliance in providing employment-related services and supports to youth with psychiatric disabilities who have experienced psychosis
  • F. Partner with Access Technologies, Inc. (ATI) to provide needed assistive technology
      IV.F Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to utilize ATI in providing assistive technology services and devices needed by clients at each stage of VR process
    • 2. Utilize ATI’s loan program to increase availability of existing and emerging assistive technology tools that facilitate employment
    • 3. Provide opportunities for staff to learn about and access technology for their clients
  • G. Increase collaboration and partnership opportunities with programs and providers that serve special populations
      IV.G Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to collaborate with and provide training and technical assistance to the 121 programs of the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde, Warm Springs, Klamath, Umatilla and Siletz tribes
    • 2. Continue to contract with Latino Project of Easter Seals
    • 3. Work with culturally specific community organizations to publicize VR services
    • 4. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans
    • 5. Support DHS pilot project with Portland’s Urban League
    • 6. Convene a forum to discuss services to ethnically diverse communities
    • 7. Identify and address barriers to employment faced by individuals with disabilities who are cultural, ethnic or linguistic minorities
    • 8. Ensure linguistic access to VR services through use of interpreters, translators, bilingual materials, and targeted hiring
Goal IV Outcomes and Targets:
  • Increase number of clients who get their NCRC certificate 2015 Target: Establish baseline
  • MOU updated and implemented
  • Maintain number contracts VR has with Centers for Independent Living 2015 Target: 6
  • Increase number of employment outcomes for I/DD supported employment clients (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 350
  • Increase percent of supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 52%
  • Increase number of employment outcomes for MH supported employment clients (Indicator 1.4) 2015 Target: 50
  • Increase number of devices and services accessed by clients from ATI 2015 Target:450
  • Increase number of minority clients served (Indicator 2.1) 2015 Target: 1,600
  • Increase percent of minority clients obtaining employment (Indicator 1.2) 2015 Target: 62%
  • Interpreters available 100% of the time when requested
Goal V. Continually improve the management of the program while insuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy. Priorities:
  • A. Utilization of DHS management processes
      V.A Strategies:
    • 1. VR Branches utilize huddles and visual boards
    • 2. Develop and implement new work plans for new strategies and activities
    • 3. Quarterly Benchmark Reports completed quarterly.
  • B. Continue to build on current data analysis to conduct program evaluation
      V.B Strategies:
    • 1. Use Business Objects Reports, ORCA reports file reviews, and performance metrics to target focus for field staff supervision, training and technical assistance
    • 2. Continue to utilize client file review’ feedback loop to facilitate accountability and support corrective action
    • 3. Continue to review and revise rules, policies, and procedures as needed
  • C. Continue to ensure responsible fiscal management of the program
      V.C Strategies:
    • 1. Build revenue plan for 2015-17 biennium
    • 2. Continue to explore and utilize opportunities to increase revenue opportunities for the program
    • 3. Develop and maintain a fiscal management plan
    • 4. Continue to work with DHS Fiscal Management
    • 5. Maximize resources available for the VR program
  • D. Develop and implement a permanent infrastructure for Work Incentives Network (WIN)
      V.D Strategies:
    • 1. Pursue policy option package and other funding options for funding the WIN over the short and long-term
Goal V. Outcomes and Targets:
  • All branches using huddles and visual boards 2015 Target: 14
  • QBR completed quarterly
  • Corrective action plans developed when need is identified by file review 2015 Target:100%
  • No Audit findings
  • Maximize the amount of Social Security cost reimbursement dollars 2015 Target: $1.5Million
  • POP submitted
Goal VI. Ensure a highly trained workforce at every level of the organization. Priorities:
  • A. Ensure staff have the foundational skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency
      VI.A Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to ensure new staff complete the orientation and comprehensive training for their position.
    • 2. Examine training cycle for existing staff, review and revise
    • 3. Continue to utilize technology to better deliver staff training
    • 4. Train staff on new iterations of ORCA as they become available
  • B. Increase staff skills and knowledge in targeted area
      VI.B Strategies:
    • 1. Continue to complete a periodic training needs assessment
    • 2. Continue to develop and update a program training plan
    • 3. Develop and hold an annual In-Service Training Conference
    • 4. Develop and hold a training summit on I/DD supported employment
    • 5.Provide staff opportunities to participate in trainings that provide additional knowledge for working with specific populations, increasing counseling skills, and creating workplace efficiency
    • 6. Continue to collaborate with stakeholders to maximize training opportunities and resources
    • 7. Continue to mentor managers and staff
    • 8. Continue to utilize TACE training and advisory opportunities
    • 9. Create and enhance staff developmental opportunities
  • C. Continue to recruit to meet the Rehabilitation Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and VR specific skill needs and engage in succession planning
    • 1. Continue to work with the DHS Office of Human Resources in recruiting staff
    • 2. Continue to work with university programs to provide internship opportunities for those working towards Rehabilitation Counseling degrees
    • 3. Continue to engage in succession planning
Goal VI Outcomes and Targets:
  • Staff trained on new iterations of ORCA
  • Training needs assessment completed
  • Applicant pools whose skills, education and skills align with CSPD goals and specific skill needs

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

See Goal III, Priority F, Strategies 1, 2, and 3 in Text Box 1.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

See Goal I, Priority G, Strategy 4; Goal II, Priority D, Strategies 1 &2; Goal IV, Priority G, Strategies 1-3, 5-8; in text box 1.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Not applicable

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

See Goals I, II, III, and IV including all corresponding Priorities and Strategies in Text Box 1. In FFY 2013, VR exceeded all standards and indicators.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

See Goal I Priority C Strategies 6 and 7; Goal III, Priority A. Strategies 1-5 and Goal IV, Priority A Strategies 1-5. in text Box 1.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

For VR’s Strategies to achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11 (c) (1) see all of Text Box 1.

For VR’s Strategies to support innovation and expansion activities see the following in Text Box 1: Goal I.B. Strategies 1,2,5,7 Goal I.C. Strategies 3,4,5,6,7 Goal I.D. Strategy 1 Goal I.F Strategies 2,3 Goal I.G. Strategy 2,3 Goal II.A. Strategies 1,3,4,5,7 Goal II.B. Strategies 1,2,3,4,5,7 Goal II.D. Strategy 2 Goal II.F. Strategy 3,4 Goal III.B Strategy 5 Goal IV.G Strategies 5,6,7 Goal V.D Strategy 1

For VR’s Strategies to be used to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the VR program and SE services see the following in Text Box 1:

Goal I.A. Strategies 1,2,3,4 Goal I.B. Strategies 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 Goal I.E Strategies 1,2,3,4 Goal I.F Strategy 3 Goal I.G Strategy 2,5 Goal II.A Strategies 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 Goal II.B Strategies 1,2,3,6,7,8 Goal II.C Strategy 1 Goal II.F. Strategies 3,4,5 Goal IV. B Strategies 1,2,3 Goal IV.D Strategies 1,2,3 Goal IV.E Strategies 1,2

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 26 2014 7:32PM by saorhaund

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

GOAL I. Increase the number and quality (as measured by wages, availability of benefits, number of hours worked, and client satisfaction) of employment outcomes for all VR clients. Goal I Objective A (I.A): Increase number of employment outcomes I.A. Strategies:

  • 1. Continue development and implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes Program initiative
  • 2. Educate and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies
  • 3. Continue to work with the Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to VR counseling staff
  • 4. Work with Department of Human Services and City of Portland to become model employers of people with disabilities
  • 5. Maintain the Preferred Workers Program (PWP) with the Workers Compensation Division (WCD) and explore feasibility of expanding it
Additional I.A Comments:
  • EOP II training continues on a quarterly basis. MI and MET facilitators meet quarterly. YTP and MH have taken on MI as a best practice when communicating with clients.
  • VR branch manager continues to be on the Career Information System advisory board.
  • Through the Closing the Employment Gap initiative VR and its partners are encouraging the State of Oregon to take on a model employer initiative.
  • City initiated modest steps to implement its model employer initiative, including its first job fair for persons with disabilities, review of its recruitment processes and is surveying City workers to establish baseline numbers on disabilities in its workforce.
  • Preferred Workers Program had a 67% rehabilitation rate in SFY13
Goal I Objective B (I.B) Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and number of hours worked I.B Strategies
  • 1. Continue to implement, evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative
  • 2. Complete development and initiate utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes such as living wage, health benefits and advancement
  • 3. Maintain the Preferred Workers Program with Workers Compensation Program and explore feasibility of expanding
  • 4. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies
  • 5.Continue to implement the charter and memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities
  • 6. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include
    • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps
    • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions
    • Recommending needed legislative changes

  • 7. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with the Department of Education (ODE) and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:
    • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan
    • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems
    • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of agreed upon data
    • Recommending needed legislative changes
    I.B Outcomes Percent of Clients Obtaining Post Secondary Degree or Certificate Who Also Obtain Employment 2013 Target 55% 2013 Outcome 67% Implemented ODDS-VR MOU and authorized ODDS-VR charter Implemented ODDS-ODE-VR MOU and Charter Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes Outcome I.B Comments:
    • No recommendations for policy and legislation were recommended
    • MOUs with ODDS and Department of Education have been updated. In April 2013, Governor Kitzhaber issued an EO that gave very specific guidance on providing employment services to individuals with I/DD. This EO and time line, directed the work of VR, ODDS, and ODE over 2013.
    • Plans for 2014 include increase staffing in the field and bringing on a Policy Analyst to work specifically in this area.
    Goal I Objective C (I.C) Implement new self-employment policy I.C Strategies
    • 1. Review and revise new Self-Employment policy as needed
    • 2. Continue to train staff on Self-Employment policy
    • 3. Continue to refine and implement a Business Plan Committee charged with reviewing and approving proposed self-employment business plans (based on feasibility and viability)

    I.C Outcomes: Increased Self Employment Outcomes 2013 Target 50 2013 Outcome 33

    Outcome Comment: Due to a large number of unsuccessful self-employment plans and ongoing success shortcomings of previous self-employment outcomes VR’s self-employment process was revised in 2011. Our new policy focused on thorough planning and business sustainability post closure. This focus has resulted in less clients opting to pursue self-employment. VR continues to monitor our policy and practice and will revise as part of continuing improvement process.

    Additional Outcome Comments:

    • Business Plan Committee met monthly during 2013. The committee reviewed 37 plans during this time period.

    Goal I Objective D (I.D) Increase the number of adults with significant disabilities who are employed. I.D Strategies

    • 1. Increase the number of supported employment clients obtaining employment outcomes
    • 2.Pilot Ticket to Work/Partnership Plus with the ODDS and continue to work with DHS to establish it as a TTW "employment network" in order to fund services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, psychiatric disabilities and traumatic brain injuries
    • 3. Continue to collaborate with Addictions and Mental Health Division in implementing and expanding evidence-based supported employment
    • 4. Continue to utilize training from the Oregon Center for Excellence on Supported Employment for individuals with psychiatric disabilities
    • 5. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities
    • 6. Continue to partner with the ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:
      • Identifying policy gaps and developing revised policy to address gaps
      • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions
      • Recommending needed legislative changes
    • 7. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:
      • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan
      • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems
      • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data
      • Recommending needed legislative changes
    I.D Outcomes Increase Number of SSI/SSDI Recipients with Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2013 Target 590 2013 Outcome 539

    Increase the Number of Employment Outcomes for Supported Employment Clients (Indicator 1.4) 2013 Target 238 2013 Outcome 290

    Increase Percent of Supported Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2013 Target 56% 2013 Outcome 44%

    Outcome Comment: During 2013 the number of referral sources for Supported Employment cases increased dramatically. Without previous VR knowledge or partnership, some of these referrals were not clients who were motivated to go to work or were not ready to go to work. In addition to this, we are questioning the information entered by counselors in the field around supported employment. Often times counselors do not know the need for or level of supports for a client to be successful at time of plan when this data is collected. The result appears to be that some clients who are supported employment clients are not recorded as such. VR continues to look at this outcome.

    Implemented ODDS-VR MOU and authorized ODDS-VR charter See I.B Implemented ODDS-ODE-VR MOU and Charter See I.B Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes See I.B

    Increase Employment Outcomes for Working Age Adults with Development Disabilities*

    2013 Target 400 2013 Outcome 370

    *Persons 18-64 y/o with autism, cerebral palsy, intellectual and/or congenital disability

    Additional Outcome Comments:

    • Worked with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) and 12 community mental health programs to on TTW/Partnership Plus to obtain TTW reimbursements for these programs.
    • Collaborated with Addictions and Mental Health, community mental health programs and OSECE to refine and expand the availability of evidence based mental health supported employment services.
    • VR participated in quarterly OSECE Advisory Council meetings and annual IPS fidelity reviews.

    Goal I Objective E (I.E) Increase the participation of and outcomes for individuals from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities

    I.E Strategies:

    • 1. Continue to contract with Latino Project in Portland and Salem metro areas and Woodburn, and explore feasibility of expanding elsewhere
    • 2. Continue to support, collaborate with and provide technical assistance (TA) to the 121 programs of the Confederated tribes of Grande Ronde and Warm Springs; initiate support, collaboration and provision of TA to new 121 programs of the Klamath, Umatilla and Siletz tribes
    • 3. Continue to recruit bicultural and bilingual staff
    • 4.Identify additional opportunities to outreach to cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities who are potential clients
    • 5.Ensure linguistic access to services through the use of interpreters, translators and bilingual materials
    • 6.Work with Department of Human Services’ Office of Equity to identify and address barriers to employment faced by individuals with disabilities who are cultural, ethnic or linguistic minorities
    • 7.Provide culturally competent services
    I.E Outcomes:

    Increase Number of minority Clients Served (Indicator 1.2) 2013 Target 1,500 2013 Outcome 1,461

    Increase Percent of Minority Clients Obtaining Employment (Indicator 1.2) 2013 Target 55% 2013 Outcome 58%

    Additional Outcome Comments:

    • The Latino Project began expansion efforts beyond Central and North Portland, Salem and Woodburn to Clackamas County, Washington County and the Gresham area. LP had a 71% Rehabilitation in SFY13, 49 achieved employment outcomes
    • VR provided technical assistance and staff training to the tribal programs. VR sponsored and participated in the 2013 Consortia of Administrators for Native American Rehabilitation Conference in Portland.
    • Planned, sponsored, and held NW Symposium on Rehabilitation and Deafness.
    • Continued to:
      • Recruit bilingual, bicultural staff.
      • Coordinate with the WOU Deafness Rehabilitation program
      • Partner with the Immigrants and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO), which provides assistance to 30 ethnic refugee and immigrant groups in the Portland metropolitan area. VR field offices provided trainings to IRCO and worked with an IRCO job developer network.
      • Sponsor and participate in annual two-day Options for Success Conference in Southern Oregon for VR professionals, disability providers and persons with disabilities and their families.
      • Implement a videophone pilot with DHS; implemented FM loop technology in all offices to facilitate linguistic access for staff and clients;
      • Collaborate with Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services for provision of ASL interpreters, text based service providers and coordination of services.
      • Use training materials specific to identification of functional limitations experienced by Deaf and Hard of Hearing consumers and distributed them statewide.
      • Support three VR VRCs serving on statewide and local boards for the Hearing Loss Association of Oregon.
      • Use bilingual/bicultural interns in targeted VR branches
      • Publish VR informational materials in multiple languages.

    Goal I Objective F (I.F): Maintain and develop connections to programs and services that assist clients obtain and maintain employment outcomes

    I.F Strategies:

    • 1. Continue targeted Work Readiness Alternatives Workshop programs as funding permits
    • 2. Continue to work with Independent Living Centers to identify services that support and improve employment outcomes
    • 3. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans, in accordance with HB 2403 (2011)

      I.F Outcomes:

      Contracts in Place for Work Readiness Alternatives Workshops Continued to contract with lane County and Medford area WRAW programs. Other areas of the state use various other programs to address work readiness.

      Maintain Number of Contracts VR Branches Have with Independent Living Centers to provide Services 2013 Target 7 2013 Outcome 7 Additional Outcome Comments:

      • Continued to collaborate with Oregon Commission for the Blind and the State Independent Living Council to provide IL services that overcome barriers to employment.
      • CIL and local VR offices worked together to create local partnerships that addressed barriers to employment for common clients.
      • Independent Living (IL) staff provided information about Centers for Independent Living (CIL) services including employment-related services, at VR’s 2013 In-Service Conference
      Goal I Objective G (I.G): Refine, administer and sustain a statewide work incentives planning system (WIN)

      I.G Strategies:

      • 1. Continue to provide work incentives/benefits planning services through 11 certified coordinators housed in six Centers for Independent Living throughout the state
      • 2. Continue to pursue policy option package and other options for funding WIN over the short and long-term
      • 3. Utilize a departmental work group to support implementation of WIN
      • 4. Continue to pursue funding to support the expansion of work incentives/benefits planning coordinators in high schools to targeted transition age youth
      • 5. Continue to provide training to staff on WIN
      • 6. Provide training to 121 tribal programs on the work incentives planning system and new Social Security Ticket to Work regulations
      • 7.Continue to provide training and outreach on work incentives to parents, caregivers of persons with significant disabilities
      • 8.Continue to evaluate effectiveness of WIN in increasing employment outcomes and reducing dependency on public benefits, and utilize results in making case for WIN
      • 9.Continue to partner with Disability Rights Oregon’s Work Incentives and Planning Assistance (WIPA) program in providing work incentives/benefits planning services(subject to continuation of WIPA)
      I.G Outcomes: Submit Policy Options Package Given the state budget, the department did not submit a policy option package this year.

      Percent of SSI/SSDI Employments that Meet SGA at Closure (indicator 1.6) 2013 Target 25% 2013 Outcome 22%

      Number of Work Incentives System Referrals Who Become VR Applicants: 2013 Target 225 2013 Outcome N/A

      Outcome Comments: In order to receive services from WIN a client must already be a VR client. This measure was written before that change and is no longer an informative measure.

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • WIN served 1,422 consumers in 2013.
      • VR continues to be the only funding source for WIN, but discussions about funding for benefits planning services for MH and ID/DD supported employment programs continues at DHS.
      • In 2013, the WIN program made the transition from a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant program to a solely VR funded program.
      • WIN developed a web-based training and certification program for new WICS
      • WIN conducted ten day-long trainings around the state with over 226 partners attending. 36% of the attendees were from mental health supported employment programs, 32% were from intellectual/developmental disabilities support programs, 17% were from VR, 5% housing, 6% Independent Living Centers, and the rest were parents, YTP representatives, and others.
      • The free training is held quarterly throughout the state and open to anyone. WIN has created a listserv to promote the training to various programs including 121 tribal programs, ID/DD and MH, YTP, and parent support groups.
      • WIN staff made numerous presentations on WIN and work incentives/benefits counseling to VR, mental health and intellectual/developmental disability counselors and case managers, school transition staff, housing, and others at the OSECE conference, Southern Oregon’s Options for Success Conference, and various community meetings around the state. WIN staff regularly visit state VR offices, Oregon Commission for the Blind, mental health programs and other partners providing information where requested.
      • Memorandum of Understanding was signed between Disability Rights Oregon/WIPA program and VR/WIN in August 2013. WIN partnered for training during a WIN-In-Service in August to learn about ACA and its impact on Medicaid, TANF, and Housing

      Goal I Objective H (I.H): Provide assistive technology (AT) services and devices needed statewide by clients at each stage of the VR process

      I.H Strategies:

      • 1. Continue to collaborate with Access Technologies, Inc. (ATI) to provide AT services and devices needed by clients at each stage of the VR process
      • 2. Collaborate with ATI loan program to increase the availability of existing and emerging AT tools that facilitate employment

      I.H Outcomes: Fulfillment of Contract Deliverables: VR purchased over 428 devices and services through ATI in FFY 2013, including hearing, vision, cognitive and orthotic devices.

      Goal I Objective I (I.I): Improve access and quality of services for Deaf and hard of hearing persons

      I.I Strategies:

        1.Continue to participate in DHS pilot for videophones/video relay interpreting
      • 2. Increase the number of staff with American Sign Language skills
      • 3. Continue statewide coordination of services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons
      • 4. Provide outreach to the Deaf and hard of hearing persons
      • 5. Explore how accessibility of job development services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons may be increased

      I.I Outcomes: Increase the Number of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Persons with Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2013 Target 325 2013 Outcome 360

      Increase the Number of Transition age Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth with Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2013 Target 26 2013 Outcome 25

      Goal I Objective J (I.J): Enhance coordination with workforce partners and vocational rehabilitation programs so that people with disabilities have better access and are better prepared for employment

      I.J. Strategies:

      • 1.Continue participation in the Workforce Policy Cabinet
      • 2.Continue to collaborate with workforce partners to provide training and technical assistance to Oregon’s workforce regions in developing, implementing and updating Resource Sharing Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding
      • 3. Continue to assess the training needs of workforce partners located in Employment Department offices and One-stops at the local level and provide training as appropriate
      • 4.Increase the number of cases co-staffed with workforce partners
      • 5. Ensure staff are aware of workforce system resources including training resources
      • 6. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across the state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans, in accordance with HB 2403 (2011)

      I.J Outcomes

      Updated Resource Sharing Agreements and MOU’s

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • VR continued to participate in the WPC with leaders from the other Oregon Workforce System. As part of the WPC VR assisted the governor’s office in exploring ways to redesign the Workforce System to make it more efficient.
      • As part of the Workforce System, VR works locally with One-Stop systems to ensure that staff there are prepared to provide services to VR clients
      • VR staff continued to collaborate with local workforce system partners on a case by case basis, when appropriate, and when services such as labor market research, resume writing, and interview skills practice were available.
      • VR field staff provided clients who are veterans with info about resources available to them through the Employment Department, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon and other agencies and programs.
      Goal I Objective K (I.K): Increase the availability and quality of job development services I.K. Strategies:
      • 1. Monitor and evaluate performance of staff and contract job development services
      • 2.Continue job development training and coaching
      • 3.Continue to implement and refine outcome based payment system for job development services
      • 4.Continue to refine job development vendor report system
      • 5. Complete development of and utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes, such as living wage, health benefits and advancement
      • 6. Review rollout of job development services to special populations, identify any needed adjustments or refinements, and implement
      I.K Outcomes: Job Development Report Card Job Development Report card was developed

      Increased Quality Job Development Outcomes (establish baseline with report card, set targets therafter)

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • EOP II (Employment Outcomes Professional II) was offered monthly at various sites around the state in FFY2013. Two additional staff members were added as EOP II trainers in FFY 2013 and will assist in 2014.

      Goal II: Increase the number of youth who seek VR services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for this population. Goal II Objective A (II.A): Increase the number of transition age youth (14-24) who obtain employment outcomes II.A Strategies:

      • 1. Continue transition job fairs in partnership with Oregon Commission for the Blind, governmental units, business groups and others
      • 2. Continue Youth Transition Program through development and implementation of YTP biennial agreements with local school districts. Address Order of Selection as needed
      • 3. Develop and implement strategy to engage select local YTP programs and VR branches in providing transition services to students earlier in the academic process
      • 4. Continue implementation of Project Access, a grant opportunity to demonstrate a new youth transition service model, which engages students at an earlier age and earlier in the academic process
      • 5. Continue collaboration with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities
      • 6. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth
      • 7. Continue to provide funding for Oregon RISE Center’s annual statewide Building Futures Conference on transition
      • 8.Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities
      • 9. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:
        • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps
        • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions
        • Recommending needed legislative changes
      • 10. Continue to implement the charter and memorandum of understanding with the ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:
        • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan
        • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems
        • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data
        • Recommending needed legislative changes
      II.A Outcomes: Increase Number of Transition Age Youth Served 2013 Target 1850 2013 Outcome 2051

      Increase Percent of Transition Age Youth Obtaining an Employment Outcome (Indicator 1.1) 2013 Target 58% 2013 Outcome 58%

      Increase Percent od Transition Age Youth Who Obtain a Post-Secondary Degree or Certificate and Obtain Successful Closure (Indicator 1.2)

      2013 Target 82% 2013 Outcome 62%

      Outcome Comment: Nationally high school graduates are finding themselves less and less prepared for the rigors of post-secondary education often requiring terms of remedial classes before moving onto core college classes. Oregon high school graduates are consistent with the national trend. This has had a negative impact on this outcome measure and one that VR continues to be concerned about.

      Implemented ODDS-VR MOU and authorized ODDS-VR charter See I.B Implemented ODDS-ODE-VR MOU and Charter See I.B Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes See I.B

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • VR co-sponsored “Tapping Fresh Talent” job fair. This was carried out in partnership with VR’s Employer Services Coordinator, FACT, and Incight Inc., under a contract for the fairs and other employer engagement services.
      • In 2013 Oregon Rise Inc.’s contract was pulled when the agency temporarily closed. A new contract was signed with FACT and they sponsored a statewide Transition Fair.
      • Collaborated with EAST project to minimize unemployment of young people with early psychosis
      • Outreach to EAST sites included partner meetings with YTP staff and the implementation of referral process from YTP to EAST.
      • Planned and delivered joint YTP/VR/EAST training.
      • Continued to partner with and support Project Employ.
      • Continued to collaborate with Oregon’s 13 services and supports “brokerages” for individuals with IDDs in assisting individuals pursuing employment outcomes

      Goal II Objective B (II.B): Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and hours worked II.B Strategies:

      • 1.Continue to implement, evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative
      • 2. Complete development of and initiate utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes, such as living wage, health benefits and advancement
      • 3. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies
      • 4. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities
      • 5. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:
        • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps
        • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implement agreed upon solutions
        • Recommending needed legislative changes
      • 6. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:
        • Refining and implementing the governance structure and project plan for the MOU and charter
        • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems
        • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of agreed upon data
        • Recommending needed legislative changes

      II.B Outcomes:

      Increase Average Wage (indicators 1.3 and 1.5) 2013 Target $9.50 2013 Outcome $9.59

      Increase Percent with Employer Paid Benefits 2013 Target 10% 2013 Outcome 9%

      Increase Number of Hours Worked 2013 Target 25 2013 Outcome 23

      Job Development Report Card See I.K

      Implemented ODDS-VR MOU and authorized ODDS-VR charter See I.B Implemented ODDS-ODE-VR MOU and Charter See I.B Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes See I.B

      Goal II Objective C (II.C) : Increase the number of youth with more significant disabilities who receive services

      II.C Strategies:

      • 1. Continue to partner with ODDS to provide training and technical assistance to community-based developmental disability programs
      • 2. Arrange for training through the internal resources and the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education center to address training needs specific to this population
      • 3. Establish DHS as an SSA Ticket to Work ‘Employment Network’ in order to fund ongoing support services for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities
      • 4. Continue collaboration with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities
      • 5. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/ developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth
      • 6. Continue to provide funding for Oregon RISE Center’s annual statewide Building Futures Conference on transition
      • 7. Initiate planning and preparation for anticipated increased federal funding for expanded transition services and submission of a related grant proposal
      • 8. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities
      • 9. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:
        • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps
        • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions
        • Recommending needed Legislative changes
      • 10. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:
        • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan
        • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems
        • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data
        • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions
      II.C Outcomes:

      Increase Number of Students who are SSI/SSDI Recipients who Obtain an Employment Outcome (Indicator 1.4) 2013 Target 160 2013 Outcome 134

      Increase the Number if Students in Supported Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4) 2013 Target 100 2013 Outcome 107

      Implemented ODDS-VR MOU and authorized ODDS-VR charter See I.B Implemented ODDS-ODE-VR MOU and Charter See I.B Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes See I.B

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • Continued to partner with Project Employ to ensure dissemination of knowledge of available services for transition age I/DD students.
      • In 2013 Oregon Rise Inc.’s contract was pulled when the agency temporarily closed. A new contract was signed with FACT and they sponsored a statewide Transition Fair.
      • VR continued its partnership with EASA

      Goal II Objective D (II.D): Improve partnerships with education agencies at the state and local level

      II.D Strategies:

      • 1. Continue to partner with ODE, University of Oregon, and Oregon school districts to carry out the Youth Transition Program, restructured as needed to address Order of Selection limitations
      • 2.Continue to participate in the Work Group with the Commission for the Blind and Oregon
      • 3. Community Colleges in order to exchange information and address concerns
      • 4. Continue to participate on State Advisory Council for Special Education and other transition related committees
      • 5. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with the ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities
      • 6.Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:
        • Identifying policy gaps and developing revised policy to address gaps
        • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions
        • Recommending needed Legislative changes
      • 7. Continue to implement a charter and MOU with the ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:
        • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure
        • Implementing agreed upon solutions to identified barriers and problems
        • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through data tracking and analysis
        • Recommending needed legislative changes

      II.D Outcomes: Maintain Number of Youth Transition Program Sites 2013 Target 39 2013 Outcome 39

      Implemented ODDS-VR MOU and authorized ODDS-VR charter See I.B Implemented ODDS-ODE-VR MOU and Charter See I.B Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes See I.B

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • Continued to partner with ODE, U of O and Oregon education school districts, consortia and schools to carry out YTP
      • YTP had a rehabilitation rate of 74%
      • YTP Coordinator represented VR on SACSE at quarterly meetings

      Goal II Objective E (II.E): Increase the awareness and understanding of transition among youth and their parents, teachers, and disability advocates and professionals

      II.E Strategies:

      • 1. Work with the local and state level advisory boards to Project Access to identify opportunities to increase awareness and understanding of transition issues
      • 2. Co-sponsor and participate in annual transition conference
      • 3. Educate VR staff, DHS partners, education staff and parents of youth in transition about services available to transition youth, including supported employment
      • 4. Explore supporting family-to-family training on transition, such as that provided through OCDD and RISE

      II.E. Outcomes: Increase Number of Transition Age Youth Served 2013 Target 1850 2013 Outcome 2051

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • Sponsored, supported and participated in 2013 Annual Youth Transition Conference in Hood River. Over 200 educators and vocational rehabilitation and allied professionals attended.
      • YTP Coordinator and YTP counselors continued to educate staff, partners and other stakeholders about transition services, including supported employment, through VR’s annual in-service conference, local planning and school board meetings, transition conferences and provision of case specific technical assistance.

      Goal II Objective F (II.F): Increase the participation of and outcomes for youth from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities and Deaf and hard of hearing youth

      II.F Strategies:

      • 1. Ensure linguistic access through the use of bilingual staff, interpreters and translated materials
      • 2. Identify opportunities to outreach to potential cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minority clients with disabilities
      • 3. Provide culturally competent services
      • 4. Develop a strategy for increasing participation and positive outcomes for Deaf and hard of hearing youth

      II.F Outcomes: Interpreters Available 100% of the Time When Requested 2013 Target 100% 2013 Outcome 100%

      Goal III: Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities.

      Goal III Objective A (III.A): Increase understanding awareness, and interest of Oregon’s businesses in employing people with disabilities

      • 1. Continue to promote employment of persons with disabilities on a business to business basis through dedicated business partnerships
      • 2. Continue to partner with the Oregon Commission for the Blind, CSAVR and others in implementing and coordinating employer engagement strategies
      • 3. Continue to work with the Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to VR counseling staff
      • 4. Continue implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes (EEO) Initiative
      • 5. Inform and educate employers about benefits of employing persons with disabilities
      • 6. Provide disability awareness education and training to businesses and employer as "value added services"
      III.A Outcomes: Increase Numbers of Job Referrals from Business and Employer Related Sources: 2013 Target 60 2013 Outcome 312

      Additional Outcome Comments:

      • Contracted with the Incight, Inc. to carry out Live Resume, job fair and career day events and internship programs.
      • Partner with OCB, and Incight Inc., in implementing employer engagement activities, and educating employers about incentives for employing persons with disabilities
      • Over 57 employers participated in Disability Awareness and Accommodation Seminars

      Goal III. Objective B (III.B): Improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

      III.B Strategies:

      • 1. Continue to participate in Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation’s National Employment Network (VR-NET)
      • 2. Expand partnerships with businesses and employers to gain and increase access of VR clients to business and employer job application pools and maintain existing partnerships
      • 3. Continue to work with Department of Human Services and City of Portland in becoming and serving as model employers for people with disabilities

      III.B Outcomes:

      Increase Number of Employment Outcomes from VR-NET 2013 Target 25 2013 Outcome 0

      Outcome Comments: VR Net was initially a helpful resource in engaging with employers and developing tools to do so. However, since the majority of employers coming through VR-NET are federal agencies that are not large employers in Oregon and east-coast private businesses, historically outcomes have been lower than expected. In 2013, VR focused on local Oregon employers using the lessons learned from working with VR-Net in the past. We expanded our employer outreach in this area. This change of direction appears to be getting us better and more consistent outcomes. GOAL IV: Continually improve the management of the program while ensuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy.

      Goal IV Objective A (IV .A): Build upon current data analysis to conduct ongoing program evaluation

      IV.A Strategies:

      • 1.Pursue technical assistance from RSA, as needed
      • 2.Use Caseload Status Indicator (CSI) reports and file reviews to identify and target training and technical assistance provided to the field
      • 3. Use CSI reports, file review and performance data to target management focus for field staff supervision
      • 4. Continue to learn and implement Lean Daily Management tools, including but not limited to huddles, visual boards, Continuous Improvement and project management

      IV.A Outcomes: Decrease the Number of Errors Cited by RSA in Yearly 911 Reports 2013 Target: 40 2013 Outcome N/A

      Goal IV Objective B (IV.B): Develop and implement those systems and processes necessary to maximize utilization of Social Security’s Ticket to Work Program

      IV.B Strategies:

      • 1. Update Ticket to Work manual as needed
      • 2.Train VR field staff on Ticket to Work processes and procedures as needed
      • 3. Pilot Partnership Plus with Office of Developmental Disability Services’ Employment First sites

          IV.B Outcomes: Maximize Ticket to Work Reimbursements: 2013 Target $ 900,000 2013 Outcome $1,463,000

          Goal IV Objective C (IV.C): Minimize risks and liabilities in the administration of the program

          IV.C Strategies:

          • 1. Continue to implement feedback loop for client file reviews that strengthens accountability and supports corrective action
          • 2. Continue to review and revise rules, policies, and procedures as needed
          • 3. Pursue technical assistance from RSA on fiscal management, contracting and performance based contracting for program and department staff
          • 4. Build revenue plan for 2013-15 biennium
          • 5. Revise Business Review protocol to align with DHS protocol

          IV.C Outcome: No Audit Findings 2013 Target: 0 2013 Outcome 0

          Accurate Fiscal Reports All fiscal reports were accurate

          GOAL V: Ensure a Highly Trained Workforce at Every Level of the Organization

          Goal V Objective A (V.A): Ensure staff have the skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency

          V.A Strategies:

          • 1.Train all staff on new iterations of ORCA as they are developed and installed online
          • 2. Require all new counseling staff to complete Counselor Training within three months of hire
          • 3. Require all staff to complete Values and Ethics Training
          • 4. Require all new staff to complete EEO job development and motivational intervention training
          • 5. Train all staff on cultural competency and diversity
          • 6. Develop, implement agency and branch diversity plans
          • 7. Provide continuing training to new and existing staff on VR new policy manual and new and revised rules, policies and technical assistance guides as developed and implemented
          • 8. Implement DHS Leadership and Performance Feedback model

          V.A Outcomes:

          Reduction in Number of Negative RSA Review Findings 2013 Target: 0 2013 Outcome: N/A

          Additional Outcome Comments:

          • Two new iterations ORCA were implemented in 2013. Staff were trained on these new iterations.
          Goal V Objective B (V.B): Increase staff knowledge in targeted areas

          V.B Strategies:

          • 1. Completion of Training Needs Assessment
          • 2. Refinement of training plan based on findings of Training Needs Assessment and Comprehensive Needs Assessment
          • 3. Staff participation in training relevant to brain injury; autism; Deafness and hearing loss; working with individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities and psychiatric disabilities; and person-centered planning; and/or training to address training needs identified through the trainings needs assessment and training plan
          • 4. VR In-Service Conference
          • 5. Collaborate with relevant stakeholders to maximize training opportunities and resources
          V.B Outcome: Completed Training Needs Assessment and Training Plan: VR management utilized inputs including state plan and agency goals and priorities/objectives, program and staff performance needs and staff input to identify needed training and plan training activities. Internal and External Training Opportunities to Address Identified Training Needs Needed trainings identified and provided..

          Goal V Objective C (V.C) : Continue to recruit to meet the Rehab Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and VR specific skill needs

          V.C. Strategies:

          • 1. Continue to work with Department of Human Services, Office of Human Resources in recruiting staff
          • 2. Recruit, as possible, at conferences and events
          • 3. Support career advancement within the program
          • 4. Continue participation in Center for Continuing Education Leadership Academy
          • 5. Continue participation with TACE advisory meetings
          • 6. Continue to utilize Department of Human Services’ and Department of Administrative Services’ leadership trainings
          • 7. Provide, as appropriate and feasible, out-of-class work opportunities for staff at every level of the organization
          • 8. Continue succession planning and retention activities
          • 9. Increased use of distance learning and development of internal capacity to provide distance learning
          • 10.Increased development and acquisition of model materials and practices
          • 11. Mentoring of managers and staff

          V.C. Outcomes: Applicant Pools Whose Skills, Education, and Experience Align with CSPD Goals and Specific Skill Needs.

          Additional Outcome Comments:

          • Continued to recruit with DHS/OHR and utilize DHS, DAS leadership training.
          • Management and field are active participants in DHS Transformation initiative and have individual Employee Development Plans.
          • Continued support career advancement and out of class work opportunities
          • Continued to participate in TACE advisory meetings
          • Participated in the Aspiring Leaders Program
          • Continue to utilize DHS and DAS trainings
          • New managers and staff are assigned mentors to help with transition to new roles.

           

          For details on VR’s supported employment goals, objectives, strategies, and outcomes and factors that impeded achievement of these see the following in Text Box 1: Goal 1

          • Objective B Strategies 5,6,7
          • Objective D Strategies 1,2,3,4,5
          • Objective G Strategies 1,7
          • Objective K Strategies 1,2,3,4,6

          Goal II

          • Objective A Strategies 5,6,7
          • Objective B Strategies 4,5,6
          • Objective C Strategies 1-10
          • Objective D Strategies 4,5,6,7
          • Objective E Strategies 1,2,3,4

          See also Attachment 6.3

           

          STANDARDS AND INDICATORS In FFY 2013 VR successfully exceeded all of our federal standards and indicators. This is an accomplishment that VR and our partners are very proud to have achieved. Federal Indicator: 1.1 Change in employment outcomes

          • Federal Standard: 2033
          • VR Performance: 2331
          Federal Indicator: 1.2 Percent of employment outcomes
          • Federal Standard: 55.80%
          • VR Performance: 59.8%
          Federal Indicator: 1.3 Competitive employment
          • Federal Standard: 72.6%
          • VR Performance: 88.1%
          Federal Indicator: 1.4 Significant disability
          • Federal Standard: 62.4%
          • VR Performance: 96.5%
          Federal Indicator: 1.5 Earnings ratio
          • Federal Standard:.52
          • VR Performance: .56
          Federal Indicator: 1.6 Self support
          • Federal Standard: 53
          • VR Performance: 71.3
          Federal Indicator: 2.1 Access to services for minorities
          • Federal Standard: .80
          • VR Performance: .975

           

          See the following, including outcomes, in Text Box 1: Goal I

          • Objective A, Strategies 1, 2, 4, 5
          • Objective B, Strategies 1, 2
          • Objective D, Strategy 2
          • Objective E, Strategy 1
          • Objective G, Strategy 2
          • Objective I, Strategy 1

          Goal II

          • Objective A, Strategies 4, 5, 6
          • Objective B, Strategies 1, 2

          Goal III

          • Objective A, Strategy 4

          This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 6:08PM by saorhaund

          Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

          • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
          • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

          OVERVIEW Supported employment (SE) is a major VR focus. VR’s SE program provides opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment in integrated settings with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR continues to work closely with other divisions and offices within the Department of Human Services (DHS), local governmental units, community-based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon.

          The new plan cycle will increase VR’s focus on supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. VR has long partnered with Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) in providing supported employment to adults. (AMH is the state program responsible for overseeing Oregon’s public mental health system.) Oregon’s early implementation of the Affordable Care Act has resulted in the inclusion of Individual Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence-based supported employment model long supported by VR, in the state’s recently established Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs). The CCOs are responsible for coordinating and overseeing delivery of health and mental health services provided under the Oregon Health Plan (Medicaid). The incorporation of IPS creates both an opportunity and a challenge for VR as it works to develop relationships with the CCOs, which presently number 16.

          VR continues to work with Mid-Valley Behavioral Health to build an employment service delivery model for youth enrolled in the Early Assessment, Screening and Treatment project, an evidence-based practice model for treating youth experiencing their first psychotic or depressive episode. For more on VR’s mental health supported employment activities, see below.

          The Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), the program that oversees and supports Oregon’s public system of services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, adopted an Employment First policy in 2008. Under this policy, first consideration is given to employment in developing services and supports for working age individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities (I/DD). VR has been a critical partner in implementing this policy. Some of the outcomes of implementing Employment First have included identification of the need for more service providers with the skills to serve individuals with I/DDs who experience more significant functional limitations; the need to align and streamline the transition process; the need to identify and implement best practices; the need for sustainable funding for benefits planning services; and the need for effective engagement strategies for youth and their families. VR’s 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment confirmed these needs.

          In FFY 2013, DDS, the Department of Education and VR developed an MOU and work plan for carrying out activities in support of the Employment First policy. VR and ODDS also updated their existing MOU. For more on the policy, see below. In January 2012, Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), the state’s protection and advocacy system, filed suit in United States District Court alleging that the State violated the ADA rights of a group of individuals by not providing them with access to supported employment services. This suit followed an earlier finding by the Court that Olmstead decision extended to employment. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Justice joined the lawsuit against the state. On April 10, 2013, Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber issued an Executive Order 13-04, consistent with ODDS’ Employment First policy. The order calls for the following:

          Improving Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and state…the Department of Human Services and Oregon Department of Education shall work to further improve Oregon’s system of designing and delivering employment services to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and increase investment in employment services.

          The complete Executive Order can be read at: http://www.oregon.gov/gov/docs/executive_orders/eo_13-04.pdf

          QUALITY OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES In general, the quality of a VR SE plan is evaluated to ensure that it complies with defining criteria of SE:

          • Work is performed in an integrated setting that provides regular interactions with individuals who do not have disabilities, other than caregivers.
          • The individual is receiving a wage commensurate with non-disabled workers doing the same work.
          • The ongoing support needs and sources of support have been identified and secured.
          • Supported employment services provided to clients are for the maximum number of hours possible, based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.
          • Clients and employer are satisfied with placements.
          Historically, VR has partnered with AMH in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence-based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a scale, which measures the ’fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance with the program’s design. Some of the measures used in the IPS fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. VR maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and AMH central office staff.

          SCOPE OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES (AND EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION) In federal year 2013, VR provided SE services to 1,414 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 290 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive employment, and 473 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs.

          Supported Employment for Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities VR continues to work to make evidence-based mental health SE services available throughout Oregon.

          Background VR’s efforts in this area were initiated 14 years ago, when its field offices in the Portland metropolitan area and Grants Pass in southern Oregon began collaborating with AMH, local mental health programs and Portland State University to provide evidence-based SE services (IPS) to individuals with psychiatric disabilities served by VR.

          In 2002, VR and AMH sought to expand the availability of evidence-based mental health SE services and initiated a project in Jackson, Douglas and Polk counties with Options of Southern Oregon, a community-based mental health provider. This project was aided by a three year grant from Dartmouth University/Johnson & Johnson Community Mental Health Project to implement IPS.

          Although the Johnson & Johnson grant funding ended in 2005, VR and AMH continued to support the efforts of Options and Life Works. This same year, VR initiated the Oregon Competitive Employment Project (OCEP), funded by a multi-year Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) awarded to VR. OCEP – a cross-cutting, cross-agency initiative tasked with identifying and addressing systemic barriers to employment of persons with disabilities – subsequently identified expansion of SE services as one of its primary objectives. Over the ensuing eight years, AMH, VR and OCEP worked to increase the number of community mental health programs providing evidence-based supported employment from the original three. This was initially done through mini-grants and provision of training and technical assistance. In 2008, AMH, VR and OCEP prompted the creation and provided funding for the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) to provide training, technical assistance and other support on a continuing basis.

          Recent to Current Activities A primary VR focus continues to be on expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR and OCEP continue to partner with and utilize OSECE in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of the end of federal year 2013, 21 community mental health programs in 29 counties were providing such services. Recently, the Oregon Health Authority decided that CCOs will be responsible achieving IPS outcomes. As a result, evidence-based supported employment services should be available throughout Oregon in the foreseeable future.

          On a related basis, VR partners with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance (EASA) to assist youth with psychiatric disabilities in pursuing their desired employment goals. Through EASA, an evidence-based practice, clinical mental health teams seek to identify young people who are experiencing psychosis and provide them with the information, services and supports they need to continue on their life path. At present, 18 counties have an EASA team. In partnership with Portland State University, VR has helped create and works with a center for excellence that provides technical assistance to EASA teams throughout the state.

          Supported Employment for Persons with Developmental Disabilities VR partners with the Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) and others, including support services brokerages (DD brokerages), county case managers, rehabilitation service providers and advocates in providing SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

          The most significant and important development in this area in recent years has been DDS’s development, adoption and implementation of its Employment First policy. The Employment First policy was the result of a multi-year effort involving:

          • The leadership and commitment of DDS
          • The efforts of disability advocates, most notably Oregon’s Council on Development Disabilities
          • The continuing support and collaboration of VR and OCEP at both a state and local level
          VR’s focus over the last year has been on the implementation of the Governor’s Executive Order. The following activities occurred:

          • Review of program’s supported employment and supported self employment policies by Cary Griffin. Griffin is a nationally recognized expert on I/DD and supported employment, including self-employment
          • A I/DD track was developed for annual statewide in-service and included presentations by national experts on job carving/finding, customized employment and supported employment
          • A multi-year work plan was developed to support the implementation of the Governor’s Executive Order
          • Continued enhancement of the program’s performance based job development strategy to better meet the needs of individuals with developmental disabilities
          • Legislative approval for eight additional counselors to serve individuals experiencing IDD and a policy analysis.
          VR and DDS are actively partnering to expand the availability of SE services to persons with developmental disabilities through agency, partner, and staff participation in transformation, transition, and pilot activities, including:
          • Working with provider sites to build stronger community placement and assessment activities
          • Working with counties on seamless youth transition to community employment with a focus on developing best practices to implement around the state,
          • Working with eight cross discipline Employment First Teams to pilot SE employment activities with a focus on developing best practices to implement across the state.
          VR is in the process of revising its supported employment policy in order to facilitate the executive order. VR anticipates an aggressive agenda for FY 2015 that will include staff training; cross program training and team building with DDS and state’s I/DD system; and, piloting of new service delivery strategies for individuals with I/DD. The program will develop minimum qualifications, develop policy and establish a fee structure for job developers.

          DDS and VR have worked with the Department of Education to develop an MOU and charter for serving youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities as they transition from high school to employment or higher education. Going forward, the MOUs and charters will be implemented, data gathered and tracked to monitor the progress made.

          Supported Employment for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injuries VR continues to provide SE services to persons with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Using the Center for Disease Control estimates, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR) calculates that there are over 72,000 individuals in Oregon living with a brain injury; that each year over 17,000 individuals in the state will sustain a brain injury; and that over 8,500 of these individuals will sustain a short-term disability or more. VR continues to work with BIAOR to expand the availability of SE services to individual with TBI and related capacities and has supported or participated in BIAOR’s annual conferences in recent years.

          Other Supported Employment Developments and Activities VR continues to carry out other significant activities related to supported employment.

          • VR continues to support and operate the statewide Work Incentives Network (WIN) and continued its efforts to sustain WIN on a long-term basis by obtaining continuing funding. Through contract Work Incentive Coordinators (WICs) in Oregon’s Centers for Independent Living, WIN provides information, referral and planning services to persons with disabilities on the use of federal and state benefits and work incentives in order to assist them in achieving their employment goals. WIN’s WICs are trained, supported and overseen by a small WIN administrative unit that is a part of VR administration.

            Work incentives/benefits planning is an important element for many individuals who are utilizing or intend to utilize supported employment and data on benefits planning programs, including WIN, indicates that benefits planning is useful in facilitating employment. WIN was started by OCEP and funded jointly by VR and OCEP. But with the end of the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funding, VR assumed full responsibility for WIN.

            VR continues to seek a stable and continuing source of state funding for WIN.

          • Under VR’s Employment Network initiative, VR serves as a Ticket administrative unit and submits and tracks Tickets and collects and disburses Ticket reimbursements; while TTW qualified community mental health programs initiate and maintain contact with clients who are Ticket holders, ensure Tickets are assigned to VR, submit Ticket reimbursement claims, and promote evidence-based supported employment of persons with psychiatric disabilities with some or all of their TTW proceeds.

            Presently, 16 community mental health programs are participating in this effort with VR, up from 12 when VR initiated it in 2010. VR is continuing to explore the possibility of developing a similar arrangement with community I/DD programs.

          EXTENT OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long-term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow-along SE services.

          VR utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time-limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community-based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include:

          • Person centered planning
          • Community-based assessment
          • Job development
          • Job placement
          • On-site training for worker and/or co workers
          • Long-term support development
          • Other services and goods
          • Post employment services
          The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including:
          • AMH and community mental health programs
          • DDS community supports
          • County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages
          • Social Security work incentives
          • Employer-provided reasonable accommodations
          • Natural supports
          • Family or community sponsorship
          TIMING OF THE TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES Generally, VR will not exceed its 18-month in-plan status with an SE case. This 18-month time-line can be extended for exceptional circumstances, if the counselor and client jointly agree to the extension. Job coaching and/or on the job training supports are usually structured into a much shorter time-frame, with long-term extended services being built into the plan as quickly as possible to ensure ongoing success when VR involvement ends.

          This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 1:54PM by saorhaund