ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Published February 16, 2017.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Department of Human Services is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Human Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Director

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Director

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at https://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryPatricia McManaman

Title of SignatoryDirector of Human Services

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)07/07/2014

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2015Yes

Comments:

DHS-DVR provides the following written assurances, which commit DVR , to 1) establish a State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the act, as required in Section 101(a)(21)(ii), so that the DVR can work with the SRC to fulfill the responsibilities listed in Section 101(a)(21)(ii) no later than September 30, 2015; and conduct a comprehensive statewide needs assessment on a triennial basis, having last performed the statewide assessment in FY 2009-FY 2011 and reported in the FY 2012 State Plan Attachment 4.11(a) with the complete comprehensive statewide needs assessment submitted to RSA January 2011, as required by Section 101(a)(15)(A) of the act and 34 CFR 361.29. DVR will report the activities and results of the FY 2012-FY 2014 comprehensive statewide needs assessment in the FY 2016 State Plan, while conducting the FY 2015-FY 2017 comprehensive statewide needs assessment.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryPatricia Mcmanaman

Title of SignatoryDirector of Human Services

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)07/07/2014

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

The Hawaii State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is committed to the goals and objectives of Hawaii’s DVR Program as it is written in this FY2015 State Plan. The SRC is made up of 21 members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Hawaii State Senate. Members of the SRC consist of a majority of individuals with disabilities who are inclusive of; • one representative of the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC), who must be the chairperson or other designee of SILC; • at least one representative of a parent training and information center established pursuant to section 682(a) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; • at least one representative of the Client Assistance Program (CAP) established under 34 CFR Part 370, who must be the Director of or other individual recommended by CAP; • at least one qualified Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor with knowledge of and experience with vocational rehabilitation programs who serves as an ex officio, non-voting member of the council if employed by the designated State agency; • at least one representative of community rehabilitation program service providers; • four representatives of business, industry, and labor; • representatives of disability groups that include a cross section of (1) Individuals with physical, cognitive, sensory, and mental disabilities; and (2) Representatives of individuals with disabilities who have difficulty representing themselves or are unable due to their disabilities to represent themselves, current or former applicants for, or recipients of, vocational rehabilitation services; • at least one representative of the state educational agency responsible for the public education of students with disabilities who are eligible to receive services under this part and Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; • at least one representative of the State workforce investment board; • the director of the designated State unit as an ex officio, nonvoting member of the council; • employees of the designated State agency who may serve only as non-voting members of the council. The SRC has the following four (4) recommendations in FY2015 to complement DVR’s goals and priorities: I. Bridging efforts in the service of transitional youth programs between DVR and the Department of Education (DOE) special education program. The SRC continues to promote and develop partnerships with parents, committees, schools and the DOE to ensure the services needed for transition age youth are recognized, incorporated and utilized. DVR agrees that development of partnerships plays an integral role in the development of communication between DVR and DOE which will assist in increasing quality of services for Transition Age Youth (TAY’s). Development of plans and recommendations for the implementation of work experience and summer youth programs within DVR and DOE/SPED will be discussed during the regularly scheduled full Council and subcommittee meetings. In FY2014, the SRC, DVR and DOE personnel jointly identified representative(s) from the DOE/Special Education Advisory Council to be appointed as a SRC member. II. Development and approval of a SRC budget and full time staff person The SRC has determined the need for a full time staff person to enable the SRC members to fully complete the work of the council and ensure compliance with the regulations, according to the Federal Rehabilitation Act, as amended. In FY2014, the Council voted to have the Administrative subcommittee work with DVR to hire a full time SRC staff person. DVR agrees that the SRC needs a full time staff person and has funding for the position. a) In FY2014 the Administrative subcommittee developed a draft budget for the FTE staff position which was submitted to the DVR liaison for review and agreement. b) In FY2014 the Administrative subcommittee finalized the staff position qualifications and duties. It was agreed that the most expedient way to hire a qualified SRC staff person is via a contract with The City and County of Honolulu to be executed on or around October 1, 2014. III. In FY2013, the SRC voted to develop By-Laws for the council. The SCR members developed the By-Laws to further its ability to successfully comply with the Rehabilitation Act and the council’s responsibilities therein. In FY2014, with approval of DVR’s attorney general, the SRC unanimously approved the By-Laws which went into effect on January 17, 2014. DVR reviewed and is in agreement with the By-Laws. IV. The SRC actively supports the execution of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Developmental Disability Division (DDD) and DVR. The purpose of the MOU is (1) to improve the transition and collaboration of DDD and DVR services for their mutual clients; and (2) to increase the opportunities for developmentally disabled clients to engage in competitive employment. The draft of the MOU is currently being reviewed by the Department of Health and Department of Human Services staff. DVR agrees with the execution of the MOU with the DDD to improve transition services by increasing employment opportunities. The SRC advocated for and recruited a representative from the Developmental Disability Division/Department of Health, to ensure the working partnership and services of DDD and DVR remain strong. In FY2014 the Administrator from DDD was appointed and remains an active member on the SRC. The SRC meets regularly each quarter in partnership with DVR. At each meeting: • The SRC reviews, discusses and makes appropriate recommendations when necessary and continues to support the progress and goals of DVR. • The SRC continues to establish, recruit and maintain the federal requirement of fifteen (15) council members as listed in the federal regulations and Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. • Additionally the SRC maintains compliance with the Hawai’i statutes requiring 21 members for the council. • The SRC worked in coordination with DVR to develop, receive public comment, and determine the validity of the goals and priorities of the FY2015 State Plan. • The SRC in partnership with DVR approves of the updated and amended fee schedule for medical consultation within the agencies administrative rules and policies in FY2015. • The SRC supports DVR’s goals and priorities and continues to develop their own goals to share with DVR. • The SRC developed in coordination with DVR the FY2015 state plan and approves of the goals and priorities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 10 2014 1:49PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on May 2 2012 3:43PM by sahikeimk

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

Hawaii DVR has a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the University of Hawaii (UH) system. The UH system includes all the public institutions (university and community colleges) statewide. Because the agreement is with the system and not the individual institutions, only one MOA is needed. The agreement includes the roles and financial and programmatic responsibilities of both DVR and the UH, to include basics of common understandings. It was signed in April 2008 by the UH President and DHS Director (Interagency Agreement 3-17-08.) a. US Dept. of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance: To provide severely handicapped persons referred by DVR with unpaid work experience and training designed to assist them in acquiring skills and training which would enable or better equip them to compete for positions in the nations work force both public and private. However, based on client needs, the objectives of the unpaid work experience assignment is to teach good, basic work attitudes and habits, and to develop self-confidence in a work situation. b. US Navy Public Works and Consolidated Civilian Personnel Office: To provide severely handicapped persons referred by DVR with unpaid work experience and training designed to assist them in acquiring skills and training which would enable or better equip them to compete for positions in the nation’s public and private workforce. Additional objectives of the unpaid work experience assignments include teaching positive work attitudes and habits, and developing self-confidence in a work situation. c. Department of Health/Developmental Disabilities Division (DDD): The purpose of this agreement is to coordinate services so that eligible individuals with developmental disabilities will have the opportunity to obtain and maintain competitive employment. The DDD shall determine appropriate individuals, who are developmentally disabled, and refer them to DVR. We are finalizing a contract with DDD to provide Job Placement and Supported Employment services. d. Department of Health/Children with Special Needs Branch: The purpose of this agreement is to clarify responsibilities of the two agencies in serving disabled persons under the age of 21 who may be eligible for diagnostic, evaluation and restorative services from either agency. This agreement will provide for coordinated services and assure that all disabled persons under age 21 will get needed services. The agreement has been amended to include inter-agency policies and procedures regarding the supplemental Security Income-Disabled Children’s Program which was established in the Crippled children Services Branch in September 1978, as provided for under P.L. 94-566. e. Medicaid: The purpose of this agreement is to mobilize personnel and financial resources of both Divisions in order to provide vocational rehabilitation services to Department of Human Services eligible recipients so that they may achieve economic self-sufficiency. The agreement permits DVR to 1) use Medicaid as a payment resource for services to Medicaid eligible VR clients, 2) use Dental Consultant services, and 3) have access to Medicaid payment information in establishing DVR fee schedules. DVR does not have programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development. DVR does not use contracting programs.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 12:45PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The Department of Human Services and the Department of Education both have responsibilities to serve students with disabilities. As a condition of the receipt of Federal funds under Title 1, Part B of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Department of Human Services, is required to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the State Plan. A formal interagency agreement, which covers all four counties of Hawaii and the entire school system of Hawaii, with the Department of Education as the State educational agency will provide the following components: 1) Consultation and technical assistance to the Hawaii Department of Education in planning for the transition age youth (TAY) with disabilities; 2) Transition planning by personnel of the Department of Human Services and the Department of Education for TAY with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their Individualized Education Program under Section 614(d) under IDEA; 3) The roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and 4) Procedures for outreach to and identification of TAYs with disabilities who are in need of transition services. DVR will continue to provide consultation and technical assistance with DOE personnel in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including vocational rehabilitation services. DVR will continue to provide transition planning for students (ages 14-24, grades 9-12 or until exit), with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and will develop the IPE for students eligible for services who meet the Order of Selection criteria, prior to graduation or exit from High School. The DOE facilitates annual IEP meetings for every student receiving Special Education Services. Should there be an agreement with the IEP team to submit a referral to DVR; the DOE Transition Teacher will be responsible for submitting a referral for VR Services after the conclusion of the IEP meeting. Once the student is found eligible to receive VR Services, whenever possible, the VR Counselor will attend all annual IEP meetings at the request of the DOE. If the VR Counselor cannot attend the meeting, information will be provided to the family. The IEP meetings are facilitated by the DOE. At the IEP meeting, the VR Counselor provides an overview of the agency’s goal/mission, eligibility criteria, scope of services, rights/remedies, and other information specific to the student’s IPE. The VR Counselor also conducts a review of the student’s IPE and allows for any amendments upon the request of the IEP Team. DVR has representation on a variety of committees (Special Education Advisory Council, Developmental Disabilities Council, Children’s Community Council, Interagency Council, and State Rehabilitation Council) that enables parents and members of the community to collect information and provide input for VR services with the transition population. DVR serves on the Transition Committee of the Special Education Advisory Council. The committee’s purpose is to develop recommendations on policy changes, best practices, and address on-going concerns for the Department of Education/Special Education Section. This committee also submits testimony to various legislative committees throughout the Hawaii Legislative Session. As stated in the FY 2013 State Plan, DVR will also assist students with employment planning. DVR, in joint cooperation with the DOE, will assist students, under the spirit of informed choice, in the development of their Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) as mentioned above. This plan will outline the provision of services, service providers, financial responsibilities, and the roles and responsibilities of each partnering agency. The partnering agencies will be responsible to provide qualified personnel responsible for provision of transition services. DVR will continue to provide procedures for outreach and identification of students with disabilities who are in need of transition services through VR counselors. Prior to the student exiting the DOE, the DOE is required to facilitate a final IEP meeting. The student’s Transition Plan is reviewed as part of the final IEP meeting, which includes a review of the IPE by the VR Counselor, student, student’s parents/ representatives, and other members of the IEP team. During this review, the student and/or student’s parents/representatives may request for any amendments to the IPE, which may include changes in the vocational goal, services, service providers, and terms/conditions of the provision of services. Should the student and/or parents/representatives decide to make no amendments to the IPE, all services listed on the IPE will continue as originally agreed upon. Nature and Scope of Joint Programming: (a) The Department of Human Services and DVR entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Hawaii Department of Education (DOE) to jointly administer and fund a transition program. The transition program for students with disabilities who were transitioning from school to work is called the “Special Education-Vocational Rehabilitation (SE-VR)” Work Study Program. The revised formal interagency agreement with the State Educational Agency (SEA) went into effect May, 5, 2014. The SE-VR Work Study Program provides the vocational opportunities and experiences to youth with disabilities who have been determined eligible for special education and vocational rehabilitation services. The SE-VR Work Study Program was designed to provide vocational orientation and programming to youth through VR focused classroom instruction, in-school work experiences and community-based work experiences to students with disabilities, while providing necessary disability-related supports. Through the program, DVR and DOE intend to increase the opportunities for vocational training and work experiences, while students are still in high school, in order to improve employment outcomes, wages earned and hours worked per week. The SE-VR Work Study Program is available statewide in all four counties in 43 out of 46 schools for students interested in employment experiences who are determined eligible for VR Services. Both DVR and DOE are equally responsible for the joint administration and implementation of the program, as well as administrative and supervisory control for the portion of programming specific to their own requirements. The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) agency maintains administrative control over the work study program. The VR agency determines eligibility of TAYs with disabilities referred for vocational rehabilitation services and SE-VR Work Study programming. The VR agency approves school program initiation requests and reviews all annual school reports and recommends continuation or termination of the program. VR counselors are responsible for consulting with school personnel and employers to determine services, as well as supports needed and the amount of wages earned per hour based on job duties and tasks performed. The VR agency approves and authorizes expenditures, as well as maintains internal controls, monitors and verifies expenditures of the SE-VR Work Study program. b) Services to be provided under this joint program: The special education teacher and the vocational rehabilitation counselor cooperatively will complete a work-study implementation plan for each student. The DOE shall be responsible for providing the most recent evaluations for the student with a disability including a psychological evaluation when initiating a referral to the vocational rehabilitation counselor. DVR will be responsible for assisting with identifying a work experience site and providing supports to the student during their work experiences. All SE-VR Work Study program services and supports must be included in an individual’s IPE and pre-approved and authorized by a VR counselor before services can begin or funds transferred. VR funds transferred to the DOE are to be used for work evaluation and work training. These funds may be expended only for costs of the work-study program which are beyond the normal responsibility of the schools and only for youth with an IPE approved by the VR agency. Wages (mentioned above) shall be provided to a student-client for realistic work experience either on the school campus or in the community. Each student-client shall be evaluated in the following areas: Work skills, work attitudes, social skills, work habits and their overall evaluation. These services shall be listed in the IEP and the IPE. Telephone installation and monthly fees shall be covered when a telephone instrument is not readily accessible to the special education teacher and only when pre-authorized by DVR. A student-client’s transportation costs shall be covered through authorized maintenance and transportation. As needed for a specific work site, small tools, supplies and equipment (not to exceed $50.00) shall be purchased for the student-client and remain the property of the student-client. When other evaluations, training and job placement costs are needed by the student-client, SE-VR funds may be approved by the VR counselor.

Additionally, a teacher’s mileage for transportation costs directly related to the SE-VR Work Study Program that is not covered by the DOE shall be covered only when approved by the VR counselor on an individualized basis to support each individual client. In order to provide full access and integration into the work environment for each student-client with a disability, assistive technology (AT) or rehabilitation technology (RT) assessments shall be arranged and based on the appropriateness of the recommendation, AT or RT shall be purchased by the DOE or by the VR agency. When AT or RT is purchased by the DOE, the device does not belong to the student-client exiting the DOE program. Should the student-client need the AT or RT to maintain themselves on the job after graduation, the VR counselor shall authorize the purchase to ensure job retention and the AT equipment will remain the property of the student client upon case closure. c) Respective Roles: The implementation plan shall include a description of the academic and vocational services identified for each student to include in-school work experiences to be arranged and monitored by the Special Education (SE) teacher with job descriptions for each of the work experiences. The work experience supervisor’s name shall be specified. All services will be reflected on both the IEP and IPE and will be approved by DVR, prior to the initiation of services. The VR Branch Administrator/Section Supervisor shall administer the VR program at the section level. The Branch Administrator/Section Supervisor annually recommends allocations for each school program for the next school year and reviews expenditures of the SE-VR Work Study Program. A plan shall be developed with the SE-VR Work Study Program with the principal, special education teacher, workplace readiness coordinator, and VR counselor. The VR counselor will plan, implement, coordinate and evaluate the SE-VR Work Study Program, as will the VR supervisor and administrator. In cooperation with the SE teacher, the VR counselor shall develop the individual student-client’s educational-vocational goal. The VR counselor shall be responsible for arranging and monitoring community work experience sites. In collaboration with the SE teacher, the VR counselor will prepare community work experience job descriptions and ensure appropriate on-site supervision. The in-community work experience sites shall be reviewed and certified by the designated staff member of the DOE SE Program who is responsible for providing liability insurance coverage for each student placement. The VR counselor obtains community work experience evaluations from the work experience supervisor and shares copies with the SE teacher. Student/ parent/SE teacher/VR counselor relationship development is a central focus for the VR staff throughout the transition process to encourage active participation of all parties in the IEP and IPE.

d) Cost Allocation: Both DOE and VR shall provide accounting services. The DOE submits to the Department of Human Services and Office of Curriculum, Instruction and Student Support, Special Education Section, reports of expenditures quarterly for reimbursement. The accountant for the DHS fiscal management office shall receive authorization from the DVR and transfer specified funds to the DOE Office of Business Services. The accountant from the DHS fiscal management office will review expenditure reports from the DOE Office of Business Services and recommends transfer of reimbursements for expenditures following approval from the VR agency.

The administrator of each vocational rehabilitation branch and Oahu Branch section supervisors shall receive, review, and recommend branch allocations to the VR Administrator. Each administrator/section supervisor will monitor expenditures of the SE-VR Work Study Program, approve eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, approve school program initiation requests, review annual school reports and recommend continuation or termination of a program. Prior to the payment of invoices and reconciliation, DVR will verify that programming and costs invoices were pre-authorized by DVR staff and itemized in each individual IPE.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 1:18PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

DVR has entered into contracts with nine Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide Job Placement and Retention Services, Supported Employment Services, Evaluation/Training/Placement Services, and Job Placement and Retention Services for the Deaf. The CRPs are required to sign contracts with DVR, prior to providing services to individuals. These services are paid for by a milestone/outcome basis not to exceed a set contracted amount. Potential CRPs that are accredited by the Commission and Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) are given preference for contract awards. The CRPs facilities must meet the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. Telecommunications devices for the deaf are essential, as all programs are expected to serve the deaf. The CRPs will provide training and employment services that includes: job skills training, job preparation skills, job seeking skills, job coaching, and follow-up services after employment is achieved.

This screen was last updated on May 9 2014 4:50PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Supported employment services: Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) provide supported employment services to individuals with Most Significant Disabilities who have been unable to maintain competitive employment.

These services include: Individualized job placement planning, job analysis, job readiness training, job training at the work site, ongoing supervision and coaching on an as-needed basis, training in various independent living skills, ongoing behavior management, coordination with other partnering agencies and family members, negotiating for necessary job accommodations with the employer, ongoing case management, and assist in acquiring funding for long term support services for job maintenance.

In addition to the services the following agreements have been made with the CRPs:

(1) Personnel: preference will be given to qualified staff with disabilities and staff who are Certified Rehabilitation Counselors

(2) Administrative: CRPs shall share information about their relationships with employers developed or maintained

(3) Qualitative assurance and evaluation specifications: participant satisfaction with services and employment outcomes are the key qualitative measures

(4) Experience: CRP experience with the placement and job coaching of individuals with significant and most significant disabilities is desired

(5) Coordination of services: CRPs will continuously coordinate the provision of services with DVR staff

(6) Reporting: Monthly reporting

(7) Facilities: facilities/offices must be adequate to provide the supported employment services Supported Employment contracts are funded through milestone payments. These payments will be made after the following outcomes are achieved:

Milestone 1 (Job Readiness Assessment)

Milestone 2 (Job Placement Plan)

Milestone 3 (On the job 3 days with job coach)

Milestone 4 (On the job 3 days, minimal job coaching)

Milestone 5 (On the job 30 days, minimal job coaching)

Milestone 6 (On the job 90 days, minimal job coaching and successful case closure)

Extended Services:

As part of the development of the individual’s IPE, the VR Counselor must identify Extended Services and Service Providers for individuals qualified for Supported Employment Services. DOH/DDD could be identified as a services provider. In addition, agreements with family members and/or employers for extended services can be arranged.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 1:23PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

DVR currently does not employ an adequate number of rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals based on the average caseload size of: Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist (VRS) I = active caseload of 63, VRS II = active caseload of 94, VRS III & IV = active caseload of 125. DVR’s average caseload for VRS I = active caseload of 85, VRS II = active caseload of 117, VRS III & IV= active caseload of 135. In FY 2009, positions were lost in a reduction-in-force due to the state budget shortfall. As of 9/9/11, Ex. Memo 11-10 delegated the authority to fill authorized positions to Department heads. Hawaii DVR began recruiting and filling vacant positions, and continues to do so.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Administrator 1 0 0
2 Assistant Administrator 1 0 0
3 Branch Administrators 5 1 1
4 Supervisors 8 0 1
5 Program Specialists & Accting Staff 8 2 1
6 Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists 41 3 1
7 Clerical Support 22 2 2
8 Employment Specialists 3 0 0
9 Social Service Assistant 3 1 1
10 Blind Rehab Instructors & BEP Staff 13 3 2

 

The University of Hawaii is the only institution in the State offering higher education with a Rehabilitation Counselor Education program. The program is offered both onsite and online. Hawaii DVR does not have or need formal agreements with other Universities. Staff, however, has the option to attend any CORE accredited university. Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists who do not meet the Comprehensive System for Personnel Development (CSPD) when hired, must enroll in a Master’s degree program, after completing six (6) months of probation and must complete their Master’s degree within five (5) years from the start of the Master’s degree. The Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists’ educational progress is based upon meetings with their supervisor and their course grades. Discussion at the meetings include, but are not limited to the following: identifying areas of concern; type and resources available for assistance needed; overall course/class progress and sites available for practicum and internships. Meetings with professors and intern/practicum supervisors are maintained as necessary.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 UH Manoa, MS Rehab Cnsl. 5 4 1 1
2 South Univ., MS Rehab Cnsl. 1 1 0 1
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

DVR works closely with the University of Hawaii (UH) to recruit qualified graduates. DVR is supportive of preparing, recruiting, hiring and retaining individuals with disabilities and persons from minority backgrounds. Personnel at DVR represent culturally diverse backgrounds reflective of the culture in Hawaii. Job openings are announced internally within the Department and on the State of Hawaii/Department of Human Services website. Counselors who specialize in serving deaf consumers are announced in the deaf organizations and deaf publications. Positions at the Services for the Blind Branch are announced with blind organizations.

 

DVR’s personnel standard is CRC eligible. VR actively recruits personnel who meet standards, and maintains a CSPD database. Standards for Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists went into effect on May 16, 2002 with approval of these class specifications by the Hawaii State Department of Human Resources Development. New VR counselors who do not meet the CSPD standards must meet the CSPD requirements in five (5) years from the start of an individual’s master’s degree/rehabilitation program. The individual’s master’s degree/rehabilitation program must commence on the earliest possible enrollment date after completing the 6-month probationary appointment. Details are described below: I. All Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists I hired after the effective date of this standard who perform one or more counselor functions must have a Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university or verification of eligibility for admission to a CORE accredited program in Rehabilitation Counseling. II. All Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists II hired (or reallocated to the II level) after the effective date of this standard who perform one or more counselor functions, in addition to meeting the minimum requirements of the I level, must have completed 27 graduate level semester credits in a CORE accredited rehabilitation counseling program at an accredited college or university. All Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists III and IV hired after the effective date of this standard who perform one or more counselor functions must have a CORE accredited Master’s degree or other post-graduate degree including coursework, internship, and experience verified by the Standards and Credentials Committee of the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) to be acceptable for certification purposes, or must be a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC). III. All Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists V, and VR Managers I, who are first- line supervisors of lower level Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists, hired after the effective date of this standard, who perform one or more counselor functions at any time, or have the authority to do so, must have a CORE accredited Master’s degree or other post-graduate degree including coursework, internship, and experience verified by the Standards and Credentials Committee of the CRCC to be acceptable for certification purposes, or must be a CRC. The new counselor’s training plans and their earned grades/grade point averages are monitored during individual meetings with their supervisor. Individual meetings with their supervisor includes, but are not limited to progress on their coursework (areas of concerns), progress in their internships, practicums, and other areas such as time management and case documentation strategies. Individual meetings are held twice a month.

 

VR Management, along with branch administrators and supervisors determine training needs from data obtained by case reviews, research on emerging trends, best practices and consultation with individuals. Staff development plans are submitted on an annual basis and kept on file within the CSPD data base. DVR utilizes funds from an in-service training grant to promote CSPD and priorities that are identified on the annual staff development plans. Information is disseminated through various meetings (Management, Supervisors, Staff) and electronically. Staff training for new Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists on vocational assessments, vocational guidance and counseling, job placement and rehabilitation counseling are provided within their probationary period. Both formalized individual and group trainings are provided. Our new counselor training modules were developed in partnership with Region 9 Technical Assistance Continuing Education (TACE) Center. In addition to the training modules, new counselors participate in new counselor training on Oahu which involves eight days of training. For Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists that have passed probation, there is no set training schedule for vocational assessment, vocational guidance and counseling, job placement and rehabilitation counseling. Training in each area is on-going based upon needs identified through case reviews or case discussions and as new products/services/technology is available in each of the aforementioned areas.

 

Hawaii DVR utilizes appropriate modes of communication which means specialized aids and supports that enable applicants and eligible individuals with a disability to comprehend and respond to information that is being communicated. Designated staff is proficient in American Sign Language (ASL). DVR staff serving the blind and visually impaired clients is specially trained in the needs and skills of the blind. In addition, spoken language interpreters are engaged through an agency which coordinates an on-site interpreter or a 24 hour telephone language service known as Tele-Interpreters. ASL interpreters are arranged through a contracted interpreter referral service. Hawaii DVR has a Rehabilitation Counselor and social service assistant with the Deaf services positions located on Oahu. Neighbor Island general service counselors provide services to blind and deaf persons. They are provided specific training in communication/culture/assistive technology training. Brochures, IPE’s and Documents are available in accessible formats and in either print or oral alternative languages.

 

Hawaii DVR will coordinate CSPD activities with those provided under the IDEA through the SRC and the DOE Administrator, Special Education Services Branch. This person is a member of the SRC representing students with disabilities. The Hawaii DVR and DOE representatives will coordinate the dissemination of program and financial information, including orientation and training with VR and DOE/Special Education personnel.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 3:36PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The comprehensive, statewide assessment is jointly conducted by DVR and the SRC. The Research Corporation of the University of Hawaii, Pacific Basin Rehabilitation and Research Training Center (PBRRTC) administers the assessment.

As stated in the FY 2014 State Plan, DVR is in its third year of a three-year Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). This three-year period covered FY 2012, FY 2013 and FY 2014. It was reported in the FY 2014 State Plan that PBRRTC was on schedule to complete the FY 2012-FY 2014 CSNA during the Spring of FY 2014. However, PBRRTC has not completed the FY 2012 - 2014 CSNA report and the report will in all likelihood not be forthcoming in FY 2014. Unfortunately, with the resignation of the PBRRTC Director in 2013 and the recent hiring of the new PBRRTC Director, there was miscommunication regarding the FY 2014 CSNA report. DVR informed PBRRTC, that going forward, PBRRTC will no longer be responsible for DVR’s CSNAs and unfortunately, PBRRTC assumed they no longer had to complete the FY 2014 CSNA. Accordingly, the results of the FY 2014 CSNA are not included in the FY 2015 State Plan. The Director of PBRRTC has assured DVR that the full (FY 2012 - FY 2014) CSNA will be completed and submitted to DVR for review by October 31, 2014. DVR will provide RSA with the CSNA upon completion and also report the results in the FY 2016 State Plan. The results reported in the FY 2015 State Plan are the results of the FY 2013 CSNA completed by PBRRTC. Individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services: The range of responses about the needs of persons with the most significant disabilities was quite broad. The needs ranged from survival and basic needs to job placement and training. The diversity of needs listed suggest that individuals with most significant disabilities need extensive, lifelong support in their everyday lives, and not just for employment. Regarding employment, the needs include, but are not limited to: (1) the need for better understanding of the different type of employment options that are “realistic” for each individual and (2) the need for better and clearer VR policies and procedures for working with individuals with the most severe disabilities. DVR is currently finalizing a new Memorandum of Agreement with the Center on Disability Studies staff to provide Social Security benefits planning services to clients; benefits planning training to VR staff and referral assistance and progress monitoring of SSI/SSDI clients participating in Employment Networks as one effort to provide statewide consistency of services. Individuals with disabilities who are minorities: Native Hawaiians, Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Deaf Blind individuals and newcomers such as the individuals from the Federated States of Micronesia (Yap, Chuuk, Pohnpei, Kosrae) were identified in the FY 2013 CSNA. The lack of health/medical services and services for incarcerated individuals were identified for Native Hawaiians. The lack of formal classes for career readiness and resilience in dealing the problems in the community were identified for the deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind individuals. The lack of interpreters, lack of understanding of the cultural differences, and lack of computer skills were identified for individuals from the Federated States of Micronesia. DVR has a dedicated counselor serving the Native Hawaiian individuals with disabilities; is providing Math, English, American Sign Language, Technology and Social Skills classes since October 2013 at the Comprehensive Service Center (CSC) for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind individuals; and VR staff has attended and will continue to attend training on the cultural diversities in Hawaii.Individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program: Hawaii continues to be confronted with a unique set of challenges in serving people with disabilities. Like most other states, there are inadequate resources to serve the growing demands associated with a growing, diverse population. In Hawaii, there are social and geographic challenges. The geographic separation of people with disabilities on neighbor islands which can only be accessed by air travel, (there are no roads or ferry system connecting the islands) is a major challenge. In addition, Hawaii has a unique cultural and social diversity and the number of each minority group is increasing due to growing number of immigrants relocating to Hawaii. DVR is currently participating in a research project conducted by Research & Training Center at the Univeristy of Montana to identify strategies to improve access to VR services in rural areas.Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system: One Stop Centers were viewed as doing good but respondents had concerns about the lack of personnel and that the existing personnel needed more training . One noted barrier to the use of the One Stop Centers is that these Centers require individuals to have computer skills and some clients do not know how to use a computer. DVR has a dedicated counselor located at the One-Stop Center on Oahu who works directly with eligible clients and provides assistance to the One-Stop center staff . The One-Stop Centers do provide individualized assistance to access the computer system and group computer skills training. However, the lack of sufficient personnel continues to be a challenge.Identify the need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the State: The need for providing comprehensive statewide services for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind individuals in Hawaii has been documented and recommended in county and state-funded studies and in DVR’s Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. According to the Gallaudent Univeristy website, between 9% and 14 % of the population in the US has a significant hearing loss. Applying that estimate to Hawaii’s population, there is roughly 110,000 - 170,000 people in Hawaii having a significant hearing loss. Currently, DVR is providing VR and/or IL services to less than 1% of that population.

This screen was last updated on Jul 9 2014 7:34PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

In 2015, DVR estimates it will provide services to 5,611 eligible individuals under Part B of Title I at an estimated cost of $ 7,615,300 and to 70 eligible individuals under Part B of Title VI at an estimated cost of $300,000.

It is anticipated that Hawaii VR will be under an Order of Selection in FY2015.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Most Significant Disability (MSD) Title I $3,736,803 2,827 $1,321
Significant Disability (SD) Title I $3,007,814 2159 $1,393
Non-Significant Disability (NSD) Title I $870,683 625 $1,393
Most Significant Disability (MSD) Title VI $300,000 70 $4,285
Totals   $7,915,300 5,681 $1,393

This screen was last updated on Jul 9 2014 8:20PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

The goals and priorities were jointly developed, reviewed, revised and agreed upon by DVR and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). The following priorities and goals were developed based upon SRC reports, monitoring activities, results of our needs assessments, performance on standards and indicators, as well as other available information.Priority 1: To assist eligible individuals in reaching their full potential by providing quality VR services.Goal 1.1 To increase the number of employment outcomes by 1 or more. Baseline: In FY 2012 we achieved 235 rehabilitations.In FY 2013 we achieved 297 rehabilitations.Goal 1.2 To increase the average hourly wage for rehabilitants.Baseline: In FY2012 we achieved an average hourly wage of $13.11.In FY 2013 we achieved an average hourly wage of $11.69.Goal 1.3 To increase the number of hours worked per week. Baseline: In FY2012 we achieved 31 hours per week. In FY 2013 we achieved 28 hours per week.Goal 1.4 To increase the number of clients participating in work experiences. Baseline: In FY2012 we achieved 390 clients participating in summer work experiences. In FY 2013 we achieved 343 clients participating in summer work experiences.Priority 2: To increase quality of services for Transition Aged Youths (TAYs).Goal 2.1 To increase the number of employment outcomes of TAYs by 1 or more. Baseline: In FY2012 we achieved 94 rehabilitations for TAYs. In FY 2013 we achieved 131 rehabilitations for TAYs.2.2 To increase the average hourly wage for TAYs. Baseline: In FY2012 we achieved an average hourly wage of $9.82 for TAYs.In FY 2013 we achieved an average hourly wage of $10.43 for TAYs.Goal 2.3 To increase the number of hours worked per week by TAYs. Baseline: In FY2012 we achieved 30 hours worked per week for TAYs.In FY 2013 we achieved 30 hours worked per week for TAYs.Goal 2.4 To increase the number of TAYs participating in work experiences. Baseline: In FY2012 we placed 390 TAY’s in work experiences.In FY 2013 we placed 228 TAY’s in work experiences.Priority 3: Develop work plans to establish and operate a Comprehensive Service Center (CSC), formerly known as the Comprehensive Deaf Center (CDC). Baseline: A CSNA appendix of data collected specific to the needs of the deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind population was completed and submitted to RSA in October of 2012.Effective December 1, 2013, the contract with Pacific Basin Rehabilitation and Research Training Center (PBRRTC) for the development of a five-year strategic plan for the establishment and operation of a Comprehensive Service Center (CSC) for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind individuals was initiated. Goal 3.1 Engage community organizations and interested individuals in planning and designing the delivery of services to be described in the business and implementation plan. Baseline: Initial discussion of the plan by the University of Hawaii, Kapiolani Community College was initiated to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advisory Board and the State Rehabilitation Council starting in January 2012. The stakeholders continue to work with DVR in the continuing development of a CSC. In October 2013, Math, English, ASL, Technology and Social Skills classes started at the CSC. The fifth session of the classes will start in mid July 2014.The business consultant hired by PBRRTC has identified a group of stakeholders representing Oahu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai and representing various deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind organizations. The stakeholders started meetings in April 2014 and anticipate completion in July 2014. Goal 3.2 Complete the development of a business and implementation plan to establish and operate the CSC.Baseline: In March 2013, DVR updated/ amended the two-year Business Plan that was completed by Kapiolani Community College staff in 2012.Effective December 1,2013, the contract with PBRRTC for the development of a five-year strategic plan for the establishment and operation of a Comprehensive Service Center (CSC) for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind individuals was initiated. The draft of the plan will be completed in May 2014.Goal 3.3 Obtain technical assistance to ensure that DVR funds will be expended in accordance with Federal Regulations as stipulated in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended.Baseline: Consultation with DVR’s Financial Consultant and the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) staff started in January 2012 and continues in FY2014. Consultation continues with DVR’s Financial Consultant by DVR’s financial and contract specialist. Focus is currently on contract monitoring to ensure that the Title I, Part B funds are expended in accordance with the Federal regulations and state funds are expended in accordance with State procurement regulations.Goal 3.4 Define and issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) for the Comprehensive Service Center.Baseline: No RFP was issued in FY 2013.Using State funds we contracted with PBRRTC to develop a Five-Year Strategic Plan for the Establishment and Operation of a Comprehensive Service Center (CSC) for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind. The contract started on December 1, 2013. Currently, Leland Chang, business planning consultant, is meeting with stakeholders to form a representative group which will assist him in the development of the Five-Year Strategic Plan. Priority 4: To develop and implement a strategic plan to increase the job readiness, job placement and job retention resources for VR clients.Baseline (Strategy): On Oahu, we created a separate Employment Section with a Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist Supervisor, one (1) Employment Specialist (ES), one (1) VRS counselor and six (6) temporary Community Service Specialists (CSS). At Services for the Blind Branch, Maui Branch and Kauai Branch, there is an Employment Specialist (ES) in each office. In addition we have established a statewide Benefits Planner resource.Goal 4.1: Increase the number of SSI and SSD consumers receiving benefits counseling.Baseline: In 2012, 42 SSI/SSDI consumers received benefits counseling.In FY 2013, 54 SSI/SSDI consumer received benefits counseling.Goal 4.2: Increase the number of clients receiving job readiness services.Baseline: In 2012, 273 clients received job readiness services.In FY 2013, 540 clients received job readiness services.Goal 4.3: Increase the number of clients receiving job retention services.Baseline: In 2012, 98 clients received job retention services.In FY 2013, 138 clients received job retention services.Goal 4.4: Increase the number of relationships with Hawaii’s businesses.Baseline: In 2012, we established long term relationships with 122 businesses in Hawaii.In FY 2013, we maintained/established long term relationships with 265 businesses in Hawaii.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 6:08PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

DVR Administrator determined that the projected funding is adequate to ensure the provision of the full range of vocational rehabilitation services; however, the number of qualified personnel is insufficient to ensure the provision of the full range of vocational rehabilitation services, as appropriate to all eligible individuals. Accordingly, the Order of Selection will be implemented for FY 2015. In FY 2015, DVR estimates that it will service 5,681 individuals under Title I and Title VI-B combined. Total case services cost under Title I and Title VI-B combined is estimated to be $7,915,300.00.In FY2015, total administrative appropriated costs are estimated to be $9,588,819.00.Total expenditure for FY2015 is estimated to be $17,504,119.00. Total revenue for FY2015 is estimated to be $20,783,411.00. Federal grant estimate is $12,700,025.00; State match estimate is $3,437,237.00; Supported Employment grant is $300,000.00; and carryover estimate is $4,346,149.00.

 

Description of Priority categories

Priority Category 1: Individuals determined to have a most significant disability (MSD). These are individuals with severe physical or mental impairments that seriously limits two (2) or more functional capacities and who require three (3) or more substantial VR services for at least twelve (12) months.Priority Category 2: Individuals determined to have a significant disability (SD). These are individuals with severe physical or mental impairments that seriously limits one (1) or more functional capacities and who require two (2) or more substantial VR services for at least six (6) months.Priority Category 3: Individuals determined to have a non-significant disability (NSD). All other VR eligible individuals.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Priority category 1, MSD will be served first. Priority category 2, SD will be served second. Priority category 3, NSD will be served third.The Order of Selection shall not be based on any other factors, including:1) Any duration of residency requirement, provided the individual is present in the State;2) Type of disability;3) Age, gender, race, color, or national origin;4) Source of referral;5) Type of expected employment outcome;6) The need for specific services or anticipated cost of services required by an individual; or7) The income level of an individual or an individual’s family.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Based upon the aforementioned revenue and expenses, the receipt of our requested allotment of Title 1 and title VI-B and having reduced our contracted services and overall expenses, we opened priority category 1, (MSD) as of April 1, 2010; priority category 2, (SD), as of April 1, 2011 and opened and closed priority category 3 (NSD) in January, 2014. From April 2010 to March 2014 we took 3,845 individuals off the deferred list and estimate to take all (147+) individuals off the NSD list in FY 2015.

In FYI 2013 our rehabililtation rate increased from 22.0% to 29.2% with 297 individuals employed for 90 days or more and 721 individuals exiting the program prior to obtaining employment. As of March 2014, we have 147 eligible individuals on the deferred list. There are 0 MSD individuals, 0 SD individuals, and 147 NSD individuals. We will be able to serve all of the NSD individuals on the deferred list in FY 2015.

In the table below: Priority Category I is Most Significantly Disabled (MSD)Priority Category II is Significantly Disabled (SD)Priority Category III is Non-Significantly Disabled (NSD)

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 2,897 547 157 55 $4,036,803
2 2,159 408 117 54 $3,007,814
3 625 117 33 53 $870,683

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 6:47PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

In 2013, we contracted with five (5) Community Resources Providers (CRP) to provide Supportive Employment (SE) services. The five CRPs provided statewide SE services for a total of $300,000. Priority 1: Increase the number of SE clients served. Goal 1.1: To increase the number of individuals that receives SE services by (1) or more. FY 2013: We had a 40% increase in the number of clients receiving SE services. Ninety eight (98) MSD clients received SE services.Baseline: FY 2012: 70 clients received SE services. Priority 2: To create new resources to provide benefits planning services for disability beneficiaries that requires SE services. These services will assist these beneficiaries in determining appropriate employment options and outcomes. Goal 2.1: To increase the number of individuals requiring supported employment services that receive benefits planning services by (1) or more. FY 2013: We had a 28% increase in the number of clients receiving benefits planning services. Fifty four (54) clients received benefits planning services. Baseline: As of December 2012, DVR has referred 42 clients who have been successfully served by a designated benefits planner available specifically for our SE clients.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 6:49PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Strategies to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities:1. In July 2014, DVR’s Automated Case Management System (ACMS) is on target to “go-live.” The ACMS’s case management system will create statewide consistency of services; will support increased timeliness and provision of services and increased fiscal accountability of case services expenditures. 2. Continued focus on creating and sustaining employer partnerships. Our strategy is threefold (1) utilization of dedicated employment specialists in each branch; (2) an active statewide employment committee; (3) active collaboration with CSAVR’s Employment Network and the use of the Talent Acquisition Portal.3. Continued focus on increasing work experiences for clients. Clients who participate in work experience increase the likelihood of getting hired, receiving more work hours and employer benefits and receiving higher salaries. Our strategy is to increase development of work experience opportunities from summer work experiences to all-year-round work experiences.4. Continued focus on minority and underserved populations. Our strategies include (1) continue development and expansion of the CSC for the deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind; (2) specialization of a counselor to the Hawaiian residents in the Leeward area on Oahu and (3) collaboration with agencies assisting disabled Veteran’s to return to employment.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

DVR is committed to identify the needs of its staff and clients to have access to alternative methods and formats necessary to prepare, obtain, maintain or regain employment. Our strategy is (1) to provide opportunities for our staff to participate in assistive technology training; (2) to establish partnerships with consultants who are individuals with disabilities and experts on the alternative technology; (3) to study best practices appropriate to Hawaii’s diverse population and to increase our outreach to clients through the use of social media.

DVR continues to assess each individual on their needs for technology services and assistive technology (AT) devices to achieve full independence and inclusion in the work place. Our strategy is (1) to contract Statewide AT services with community rehabilitation programs or entities that are experienced in the assessment and determination of assistive technology services and devices to Hawaii’s diverse population (2) to keep cognizant of AT needs by engaging in discussions with the SRC, SILC, advisory boards and consumer organizations of individuals with disabilities.

While DVR continues to serve its clients with their individual technology needs in their work place, DVR will strive towards being the model for providing accessibility within its own Division, ensuring it is in compliance with Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Once DVR has successfully implemented its own procedures for access, we will prepare and present an action plan to the Department of Human Service (DHS) Access Task Force to implement throughout the department to enable equanimity for the DHS’ clients and staff.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

DVR will contract the services of San Diego State University Research Foundation (SDSURF) to outreach and conduct our statewide Needs Assessment in FY 2015. The Needs Assessment will identify individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities and those who are unserved or underserved by the VR program. The SDSURF’s outreach procedures include, but are not limited to face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews and online surveys with VR staff, Community Rehabilitation Program staff, State Rehabilitation Council members, Statewide Independent Living Council members, advisory groups, parent groups, Department of Health staff, Department of Education/Transition staff, employers, disability groups and other stakeholders in the community.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Using State funds we contracted the services of PBRRTC to develop a Five-Year Strategic Plan for the Establishment and Operation of a Comprehensive Service Center (CSC) for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind individuals.Requested services include:• a statewide needs assessment to identify the services and programs to be offered at the CSC, • identifying and securing the physical facility for the CSC, • identifying and securing the infrastructure, equipment and staff necessary to provide the necessary services at the CSC, • identifying the organization structure of the CSC,• developing the business and financial plan for the establishment and continued operation of the CSC. Currently, PBRRTC’s business facilitator is engaging consumers, key stakeholders and other State and county and public agencies serving the target population in the planning process through meetings convened to discuss the design and establishment of the CSC.The Aloha United Way building located at 200 North Vineyard Street in Honolulu, Hawaii was identified and secured in March 2014 as the physical facility for the CSC. Currently, five classes (math, English, American Sign Language, technology and social skills) are being offered for VR and Non-VR clients. Active recruitment for the CSC Project Specialist position is being done by PBRRTC. A tentative offer of employment has been made to an individual who is anticipated to start sometime in May-June 2014. This CSC Project Specialist will assist in the development and implementation of the 5-year strategic plan.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

DVR’s continues to focus on improvement of our quality measures: (1) increase in employment outcomes; (2) increase in the number of clients participating in work experiences; (3) increase in the average hourly wage and (4) increase in the number of work hours. Strengthening our case record reviews is DVR’s focus. The case record review process is a primary component of DVR’s quality assurance system. The purpose is to measure how well counselors, supervisors and administrators are executing the VR program for eligible individuals with disabilities in accordance with the federal regulations promulgated by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. The results of our bi-annual statewide case record review highlight areas of high and low compliance for each branch or section. Our trimester statewide case record reviews highlight areas of high and low compliance for each individual counselor. There are five fundamental areas that we consider in determining strategies on how to strengthen areas of low compliance: (1) is our written policy/procedure understandable; (2) is the policy/procedure communicated effectively to our staff; (3) does our staff require additional skills/training; (3) is the area of concern a compliance issue and a matter of administrators and supervisors needing to reinforce DVR’s policy and procedure. Based on our April 2014 bi-annual case record review results and the fact that we have many new counselors, it was agreed that DVR will provide small group training on the federal regulations and VR’s policies and procedures with follow up.DVR believes that with the implementation of the ACMS in July 2014, the case management and data processing for each client will allow for increase timeliness of the provision of services; increase in the organization of available statewide employment openings and an increase in the consistency and accuracy in data collection and reporting.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

DVR will continue its active participation and collaboration with the statewide workforce board members . Currently the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA) system structure is being considered for possible reorganization. The proposal is to consolidate the county boards under one statewide board with representatives from each county. DVR will continue to educate, advocate and work with all partners to ensure that persons with disabilities are afforded equal opportunity, employment services and access for competitive integrated employment.

DVR will continue its participation with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Grant. Hawaii was awarded $2.9M over a three year period. The grant is jointly funded by U.S. DOL’s Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. The purpose of the grant is to improve education, training and employment opportunities and outcomes of adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits.

The DVR Assistant Administrator, Hawaii Branch Administrator , Maui Branch Administrator and two SRC members are all participants of the grant’s Steering Committee. As Steering Committee members, our role is to guide the major project elements and infrastructure to reach the goal of improving the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities by improving One-Stop Center partnerships.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

DVR will continue providing Vocational and Work Adjustment Training Services (VWATS) for VR clients with significant and most significant disabilities with a minimum of a third grade reading level. VWATS services are provided to enable the individual to achieve meaningful employment consistent with their strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and informed choice. VWATS provides classroom, facility and/or community training to increase a consumer’s interpersonal skills relating to basic traits and attitudes. 1. The goal of VWATS is attainment of personal habits, attitudes, and skills (commonly known as “soft skills”) that will enable the VR consumer to function effectively in employment, in spite of the individual’s disability.2. To develop and/or increase work tolerance before engaging in prevocational or vocational training or employment.3. To develop work habits and to orient the VR consumer to the world of work.4. To develop skills or techniques for the specific purpose of enabling the individual to compensate for the loss of a member of the body or the loss of a sensory function.To strengthen our partnership with CSAVR’s Employment Network and Hawaii’s employers. We completed the training on the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP) and have increased the number of potential long term partnerships with Hawaii’s Businesses. Last year we established 122 employer partnerships. In FY 2013, we achieved maintaining and establishing potential long term partnerships with 265 employers! We anticipate posting our job openings and our client’s resumes in the TAP. Priority 2: To increase quality of services for Transition Aged Youths (TAYs).Strategy: Since we have been very successful in improving all of our outcomes with TAYs, our strategy is to continue to improve our current model which involves:• Collaboration: We continue to streamline the transition process from high school to either vocational training, post-secondary education or continual employment by working closely with Transition Coordinators.• Participation: Students are assessed and evaluated to determine abilities, capabilities, resources, strengths, priorities, interests, concerns, and informed choice before matching them with work sites through the SEVR work study program.• Communication: On-going dialogues between Transition Coordinators, Counselors, and parents/guardians to ensure productivity or active participation.• Follow-Up: We consider this aspect of the process as one of the most significance part of the students success in any transition. Follow up varies depending on the severity of disabilities, as some individuals may need more follow up than others. • At Hawaii Branch, our strategy included getting more TAY work experience and OJT’s in the community which resulted in more job opportunities.Priority 3: Develop work plans to establish and operate a CSC.Strategy: Using State funds we secured the services of PBRRTC/University of Hawaii to develop a Five-Year Strategic Plan for the Establishment and Operation of a Comprehensive Service Center (“CSC”) for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind. The contract started on December 1, 2013. Currently, Leland Chang, business planning consultant, is meeting with stakeholders to establish a representative group of stakeholders which will assist him in the development of the Five-Year Strategic Plan for the CSC. The CSC Project Specialist was hired in June 2014. The CSC Project Specialist assists in the development of the Five-Year Strategic Plan and implementation of the CSC to include obtaining additional funding for the continued operation of the CSC. Priority 4: To develop and implement a strategic plan to increase the job readiness, job placement and job retention resources for VR clients.Strategy: DVR’s Statewide Employment Committee is organizing quarterly Employer Presentations to be held at the One-Stop Center located in Honolulu. DVR Employment Specialists from Maui, Hawaii, Kauai and Oahu and Oahu DVR counselors; the One-Stop Center staff; Community Resource Partners (CRP) and clients are all invited. Each Employer Presentation features a different employment industry. The first presentation featured employers from the Hospitality industry, the second presentation featured employers from the Laborer industry and the upcoming presentation features various Unions in Hawaii. Attendance at each presentation is increasing and the partnership with DVR, the One-Stop and CRP staff is strengthening. Clients are able to apply for jobs at the end of the presentation!Strategies to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities;DVR continues to support the work of the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC), with the Innovation and Expansion Authority. DVR supports the work of the SILC with Title I Basic Support Grant - Innovation and Expansion authority funding, to maximize the limited IL funds to be used for IL consumers.The SRC has determined the need for a full time staff person to enable the SRC to complete the work of the Council and ensure compliance with the regulations according to the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. The Title I Innovation and Expansion (I&E) authority will be used to fund position. Overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.DVR will continue its active participation and collaboration with the statewide workforce board members. Currently the WIOA system structure is being discussed. The proposal under consideration is to consolidate the county boards into one statewide board with representatives from each county. DVR will continue to educate, advocate and work with all partners to ensure that persons with disabilities are afforded equal opportunity, employment services and access for competitive integrated employment. DVR will continue its participation with the Disability Employment Initiative (DEI) Grant. Hawaii was awarded $2.9M over a three year period. The grant is jointly funded by U.S. DOL’s Employment and Training Administration and the Office of Disability Employment Policy. The purpose of the grant is to improve education, training and employment opportunities and outcomes of adults with disabilities who are unemployed, underemployed, and/or receiving Social Security disability benefits. The DVR Assistant Administrator, Hawaii Branch Administrator, Maui Branch Administrator and two SRC members are all participants of the grant’s Steering Committee. As steering committee members, our role is to guide the major project elements and infrastructure to reach the goal of improving the accessibility and accountability of the public workforce development system for individuals with disabilities by improving One-Stop Center partnerships. Improvements include but are not limited to easy and equitable access to benefits planning services; job readiness training by the Center for Disability Studies staff; job supports and Employment Networks (EN).

 

This screen was last updated on Jul 7 2014 9:03PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Priority 1:Assist eligible individuals in reaching their full potential by providing quality VR services. Goal 1.1 To increase the number of employment outcomes by 1 or more. Baseline: FY 2011 we achieved 218 rehabilitations. FY 2012 we achieved 235 rehabilitations. FY 2013 we achieved 297 rehabilitations.The strategies that contributed to increasing the number of rehabilitations are: (1) Establishing dedicated VR Employment Specialists/Counselors in all branches; (2) Establishing a Statewide Employment Committee (SEC) that meet quarterly; (3) Organizing employer presentations at the One-Stop by SEC that include VR staff, clients, One-Stop staff. Goal 1.2 To increase the average hourly wage for rehabilitants. Baseline: In FY 2011 we achieved an average hourly wage of $11.68.FY 2012 we achieved an average hourly wage of $13.11.FY 2013 we achieved an average hourly wage of $11.69.We were able to increase the average hourly wage for our TAY rehabilitants, however, we were not able to increase the average hourly wage for our overall rehabilitants. Although not certain, it appears that the decrease in the average hourly wage for our rehabilitants as a whole may be attributed to employers paying slightly lower wages than before and our clients are working less hours.

Goal 1.3 To increase the number of hours worked per week. Baseline: In FY 2011 we achieved 29 hours per week. FY 2012 we achieved 31 hours per week. FY 2013 we achieved 28 hours per week.The main factor that impeded the achievement of this goal is the slow growth in Hawaii’s job market/economy. Employers seemed somewhat reluctant to increase work hours. Hawaii did not experience the anticipated increase in the FY 2013. However, the economists do predict continued improvement in FY 2014 and 2015. Goal 1.4 To increase the number of clients participating in work experiences. Baseline: In FY 2011: We achieved 81 clients participating in summer work experiences. FY 2012: We achieved 390 clients participating in work experiences. FY 2013: We achieved 343 clients participating in work experiences.The factors impeding this goal appear to be: a decrease in our overall statewide caseload; the increase in the number of VR new counselors; liability insurance for work experiences are not readily available; and slow to improve economy. As the new counselors gain more experience and we continue to expand/increase our work experience opportunities we anticipate an increase in this area.Priority 2: To increase quality of services for Transition Aged Youths (TAYs).Goal 2.1 To increase the number of employment outcomes of TAYs by 1 or more. Baseline: In FY 2011 we achieved 92 rehabilitations for transition aged youth.FY 2012 we achieved 94 rehabilitations for transition aged youth. FY 2013 we achieved 131 rehabilitations for transition aged youth. The strategies that contributed to the achievement of this goal are: (1) Collaboration: We continue to streamline the transition process from high school to either vocational training, post-secondary education or continual employment by working closely with Transition Coordinators. (2) Participation: Students are assessed and evaluated to determine abilities, capabilities, resources, strengths, priorities, interests, concerns, and advised of informed choice before matching them with work sites through the SEVR work study program. (3) Communication: On-going dialogues between, Transition Coordinators, Counselors and parents/guardians to ensure productivity or active participation. (4) Follow-Up: We consider this aspect of the process as one of the most significance part of the students success in any transition. Follow-up varies depending on the severity of disabilities, in which some individuals may need more follow up than others. (5) At Hawaii Branch, our strategy included getting more TAY work experience and OJT’s in the community which resulted in more job opportunities.Goal 2.2 To increase the average hourly wage for rehabilitees TAYs. Baseline: In FY 2011 we achieved an average hourly wage of $9.64 for transition aged youth and young adults.FY 2012 we achieved an average hourly wage of $9.82 for transition aged youth. FY 2013 we achieved an average hourly wage of $10.43 for transition aged youth.Goal 2.3 To increase the number of hours worked per week by TAYs. Baseline: In FY 2011 we achieved 28.97 hours worked per week for transition aged youth. FY 2012 we achieved 30 hours worked per week for transition aged youth. FY 2013 we achieved 30 hours worked per week for transition aged youth.Goal 2.4 To increase the number of TAYs participating in work experiences. Baseline: In FY 2011 we placed 81 TAY’s in work experiences. FY 2012 we placed 390 TAY’s in work experiences. FY 2013 we placed 228 TAY’s in work experiences.

The main factors that impeded the achievement of this goal are: the decreasing number of DOE Transition teachers and the limited liability insurance for work experiences with private employers. Less than 50% of the Transition teachers are dedicated 100% to transition responsibilities and the rest of the teachers have multiple responsibilities which limits their involvement. We are securing liability insurance for our clients through contracting with CRPs whenever possible.

Priority 3: To establish a five-year framework for development of the philosophy, purpose and goals of the center to assist deaf and hard of hearing individuals in returning to employment.

Baseline: We started the Memorandum of Agreement with the University of Hawaii, Kapiolani Community College (KCC) Division for five-year planning for the Comprehensive Service Center, CSC for the deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind on July 1, 2010. Completion of the five-year plan was completed on 9/30/11. The development, establishment and implementation of the CSC continued in FY 2013.

Goal 3.1: Discuss the strategic five-year plan for the establishment of CSC with all interested entities to include the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advisory Board (DHHAB) and SRC by September 2012.

Baseline: Initial discussion of the plan by KCC was initiated with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Advisory Board (DHHAB) and SRC in January 2012.

FY 2012: We completed the deaf and hard of hearing Statewide Needs Assessments. The final focus groups were completed on Kauai in May 2012 and on Maui in June 2012. All of the assessments completed by various entities (DVR, Legislature, KCC and input from the deaf, deaf-blind and hard of hearing communities) were complied and summarized by PBRRTC.

FY 2013: Using State funds we secured the services of PBRRTC to develop a Five-Year Strategic Plan for the establishment and operation of the CSC. The contract started on December 1, 2013. Currently, a Business Planning Consultant is establishing a representative group of stakeholders which will assist him in the development of the Five-Year Stargice Plan for the CSC. In addition, the CSC Project Specialist was hired in June 2014.

Goal 3.2 Initiate implementation (drafting of the Request for Proposal/Establishment Authority) of the strategic five-year plan for the establishment of the CSC by November 2012.

Baseline: Consultation with DVR’s Financial Consultant and the RSA staff has been initiated and continues.

FY 2012: Upon consultation with DVR’s Financial Consultant and the RSA staff, we determined that DVR will not be using the Establishment Authority. We requested State funding to assist in the establishment and operation of the CSC.

FY 2013: Four hundred thousand dollars was received from the State. Using State funds we secured the services of PBRRTC to develop a Five-Year Strategic Plan for the establishment and operation of the CSC. The contract started on December 1, 2013. The Five-Year Strategic Plan is anticipated to be completed by December, 2014.

Priority 4: To purchase an Automated Case Management System (ACMS) by FY 2013.

Goal 4.1: To purchase an ACMS by September 30, 2012.

Baseline: DVR was unable to complete the procurement process due to lack of ARRA funding. An executed contract for the purchase of the ACMS could not be completed by December 31, 2011. Accordingly, the ARRA funds, which were to be used to purchase the ACMS was returned to the RSA.

FY 2013: DVR solicited via the Western States contracting Alliance (WSCA) for an ACMS. En Pointe Technologies Inc., (ENTI) responded to the solicitation. As of June 2013, DVR and ENTI were finalizing the Statement of Work (SOW). DVR is optimistic that the ACMS will be procured by the end of FY2013.

FY 2014: In June, 2013, the contract was executed with ENTI and Alliance Enterprises. We are on target to go live on July 7, 2014.

Goal 4.2: To hire a Project Director to assist in the implementation of the ACMS. Baseline: We completed interviewing potential applicants for the ACMS Project Director position in March 2011. The selected candidate did not accept the offer. DVR posted the recruitment notice again.

FY 2012: DVR posted the recruitment for the ACMS Project Coordinator position for the third time. The ACMS Project Coordinator started May 1, 2013 and continues to be instrumental in assisting DVR in ensuring that all technical requirements of the ACMS are met. Since DVR does not have any dedicated Information Technology staff, DVR needs an additional Help Desk staff person.

FY 2013: The ACMS Project Coordinator’s contract has been extended to June 30, 2015 with the possibility of extension. We are on target to go-live on July 7, 2014. We are currently finalizing the job description for the Help Desk position.

 

DVR estimated that it will service 70 eligible individuals under Part B of Title VI at a cost of $300,000 through five (5) community rehabilitation programs contracted with DVR.Priority 1: To increase the number of individuals that receives SE services. Goal 1.1: To increase the number of individuals that receives SE services by 5%. Baseline: In FY 2010, 68 clients received SE services.FY 2011: 72 clients received SE services.FY 2012: 70 clients received SE services.FY 2013: 98 clients received SE services, this is a 40% increase.The strategies that contributed to the achievement of the increase are: (1) the increase in the percentage of cases of individuals being served and focus on services for significantly disabled clients; (2) the continued active partnership (meetings) with staff from the Developmental Disability Division (DDD) and the Developmental Disability Council (DDC); and the continued VR representation at the State Council on Mental Health. Specifically, we continue to work with DDD and DDC to obtain the necessary approvals for the drafted Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to provide a continuity of services for the smooth transition of DD services for clients to DVR services.Priority 2: To create new resources to provide benefits planning services for disability beneficiaries that requires SE services. These services will assist these beneficiaries in determining appropriate employment options and outcomes. Goal 2.1: To increase the number of individuals requiring supported employment services that receive benefits planning services.. Baseline: In FY 2010, 31 clients received benefits planning services.FY 2011: we did not collect data on the number of clients receiving benefits planning services. FY 2012: 42 clients received benefits planning services. FY 2013: 54 clients received benefits planning services.We are currently working on an agreement with the Center on Disability Studies at the University of Hawaii as a new resource to provide benefits planning services.

 

Standard 1.1 to increase the number of employment outcomes by 1 or more.FY 2012 we achieved 235 rehabilitations.FY 2013: we achieved 297 rehabilitations.Standard 1.2 To increase the percent of employment outcomes to 55.8%.FY 2012: we achieved 23.48%.FY 2013: we achieved 31.11%. Standard 1.3: To annually equal or exceed 72.6% of all individuals who have achieved an employment outcome that are determined to be in competitive employment, self-employment and Business Enterprise program employment with earning equivalent to at least the minimum wage. FY 2012: 96.17%FY 2013: 95.99%Standard 1.4: To annually equal or exceed 62.4% of all individuals who achieve an employment outcome in competitive employment, self-employment and Business Enterprise program employment earning at least minimum wage who are individuals with significant disabilities. FFY 2012: 95.13% FY 2013: 98.39%Standard 1.5: To annually equal or exceed the ratio (.52) of the average hourly wage of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive employment, self-employment and Business Enterprise program employment to the average wage of all employed individuals in the State. FY 2012: .062FY 2013: .564Standard 1.6: To annually equal or exceed the difference of 53.0 between the percentage of all individuals who enter the VR program and the percentage of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive employment, self-employment and Business Enterprise program employment earning at least minimum wage who report their income as largest single source of support. FY 2012: 62.4 %FY 2013: 65.59%Standard 2.1: To annually equal or exceed the ratio (.80) of the percent of individuals with a minority background to the percent of individuals without a minority background exiting the program who received VR services. FY 2012 - 1.1FY 2013: 1.1

 

The continued Support of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) with the expertise of our staff specialist who is the ‘client liaison’ is very successful. The Councils continue to jointly develop our State VR and IL Plans and actively participate in the assessment of our current statewide needs assessment. In FY 2013 DVR spent $16,000 to hold quarterly SRC meetings and support the continuing education of identified council members to attend CSAVR, NCSAB and the NCSRC. Specific expenses were for conferences, regularly scheduled quarterly and subcommittee meetings: travel (airfare, car rental and per diem) of SRC members; room rental with continental breakfast; accommodations to include braille formatted material, deaf interpreter costs and any other accommodation requests and public hearings. We are in the process of hiring a SRC staff to coordinate the SRC activities. For SILC we have a $235,208 contract (10/01/13 to 09/30/14) with them which is funded by our Title I I&E authority. The funding is used to pay for the salary of the Executive Director, a full time support staff, accommodations for the executive director, office rental and operating costs, travel (airfare, car rental and per diem) of SILC council members to attend quarterly meetings, travel to mainland conferences, legal fees, public hearings and accommodations for members and the public making special requests. We will be executing another two year contract based upon their needs and proposed budget. PBRRTC/University of Hawaii is contracted to develop a Five-Year Strategic Plan for the Establishment and Operation of a CSC for deaf, hard of hearing and deaf-blind. The contract started on December 1, 2013. Currently, Leland Chang, business planning consultant, is meeting with stakeholders to establish a representative group of stakeholders which will assist him in the development of the Five-Year Strategic Plan for the CSC. Upon completion and agreement (by the Deaf, hard of hearing and deaf blind stakeholders, the community and DVR) of the 5-year Strategic Plan, PBRRTC will assist in the implementation of the plan. Organizationally, the DVR Administrator will have oversight for the CSC. PBRRTC has completed the CSC Project Specialist position interviews. We anticipate that a final selection for the position will be made in June, 2014. In October 2013, the following classes were provided to DVR clients: Mathematics, English, ASL, Technology and Social Skills to enable them to participate in secondary training and/or employment. We have completed four sessions of classes. Currently,we recruiting students the fifth session classes.

This screen was last updated on Jul 16 2014 9:30PM by Susan Foard

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Supported Employment Services include: Individualized job placement, planning, job analysis, job readiness training, job training at the work site, ongoing supervision and coaching on an as-needed basis, training in various independent living skills, ongoing behavior management, coordination with other partnering agencies and family members, negotiating for necessary job accommodations with the employer, ongoing case management, and assist in acquiring funding for long term support services for job maintenance.

In FY 2013, 98 clients under the MSD category were provided Supported Employment Services under five (5) contracted Community Rehabilitation Programs.

During FY2014 - FY2015, $300,000 will be allocated to fund direct and contracted Supported Employment Services. This will provide approximately 110 MSD/SE eligible clients Supported Employment Services through a combined service delivery effort of direct services and contracted Community Rehabilitation Programs.

The transition from Supported Employment Services to extended services occurs during the initial phase of the client’s employment. The duration of time of transition is determined on a case-by-case basis. VR Counselors are required to conduct follow up services after the client achieves employment for a minimum of 90 days.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2014 5:08PM by Susan Foard