ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Published February 16, 2017.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired - DHHS Campus State Plan for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Secretary, Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS)

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Director, Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI)

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at https://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryDaniel M. Madrid

Title of SignatoryDirector

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/26/2014

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2015No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI)

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions. Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council’s annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include: • the Designated state unit’s response to the input and recommendations; and • explanations for the designated state unit’s rejection of any input or recommendation of the council. The Delaware Vocational Rehabilitation Advisory Council for the Division for the Visually Impaired* (hereinafter referred to as SRC”) is a voluntary Council whose membership is comprised of individuals appointed by Governor Jack Markell. In accordance with statutory requirements, our Council is comprised of members representing individuals who are blind or visually impaired; individuals representing other disability groups and interests; parents of children who are blind or visually impaired; recipients of vocational rehabilitation services from the Division of the Visually Impaired’s VR program; a representative of the Client Assistance Program; representatives from business and industry; a vocational rehabilitation counselor; a representative of the state educational agency; and a representative of the State Workforce Investment Board. The input and recommendations of the SRC outlined in Attachment 4.2(c) reflect ongoing efforts to obtain information and feedback from Delawareans who are blind or visually impaired and are derived from the following sources: 1. Information supplied to the SRC by the Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired; 2. Information outlined in the summary report of the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment, completed during FY 2013; 3. Input received from public hearings and town hall meetings held in calendar years 2013 and 2014; 4. Information obtained from the Section 107 RSA monitoring activities of the VR Agency that took place in April 2013; 5. Information received from consumers and other related stakeholders; and 6. Statistics and other related data.

Recommendations from the Delaware Vocational Rehabilitation Council for the Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired (SRC)

Commendation:

“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much” – Helen Keller The Delaware Vocational Rehabilitation Advisory Council for the Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired (SRC) commends DVI for its engagement with the SRC and the community of Delawareans who are blind and visually impaired. The community benefits when we work cooperatively to improve services and empower consumers to self-advocate effectively. We look forward to accomplishing important goals together during FY 2015.

Summary of the SRC’s Input

During FY 2014, the SRC took an active role in evaluating and addressing barriers to employment and increasing employment opportunities for Delawareans who are blind or visually impaired. These important activities include, but are not limited to:

Drafting consumer satisfaction surveys and collaborating with DVI to establish a regular schedule for survey completion and transmission of survey results to the Council for analysis and action;

Participating in DVI’s statewide public meetings;

Facilitating joint stakeholder meetings to maximize the community’s ability to address common issues;

Establishing a legislative agenda for the SRC, designed to increase the state legislators’ awareness of issues impacting Delawareans who are blind and visually impaired. The legislative efforts of the SRC include face-to-face communication with members of the State’s House of Representatives and Senate and collaboration with Delaware’s disability advocacy groups;

Chartering and executing a plan to complete a Delaware Statewide Needs Assessment and Analysis through the use of consultative services.

Actively participating in efforts to create and disseminate public service announcements (PSAs) designed to publicize the National Governors’ Association’s efforts to improve employment opportunities for persons with disabilities;

Volunteering to participate in DVI’s programming, such as Career Day, and serve as members of interview panels during recruitment activities for VR leadership and staff;

Sponsorship of programming designed to increase the public’s awareness of services for Delaware’s blind and visually impaired community in conjunction with the National Federation of the Blind, the Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired, and corporate sponsors, such as Comcast.

Actively engaging in strategic planning activities and processes with DVI, which were facilitated by TACE Region 3 representatives, to evaluate the needs of the community of blind and visually impaired persons in Delaware and to set a collective agenda to prioritize and address the significant needs identified.

Recommendations from the SRC for the Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired

The Council recognizes that the community of Delawareans who are blind and visually impaired face a number of issues in their pursuit of meaningful employment. The following recommendations represent the Council’s attempt to prioritize these issues to assist DVI in establishing specific, measurable, achievable, results-focused, time-bound goals for the community’s benefit.

1. Transition - DVI provided to the SRC its new transition policy and program in May 2014. The SRC appreciates DVI’s work in the area of transition and looks forward to evaluating the program’s effectiveness.

Recommendations: a. Establish policies jointly with the Department of Education and the school districts to ensure that VR Counselors, who are expected to attend all IEP meetings and all other appropriate meetings involving the transitioning needs of the consumer, receive timely notification of all IEP meetings and regular reports of the student’s progress from IEP team members. DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

b. Establish a means through which DVI-VR Counselors and IEP team members receive appropriate training on the means through which to integrate Individualized Education Plans with Individualized Plans for Employment.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

c. Establish a program that offers to students who are blind or visually impaired and their parents and/or guardians, services designed to obtain from the College Board, which administers the SAT and PSAT, and the ACT organization, reasonable accommodations for testing, including assistance with completion of paperwork related to such requests, determinations related to the accommodations required, and practice testing.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

d. Establish an objective means through which to evaluate a consumer’s educational progress toward a selected career path prior to altering or otherwise reducing or eliminating DVI-VR sponsorship of the activities related to the chosen career.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation, though will require additional clarification in working in coordination with the SRC on the type(s) of objective means through which they are looking for DVI to refine the agency’s ability to measure the educational progress of our consumers.

e. Fill the Education Principal position and engage the agency’s education program leader in transition student case reviews with VR, TVI, O&M, and AT staff to identify recommendations and facilitate sharing of information with the IEP team.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

2. Increase public awareness of available services.

Recommendations:

a. Implement the use of automatic calling to disseminate information to members of the community.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

b. Increase utilization of social media to inform eligible consumers of events, programming, and resource availability.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

c. Sponsor workshops or courses on use of social media to access information about programs and services for persons who are blind or visually impaired.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

d. Increase public knowledge of SRC meetings by posting them on the DVI website, Facebook, the DVI newsletter, and other means through which DVI communicates with eligible consumers.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

3. Establish a sustainable means through which to oversee, monitor, and review all Memoranda of Understanding to which DVI is a party.

Recommendations:

a. Include in the marketing toolkit a resource guide that outlines services available to VR consumers, current, and potential employers through partnerships established by existing MOUs with other organizations or entities.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

b. On at least an annual basis, provide to the SRC status reports on existing MOUs and identify issues that require evaluation of the MOU and/or revisions of existing terms.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

c. Execute the Revised Memorandum of Understanding between the Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired and the Delaware Department of Education on or before September 1, 2014.

DVI Response: The DSU rejects this recommendation. The DSU is currently on track to have the draft version of the MOU completed by August 7,2014, with the documented executed and signed by all parties on or before November 1, 2014.

Recommendations:

a. Establish a new timeline for execution of the DVI/DOE MOU by proactively identifying concrete dates upon which to hold meetings with required parties.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

b. Establish and publish a review schedule for each Lead Education Agency’s review and transmission of feedback and suggested changes to the MOU. All such activities should be completed on or before the above-identified deadline for execution of the MOU.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

c. Develop a DVI training program to implement educational sessions designed to outline responsibilities created by the MOU and establish a timetable for beginning such training sessions during calendar year 2014. DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

d. Establish and implement a quarterly meeting schedule to obtain feedback from LEAs with whom DVI is working under the executed MOU.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015 with the caveat that these meetings will be an extension of existing special education director meetings coordinated by the Delaware Department of Education in which DVI is invited to participate as a portion of these quarterly meetings.

5. Implement an effective means through which to obtain information and feedback from the approximately 6,429 individuals between the ages of 18-64 that may be potentially eligible for VR services.

Recommendations:

a. Explore use of web-based surveys.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

b. Explore use of trained personnel or consultants to conduct telephone interviews with potentially eligible consumers to determine needs and identify barriers to receipt of services.

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015. c. Institute or enhance current efforts to obtain information from consumers who have been identified as successful closures at regular intervals (90 days, six months, one year, etc...)

DVI Response: The DSU accepts this recommendation and shall incorporate it into program goals for FY 2015.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 1:42PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:34AM by sadebgoodhartb

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

To utilize various services as deemed necessary and appropriate to address the unique and individualized needs of our targeted population the Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) works cooperatively with state agencies under the umbrella of Delaware Health and Social Services that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. Such agencies include: 1. Division of Social Services to address immediate needs for: Health Care Coverage, Food Supplement Program, Cash Assistance, Child Care Assistance, 2. Division of State Service Centers to address immediate needs for Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program 3. Division of Developmental Disabilities Services for transition of our jointly served consumers to extended services following the cessation of supported employment services under Title VI Part B funding, and consultation for development of Behavior Support Plans as necessary to reduce self-limiting and/or complex behaviors to facilitate positive supported employment outcomes. 4. Division of Medicaid and Medical Assistance to assist individuals with disabilities by allowing them to work without losing health benefits. Individuals with countable income below 275% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) may be eligible under this Medicaid for Workers with Disabilities program. 5. Division of Public Health for referral to community Health Centers for comprehensive family health services from prenatal and adolescent care to adult and geriatric medicine. 6. Division of services for Aging and Adults with Physical Disabilities as a comprehensive resource for Independent Living in areas such as money management, Medicare Part D for prescription assistance, Emergency Preparedness, Home Modifications, Medical Transportation, Attendant Services, and the Senior Community Service Employment Program. 7. The Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide drug and alcohol treatment services for adults, primarily through contracts with private agencies for screening and evaluation; outpatient counseling; opioid treatment, including methadone maintenance; continuous treatment team programs for individuals with long-term, disabling alcohol and drug dependence disorders; less intensive case management services offered through the outpatient counseling agencies; detoxification; and residential services. The residential services include short-term/variable length-of-stay treatment (30 days or less), long-term treatment, and halfway houses. 8. Delaware Industries for the Blind (DIB), an Ability One, not for profit program operated under the auspices of the Department of Health and Social Services, with its activities and programs reporting to the DVI Division Director to provide employment opportunities at competitive wages to persons with visual impairments. The VR program works cooperatively with (DIB), to develop the capacity of DIB to function as a Rehabilitation Facility for VR consumers. The intent is to provide limited term employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities to develop marketable work skills in areas of Customer Service, Engraving, Quality Control, Environmental Services, Engraving, Production, and General Office Work. During FFY 10 a Memorandum of Agreement was developed between DIB and VR to further competitive vocational opportunities by expanding the vocational training and assessment capability within DVI by expanding the internal partnerships between DVI VR and DIB.

DVI currently maintains a memorandum of understanding with the Delaware Division of Libraries, a state agency dedicated to providing leadership and support for the timely development of Delaware’s libraries, to ensure convenient access to, and encourage use of current information resources and reading material by all Delawareans. The Division for the Visually Impaired and the Division of Libraries share a mission to enhance and promote values of service, access, and excellence for all constituents and work together to uphold the National Federation for the Blind’s Newsline Service and other accessible systems through the public library system that benefits Delawareans with disabilities. The Newsline is a service provided by the National Federation of the Blind (NFB) where individuals with disabilities including visually impaired people can call in and access local and national media content including local newspapers, job advertisements, magazines, and periodicals.

DVI maintains an agreement regarding the establishment of the Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM) Collaborative between the Delaware Department of Education (DOE), the Delaware Department of Health and Social Services/Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI), and the University of Delaware/Center for Disabilities Studies (CDS). The parties collaborate in pursuit of a coordinated online request system and repository for the delivery of high quality AIM to all students with qualifying print disabilities in formats appropriate to their strengths and needs. DVI serves students who qualify for its services, and uses the centralized online material request system and repository in support of statewide accountability and optimized efficiency. DVI’s Instructional Materials Center (IMC) fulfills AIM orders for students within DVI’s purview. Students with print disabilities outside the purview of DVI are served by the Delaware AIM Center under CDS.

DVI is currently working with several other agencies within the Department of Health and Social Services to develop a comprehensive, cross-disability 1915i Medicaid waiver program entitled Pathways to Employment. The Pathways program will provide employment based services to those that are Medicaid/Target Population/Functionally eligible for the program. The Pathways is a Medicaid program designed to provide greater options for individuals with disabilities, including those with visual impairments, to gain additional supports for employment. This program will: serve low income individuals aged 14 to 25, across disabilities, who have a desire to work in a competitive work environment; provide individually tailored services for individuals with visual impairments, physical disabilities, intellectual disabilities (including brain injury), autism spectrum disorder, and Aspergers. Individuals with mental health support needs will receive similar services through a different, comprehensive Medicaid authority; offer an array of services such as career exploration, on the job supports, transportation, personal care, orientation and mobility training, assistive technology, and other services to help individuals gain and maintain employment based on their specific needs and tailored to their interests; stretch limited State dollars by partnering with the federal government, increasing individual independence, and strengthening the State’s workforce; and, provide a strong foundation for Delaware’s ongoing efforts to ensure that transition aged individuals with disabilities have a clear path to employment. While an MOU has not yet been executed a state plan amendment has been submitted to CMS by DHSS and the representative agencies. An interagency agreement shall be developed during FFY 14 with the program expected to launch by the conclusion of the federal fiscal year.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 1:44PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

 

The Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program works with the Department of Education (DOE) through the Interagency Agreement implemented on March 4, 2004 reviewed and accepted on September 19, 2007 by RSA to be incompliance with 34 CFR 361.22. This agreement is currently under review and revision between DVI and DOE to improve compliance between local education agencies and DVI’s education and VR transition programs as required by law and under the terms of a recent RSA monitoring review. It is anticipated that the new MOU will be finalized by 11/1/14. The current agreement with DOE includes specific roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services. It also includes the appeal process for families to grieve any decisions regarding services requests. The new agreement with further delineate the differences in services being provided by the agency’s education unit in comparison with the vocational rehabilitation unit.

DVI-VR continues to maintain a transition program that is designed as an integrated network of activities, which facilitates the successful progression of students through high school into the adult employment arena. The program includes: vocational assessment; career exploration; vocation training; post-secondary education; employment within integrated work settings (including early start to supported employment); and individualized adaptive living services from DVI including orientation and mobility training, low vision services, in home adaptive living skills training and assistive technology, etc. All of our student referrals continue to be made through the education unit of the agency, which provides educational programming to students in public and private schools through graduation or to the end of the school term during which the student reaches 21 years of age within DOE. All of the students served by our Educational Services program are involved in the Special Education program in accordance with Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

In SFY 2007 DVI was successful in obtaining an additional VR counselor position dedicated to transition aged students. In FFY 13 the agency changed the transition services model from having one VR counselor position dedicated on a full time basis to transition services statewide, to all three of the agency’s VR counselors dedicated to transition services in their respective regions in addition to their general caseload.

Following receipt of a student referral beginning at least four years prior to graduation, the VR counselor works collaboratively with all other DVI agency program staff for coordination of specific services focusing on career exploration and skill development in the areas of activities of daily living and rehabilitation technology. The Department of Education Program maintains the lead in terms of financial responsibility for purchase of reasonable accommodations within the classroom setting. In order to ensure consistent progress toward vocational goals, contacts by the VR Counselor are required throughout the calendar year with the students, their families, appropriate school personnel DVI Education staff, and various other sources contracted for student transition educational programming. The VR Counselor also attends Individualized Educational Program (IEP) meetings and interagency interdisciplinary team meetings to gather information relative to the full scope of VR services required for transition from secondary education to self-sufficiency. Based on the information obtained from various sources to include the student, the students, family, school officials and others, DVI VR Casework Manual mandates that an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed a minimum of 90 days following the determination of eligibility. At this time, assistive technology, funding resources for the assistive technology, timeframes for delivery of services, transportation assistance, low vision services, Orientation and Mobility, and all other pertinent VR services are provided as deemed necessary. If a needs assessment determines that specific equipment/technology must be provided, VR will loan (if it is in stock) the necessary equipment to an individual until such equipment can be ordered, setup and installed by the responsible parties. If funds or loaner equipment are not available, DVI-VR will work with DOE through the DVI Principal, who acts as the liaison between DVI and DOE, to transfer DOE purchased equipment to VR or provide a waiver that will enable the student to retain his/her DOE purchased equipment until replacement equipment is procured through VR.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 5:34PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

  Our practice is to identify VR vendors in New Castle, Kent and Sussex Counties that provide services to include: Medical and Psychological/Psychiatric assessments and treatment, Job Placement, Job Coaching, Supported Employment, Vocational Training, Work Adjustment training, Community Based Work Assessments, Job Readiness Training, Language Translation, Tutoring and Assistive Technology support/assessments and training. These services are provided for DVI VR consumers in an effort to facilitate employment. We partner with the general agency, Department Of Labor DVR, via a cooperative memorandum of understanding and “share” contractual agreements with local non-profit service providers. We continually review contractual agreements with vendors, consumers and counselors in an effort to provide a diverse array of services and to support consumers’ right to informed choice. As an agency we offer sensitivity and assistive technology awareness trainings for all private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers entering into cooperative agreements with DVI for contracted services. Vocational Rehabilitation, Independent Living Services, Technology Center, Education, and Orientation and Mobility staff partner with each other to provide comprehensive support designed to teach techniques and strategies that promote skill development and lead to employment when desired. This collaboration enables persons with vision loss to function comparably with their contemporaries at school, at work and in their communities. We regularly review and revisit consumers’ needs and plans towards employment. Contracts for employment related services with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers include Community Accredited Rehabilitation Facilities such as Service Source, Goodwill, CHIMES, Elwyn, KSI and Easter Seals. When specific blindness services for Occupational Training or Rehabilitation Technology Services are warranted, DVI has the flexibility to seek approval from the Office of Management and Budget to enter into contractual agreements with private non-profit organizations that may be located outside the state of Delaware. We represent DVI at local Delaware Association for Rehabilitation Professionals meetings, and work specifically with Service Source and Goodwill to facilitate DVI consumers enjoying access to set-aside employment opportunities within the State of Delaware.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 1:50PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities: • supported employment services; and • extended services. The Division for the Visually Impaired (DV)I has Memorandum of Understanding agreements with the Division for Developmental Disabilities Services (DDDS), the Department of Education (DOE), the Department of Labor Vocational Rehabilitation Division (DOL DVR) and the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (DSAMH) to provide wrap around Supported Employment and coordinate extended services for consumers with most significant disabilities in DVI. Specific supported employment (SE) vocational rehabilitation services best practices are provided as per the Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center Evidence Based Supported Employment model. All consumers who receive services via DDDS and/or a local Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)/Intensive Case Management (ICM) team are eligible for SE employment services as provided by a variety of in state qualified non-profit service providers. DDDS, DVR, and DOE entered into a formal agreement to work together with eligible students aged 14 and above, to transition successfully from school into employment, training/education or both. It is the goal of DVI VR to have every student who is a Supported Employment candidate and active with DDDS to start Supported Employment Services by age 15. This is to ensure there is no gap in services between the last month of school and the beginning of Supported Employment services and/or actual employment obtained through the Supported Employment service provision. If the program participant obtains employment during the school year and reaches the point of receiving follow along services prior to graduation, there is an agreement in place between DDDS, DVR and DOE that DOE will pay the placement vendor for follow along services until Sept. 1, of that current federal fiscal year. DDDS will then take over payment for the follow along services. Other applicants for services, who are not transition students, identified as most significantly disabled that will benefit from supported employment services, based on the severity of their disability, will be served through other Community Rehabilitation Programs. These CRP’s have contracts with the General VR agency, DVR, and in all cases accept the same contracted rates with DVI. The VR Program Specialist for DVI participates in the contract negotiations and approval process when requested. Specific contractual agreements with vendors who are most interested in serving the visual impaired require sensitivity training. The Program Specialist meets with all vendors and encourages separate contractual agreements where applicable.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 2:43PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing data to meet service delivery needs on an annual basis has not changed. The agency director continues to look at the numbers served, the severity of their disability, and the overall service needs on a monthly basis. The trend in the number of individuals making application for VR services and those being identified “most significantly disabled” continues to increase in that these individuals have two or more functional limitations that present a substantial impediment to employment and they will require VR services for a period of 6 months or more.” Over the past three years DVI has seen some variation in the numbers served in the VR program. In FY 11 the program served 249 persons, with 60% identified as “most significantly disabled”. In FY 12, 248 eligible individuals received VR services; 65% were identified as persons with “most significant disabilities. In FY 13, 217 persons were served with 74% identified as being “most significantly disabled”. There are currently 17 staff positions dedicated to the direct provision of VR services. The VR Team is currently staffed statewide by (1) District Administrator, (3) Senior VR Counselors, (1) Casual/Seasonal Counselor, (3) Employment Services Specialists, (2) Administrative Specialists, (5) Teachers, Special Education Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialists, (1) Technology Trainer and (1) Vocational Rehabilitation Program Specialist. Presently, all of our full-time VR counselors have Master’s Degrees in a Counseling related field. One of our Employment Specialists will have her Master Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling this summer and will sit for the CRC examination; (3) staff members have their Certification as Rehabilitation Counselors. Based on the increasing numbers served on an annual basis coupled with the complexity of secondary and tertiary disabilities we see the agency requiring 19 staff positions dedicated to the direct provision of VR services. The statewide staffing needed by the agency to handle the increased number of consumers being served in the next 5 years is (5) Senior VR Counselors (this includes 2 Senior VR Counselors for Transition Services), (3) Employment Services Specialists, (2) Administrative Specialists, (5) Teachers, Special Education Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialists, (1) VR District Administrator, (1) VR Program Specialist, and (1) VR Counselor I (seasonal/casual). In addition to the VR direct service positions mentioned above, DVI has an assortment of ancillary positions that provide either technical, administrative, fiscal or supportive roles in VR service provision and which are partly funded with VR Basic Support funds. Below is a summary of the personnel data regarding all positions whose salaries are partially or totally funded by the VR Basic Support grant.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Senior Accountant/Accounting Specialist 2 0 0
2 BEP Director/Administrative Officer 2 1 0
3 Fiscal Admin Officer/Administrative Specialist I 4 0 0
4 Vocational Rehabilitation Senior Counselor 3 0 0
5 Employment Services Specialist 3 0 0
6 Information Systems Support Specialist 1 0 0
7 Manager of Comp/Applic Sprt/Telecom Network/etc 4 0 0
8 VI Business Svc Supervisor 1 0 0
9 VR District Administrator 1 0 0
10 VR Program Specialist 1 0 0

 

Delaware continues to be without an institution of higher education with a program to prepare Vocational Rehabilitation professionals. DVI continues to support local university applications to implement such training programs. Currently, VR professionals are encouraged to pursue on-line training programs, such as George Washington University.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

DVI has partnership agreements with the University of Delaware, Delaware State University, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and Salus University to provide internships for graduate students majoring in Rehabilitation Education and other closely related fields of study. These partnerships afford an intern the opportunity to participate in the work environment of VR Service delivery and the delivery of ancillary services in a role similar to rehabilitation counselor. Interns are assigned working mentors in the VR program, as well as working in partnership with other field services to gain the broad scope of knowledge needed to become a successful rehabilitation professional. Generally, after completion of a successful internship, the intern is considered to be a qualified candidate for employment and would be considered for hiring purposes if/when a vacancy exists. In FY’14 DVI has (2) Public Allies to work specifically with our transition students and communication staff. To retain qualified personnel the agency has instituted a system for Staff Development Training that affords everyone the opportunity for professional growth within their specific occupational field. Tuition reimbursement up to $1,000 for tuition in addition to 6 hours weekly of paid educational leave is offered as an incentive to those pursuing advancement in the field of Rehabilitation Education. Our agency has also developed a solid partnership with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). OMB operates a Selective Placement Registry for the State of Delaware. This Registry lists qualified persons with disabilities from various ethnic backgrounds who have been pre-determined eligible to fill specific vacancies within state agencies. Agencies are free to select qualified individuals from this registry without going through the normal state recruitment process.

 

The agency follows recruitment practices established by the state to recruit, prepare and retain qualified personnel. In addition, vacancies for the Division are shared with various advocacy group chair persons so that their memberships are aware of any vacancies. They are asked to encourage qualified members, specific to the vacant position, to apply when vacancies occur. One of DVI’s Employment Services Specialist is a liaison to the State Human Resource Management office for Selective Placement. Presentations and site visits have been made to state agencies to create promote hiring of persons with disabilities via Selective Placement and to identify the types of reasonable accommodations to facilitate positive employment outcomes. The minimum qualifications for an entry level VR Counselor I requires a Bachelor’s degree or higher in Rehabilitation Counseling, Social or Behavioral Science or a related field. A Qualified Rehabilitation Counselor in Level II or the Senior level designated in the State Personnel system are required to possess or obtain a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or a related field (such as but not limited to Sociology, Psychology, or Behavioral Science), and must include graduate level coursework in Theory & Techniques of Counseling. DVI’s current practice for the VR Counselors and applicants not already CRC certified, is to ensure the Counselor/potential candidate aspires to achieve the educational requirements to be eligible to sit for the CRC exam. Following an offer of employment a performance plan is implemented and signed by the employee that includes a requirement for enrollment and participation in rehabilitation education graduate classes leading to eligibility to sit for the CRC exam within five (5) years from the date of hire. Due to the absence of an in-state graduate program in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling newly hired counselor(s) at the VR Counselor I and II levels are encouraged to take advantage of online distance learning opportunities with George Washington University (GWU), Virginia Commonwealth University and other schools nationwide that offer graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling and coursework leading to certification eligibility. The VR Program Specialist gathers information regarding available online graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling to share with VR staff. The minimum qualifications for an Orientation and Mobility Specialist is the Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist (COMS) certification issued by the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP). DVI currently requires this certification for practicing Orientation and Mobility Specialists within the agency. The minimum qualifications for Trainer/Educator IIs is currently three years of experience in preparing and developing training or education courses which includes designing learning objectives, curricula and materials with a focus on assistive technology. In order to become fully CSPD compliant the agency is moving toward requiring the two agency staff in this area to achieve Assistive Technology Professional (ATP) certification through the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) no later than FY 16."

 

To ensure that all personnel employed by the agency receive appropriate and adequate training with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement, and rehabilitation technology, trainings from outside vendors in specific areas are coordinated through Region 3 TACE Centers, through In-Service Training for workshops via contracted vendors specializing in specific areas and by approving staff travel to attend meetings and conferences as well as webinars to keep staff abreast of “Best Practices.” As outlined in the Division’s Staff Development Policy, as part of the annual Training Needs Assessment, the individual staff person meets with his/her supervisor to determine areas of training needed for career development. The VR Program Specialist (Staff Development Officer) compiles and summarizes this data and updates each person’s Career Development file. Based upon the needs assessment, the Staff Development Officer works with staff and supervisors to see that each has the opportunity to receive the training that has been identified as needed to perform their job duties as efficiently and effectively as possible. Through the coordination of in house training seminars, access to the Delaware Department of Health & Social Services extensive training curriculum, the Human Resource Management of the Office of Management and Budget’s Career Enrichment Program, and a multitude of outside training opportunities, specific needs can usually be met.

 

Whenever an applicant for services needs an interpreter in order to communicate, DVI staff obtains the services of an appropriate interpreter from a list of local professional interpreting services with whom we have a contractual agreement. All written materials are disseminated to consumers in the appropriate media: Braille, large print, audio or electronic file, as well as Spanish for various forms/brochures.

 

DVI’s Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired (TVIs) work in our local school districts throughout the state. At age 14, TVIs begin to refer their students to the Vocational Rehabilitation Program to begin transition services. The students are assigned to our VR Counselors who work with the students in the schools and in their homes to garner parental support during the transitional phase from school to the world of work. The VR Counselor also works to promote the concept of self-sufficiency, provides career counseling, and encourages and assists the student with obtaining part time employment. DVI personnel providing services to students with disabilities include, Teachers for the Visually Impaired, Orientation and Mobility Specialists, Vision Rehabilitation Therapists, Technology Trainer/Educators, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Employment Services Specialist. All personnel requiring CEU’s to maintain their specific certification or to keep abreast of trends impacting persons with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to participate in trainings for professional development. Staff Development Trainings are paid for through the Federal In-Service Training (IST) grant, as well as limited state funding. When travel funding is not available or restricted, the agency has made on-line CEU opportunities available for staff.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 5:38PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Following the guidelines established for a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) and the Vocational Rehabilitation Needs Assessment Guide established by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Division for the Visually Impaired contracted with Analytic Insights for the completion of the Statewide Needs Assessment. The following observations are based on consumer, staff and CRP feedback obtained via the CSNA process: • The rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly those with most significant disabilities are being well-met by the Division, however, there is a need to improve the provision of supported employment services. • The needs of racial and ethnic minorities are well-addressed by the department, with no significant differences in satisfaction with department services between minority groups. • Individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by VR may include Amish residents. There are approximately 1,500 Amish residents in the state, but there is an unknown number of Amish community members affected by blindness or visual impairment. DVI is planning to extend a successful campaign targeted toward Hispanic persons and to the Amish community. • Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system also participate in DVI. • Although the CSNA did not identify gaps for establishment, development, or improvement of community rehabilitation programs within the state, the agency recognizes the need to continue to work with our CRPs to further build their capacities to provide services to individuals who are blind and visual impaired. .

Assistive Technology was found to be an important issue to consumers, and the most frequently cited difficulty in finding employment.

The Division for the Visually Impaired, in conjunction with the State Rehabilitation Council for DVI will be evaluating additional information related to the CSNA and adding goals to the 2014 and 2015 state plan attachments to address those needs identified by the CSNA.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 5:39PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

The 2012 U S Censur Bureau, American Community Survey suggests there are 6,429 individuals in the state of Delaware between the ages of 18-64 that would potentially be eligible for VR services. We estimate during FY 15 VR will serve 250 individuals and of those 250 individuals 4% will be eligible for use of Part B Title VI funds. DVI anticipates having sufficient resources and funding streams to serve all eligible individuals making application for VR services which will preclude DVI from implementing an order of selection wait list. The table below represents the estimates for the number of eligible individuals for services, and the estimated cost of providing identified services utilizing Title I and Title VI funds.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Eligible Title I $744,000 240 $3,100
Eligible Title VI $85,000 10 $8,500
Totals   $829,000 250 $3,316

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 5:40PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

As a result of ongoing regularly scheduled State Rehab Council (SRC) meetings in conjunction with the FY 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment it is jointly agreed between DVI and the SRC that the following constitute the goals and priorities of Delaware Blind State VR Program: (1) Increase the Quality of employment outcomes, and Quantity of Employment Outcomes by 20% from the prior fiscal year. (2) Review, Evaluate and Implement Improvements to Transition Services. (3) Improve Marketing and Outreach to Potentially Eligible DVI Consumers. (4) Improve Assistive Technology Services through Innovation and Expansion. (5) Consistently Provide a High Level of Consumer Satisfaction.

Goal 1: Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes by 20% from the prior fiscal year. • Performance Measure 1.1: Increase successful closures from FY2014 levels by 20%. • Performance Measure 1.2: Demonstrate business partnerships through at least five new employer partnerships, whereby DVI consumers are employed within the fiscal year by 07/01/15. (SRC Goal) • Performance Measure 1.3: Implement business toolkit by December 31, 2014. The toolkit shall include information on the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, DVI’s on the job training program/model, and accommodation resources for employing persons with visual impairments. • Performance Measure 1.4: DVI shall implement a “business champions” program to highlight the successful partnerships established between the agency and local businesses by 07/01/15. (SRC Goal) • Performance Measure 1.5: DVI shall revise and implement a new model for customers that are interested in self-employment/entrepreneurship no later than 12/31/2014. (SRC Goal)

Goal 2: Review, evaluate and implement improvements to Transition Services. • Performance Measure 2.1: Continue to engage the GWU TACE for evaluation of current Transition programs and services by 04/01/15. • Performance Measure 2.2: Use the Visually Impaired Client Registry, and the September 30th Child Count to validate the identity and school enrollment status and location of all transition-aged youth eligible for transition services by 10/31/14. • Performance Measure 2.3: DVI shall implement its new transition model for services by 12/31/14, which includes direct coordination with DVI’s education program in establishing agency protocol for the provision of services under the extended core curriculum. (SRC Goal) • Performance Measure 2.4: DVI will finalize and execute the terms of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Delaware Department of Education, which details the roles and responsibilities of: (i) DVI staff; (ii) lead educational agencies; (iii) transition personnel; (iv) and the Department of Education in providing transition-related services to students who are blind and visually impaired no later than October 31, 2014. DVI shall meet with DOE on a consistent basis to discuss mutual issues and terms of this agreement. At least two of these meetings shall occur prior to September 30, 2015. • Performance Measure 2.5: Ensure that 100% of students that are expected to graduate within the next four school years are provided the opportunity and support to enroll in DVI VR services no later than September 1, 2015. • Performance Measure 2.6: Evaluate the current level of exposure to AT that transition students currently receive and ensure that 100% of students are referred for AT evaluations related to AT that is consistent to their IPE goals. • Performance Measure 2.7: Continue to employ the use of interns/public service projects such as Public Allies in order to assist with outreach to recruit schools and job shadowing/training opportunities for transition youth.

Goal 3: Improve Marketing and Outreach to Potentially Eligible DVI Consumers. • Performance Measure 3.1: DVI will partner directly with the Delaware Association for the Blind to coordinate outreach efforts to our mutual customers no later than 10/1/14. • Performance Measure 3.2: DVI will develop and maintain a public outreach listserv that includes optometry practices, ophthalmologic practices, senior centers, short term disability providers, long term disability providers, 55+ older communities, and related associations and market directly to them no later than 12/31/14. • Performance Measure 3.3: DVI will revise and publish a new website no later than 4/1/15 that includes updated information on the agency along with links to social media for the agency.

Goal 4: Develop Innovation and Expansion Activities in FY 15. • Performance Measure 4.1: DVI will require semi-annual training for VR Counselors and other support staff in AT. (SRC Goal) • Performance Measure 4.2: Increase pool of service providers by adding 2 new vendors by 06/30/2015 in Kent/Sussex Counties. • Performance Measure 4.3: DVI will hire a certified work incentives coordinator for consumers with visual impairments no later than 6/30/2015. (SRC Goal)

Goal 5: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction Performance Measure 5.1: DVI shall share consumer satisfaction survey data every other month with the State Rehabilitation Council through 9/30/2015. Performance Measure 5.2: Conduct 2 Town Hall Meetings in coordination with the State Rehabilitation Council by 04/30/2015. Performance Measure 5.3: DVI shall establish a new program with Delaware Association for the Blind that focuses particularly on self-advocacy skills development by 12/31/14. (SRC Goal)

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 5:40PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:53AM by sadebgoodhartb

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Specify the state’s goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services. Title VI, Part B funds in the amount of $45,000 will be utilized to provide intensive Supported Employment Services. The goal for FY 2014 will remain as previously reported to develop negotiated relationships with employers to craft customized supported employment opportunities in integrated settings that is consistent with the individual’s unique skills, abilities, interests, and informed choice. The DSU is estimating supported employment services will be provided to approximately 10 most significantly disabled individuals requiring supported employment services resulting from severe developmental delays, traumatic brain injuries, and/or severe mental health impairments. DVI has hired a Senior Counselor with experience working with DDDS consumers to manage all SE referred individuals. General funds will be utilized to supplement Title VI part B funds as deemed necessary to provide supplemental disability related support services that facilitate successful employment outcomes. Supplemental support services may include, but are not limited to, adjustment counseling, adaptive devices, transportation, interpreter services, personal attendant services, and maintenance. To identify individuals requiring such intensive job support services, the state unit will engage in comprehensive assessments to determine the nature and scope of the individual’s rehabilitation needs prior to plan development. The VR Counselor’s assessment will include a psychological evaluation, a functional skill assessment, three to five situational assessments through community work based assessments, and an evaluation of rehabilitation technology needs based on the individual’s selected employment goal as necessary and appropriate. A Memorandum of Understanding exists between DVI DHSS, DVR DOL, DSAMH, DOE and DDDS to operationalize all SE services. In accordance with Section 7(36) of the Rehab Act, the provision of supported employment services allows for 18 months of VR follow-along services. Under special circumstances, in mutual agreement with the eligible individual, the contracted vendor, the VR Counselor, and the VR District Administrator, DVI policy allows for extended service provision in order to achieve the employment outcome identified in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). We will continue in this manner.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 5:41PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

 • Performance Measure 1.1: Increase successful closures from FY2014 levels by 20%. Strategy 1.1: The agency plans on doing further outreach to Delaware’s minority populations through the faith based network, and a targeted outreach to Delaware’s optometrists, ophthalmologists, senior centers, Lion’s Clubs, and 55 and older communities where potential customers may be found. The increased referral base should create a commensurate increase in outcomes for the agency.

• Performance Measure 1.2: Demonstrate business partnerships through at least five new employer partnerships, whereby DVI consumers are employed within the fiscal year by 07/01/15. (SRC Goal) Strategy 1.2: DVI is engaging employers directly through several targeted initiatives. One initiative involves direct communication with the regional OFCCP office based out of Philadelphia, PA. Another initiative involves engagement with business through the recently established Delaware Business Leaders Network.

• Performance Measure 1.3: Implement business toolkit by December 31, 2014. The toolkit shall include information on the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, DVI’s on the job training program/model, and accommodation resources for employing persons with visual impairments. Strategy 1.3: DVI has been developing the business toolkit since FY 2014. The WOTC for individuals with visual impairments was established on October 1, 2013 through an agreement with the Delaware Department of Labor’s Division of Employment and Training. In FY 2015 the agency will also develop a policy and procedure for the use of an on-the-job-training model/program for the agency. The various tools that the agency utilizes as incentives to employers will then be packaged and advertised through the agency website and additional employer specific marketing materials.

• Performance Measure 1.4: DVI shall implement a “business champions” program to highlight the successful partnerships established between the agency and local businesses by 07/01/15. (SRC Goal) Strategy 1.4: DVI will work on the business champions program in monthly SRC meetings with technical assistance from the agency’s TACE, George Washington University.

• Performance Measure 1.5: DVI shall revise and implement a new model for customers that are interested in self-employment/entrepreneurship no later than 12/31/2014. (SRC Goal) Strategy 1.5: DVI shall review previous policies developed by both the blind agency and general agency, in addition to seeking consultation from at least one community based program that specializes in self-employment training and consulting, such as the Small Business Administration.

Goal 2: Review, evaluate and implement improvements to Transition Services.

• Performance Measure 2.1: Continue to engage the GWU TACE for evaluation of current Transition programs and services by 04/01/15. Strategy 2.1: DVI will contact Melissa Diehl through GWU TACE directly to finalize a report/analysis of the agency’s transition program.

• Performance Measure 2.2: Use the Visually Impaired Client Registry, and the September 30th Child Count to validate the identity and school enrollment status and location of all transition-aged youth eligible for transition services by 10/31/14. Strategy 2.2: The DVI Director, or their designee(s), will perform this task in October 2014.

• Performance Measure 2.3: DVI shall implement its new transition model for services by 12/31/14, which includes direct coordination with DVI’s education program in establishing agency protocol for the provision of services under the extended core curriculum. (SRC Goal) Strategy 2.3: DVI will engage in several training sessions with unit staff representing education, vocational rehabilitation, orientation/mobility, assistive technology, independent living, and business enterprise services quarterly for at least 2 consecutive quarters focused exclusive on an integrated transition model for the agency beginning in June, 2014.

• Performance Measure 2.4: DVI will finalize and execute the terms of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Delaware Department of Education, which details the roles and responsibilities of: (i) DVI staff; (ii) lead educational agencies; (iii) general VR transition personnel; (iv) and the Department of Education in providing transition-related services to students who are blind and visually impaired no later an October 31, 2014. DVI shall meet with DOE on a consistent basis to discuss mutual issues and terms of this agreement. At least two of these meetings shall occur prior to September 30, 2015. Strategy 2.4: DVI will continue to engage in meetings regarding the MOU with the Delaware Department of Education as frequently as possible until this document is finalized.

• Performance Measure 2.5: Ensure that 100% of students that are expected to graduate within the next four school years are provided the opportunity and support to enroll in DVI VR services no later than September 1, 2015. Strategy 2.5: DVI will closely monitor on a monthly basis the progress of those students being referred from DVI’s education program to the VR transition program based on the initial analysis conducted under Performance Measure 2.2.

• Performance Measure 2.6: Evaluate the current level of exposure to AT that transition students currently receive and ensure that 100% of students are referred for AT evaluations related to AT that is consistent to their IPE goals. Strategy 2.6: With the establishment of the SETT framework for AT services, DVI will offer evaluation or reevaluation of graduating transition students for their AT needs in addition to those students currently requiring AT supports engaged in post-secondary education, ready for employment, and/or employment.

• Performance Measure 2.7: Continue to employ the use of interns/public service projects such as Public Allies in order to assist with outreach to recruit schools and job shadowing/training opportunities for transition youth. Strategy 2.7: DVI will attend the initial informational session for the next series of Public Allies to develop a pathway for at least one public ally to work with the agency on transition related activities in FY 15.

Goal 3: Improve Marketing and Outreach to Potentially Eligible DVI Consumers. • Performance Measure 3.1: DVI will partner directly with the Delaware Association for the Blind to coordinate outreach efforts to our mutual customers no later than 10/1/14.

• Performance Measure 3.2: DVI will develop and maintain a public outreach listserv that includes optometry practices, ophthalmologic practices, senior centers, 55+ older communities, and related associations and market directly to them no later than 12/31/14. Strategy 3.2: DVI will develop this listserv and ensure it is maintained by assigning it to the agency’s communications director.

• Performance Measure 3.3: DVI will revise and publish a new website no later than 4/1/15 that includes updated information on the agency along with links to social media for the agency. Strategy 3.3: DVI will work closely with the agency website administrator and engage in meetings at least once every other month to make sure content is validated and uploaded in a timely manner.

Goal 4: Develop Innovation and Expansion Activities in FY 15. • Performance Measure 4.1: DVI will require semiannual training for VRCs and other support staff in AT. (SRC Goal) Strategy 4.1: DVI will work with specialized providers in the provision of AT such as the Delaware Assistive Technology Initiative and the Sierra Group to create specialized training for VR staff. • Performance Measure 4.2: Increase pool of service providers by adding 2 new vendors by 06/30/2015 in Kent/Sussex Counties. Strategy 4.2: DVI will run a request for proposals for innovation and expansion in the development of community rehabilitation programs that are interested in developing accessible training programs for the blind and visually impaired. The request for proposals will include the availability of funding for technical assistance, assistive technology provision/installation, and model development from the agency.

• Performance Measure 4.3: DVI will hire a certified work incentives coordinator for consumers with visual impairments no later than 6/30/2015. (SRC Goal) Strategy 4.3: DVI will work closely with organizations such as VCU-RRTC that credential certified work incentives coordinators to recruit a qualified individual for this position on a contractual basis.

Goal 5: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction Performance Measure 5.1: DVI shall share consumer satisfaction survey data every other month with the State Rehabilitation Council through 9/30/2015. Strategy 5.1: DVI shall monitor the completion of consumer satisfaction surveys on a monthly basis by assigning this task to the agency district administrator.

Performance Measure 5.2: Conduct 2 Town Hall Meetings in coordination with the State Rehabilitation Council by 04/30/2015. Strategy 5.2: DVI will hold at least one meeting in the northern part of the state and another in the southern part of the state. DVI will utilize locations that offer the availability of video and phone conferencing for the meetings.

Performance Measure 5.3: DVI shall establish a new program with Delaware Association for the Blind that focuses particularly on self-advocacy skills development by 12/31/14. (SRC Goal) Strategy 5.3: DVI will conduct a series of meetings with qualified organizations in Delaware to develop this training model for consumers statewide.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

  To facilitate informed choice, DVI‘s computer labs located in each of the agency’s offices offers a variety of rehab technology devices to afford VR consumers the opportunity to use and select devices to increase their functional capacities to engage in vocational training, educational training, and/or a work environment. Evaluation and training is provided by DVI Trainer Educators at each stage of the rehabilitation process be it plan development, training, or placement to the extent that training or technical assistance is necessary for an individual with a disability to achieve an employment outcome. Assistive Technology devices are not subject to financial needs tests. If an individual requires an Assistive Technology device to prepare for employment and it cannot be obtained in a timely manner through comparable benefits such as Lions Clubs or other such foundations specific to persons with visual impairments the items are procured through the Department of Health and Social Services’ procurement process. VR Consumers are also made aware of and referred to other community resources such as the Delaware Assistive Technology Initiative, and Easter Seals that also offer a variety of rehab technology devices to trial prior to purchase to ensure the device meets their specific need.

In FFY 2014 the agency adopted the SETT framework as a validated process for assessing clients’ assistive technology needs. This model emphasizes the Student (or consumer), Environment, Tasks, and Tools as equally valid components in determining the AT needs of an individual with a visual impairment. While this was originally developed for transition aged youth, the agency has broadened its applicability to all consumers served by the agency in order to consistently and effectively meet their AT needs.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

In FFY 14 the agency made comprehensive revisions to all of the marketing materials, including the agency website. The materials developed are all required to be A. Accessible in large print and alternate formats if requested, and B. Select materials are being developed in Spanish versions to better meet the needs of this minority population. In addition the agency has done specific outreach through meetings in February, 2013 with the Delaware Lenape Tribe to better engage this minority population in Delaware. The agency plans on doing further outreach to Delaware’s minority populations through the faith based network, and a targeted outreach to Delaware’s optometrists, ophthalmologists, senior centers, Lion’s Clubs, and 55 and older communities where potential customers may be found. In addition, the agency established a presence on social media through Facebook and Linked In in FFY 2014.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

 As identified through the FY 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment there is a need to develop the capacity of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) for serving blind individuals with most significant disabilities to increase the quality and quantity of our employment outcomes as well as increase the number of service providers for DVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Innovation and Expansion dollars will be allocated to the following methods and strategies to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

To improve the performance of DVI’s VR program with respect to the evaluation of standards and performance indicators we intend to work towards development and implementation of a series of case management reports in our electronic case management system that will enable us to capture real time date for the federal performance indicators as an administrative management tool. One of these reports was developed in FFY 2014 that allows the agency to do real time monitoring of the agency case flow, outcomes, and caseload distribution. This information will be shared with our councils and other stake holders to develop specific strategies to increase our number of applicants and educate employers to the skills and abilities possessed by individuals with disability. Additionally we will continue with our documented goals to improve the quantity and quality of our employment outcomes through networking with various employers at community events and marketing the services of DVI through advertisements and outreach events.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

 As of October, 2013 the Director for the Division for the Visually Impaired was appointed as a member of the statewide Workforce Investment Board that administers the federal Department of Labor programs within the State of Delaware. As a member of the Board, the Director will have input into the awarding of contracts and funds to workforce training programs and in ensuring that the programs are accessible to all persons with disabilities, including those with legal blindness.

As an agency we have taken steps to develop and offer sensitivity and awareness trainings for all private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers entering into cooperative agreements with DVI for contracted services. Vocational Rehabilitation Program Staff, Independent Living Services Program Staff, Technology Center, Education, Support Staff and Certified Orientation and Mobility partner to provide a day of comprehensive activities designed to teach techniques and strategies that promote skill development. These trainings demonstrate the capability of persons with severe vision loss to function on as much of an equal plane as their sighted peers in terms of acquiring skills training and employment within integrated settings. Contracts for employment related services with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers typically include Community Accredited Rehabilitation Facilities such as Goodwill, CHIMES, Elwyn, and Easter Seals. When specific blindness services for Occupational Training or Rehabilitation Technology Services, DVI has the flexibility to seek approval from the Office of Management and Budget to enter into contractual agreements to procure specific client services from other private non-profit organizations that may be located outside the state of Delaware such as the Statler Center in Buffalo, New York.

With respect to the provision of services by more than one VR Agency to an individual simultaneously, a cooperative agreement was updated between the director of the General VR Agency and DVI agency director, Mr. Daniel Madrid, effective December, 2013. This agreement provides that DVI, in fulfilling the terms of this agreement, shall: A. Refer to DVR all persons who do not fall under the legal definition of blindness. OR B. Refer to DVR for case management purposes all persons who are classified as Severely Visually Impaired only when a waiting list exists for DVI while under an Order of Selection. AND C. DVI will provide support as subject matter experts for cases referred to DVR where either the condition does not make the individual eligible for DVI services or for those cases referred to DVR while an Order of Selection waiting list exists. This support can be, but not limited to assessments, evaluation for assistive technology, training with assistive technology and orientation and mobility instruction. Reimbursement for services provided to DVR consumers provided by DVI personnel shall be assessed at the prevailing Medicaid rate for that service.

For purposes of this agreement in those cases where two or more disabling conditions are present, the primary disability will be the determining factor in which agency will assume case management authority. For those cases in which eligibility for VR services has been established by DVR and/or DVI and the case has been accepted (eligible for VR services) with a significant disability, a case conference will be convened, to include the District Administrators and to determine the most appropriate service delivery system. In those cases where agreement cannot be reached, the Directors of DVI and DVR will make the final determination. Regardless of which agency retains the Vocational Rehabilitation case management authority, it is required under Delaware Code Title 31, Chapter 2108, that DVI be informed of all persons known to be Legally Blind or Severely Visually Impaired within the State in order that an accurate Registry of the Blind can be maintained.”

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

 Goal 1: Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes by 20% from the prior fiscal year.

• Performance Measure 1.1: Increase successful closures from FY2014 levels by 20%. Strategy 1.1: The agency plans on doing further outreach to Delaware’s minority populations through the faith based network, and a targeted outreach to Delaware’s optometrists, ophthalmologists, senior centers, Lion’s Clubs, and 55 and older communities where potential customers may be found. The increased referral base should create a commensurate increase in outcomes for the agency.

• Performance Measure 1.2: Demonstrate business partnerships through at least five new employer partnerships, whereby DVI consumers are employed within the fiscal year by 07/01/15. (SRC Goal) Strategy 1.2: DVI is engaging employers directly through several targeted initiatives. One initiative involves direct communication with the regional OFCCP office based out of Philadelphia, PA. Another initiative involves engagement with business through the recently established Delaware Business Leaders Network.

• Performance Measure 1.3: Implement business toolkit by December 31, 2014. The toolkit shall include information on the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, DVI’s on the job training program/model, and accommodation resources for employing persons with visual impairments. Strategy 1.3: DVI has been developing the business toolkit since FY 2014. The WOTC for individuals with visual impairments was established on October 1, 2013 through an agreement with the Delaware Department of Labor’s Division of Employment and Training. In FY 2015 the agency will also develop a policy and procedure for the use of an on-the-job-training model/program for the agency. The various tools that the agency utilizes as incentives to employers will then be packaged and advertised through the agency website and additional employer specific marketing materials.

• Performance Measure 1.4: DVI shall implement a “business champions” program to highlight the successful partnerships established between the agency and local businesses by 07/01/15. (SRC Goal) Strategy 1.4: DVI will work on the business champions program in monthly SRC meetings with technical assistance from the agency’s TACE, George Washington University.

• Performance Measure 1.5: DVI shall revise and implement a new model for customers that are interested in self-employment/entrepreneurship no later than 12/31/2014. (SRC Goal) Strategy 1.5: DVI shall review previous policies developed by both the blind agency and general agency, in addition to seeking consultation from at least one community based program that specializes in self-employment training and consulting, such as the Small Business Administration.

Goal 2: Review, evaluate and implement improvements to Transition Services.

• Performance Measure 2.1: Continue to engage the GWU TACE for evaluation of current Transition programs and services by 04/01/15. Strategy 2.1: DVI will contact Melissa Diehl through GWU TACE directly to finalize a report/analysis of the agency’s transition program.

• Performance Measure 2.2: Use the Visually Impaired Client Registry, and the September 30th Child Count to validate the identity and school enrollment status and location of all transition-aged youth eligible for transition services by 10/31/14. Strategy 2.2: The DVI Director, or their designee(s), will perform this task in October 2014.

• Performance Measure 2.3: DVI shall implement its new transition model for services by 12/31/14, which includes direct coordination with DVI’s education program in establishing agency protocol for the provision of services under the extended core curriculum. (SRC Goal) Strategy 2.3: DVI will engage in several training sessions with unit staff representing education, vocational rehabilitation, orientation/mobility, assistive technology, independent living, and business enterprise services quarterly for at least 2 consecutive quarters focused exclusive on an integrated transition model for the agency beginning in June, 2014.

• Performance Measure 2.4: DVI will finalize and execute the terms of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Delaware Department of Education, which details the roles and responsibilities of: (i) DVI staff; (ii) lead educational agencies; (iii) general VR transition personnel; (iv) and the Department of Education in providing transition-related services to students who are blind and visually impaired no later an October 31, 2014. DVI shall meet with DOE on a consistent basis to discuss mutual issues and terms of this agreement. At least two of these meetings shall occur prior to September 30, 2015. Strategy 2.4: DVI will continue to engage in meetings regarding the MOU with the Delaware Department of Education as frequently as possible until this document is finalized.

• Performance Measure 2.5: Ensure that 100% of students that are expected to graduate within the next four school years are provided the opportunity and support to enroll in DVI VR services no later than September 1, 2015. Strategy 2.5: DVI will closely monitor on a monthly basis the progress of those students being referred from DVI’s education program to the VR transition program based on the initial analysis conducted under Performance Measure 2.2.

• Performance Measure 2.6: Evaluate the current level of exposure to AT that transition students currently receive and ensure that 100% of students are referred for AT evaluations related to AT that is consistent to their IPE goals. Strategy 2.6: With the establishment of the SETT framework for AT services, DVI will offer evaluation or reevaluation of graduating transition students for their AT needs in addition to those students currently requiring AT supports engaged in post-secondary education, ready for employment, and/or employment.

• Performance Measure 2.7: Continue to employ the use of interns/public service projects such as Public Allies in order to assist with outreach to recruit schools and job shadowing/training opportunities for transition youth. Strategy 2.7: DVI will attend the initial informational session for the next series of Public Allies to develop a pathway for at least one public ally to work with the agency on transition related activities in FY 15.

Goal 3: Improve Marketing and Outreach to Potentially Eligible DVI Consumers. • Performance Measure 3.1: DVI will partner directly with the Delaware Association for the Blind to coordinate outreach efforts to our mutual customers no later than 10/1/14.

• Performance Measure 3.2: DVI will develop and maintain a public outreach listserv that includes optometry practices, ophthalmologic practices, senior centers, 55+ older communities, and related associations and market directly to them no later than 12/31/14. Strategy 3.2: DVI will develop this listserv and ensure it is maintained by assigning it to the agency’s communications director.

• Performance Measure 3.3: DVI will revise and publish a new website no later than 4/1/15 that includes updated information on the agency along with links to social media for the agency. Strategy 3.3: DVI will work closely with the agency website administrator and engage in meetings at least once every other month to make sure content is validated and uploaded in a timely manner.

Goal 4: Develop Innovation and Expansion Activities in FY 15. • Performance Measure 4.1: DVI will require semiannual training for VR Counselors and other support staff in AT. (SRC Goal) Strategy 4.1: DVI will work with specialized providers in the provision of AT such as the Delaware Assistive Technology Initiative and the Sierra Group to create specialized training for VR staff. • Performance Measure 4.2: Increase pool of service providers by adding 2 new vendors by 06/30/2015 in Kent/Sussex Counties. Strategy 4.2: DVI will run a request for proposals for innovation and expansion in the development of community rehabilitation programs that are interested in developing accessible training programs for the blind and visually impaired. The request for proposals will include the availability of funding for technical assistance, assistive technology provision/installation, and model development from the agency.

• Performance Measure 4.3: DVI will hire a certified work incentives coordinator for consumers with visual impairments no later than 6/30/2015. (SRC Goal) Strategy 4.3: DVI will work closely with organizations such as VCU-RRTC that credential certified work incentives coordinators to recruit a qualified individual for this position on a contractual basis.

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 5:45PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

4.11 (c) (1) Goal and Priorities Delaware Blind is scheduled for RSA monitoring activities under section 107 in May 2013. As a result of ongoing regularly scheduled State Rehab Council (SRC) meetings in conjunction with the FY 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment it is jointly agreed between DVI and the SRC that the following constitute the goals and priorities of Delaware Blind State VR Program: (1) Increase the Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes (2) Improve Case Management (3) Automate and Streamline VR processes (4) Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction

Goal 1: Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes Performance Measure 1.1: Network to establish business partnerships. Performance Measure 1.2: Develop and implement a marketing campaign. Performance Measure 1.3: Participate in, and conduct, various outreach events. Performance Measure 1.4: Increase pool of service providers

DVI has increased the number of business partnerships in FY 2013. DVI has educated and provided business consultation on hiring individuals that are blinded and visually impaired employers. The DVI staff has conducted trainings with various management teams throughout the state to educate and establish a relationship with hiring managers as an avenue of potential employment for our consumers. Some current business partnerships are: Current Business Partnerships 1. Delaware Department of Transportation 2. Walgreen’s 3. Big Lots 4. Food Lion 5. Sodexo – locally at AI DuPont Hospital 6. Brookdale Retirement 7. Regal Retirement Home 8. Bernard Personnel 9. Wilmington Hospital 10. DE State Housing Authority 11. Beebe Healthcare in Lewes

DVI has participated in various outreach activities in FY” 2013. During FY’13 efforts continued to identify and provide services to populations that might be underserved and/or unserved. DVI advertised with Vital! Magazine, News Journal, the Central Delaware Chamber of Commerce, local mall kiosks with Clear Channel Communications, on Paratransit, rail stations, and fixed route buses via Gateway Communications. DVI had two appearances on Window on Wilmington, TV. DVI established Social Media accounts this period to increase awareness as well. DVI worked with IN-Focus with Martin Sheen to develop a documentary and commercial. The documentary was aired in the summer of 2013 and is available on DVI’s website and YouTube. DVI also partnered with Screen Vision, Inc. for a twelve week advertising campaign at the Dover Mall Carmike Theaters; two thirty second ads highlighting services before every movie. Presentations about services provided include: • Employees of Delaware Park • Board of Examiners in Optometry Meeting in Dover • The Annual Winter Thaw meeting of the Delaware Optometric and Para-Optometric Association in Newark • Coalition for the Organization for Delaware Entrepreneurship Centers held at the Chase Center in Wilmington • Millsboro Lions Club • Support Groups

DVI participated in numerous health fairs, wellness programs and presentations throughout the state such as: • Delaware Industries for the Blind Open House • Delaware Diabetes Coalition Tenth Annual "Delaware Diabetes Wellness EXPO" • Life Conference • Heritage Shores Wellness Fair • Homelife Milton Century Club Annual Meeting • 55+ Expo • Brain Injury Conference • NFB State Conference • Woodlea Apt. Independence Health Fair • AstraZeneca • Methodist Country House • Cape Henlopen Senior Center • Statewide Training Advisory Network of DE • 42nd Annual Summer Institute "Trauma Across the Lifespan" • Wesley College Disabilities Coordinator Sensitivity Training • Health Fair Long Neck Cheer Center Christina School District Transition Conference • Employer Conference at the White Clay Conference Center • Blue Rocks Father’s Day Game • Workforce Opportunities Conference The agency made comprehensive revisions to all of the marketing materials, including the agency website. The materials developed are all required to be A.) Accessible in large print and alternate formats if requested and B.) Select materials are being developed in Spanish versions to better meet the needs of this minority population. In addition the agency has done specific outreach through meetings in February, 2013 with the Delaware Lenape Tribe to better engage this minority population in Delaware. The agency plans on doing further outreach to Delaware’s minority populations through the faith based network, and targeted outreach to Delaware’s optometrists, ophthalmologists, senior centers, Lion’s Clubs, and 55 and older communities where potential customers may be found. Our practice is to identify VR vendors in New Castle, Kent and Sussex Counties that provide services to include: Medical and Psychological/Psychiatric assessments and treatment, Job Placement, Job Coaching, Supported Employment, Vocational Training, Work Adjustment training, Community Based Work Assessments, Job Readiness Training, Language Translation, Tutoring and Assistive Technology support/assessments and training. These services are provided for DVI VR consumers in an effort to facilitate employment. We partner with the general agency, DOL DVR, via a cooperative memorandum of understanding and “share” contractual agreements with local non-profit service providers. We continually review contractual agreements with vendors, consumers and counselors in an effort to provide a diverse array of services and to support consumers’ right to informed choice. As an agency we offer sensitivity and assistive technology awareness training for all private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers entering into cooperative agreements with DVI for contracted services. Vocational Rehabilitation, Independent Living Services, Technology Center Education and Certified Orientation and Mobility staff partner with each other to provide comprehensive support designed to teach techniques and strategies that promote skill development and lead to employment. This collaboration enables persons with severe vision loss to function comparably with their peers at school, at work and in their communities. We regularly review and revisit consumers’ needs and plans towards employment. Contracts for employment related services with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers include Community Accredited Rehabilitation Facilities such as Service Source, Goodwill, CHIMES, Elwyn, KSI and Easter Seals. When specific blindness services for Occupational Training or Rehabilitation Technology Services are warranted, DVI has the flexibility to seek approval from the Office of Management and Budget to enter into contractual agreements with private non-profit organizations that may be located outside the state of Delaware. We represent DVI at local Delaware Association for Rehabilitation Professionals meetings, and work specifically with Service Source and Goodwill to facilitate DVI consumers enjoying access to set-aside employment opportunities within the State of Delaware.

Goal 2: Improve Case Management Performance Measure 2.1: Monthly supervisory meetings Performance Measure 2.2: Revise Casework Manual Performance Measure 2.3: Coordinate Interdisciplinary Team Meetings Performance Measure 2.4: Professional Staff Development

DVI staff conducted interdisciplinary monthly meetings to complete case reviews, review goals, and address performance measures. Challenging cases are discussed at this time by the team to establish effective methods and strategies that insure quality employment outcomes. This practice is on-going throughout the fiscal year.

The Casework Manual was reviewed during the fiscal year for revisions. No significant changes in policies or procedures were cited during the fiscal year. The Casework Manual revisions are made as changes are identified.

The VR Counselor and other staff attend monthly Individualized Educational Program (IEP) meetings and interagency interdisciplinary team meetings to gather information relative to the full scope of VR services required for transition from secondary education to self-sufficiency. Based on the information obtained from various sources to include the student, the students, family, school officials and others, DVI VR Casework Manual mandates that an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed a minimum of 90 days following the determination of eligibility. The meetings goal is to establish quality services plan and support for each consumer.

Services provided by DVI personnel for students with disabilities include: Teachers for the Visually Impaired, Orientation and Mobility Specialists, Vision Rehabilitation Therapist, Technology Trainer/Educators, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Employment Services Specialist. All personnel requiring CEU’s to maintain their specific certification or to keep abreast of trends impacting persons with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to participate in trainings for professional development. Staff Development Trainings are paid for through the Federal In-Service Training (IST) grant, as well as limited state funding. When travel funding is not available or restricted, the agency has made on-line CEU opportunities available for staff. This fiscal year all vocational rehabilitation professional and support staff were trained in motivational interviewing. Also, staff are provided with the opportunity to participate in internal and external training. .

Additionally, all contracted vendors shall maintain a program of professional development for those employees within its organization who provide job placement services by participating in training opportunities for on-site trainers, employment specialists/job developers and Supported Employment managers.

Goal 3: Automation & Streamlining Performance Measure 3.1: Automate VR forms Performance Measure 3.2: Streamline VR systematic processes

DVI has started the process of automating VR forms to streamline the work process. Forms are reviewed for usefulness and revised to be included in DVI’s case management system. Another goal is to streamline and automate manual reports to enhance the data retrieval process. Development of automated reports and forms will be an on-going process that will evolve to ensure effective and efficient use of the team’s time.

Goal 4: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction Performance Measure 4.1: Revise consumer satisfaction surveys. Performance Measure 4.2: Conduct Town Hall Meetings Performance Measure 4.3 Respond to 100% of written consumer complaints within 10 business days of receipt.

The consumer surveys were conducted and transmitted to the SRC. Overrall,the consumers are satisfied with the services provided by DVI. The FY 2013 consumer satisfaction survey results included responses from six consumers via telephone. A summary of their responses are as follows: • 67% of the respondents stated they were satisfied with the overall interaction received from the VR counselor during the process. • 83% of the respondents stated the VR counselors were courteous. • 83% of the respondents stated the VR counselors were responsive to their needs, requests, questions, and/or concerns. • 84% of the respondents stated they were satisfied with the VR teams ability to provide information about the VR services. • 67% of the respondents stated they were not satisfied with the services they received prior to job placement. • 83% of the respondents stated they requested and received job services and was not satisfied with the job placements. • 100% of the respondents that received job services stated they very satisfied with the services. • 67% of the respondents stated they were involved in choosing their vocational goal. • 67% of the respondents stated they were very involved in development of their plan for employment. • 50% of the respondents stated they were satisfied with the timely response of the VR services. • 100% of the respondents stated they were involved with the overall VR process. • 100% of the respondents stated they were very satisfied with the quality of VR services received.

Consumer feedback is important for quality service delivery. DVI will continue to assess all consumer feedback to ensure quality outcomes for our consumers and use activities to professionally develop staff.

Town Hall meetings were held February 11, 2013 and July 18, 2013. The consumer feedback and inquiries were address to insure appropriate comment from the public. This fiscal year all consumer complaints were responded on or before the required 5 business day period. All consumer concerns are assessed for future service delivery enhancements during the fiscal year.

 

The goal for FY 2013 was to develop negotiated relationships with employers to craft customized supported employment opportunities in integrated settings for a minimum of 7 most significantly disabled individuals. This goal was not achieved having successfully counted zero outcomes in FY 2013 under the supported employment program.

The reason for this has historically been that DVI referred all consumers with a primary impediment other than blindness to the VR general agency for supported employment services in Delaware. Often, a cognitive disability or significant mental health impairment has taken precedence over a visual limitation, thus resulting in most referrals that would otherwise qualify as supported employment going to the general agency in Delaware.

 

1.1 The number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the current performance period (FFY 13) compared to the number of individuals who exited the VR program after achieving an employment outcome during the previous performance period (FFY 12) will equal or exceed the pervious performance period.

How many status 26 closures were achieved in FFY 13 (October 1, 2012 – September 30, 2013) 25 How many status 26 closures were achieved in FFY 12 (October 1, 2011 – September 30, 2012) 45

Did the number equal or exceed FFY 13 performance period? No (had 20 less in FFY 13 than FFY 12; 25-45)

1.2 Of all individuals who exit the VR program after receiving services, the percentage that are determined to have achieved an employment outcome will be at least 68.9%.

What is the total number of status 28 closures 8 What is the total number of status 26 closures 25 Is the number of status 26’s at least 68.9% of the total number of combined status 26 and status 28 cases closed? Yes What is that percentage? 75.8%

1.3 Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, the percentage that exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage shall be minimally 35.4%.

Of all status 26 closures, what percentage closed compared to unpaid employment that exited with earnings equivalent to the minimum wage during FFY 13? 92%

How many were closed as homemakers or unpaid? 2 Of the status 26 closures for FFY 13 receiving wages is that number minimally 35.4% of all status 26 closures? Yes, 92% of status 26 closures rec’d earnings at least equal to min. wage

1.4 Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage the percentage that are individuals with significant disabilities shall be minimally 89%.

Number of Status 26 Closures with at least minimum wage? 23 Number of these consumers who had significant disabilities? 22

Is the number of Consumers with Significant Disabilities who earned at least minimum wage at least 89% of total Consumers who earned minimum wage? Yes,95.6% of those earning at least minimum wage were significantly disabled. 22

1.5 The average hourly earnings of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earning levels equivalent to at least the minimum wage as a ratio to the State’s average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed (as derived for the Bureau of Labor Statistics report “State Average Annual Pay” for the most recent available year) shall be 59%.

Summary: The average hourly earnings for those individuals exiting the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment is $12.90. Based on information obtained from Delaware Department of Labor, Office of Labor Market Information [September Occupational Employment Statistics measuring employment and wage rates for hourly and salaried workers in nonfarm industries] the average hourly earnings are recorded as $22.00. Outcome/Passed: The average hourly wage of all individuals exiting the VR program with earning levels equivalent to the minimum wage as a ratio to the Delaware’s average hourly wage is 59%. Yes

1.6 Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage (23), the difference between the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they exited the VR program and the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they apply for VR service (9/23 = 39.1%) shall be 30.4%. (73.9% - 39.1% = 34.8%)

Does the difference between the percentage who reported their own income as largest source of support and the percentage who report their own income as largest source of support at application at least 30.4%? Yes (34.8%)

2.1 The service rate for all individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds as a ratio to the service rate for all non-minority individuals with disabilities shall be .80%.

Total of closures? 60 Total of closures who are minorities? 26 Total of closures who are non-minorities? 34 26/34= .76 - Fail

 

Funds in FY 2013 were utilized for innovation and expansion in finalizing the comprehensive statewide needs assessment through Analytic Insight. The report was published in FY 2013 providing the agency and our various stakeholders with relevant information that was utilized to engage in strategic planning for the agency, and our community, in FY 2013 into FY 2014. In addition, funding was utilized through Clear Channel Outdoor, a media advertising company, to post billboards and marquees on buses that advertised our programs and services to the general public.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 3:54PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

The quality of contracted vendors for Supported Employment SE services will be assessed based on the level of integration our eligible individuals have with non-disabled individuals performing the associated tasks of similar duties [which can also be customized based on functional capacities] occurring in an integrated setting with similar wages paid to other employees performing like duties. The number of hours worked per week will be dependent upon the eligible individuals’ functional capacities and in mutual agreement between the individual, the VR Counselor and as appropriate, the individuals representative. Additionally, all contracted vendors shall maintain a program of professional development for those employees within its organization who provide job placement services by participating in training opportunities for on-site trainers, employment specialists/job developers and SE managers. The scope and extent of contracted supported employment services shall include: 1. Assessment services to evaluate the needs, strengths, skills and job preferences through 3-5 community based work assessments. Unless the nature of the Consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours each assessment will last a minimum of 4 hours. 2. Job readiness skills training to assist the eligible individual with understanding appropriate work behaviors for job retention, appropriate grooming for the workplace, developing a resume, completing a criminal background check. 3. Placement in a job that is commensurate with the eligible individuals’ skills, interests, functional capacities, aptitude, and informed choice following a job analysis. 4. Provide a minimum of four weeks [up to a maximum of 18 months with supervisory approval] of intensive on-site job skills training to assist the eligible individual with new employee orientation, mastering the job tasks, establishing appropriate work habits, and meeting all required work standards of the job. 5. On-site assistance at a rate 20% of the time or less for a minimum of four weeks to address any problems or concerns to ensure stabilization for a positive employment outcome. 6. Follow-along services for 90 days post-stabilization for continued collaboration with the employer to address any issues arising that may potentially impact job retention. 7. Extended services for continued monitoring and crisis intervention as necessary for as long as the eligible individual remains employed. Payment for services will be made in milestones as follows: Assessment (25% of payment) following a determination of the consumer’s rehabilitation needs through assessment of the consumer’s abilities and functional limitations will be made in a competitive setting. Placement (25% of payment) in an integrated setting that meets RSA supported employment guidelines and is commensurate with the eligible individuals’ skills, interests, functional capacities, aptitude, and informed choice. Stabilization (25% of payment) following demonstrated ability to perform the essential job tasks and ability to work as independently as possible with natural supports. Successful Closure (25% of payment) following 90 days of continuous employment to include the employers written report of satisfactory job performance A vendor to provide Follow-Along services (extended services) will be identified at the time the plan for Supported Employment Services is developed for implementation. The eligible individual will transition to Extended Services following 90 days of continuous employment. Extended services will continue to be offered primarily through community rehabilitation programs. Due to budget cuts impacting the Division for Developmental Disability Services in the state of Delaware, as necessary extended services will be offered and provided by DVI’s Independent Living Services and Orientation and Mobility programs. Extended services will include a minimum of two worksite contacts each month to monitor stable job performance. Should a situation arise that requires additional VR services for job retention, the case service record will be reactivated as Post Employment. If a breakdown in the employment occurs whereas the employment situation terminates a meeting with all relevant parties (individual, individuals’ representative, vendor, and VR Counselor) will occur to determine the best course of action based on the extenuating circumstances. Contracted vendors (Community Rehabilitation Programs) such as Easter Seals, Goodwill, OCI, KSI, Horizon House and Chrysalis will provide supported employment services under a purchase of service agreement to DVI consumers referred for services who because of the nature and severity of their disabilities need intensive supported employment services and extended services after transition, in order to perform the specific job tasks to maintain and retain employment that are consistent with the current standards of industry and accreditation organizations. The vendor will be paid to: 1. Provide Supported Employment (SE) Assessment services to evaluate the needs, strengths, skills and job preferences of consumers to be served. Situation assessments will be a minimum of one and a maximum of three work experiences. Each experience will last a minimum of 6 hours unless the nature of the Consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours. 2. Provide SE Placement Services to assist the consumer in job search, in obtaining, and retaining employment; to provide job leads and to assist consumers with scheduling, attending job interviews, and navigating the hiring process. Consumers will be placed in jobs that offer a minimum of 20 hours of employment unless the nature of the consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours worked each week. 3. Provide a minimum of four weeks of intensive on-site SE training services to assist the consumer with new employee orientation, learning job skills, establishing work habits, and meeting all required work standards of the job. 4. Provide a minimum of four weeks of SE stabilization on the job that requires on-site assistance at a rate 20% of the time or less. 5. Provide follow-up services for 90 days post-stabilization to ensure consumer receives on-going support necessary to retain employment. All contracted vendors shall maintain a program of professional development for those employees within its organization who provide services under the terms of a purchase of service agreement by participating in training opportunities for on-site trainers, employment specialists/job developers and SE managers. Payment for services will be made in milestones as follows: 1. Assessment (10% of payment): maximum of 60 days • Determination of the consumer’s rehabilitation needs through assessment of the consumer’s abilities and functional limitations will be made in a competitive setting. 2. Placement (20% of payment): • Job Placement is made based on consumer’s identified abilities and functional limitations in a competitive setting. • A job-site analysis has been performed and completed. • The job in which the consumer has been placed meets all RSA supported employment guidelines, the consumer has made an informed choice in selection of the identified employer, and he/she is satisfied with the placement. 3. Four Week Job Retention (20% of payment): • The consumer has worked successfully for a period of four weeks at or above the number of hours based on his/her functional limitations. 4. Stabilization (20% of payment): • The consumer has been employed a minimum total of four weeks and requires assistance approximately 20% of the time of his/her total work week hours on the job. 5. Successful Closure (30% of payment): • Following withdrawal of intensive support the consumer has achieved 90 days of consecutive employment and meets all required RSA criteria to be considered having achieved a positive employment outcome by performing essential job functions in an independent manner. A vendor to provide Follow-Along services (extended services) will be identified at the time the plan for Supported Employment Services is developed for implementation. Consumers will transition to Follow -Along Services at time of closure. Extended services will continue to be offered primarily through community rehabilitation programs. Due to budget cuts impacting the Division for Developmental Disability Services in the state of Delaware, when appropriate extended services will be offered and provided by DVI’s Independent Living Services Unit. Extended services include a minimum of two worksite visits each month to monitor stable job performance. Other services as identified during the course of the vocational rehabilitation process that are required for an individual to maintain employment will be coordinated prior to case closure. Post Employment services will be provided as necessary and appropriate for job retention.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 3:54PM by Elisha Jenkins