ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired - DHHS Campus State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Dept of Health and Social Services (DHSS) Div for the Visually Impaired (DVI) is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Secretary Dept of Health and Social Services (DHSS)

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Director Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI)

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryDaniel M. Madrid

Title of SignatoryDirector

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)08/06/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI)

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

The Delaware Vocational Rehabilitation Advisory Council for the Division for the Visually Impaired* (hereinafter referred to as “SRC”) is a voluntary Council whose membership is comprised of individuals appointed by Governor Jack Markell. In accordance with statutory requirements, our Council is comprised of members representing: individuals who are blind or visually impaired, individuals representing other disability groups and interests; parents of children who are blind or visually impaired, recipients of vocational rehabilitation services from the Division of the Visually Impaired’s VR program; a representative of the Client Assistance Program; representatives from business and industry; a vocational rehabilitation counselor; a representative of the state educational agency; and a representative of the State Workforce Investment Board. Although the Council is required to maintain representation from other specified interest or consumer groups, certain positions remain vacant at this time pending action of the Governor or successful recruitment efforts.

The input and recommendations of the SRC outlined in Attachment 4.2(c) reflect ongoing efforts to obtain information and feedback from the blind and visually impaired community of Delaware and to respond appropriately and swiftly to their identified needs. In formulating its recommendations, the SRC considered a number of data sources, including but not limited to:

1. Information supplied to the SRC by the Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired;

2. Information outlined in the summary report of the 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment;

3. Input received from public hearings held to apprise the community of the proposed State Plan and Town Hall meetings;

4. Information obtained from preliminary findings derived from the Section 107 Monitoring activities of the VR Agency that took place in April 2013; and

5. Information received from Agency staff and other related stakeholders.

The goals and priorities identified in the State Plan documents offered for RSA review on June 30, 2013, reflect a continuation of the cooperative work in which the SRC and DVI engaged between October 2012 and June 2013. Prior to writing the SRC’s recommendations contained in this Section 4.2(c) Attachment, the Council jointly reviewed proposed goals with DVI and made recommendations regarding revisions. DVI accepted the recommendations of the Council and included them in a revised State Plan. It is important to note that certain events occurred after the SRC and DVI collaborated on the goals identified in the proposed State Plan. Such events prompted the SRC to reevaluate the proposed State Plan and to issue revised recommendations to DVI for consideration. While we do not reject outright all of the goals identified on DVI’s proposed Attachment 4.11(c), we believe that recent senior leadership staff turnover at the VR Agency creates the existence of a resource void. Consequently, the SRC believes that a more conservative approach to address and identify achievable goals during FFY2013 is warranted under these circumstances.

Summary of Input and Recommendations from the SRC

The SRC recognizes that there are a myriad of issues that have been identified through our efforts to advocate on behalf of blind and visually impaired consumers in Delaware. The following recommendations, however, reflect the Council’s careful assessment and prioritization of certain issues that require immediate attention. Our ongoing efforts will not be limited to the items identified in this Attachment, but we intend to work in partnership with DVI to ensure that the goals outlined in the State Plan and our recommendations receive appropriate attention and action.

The SRC recommends the following goals for FFY 2013:

(1) Employment Outcomes will increase from 55 to 60 (approximately 10% of last year’s employment outcomes).

(2) Transition Services provided to all eligible consumers by June 2014.

(3) All vacant DVI Senior Leadership positions (Director, Senior VR Administrator, VR Program Specialist, and Principal of the Education Department) will be filled by qualified, experienced personnel by December 2013.

EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES

The SRC recognizes that increasing employment outcomes depends upon many factors. During FFY 13, the State Plan objective can be accomplished through:

1. Increasing marketing efforts to current and potential employers of blind and visually impaired persons. DVI will create and disseminate an “Employer Marketing Tool Kit” to current and potential employers by January 2014.

2. The pool of identified potential employers of blind and visually impaired Delawareans will increase by 10% by March 2014.

3. DVI will seek and secure funding to engage a qualified consultant to study and identify transportation barriers to employment of blind and visually impaired persons living in Delaware by March 2014

4. DVI will identify and implement three specific aspects of its VR Case Management Requirements that will be upgraded, automated, and implemented to decrease by 10% the amount of time VR Counselors and staff expend on manual data management and report generation by June 2014.

5. On or before October 2013, DVI will adopt and institute policies mandating transmission and completion of Consumer Satisfaction Surveys to consumers at three stages of the VR process: (i) the completion of orientation; (ii) the end of a 90 day period following the development of an IPE; and at closure (regardless of the reason for same. institute policies mandating that all personnel with direct service or consulting responsibility on VR Cases Up-to-date Case Management Data maintained and accessible to all VR service providers with responsibility for the consumer’s VR case.

6. All completed consumer satisfaction surveys will be analyzed within ten (10) days of receipt by DVI and the results reported to the SRC at each meeting, beginning October 2013.

7. DVI will offer to all personnel involved in provision of direct services to VR Consumers education and training on assistive technology developments, strategies designed to increase employer pools, and cultural sensitivity, with an emphasis on services disabled clients.

TRANSITION

1. DVI will validate the identity and school enrollment status and location of all transition-aged youth eligible for transition services by October 2013.

2. DVI will identify and implement a validated formula to calculate the appropriate number of students to whom a VR/Transition Counselor will effectively provide statutorily required transition services by October 2013.

3. DVI will hire or retain the appropriate number of transition counselors (based upon the formula discussed in paragraph 2 above) necessary to provide transition services to all eligible blind and visually impaired persons in the State.

4. DVI will draft the terms of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Delaware Department of Education, which details the roles and responsibilities of: (i) DVI staff; (ii) lead educational agencies; (iii) general VR transition personnel; (iv) and the Department of Education in providing transition-related services to blind and visually impaired eligible youth before November 2013.

DIVISION FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERSHIP

1. DVI will employ experienced, qualified full-time personnel to discharge the duties of the following Agency leadership positions before December 2013:

- Agency Director

- Education Principal

- VR District Administrator

- VR Program Specialist

DVI Response to Input and Recommendations:

The Division for the Visually Impaired appreciates the input and recommendations that have led to the development of the goals that are established in the state plan attachments. The agency agrees to the basics of the three goals identified above. These three recommendations have been incorporated into the principals of the goals and priories of attachment 4.11(c)(1). In some instances, specific action steps have been omitted, and some dates have been modified or extended in order to recognize the need to allow for the flexibility of the incoming Administration to get new personnel on board and acclimated to the Division.

The DSU will continue to work closely with the DSA to identify qualified personnel to fill key positions within the division with the goal to have all positions filled and functioning in their new positions by 12/31/2013.

The Division for the Visually Impaired’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) has reviewed the State Plan and its attachment. The following statements represent the other comments as received, and this State Units response to those comments.

4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

SRC Input: What contingency plans exist to serve individuals if the agency’s marketing efforts work?

State Unit Response: The Order of Selection is that contingency plan. If we have more people than we can serve then we prioritize based on severity of disability.

SRC Input: Because Delaware continues to be without an institution of higher education with a program to prepare Vocational Rehabilitation professionals this should be a goal in the current state plan or at the very least, exploration efforts should be included.

State Unit Response: The agency rejects adding pursuit of an institution of higher learning in Delaware to prepare Vocational Rehabilitation professionals as a goal. This should be part of a long term engagement with the Universities in DE. DVI and DVR would need to work together to determine the demand and how we would support the higher education system to help us produce VR counselors. Our Counselors receive training online now and we recruit from Maryland and other close locations that do have such programs.

4.11(a) Statewide Needs Assessment

SRC Input: Based on the survey DVI needs to add additional goals to address the identified need for improved transportation options, expand employment opportunities and access to assistive technology.

State Unit Response: The agency accepts the SRC recommendations and has added 3 new goals to attachment 4.11(c) (1). In specific response to the action step of securing funding to engage a qualified consultant to study and identify transportation barriers to employment of blind and visually impaired persons living in Delaware, the Division recognizes efforts being taken by the DSA and the Delaware General Assembly to complete such steps. The agency will remain an active participant in these developments.

4.11 (b) Annual Estimates

SRC Input: The SRC is satisfied with the Annual Estimates as written

State Unit Response: The agency will submit as written.

4.11(c) (1) States Goals and Priorities

SRC Input: The SRC has suggested the agency add three goals to this attachment.

• Advocate and Participate in Methods to Improve Consumer Access to Transportation in Delaware

• Develop Marketing Toolkit for Employers.

• Consistently Provide a High Level of Consumer Satisfaction

State Unit Response: The agency concurs with the SRC. In collaboration with the SRC these goals with corresponding performance measures have been added.

4.11(c) (4) Goals and Plans Title VI Part B

SRC Input: Are there other reasons the agency did not achieve projected outcomes for Supported Employment program goals?

State Unit Response: Supported Employment is a contracted service. The agency does not have the resources to deliver this service.

4.11(e) (2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Increase Quantity and Quality of Outcomes:

SRC Input: Please identify the specific reasons for the 15% decrease. Were the goals realistic? If so, what happened? How will DVI attempt to make up for the significant decrease in outcomes in the current State Plan? In addition, was the only quality measure earning above or equal to minimum wage.

State Unit Response: While the Division experienced a 15% decrease in this period, data shows a 325% overall increase in employment outcomes comparing to the previous period. Factors that impeded achievement included consumer demographics and staffing availability:

Consumer Demographics:

• More consumers were in training status in FFY 2012 – There were 11 more consumers in formal training programs such as college in FFY 2012 than in 2011. These consumers were not yet ready for employment and could not be placed in jobs.

• Consumers required more time for rehabilitation in 2012 - On average consumers closing in FFY 2012 required 112 days more to complete rehabilitation and achieve employment than in FFY 2011. Some of this is based on the consumers’ skills, aptitudes and individualized pace to complete rehabilitation.

• At the beginning of FFY DVI had 39% fewer consumers who were either ready to be (or who had just been)placed in jobs that eventually led to closure in FFY 2012.

Staffing:

• Staff were (and are currently) engaged in training to become highly qualified - During the same period, DVI had several employees begin Masters Degree Programs to reach the credential level of Certified Rehabilitation Counselor. This is very positive for DVI consumers; however, this requires the agency to provide time to the staff during their work week for educational leave. This has an impact on services.

• Staff shortages- Key position vacancies (requiring 6 months to find a replacement). The replacement is still in training.

Satisfaction.

(6) Advocate and Participate in Methods to Improve Consumer Access to Transportation in Delaware.

Goal 1: Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes by 10%

• Performance Measure 1.1: Increase outcomes from FY2011 levels of 55 to 60.

• Performance Measure 1.2: Increase business partnerships by 10% by 03/30/14.

• Performance Measure 1.3: Develop and implement a marketing campaign to employers by January 31, 2014.

o Performance Measure 1.3a: Review, compile and revise current tools for engaging with employers; tools to include DVI’s current “Infinite Possibilities” materials; review of tools provided by other VR agencies and the National Employment Team.

o Performance Measure 1.3b: Create and disseminate the “Employer Marketing Tool Kit” to current and potential employers by 01/31/14.

• Performance Measure 1.4: Increase pool of service providers by adding 2 new vendors by 06/30/2014.

Goal 2: Review, evaluate and implement improvements to Transition Services.

• Performance Measure 2.1: Engage the GWU TACE for evaluation of current Transition programs and services by 10/31/13.

• Performance Measure 2.2: Use the Visually Impaired Client Registry, and the September 30th Child Count to validate the identity and school enrollment status and location of all transition-aged youth eligible for transition services by 10/31/13.

• Performance Measure 2.3: Identify and implement a validated formula to calculate the appropriate number of students to whom a VR/Transition Counselor will effectively provide statutorily required transition services by 10/31/13.

• Performance Measure 2.4: Seek the resources to employ the appropriate level of transition staff necessary to provide transition services to all eligible blind and visually impaired persons identified to the agency.

• Performance Measure 2.5: DVI will draft the terms of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Delaware Department of Education, which details the roles and responsibilities of: (i) DVI staff; (ii) lead educational agencies; (iii) general VR transition personnel; (iv) and the Department of Education in providing transition-related services to students who are blind and visually impaired before 11/30/13.

• Performance Measure 2.6: Ensure that 100% of transition students who have IEPs have IPEs that are consistent with the IEP by 06/30/14.

• Performance Measure 2.7: Evaluate the current level of exposure to AT that transition students currently receive and ensure that 100% of students are referred for AT evaluations related to AT that is consistent to their IPE goals.

• Performance Measure 2.8: Employ the use of interns/public service projects such as Public Allies in order to assist with outreach to recruit schools and job shadowing/training opportunities for transition youth by 10/01/13.

Goal 3: Improve Case Management

• Performance Measure 3.1: DVI will Identify three specific aspects of its VR Case Management requirements that will be upgraded, automated, and implemented with a goal to decrease by 10% the amount of time VR Counselors and staff expend on manual data management and report generation by June 2014.

Goal 4: Automate & Streamline VR Processes

• Performance Measure 4.1: Identify and Automate 10 VR forms by 06/30/2014.

• Performance Measure 4.2: Streamline VR systematic processes by 06/30/2014.

Goal 5: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction

• Performance Measure 5.1: Implement new consumer satisfaction survey model at three stages.

o Performance Measure 5.1a: The completion of orientation;

o Performance Measure 5.1b: The end of a 90 day period following the development of an IPE;

o Performance Measure 5.2c: At closure.

Goal 6: Advocate and participate in methods to improve consumer access to transportation in Delaware.

• Performance Measure 6.1: DVI will continue to provide representation and leadership to the Delaware Elderly and Disabled Transportation Advisory Committee related to the transportation needs identified by DVI’s consumers.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 11:56AM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:34AM by sadebgoodhartb

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

 

To utilize various services as deemed necessary and appropriate to address the unique and individualized needs of our targeted population the Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) works cooperatively with state agencies under the umbrella of Delaware Health and Social Services that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system. Such agencies include:   1. Division of Social Services to address immediate needs for; Health Care Coverage, Food Supplement Program, Cash Assistance, Child Care Assistance, Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program   2. Division of Developmental Disability Services for transition of our jointly served consumers  to extended services following the cessation of supported employment services under Title VI Part B funding; and consultation for development of Behavior Support Plans as necessary to reduce self-limiting and/or destructive behaviors to facilitate positive supported employment outcomes.   3. Division of Medicaid and Medical Assistance to assist individuals with disabilities by allowing them to work without losing health benefits. Individuals with countable income below 275% of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL) may be eligible.   4. Division of Public Health for referral to community Health Centers for comprehensive family health services from prenatal and adolescent care to adult and geriatric medicine.   5.  Division of services for Aging and Adults with Physical Disabilities as a comprehensive resource for Independent Living in areas such as money management, Medicare Part D for prescription assistance, Emergency Preparedness, Home Modifications, Medical Transportation, Attendant Services, and the Senior Community Service Employment Program.   6. The Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) to provide drug and alcohol treatment services for adults, primarily through contracts with private agencies for screening and evaluation; outpatient counseling; opioid treatment, including methadone maintenance; continuous treatment team programs for individuals with long-term, disabling alcohol and drug dependence disorders; less intensive case management services offered through the outpatient counseling agencies; detoxification; and residential services. The residential services include short-term/variable length-of-stay treatment (30 days or less), long-term treatment, and halfway houses.   7. Delaware Industries for the Blind, a NISH non-profit program operates under the auspices of the Department of Health and Social Services, with its activities and programs reporting to the DVI Division Director to provide competitive employment opportunities at competitive wages. DIB is a participating member in The State Use Commission.  The VR program works cooperatively with (DIB), to develop the capacity of DIB to function as a Rehabilitation Facility for VR consumers. The intent is to provide limited term employment opportunities for individuals with significant disabilities to develop marketable work skills in areas of Customer Service, Engraving, Quality Control, Environmental Services, Engraving, Production, and General Office Work.  During FFY 10 a Memorandum of Agreement was developed between DIB and VR to further competitive vocational opportunities by expanding the vocational training and assessment capability within DVI by expanding the internal partnerships between DVI VR and DIB. Through the use of ARRA funds, VR created a Vocational Evaluator position within DIB for an individual with a visual impairment. DIB now offers Work Adjustment Training, Vocational Skills Training, Vocational Evaluation, Computer Office Skills Training, and Customer Service Training.  

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2012 8:49AM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

 

The Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program works with the Department of Education (DOE) through the Local Agreement implemented on March 4. 2004 reviewed and accepted on September 19, 2007 by RSA to be incompliance with 34 CFR 361.22. The agreement with DOE includes specific roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services. It also includes the appeal process for families to grieve any decisions regarding services requests. DVI-VR continues to maintain a transition program that is designed as an integrated network of activities, which facilitates the successful progression of students through high school into the adult employment arena. The program includes: vocational assessment; career exploration; vocation training; post-secondary education; employment within integrated work settings (including early start to supported employment); and individualized adaptive living services from DVI including orientation and mobility training, low vision services, in home adaptive living skills training and equipment, etc. All of our student referrals continue to be made through the Educational Services Program of the agency, which provides educational programming to students in public and private schools through graduation or to the end of the school term during which the student reaches 21 years of age and the Delaware Deaf/Blind (Education) program within the DOE.  All of the students served by our Educational Services program are involved in the Special Education program in accordance with Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Even if the children are fully mainstreamed within the classrooms of their respective schools, such that the only specialized services that they receive are through DVI programs, special education designation ensures that the schools will fully interface with our programs in order to facilitate individual student development. In SFY 2007 DVI was successful in obtaining an additional VR counselor position dedicated to transition aged students. Following receipt of a student referral at age 14 the Transition Counselor works collaboratively with all other DVI agency program staff for coordination of specific services focusing on career exploration and skill development in the areas of activities of daily living and rehab technology. The Department of Education Program maintains the lead in terms of financial responsibility for purchase of reasonable accommodations within the classroom setting. In order to ensure consistent progress toward vocational goals, contacts by the VR Transition Counselor are required throughout the calendar year with the students, their families, appropriate school personnel DVI Education staff, and various other sources contracted for student transition educational programming.  The VR Transition Counselor also attends Individualized Educational Plan meetings (IEP) and interagency interdisciplinary team meetings to gather information relative to the full scope of VR services required for transition from secondary education to self-sufficiency. Based on the information obtained from various sources to include the student, the students, family, school officials and others, DVI VR Casework mandates that an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed a minimum of 60 days prior to exiting the school program or as early as the student’s Junior or Senior year as deemed necessary for obtaining employment and/or transitioning from secondary to post secondary education. At this time, assistive technology, funding resources for the technology, timeframes for delivery of services, transportation assistance, low vision services, Orientation and Mobility, and all other pertinent VR services are provided as deemed necessary. If a need assessment determines that specific equipment must be provided, VR will loan (if it is in stock) the necessary equipment to an individual until such equipment can be ordered, setup and installed by the responsible parties. If funds or loaner equipment are not available, DVI-VR will work with DOE through the DVI Principal, who acts as the liaison between DVI and DOE, to transfer DOE purchased equipment to VR or provide a waiver that will enable the student to retain his/her DOE purchased equipment until replacement equipment is procured through VR. 

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2012 8:49AM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

 

  Our current practice is to identify private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers in New Castle County, Kent Count, and Sussex County that provide services such as; medical/psychological/psychiatric diagnostics and consults, Job Placement, Job Coaching, Supported Employment, Vocational Training, Work Adjustment, Community Based Work Assessments, Job Readiness Training, Language Translation, and Tutoring.  The nature of blindness “in itself” creates discomfort for those not understanding the potential of functional capacity for persons with severe vision loss. As an agency we have taken steps to develop and offer sensitivity and awareness trainings for all private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers entering into cooperative agreements with DVI for contracted services.  Vocational Rehabilitation Program Staff, Independent Living Services Program Staff, Technology Center Education Support Staff and Certified Orientation and Mobility partner to provide a day of comprehensive activities designed to teach techniques and strategies that promote skill development.   These trainings demonstrate the capability of persons with severe vision loss to function on as much of an equal plane as their sighted peers in terms of acquiring skills training and employment within integrated settings.   Contracts for employment related services with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers typically include Community Accredited Rehabilitation Facilities such as Goodwill, CHIMES, Elwyn, and Easter Seals. When specific blindness services for Occupational Training or Rehabilitation Technology Services, DVI has the flexibility to seek approval from the Office of Management and Budget to enter into contractual agreements to procure specific client services from other private non-profit organizations that may be located outside the state of Delaware such as the Statler Center in Buffalo New York. 

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2012 8:49AM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) has no formal written agreement in place with the Division for Developmentally Disability Services (DDDS) for the provision of supported employment services however over the years DVI has worked cooperatively with this state agency to secure funding for payment of “On Going Support Services” (follow along) following a consumer’s job stabilization to ensure job retention. DDDS, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), and the Department of Education (DOE) entered into a formal agreement to pilot a program entitled “Early Start to Employment.” Although DVI was not a signatory in this agreement the agency was contacted by DOE for inclusion. Resultantly one of our transition students was included in the pilot program. It is the goal of DDDS to have every student who is a Supported Employment Candidate and active with DDDS to start Supported Employment Services in the last year of high school. This is to insure that there is no gap in services between the last month of school and the beginning of Supported Employment services and/or actual employment obtained through the Supported Employment service provision. Transition planning will include identification of transition students with most significant disabilities that are appropriate candidates for this particular program. If the program participant obtains employment during the school year and reaches the point of receiving follow along services prior to graduation, there is an agreement in place between DDDS, DVR and DOE that DOE will pay the placement vendor for follow along services until Sept. 1, of that current federal fiscal year. DDDS will then take over payment for the follow along services. Other applicants for services, who are not transition students, identified as most significantly disabled that will benefit from supported employment services, based on the severity of their disability, will be served through other Community Rehabilitation Programs. These CRP’s have contracts with the General VR agency (DVR) and in all cases accept the same contracted rates with DVI. The VR Program Specialist for DVI participates in the contract negotiations and approval process when requested to do so by DVR.

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2012 8:49AM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing data to meet service delivery needs on an annual basis has not changed. The agency director continues to look at the numbers served, the severity of their disability, and the overall service needs on a monthly basis.

The trend in the number of individuals making application for VR services and those being identified “most significantly disabled” continues to increase in that these individuals have two or more functional limitations that present a substantial impediment to employment and they will require VR services for a period of 6 months or more.”

Over the past three years DVI has seen some variation in the numbers served in the VR program. In FY 10 the VR program 220 eligible individuals. In FY 11 the program experienced a 13% increase (249) with 60% identified as “most significantly disabled” and in FY 12, 248 eligible individuals received VR services. 65% were identified as persons with “most significant disabilities. As of March 1st for FY 13, 71% are individuals categorized as most significantly disabled in that those individuals had two or more functional limitations.

There are currently (12) staff positions dedicated to the direct provision of VR services. The VR Team is currently staffed statewide by (2) Senior VR Counselors, (3) Employment Services Specialists, (2) Administrative Specialists Level I, (1) Teacher, Special Education Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist, (1) Trainer/Educator II, (1) VR District Administrator, (1) Vocational Rehabilitation Program Specialist and (1) VR Counselor I (Seasonal/casual). Presently, 1 of our full-time VR counselors has a Master’s Degrees in a Counseling related field. The other is currently enrolled in a Masters Program for Rehabilitation Education. This counselor will become a CRC by the end of FY 13. Within the next 5 years it is expected that the current VR District Administrator and a Special Education Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist will retire thus creating 2 vacancies.

Based on the increasing numbers served on an annual basis coupled with the complexity of secondary and tertiary disabilities we see the agency requiring 16 staff positions dedicated to the direct provision of VR services. The statewide staffing needed by the agency to handle the increased number of consumers being served in the next 5 years is (4) Senior VR Counselors (this includes 2 Senior VR Counselors for Transition Services), (3) Employment Services Specialists, (2) Administrative Specialists Level I, (2) Teacher, Special Education Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist, (2) Trainer/Educator II, (1) VR District Administrator, (1) VR Program Specialist, and (1) VR Counselor I (seasonal/casual).

In addition to the VR direct service positions mentioned above, DVI has an assortment of ancillary positions that plays a technical, administrative, fiscal or support role in VR service provision and which are partly funded with VR Basic Support funds. Below is a summary of the personnel data regarding all positions whose salaries are partially or totally funded by the VR Basic Support grant.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Sr. Accountant/Accounting Specialist 2 0 1
2 BEP Director/Administrative Officer 2 1 1
3 Fisc Admin Ofcr/Administrative Specialist I 4 0 1
4 Vocational Rehabilitation Senior Counselor 3 1 0
5 Employment Services Specialist 3 0 0
6 Information Systems Support Specialist 1 0 0
7 Mgr of Comp/Applic Sprt/Telecom Network/etc 4 0 0
8 VI Business Svc Supervisor 1 0 1
9 VR Dist Admin/VR Prog Spec 2 2 0
10 0 0 0

 

Delaware continues to be without an institution of higher education with a program to prepare Vocational Rehabilitation professionals. DVI continues to support local university applications to implement such training programs. Currently, VR professionals are encouraged to enroll with on-line training programs, such as George Washington University. Therefore no students graduate in state in the field of vocational rehabilitation

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

As a means of recruiting qualified personnel to address our current and projected needs for qualified personnel, DVI has entered into partnership agreements with the University of Delaware, the Delaware State University, the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and Pennsylvania College of Optometry to provide internships for graduate students majoring in Rehabilitation Education and other closely related fields of study. These partnerships afford an internship the opportunity to participate in the work environment of VR Service delivery and the delivery of ancillary services in a role similar to rehabilitation counselor. Interns are assigned working mentors in the VR program, as well as working in partnership with other field services to gain the broad scope of knowledge needed to become a successful rehabilitation professional. Generally, after completion of a successful internship, the intern is considered to be a qualified candidate for employment and would be considered for hiring purposes if/when a vacancy exists.

To retain qualified personnel the agency has instituted a system for Staff Development Training that affords all agency staff the opportunity for professional growth within their specific occupational field. Tuition reimbursement up to $1,000 for books etc in addition to 6 hours weekly of paid educational leave is offered as an incentive to those pursuing advancement in the field of Rehabilitation Education.

Our agency has also developed a solid partnership with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). OMB operates a Selective Placement Registry for the State of Delaware. This Registry lists qualified persons with disabilities from various ethnic backgrounds who have been pre-determined eligible to fill specific vacancies within state agencies. Agencies are free to select qualified individuals from this registry without going through the normal state recruitment process.

 

The agency follows recruitment practices established by the state to recruit, prepare and retain qualified personnel. In addition, vacancies for the Division are shared with various advocacy group chair persons so that their memberships are aware of any vacancies. They are asked to encourage qualified members, specific to the vacant position, to apply when vacancies recruitments occur. One of the DVI’s Employment Services Specialist is a liaison to the State Human Resource Management office for Selective Placement. Presentations and site visits have been made to state agencies to create promote hiring of persons with disabilities via Selective Placement and to identify the types of reasonable accommodations to facilitate positive employment outcomes.

The minimum qualifications for an entry level VR Counselor I requires a Bachelors degree or higher in Rehabilitation Counseling, Social or Behavioral Science or a related field. A Qualified Rehabilitation Counselor in Level II or the Senior level designated in the State Personnel system are required to possess or obtain a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or a related field (such as but not limited to Sociology, Psychology, or Behavioral Science), and must include graduate level coursework in Theory & Techniques of Counseling.

DVI’s current practice for the VR Counselor positions, if not already CRC certified, during the selection interview the CRC requirement is discussed to ensure the potential candidate has no concerns with pursuing the educational requirements to be eligible to sit for the CRC exam. Following an offer of employment a performance plan is implemented and signed by the employee that includes a requirement for enrollment and participation in rehabilitation education graduate classes leading to eligibility to sit for the CRC exam within five (5) years from the date of hire.

Due to the absence of an in-state graduate program in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling newly hired counselor(s) at The VR Counselor I and II levels are encouraged to take advantage of online distance learning opportunities with George Washington University (GWU), Virginia Commonwealth university and other schools nationwide that offer graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling and coursework leading to certification eligibility. The VR Program Specialist gathers information regarding available online graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling to share with VR staff.

The minimum qualifications for an orientation and mobility specialist is the Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist (COMS) certification issued by the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP). DVI currently requires this certification for practicing Orientation and Mobility Specialists within the agency.

The minimum qualifications for Trainer/Educator IIs is currently three years of experience in preparing and developing training or education courses which includes designing learning objectives, curricula and materials with a focus on assistive technology. In order to become fully CSNA compliant the agency is moving toward requiring the two agency staff in this area to achieve Assistive Technology Professional (ATP) certification through the Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (RESNA) no later than FY 16."

 

other sources.

To ensure that all personnel employed by the DSU receive appropriate and adequate training with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement, and rehabilitation technology trainings from outside vendors in specific areas are coordinated through Region 3 TACE Centers, utilizing the In-Service Training for workshops to bring in contracted vendors specializing in specific areas, approving staff travel to attend meetings and conferences as well as webinars to keep staff abreast of “Best Practices.”

As outlined in the Division’s Staff Development Policy, as part of the annual Training Needs Assessment, the individual staff person meets with his/her supervisor to determine areas of training needed for career development. The VR Program Specialist (Staff Development Officer) compiles and summarizes this data and updates each person’s Career Development file.

Based on the needs assessment, the Staff Development Officer works with staff and supervisors to see that each has the opportunity to receive the training that has been identified as needed to perform their job duties as efficiently and effectively as possible. Through the coordination of in house training seminars, access to the Delaware Department of Health & Social Services (DHSS) extensive training curriculum, the Human Resource Management Office’s Career Enhancement Program, and a multitude of outside training opportunities, specific needs can usually be met.

Provided sufficient funding is available, tuition reimbursement can be requested for courses taken at colleges and universities in pursuit of Associates’, Bachelor’s, Master’s and/or Doctorate Degrees. DHSS Tuition Reimbursement policy allows up to a maximum of $1000 per fiscal year. However, a waiver requesting 100% reimbursement or spending in excess of the $1000 cap is permitted by approval of the Division Director. Also the agency has the ability to sponsor membership to the National Rehabilitation Association as well as agency memberships in the Association of Educators and Rehabilitation (AER) to pursue opportunities for professional growth.

 

Whenever an applicant for services needs an interpreter in order to communicate, DVI staff obtains the services of an appropriate interpreter from a list of local professional interpreting services. All written materials are disseminated to consumers in the appropriate media: Braille, large print, tape or electronic file, as well as Spanish for various forms/brochures.

 

DVI’s Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired (TVIs) work in our local school districts throughout the state. At age 14, TVIs begin to refer their students to the Vocational Rehabilitation Program to begin transition services. The students are assigned to our designated Transition Counselor who works with the students in the schools and in their homes to garner parental support during the transitional phase from school to the world of work. The designated Transition Counselor also works to promote the concept of self-sufficiency, provides career counseling, and encourages and assists the student with obtaining part time employment.

DVI personnel providing services to students with disabilities include, Teachers for the Visually Impaired, Orientation and Mobility Specialists, Certified Rehabilitation Instructors, Technology Trainer/Educators, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Employment Services Specialist. All personnel requiring CEU’s to maintain their specific certification or to keep abreast of trends impacting persons with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to participate in trainings for professional development. Staff Development Trainings are paid for through the Federal In-Service Training (IST) grant, as well as limited state funding. When travel funding is not available or restricted, the agency has made on-line CEU opportunities available for staff.

This screen was last updated on Aug 27 2013 4:05PM by Elisha Jenkins

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Following the guidelines established for a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) and the Vocational Rehabilitation Needs Assessment Guide established by the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Division for the Visually Impaired contracted with Analytic Insights for the completion of the Statewide Needs Assessment.

The following observations are based on consumer, staff and CRP feedback obtained via the CSNA process:

• The rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly those with most significant disabilities are being well-met by the Division, however, there is a need to improve the provision of supported employment services.

• The needs of racial and ethnic minorities are well-addressed by the department, with no significant differences in satisfaction with department services between minority groups.

• Individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by VR may include Amish residents. There are approximately 1,500 Amish residents in the state, but there is an unknown number of Amish community members are affected by blindness of visual impairment. DVI is planning to extend a successful campaign targeted toward Hispanic persons to the Amish community.

• Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system also participate in DVI.

• Although the CSNA did not identify gaps for establishment, development, or improvement of community rehabilitation programs within the state, the agency recognizes the need to continue to work with our CRPs to further build their capacities to provide services to individuals who are blind and visual impaired. .

Assistive Technology was found to be an important issue to consumers, and the most frequently cited difficulty in finding employment.

The Division for the Visually Impaired, in conjunction with the State Rehabilitation Council for DVI will be evaluating additional information related to the CSNA and adding goals to the 2014 and 2015 state plan attachments to address those needs identified by the CSNA.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 1:27PM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

The numbers in our data base suggest that there are 1449individuals in the state of Delaware between the ages of 14-72 that would potentially be eligible for VR services.

We estimate during FY 14 VR will serve 250 individuals and of those 250 individuals 4% will be eligible for use of Part B Title VI funds.

DVI anticipates having sufficient resources and funding streams to serve all eligible individuals making application for VR services which will preclude DVI from implementing an order of selection wait list.

The table below represents the estimates for the number of eligible individuals for services, and the estimated cost of providing identified services utilizing Title I and Title VI funds.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Eligible Title I $744,000 240 $3,100
Eligible Title VI $90,000 10 $9,000
Totals   $834,000 250 $3,336

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 1:09PM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

As a result of ongoing regularly scheduled State Rehab Council (SRC) meetings in conjunction with the FY 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment it is jointly agreed between DVI and the SRC that the following constitute the goals and priorities of Delaware Blind State VR Program:

(1) Increase the Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes.

(2) Review, Evaluate and Implement Improvements to Transition Services.

(3) Improve Case Management.

(4) Automate and Streamline VR processes.

(5) Consistently Provide a High Level of Consumer Satisfaction.

(6) Advocate and Participate in Methods to Improve Consumer Access to Transportation in Delaware.

Goal 1: Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes by 10%

• Performance Measure 1.1: Increase outcomes from FY2011 levels of 55 to 60.

• Performance Measure 1.2: Increase business partnerships by 10% by 03/30/14.

• Performance Measure 1.3: Develop and implement a marketing campaign to employers by January 31, 2014.

o Performance Measure 1.3a: Review, compile and revise current tools for engaging with employers; tools to include DVI’s current “Infinite Possibilities” materials; review of tools provided by other VR agencies and the National Employment Team.

o Performance Measure 1.3b: Create and disseminate the “Employer Marketing Tool Kit” to current and potential employers by 01/31/14.

• Performance Measure 1.4: Increase pool of service providers by adding 2 new vendors by 06/30/2014.

Goal 2: Review, evaluate and implement improvements to Transition Services.

• Performance Measure 2.1: Engage the GWU TACE for evaluation of current Transition programs and services by 10/31/13.

• Performance Measure 2.2: Use the Visually Impaired Client Registry, and the September 30th Child Count to validate the identity and school enrollment status and location of all transition-aged youth eligible for transition services by 10/31/13.

• Performance Measure 2.3: Identify and implement a validated formula to calculate the appropriate number of students to whom a VR/Transition Counselor will effectively provide statutorily required transition services by 10/31/13.

• Performance Measure 2.4: Seek the resources to employ the appropriate level of transition staff necessary to provide transition services to all eligible blind and visually impaired persons identified to the agency.

• Performance Measure 2.5: DVI will draft the terms of a Memorandum of Understanding with the Delaware Department of Education, which details the roles and responsibilities of: (i) DVI staff; (ii) lead educational agencies; (iii) general VR transition personnel; (iv) and the Department of Education in providing transition-related services to students who are blind and visually impaired before 11/30/13.

• Performance Measure 2.6: Ensure that 100% of transition students who have IEPs have IPEs that are consistent with the IEP by 06/30/14.

• Performance Measure 2.7: Evaluate the current level of exposure to AT that transition students currently receive and ensure that 100% of students are referred for AT evaluations related to AT that is consistent to their IPE goals.

• Performance Measure 2.8: Employ the use of interns/public service projects such as Public Allies in order to assist with outreach to recruit schools and job shadowing/training opportunities for transition youth by 10/01/13.

Goal 3: Improve Case Management

• Performance Measure 3.1: DVI will Identify three specific aspects of its VR Case Management requirements that will be upgraded, automated, and implemented with a goal to decrease by 10% the amount of time VR Counselors and staff expend on manual data management and report generation by June 2014.

Goal 4: Automate & Streamline VR Processes

• Performance Measure 4.1: Identify and Automate 10 VR forms by 06/30/2014.

• Performance Measure 4.2: Streamline VR systematic processes by 06/30/2014.

Goal 5: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction

• Performance Measure 5.1: Implement new consumer satisfaction survey model at three stages.

o Performance Measure 5.1a: The completion of orientation;

o Performance Measure 5.1b: The end of a 90 day period following the development of an IPE;

o Performance Measure 5.2c: At closure.

Goal 6: Advocate and participate in methods to improve consumer access to transportation in Delaware.

• Performance Measure 6.1: DVI will continue to provide representation and leadership to the Delaware Elderly and Disabled Transportation Advisory Committee related to the transportation needs identified by DVI’s consumers.

(2) Review, Evaluate and Implement Improvements to Transition Services.

(3) Develop Marketing Toolkit for Employers.

(4) Improve Case Management.

(5) Automate and Streamline VR processes

(6) Consistently Provide a High Level of Consumer Satisfaction

(7) Advocate and Participate in Methods to Improve Consumer Access to Transportation in Delaware.

Goal 1: Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes by 10%

Performance Measure 1.1: Network to establish business partnerships.

Performance Measure 1.2: Schedule a minimum of 2 “regional” employer learning sessions to help build the capacity of employers to engage with DVI Consumers.

Performance Measure 1.3: Develop and implement a marketing campaign.

Performance Measure 1.4: Participate in, and conduct, various outreach events.

Performance Measure 1.4a: Provide 3 targeted outreach activities to the Amish community by 06/30/2014.

Performance Measure 1.5: Increase pool of service providers by adding 2 new vendors by 06/30/2014.

Goal 2: Review, Evaluate and Implement Improvements to Transition Services.

Performance Measure 2.1: Implement Changes identified in 2013 RSA Monitoring by 10/31/2013.

Performance Measure 2.2: Engage the GWU TACE for evaluation of current Transition programs and services by 10/31/2013.

Performance Measure 2.3: Establish Workgroup and complete new MOU with the Delaware Department of Education and Local Education Agencies by 12/31/2013; develop a marketing plan related to MOU and hold a minimum of 2 training sessions with DOE and LEAs regarding the details of the MOU by 06/30/2014.

Performance Measure 2.4: Ensure that 100% of transition students have IEPs that are consistent with their IPEs by 06/30/2014.

Performance Measure 2.5: Evaluate the current level of exposure to AT that transition students currently receive and ensure that 100% of students are referred for AT evaluations related to AT that is consistent to their IPE goals.

Performance Measure 2.6: Employ the use of interns/public service projects such as Public Allies in order to assist with outreach to recruit schools and job shadowing/training opportunities for transition youth by 10/01/2013.

Goal 3: Develop Marketing Toolkit for Employers by 10/31/2013

Performance Measure 3.1: Review Compile and Revise current tools for engaging with employers; tools to include DVI’s current Infinite Possibilities materials, Review of tools provided by other VR agencies and the National Employment Team.

Goal 4: Improve Case Management

Performance Measure 4.1: Monthly supervisory meetings

Performance Measure 4.2: Revise Casework Manual

Performance Measure 4.3: Coordinate Interdisciplinary Team Meetings

Goal 5: Automate & Streamline VR Processes

Performance Measure 5.1: Identify and Automate 10 VR forms by 06/30/2014.

Performance Measure 5.2: Streamline VR systematic processes by 06/30/2014.

Goal 6: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction

Performance Measure 6.1: Implement new consumer satisfaction surveys by 10/31/2013.

Performance Measure 6.2: Conduct 2 Town Hall Meetings by 04/30/2014.

Performance Measure 6.3: Respond to 100% of written consumer complaints within 10 business days of receipt.

Goal 7: Advocate and Participate in Methods to Improve Consumer Access to Transportation in Delaware.

Performance Measure 1.1: DVI will continue to provide representation and leadership to the Delaware Elderly and Disabled Transportation Advisory Committee related to the transportation needs identified by DVI’s consumers.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 11:51AM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:53AM by sadebgoodhartb

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Title VI, Part B funds in the amount of $45,000 will be utilized to provide intensive

Supported Employment Services.

The goal for FY 2014 will remain as previously reported to develop negotiated relationships with employers to craft customized supported employment opportunities in integrated settings that is consistent with the individual’s unique skills, abilities, interests, and informed choice.

The DSU is estimating supported employment services will be provided to approximately 10 most significantly disabled individuals requiring supported employment services resulting from severe on developmental delays, traumatic brain injuries, and/or severe mental health impairments.

General funds will be utilized to supplement Title VI part B funds as deemed necessary to provide supplemental disability related support services that facilitate successful employment outcomes. Supplemental support services may include, but are not limited to, adjustment counseling, adaptive devices, transportation, interpreter services, personal attendant services, and maintenance.

To identify individuals requiring such intensive job support services, the state unit will engage in comprehensive assessments to determine the nature and scope of the individual’s rehabilitation needs prior to plan development. The VR Counselor’s assessment will include a psychological evaluation, a functional skill assessment, three to five situational assessments through community work based assessments, and an evaluation of rehabilitation technology needs based on the individual’s selected employment goal as necessary and appropriate.

In accordance with Section 7(36) of the Rehab Act, the provision of supported employment services allows for 18 months. Under special circumstances, in mutual agreement with the eligible individual, the contracted vendor, the VR Counselor, and the VR District Administrator, DVI policy allows for extended service provision in order to achieve the employment outcome identified in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). We will continue in this manner.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 1:13PM by sadebharperh

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

 

To operate an effective vocational rehabilitation program for individuals with significant and most significant disabilities, the Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) described its goals and priorities in FY 2008 State Plan Attachment 4.11(c)(1) as:   (1) Increase the Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes (2) Improve Case Management (3) Automate and Streamline VR processes  

 

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

 

To facilitate informed choice, DVI‘s computer lab offers a variety of rehab technology devices to afford VR consumers the opportunity to use and select devices to increase their functional capacities to engage in vocational training, educational training, and/or a work environment. Evaluation and training is provided by DVI Trainer Educators at each stage of the rehabilitation process be it plan development, training, or placement to the extent that training or technical assistance is necessary for an individual with a disability to achieve an employment outcome. Assistive Technology devices are not subject to financial needs tests. If an individual requires an Assistive Technology device to prepare for employment and it cannot be obtained in a timely manner through comparable benefits such as Lions Clubs or other such foundations specific to persons with visual impairments the items are procured through the Department of Health and Social Services’ procurement process. VR Consumers are also made aware of and referred to other community resources such as DATI, and Easter Seals that also offer a variety of rehab technology devices to trial prior to purchase to ensure the device meets their specific need.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

A series of events will constitute efforts to encourage un-served and underserved populations to make application for VR services.

  (a) Each DVI quarterly newsletter will feature a former VR client whom is successfully employed in hopes that this will encourage more minorities and older blind individuals on the blind registry to rethink their ability to prepare for and obtain competitive employment.   (b)  New mailing lists to include businesses, churches, doctor’s offices, community centers and community health centers catering to diverse ethnic groups will be sought for distribution of the DVI newsletter and brochures to encourage potentially eligible individuals to apply for VR services. (c) Facilitate awareness of VR services for job retention to prevent unserved individuals from considering application for Social Security Title XVI funds. (d) DVI agency personnel will offer workshops to businesses to educate employers and their employees on services provided by DVI.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

 

As identified through the FY 2010 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment there is a need to develop the capacity of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) for serving blind individuals with most significant disabilities to increase the quality and quantity of our employment outcomes as well as increase the number of service providers for DVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Innovation and Expansion dollars will be allocated to the following methods and strategies to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.   Strategy 1:    Consultation as a method to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities:   To increase the ability and comfort level of CRP’s to provide assessment services, vocational training services, and job placement services for individuals with a primary disability of blindness, basic grant funds for trainings in blindness related issues that will enable CRP staff to develop a sensitivity to blindness by demonstrating ADL and sighted guide techniques under blindfold and simulated blindness goggles will be offered as necessary and appropriate. Funds will also be used as necessary and appropriate to evaluate the capability of a CRP’s information technology network to interface with rehab technology such as speech software required for engaging in the full range of employment related services offered by that facility. If scripting is required to resolve compatibility issues the DVI Agency Director will negotiate with the CRP’s Chief Operating Executive for resolution.   The VR Program Specialist will work closely with the VR Counselors and the VR District Administrator to identify gaps in services and available service providers.  To fill these gaps, we will work closely with the Contract Manager for the Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) to issue Requests for Information as a means to increase our pool of service providers.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

To improve the performance of DVI’s VR program with respect to the evaluation of standards and performance indicators we intend to work towards development and implementation of a Visual Dashboard Display that will enable us to capture real time date for the federal performance indicators as an administrative management tool.  This information will be shared with our councils and other stake holders to develop specific strategies to increase our number of applicants educate employers to the skills and abilities possessed by individuals with disability. Additionally we will continue with our documented goals to improve the quantity and quality of our employment outcomes through networking with various employers at community events, marketing the services of DVI through advertisements and outreach events

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

 

The nature of blindness “in itself” creates discomfort for those not understanding the potential of functional capacity for persons with severe vision loss. As an agency we have taken steps to develop and offer sensitivity and awareness trainings for all private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers entering into cooperative agreements with DVI for contracted services.  Vocational Rehabilitation Program Staff, Independent Living Services Program Staff, Technology Center Education Support Staff and Certified Orientation and Mobility partner to provide a day of comprehensive activities designed to teach techniques and strategies that promote skill development.   These trainings demonstrate the capability of persons with severe vision loss to function on as much of an equal plane as their sighted peers in terms of acquiring skills training and employment within integrated settings.   Contracts for employment related services with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers typically include Community Accredited Rehabilitation Facilities such as Goodwill, CHIMES, Elwyn, and Easter Seals. When specific blindness services for Occupational Training or Rehabilitation Technology Services, DVI has the flexibility to seek approval from the Office of Management and Budget to enter into contractual agreements to procure specific client services from other private non-profit organizations that may be located outside the state of Delaware such as the Statler Center in Buffalo New York.   With respect to the provision of services by more then one VR Agency to an individual simultaneously, a cooperative agreement was updated between the director of the General VR Agency and former DVI agency director Mr. Harry Hill. 

This agreement provides that DVI, in fulfilling the terms of this agreement, shall:

A. Refer to DVR all persons who do not fall under the legal definition of blindness (MSD), and documented evidence exists indicating the visual condition is stable.

OR

B. Refer to DVR for case management purposes all persons who are classified as Severely Visually Impaired (SD) only when there exists a waiting list for DVI while under an Order of Selection.

AND

C. DVI will provide support as subject matter experts for cases referred to DVR where either the condition does not make the individual eligible for DVI services or for those cases referred to DVR while an Order of Selection waiting list exists. This support can be, but not limited to assessments, evaluation for assistive technology, training with assistive technology and orientation and mobility instruction.

III. For purposes of this agreement in those cases where two or more disabling conditions are present, the primary disability will be the determining factor in which agency will assume case management authority. For those cases in which eligibility for VR services has been established by DVR and the case has been accepted (DVR status 10 or above) with a significant visual disability, a case conference will be convened, to include the District Administrator (DVR) and the VR Casework Supervisor (DVI) to determine the most appropriate service delivery system. In those cases where agreement cannot be reached, the Directors of DVI and DVR will make the final determination.

IV. Regardless of which agency retains the Vocational Rehabilitation case management authority, it is required under Delaware Code Title 31, Chapter 2108, that DVI be informed of all persons known to be Legally Blind or Severely Visually Impaired within the State in order that an accurate Registry of the Blind can be maintained.

IV. In allocating federal funds, which are available to the State of Delaware for rehabilitation programs, the DVR shall receive 85 percent and the DVI shall receive 15 percent of the Section 110 funds on an annual basis. The same percentage in sharing applies to any funding provided to the State on a formula basis unless otherwise specified in program language and intent such that one of the agencies is clearly uniquely the qualified recipient of the funding in question (i.e. formula grants for deaf and hearing impaired is allotted exclusively to DVR, formula grants for the Older Individuals Who are Blind is allotted exclusively to DVI). The two agencies will continue to cooperate to make certain that all federal funds, which are available to the State for rehabilitation programs, are utilized. This agreement will not apply to those situations in which additional funds are made available to the states as a redistribution of federal vocational rehabilitation funds in the fourth quarter of the federal fiscal year.

V. A VR Program Specialist from each agency will administer the federal funds received for the purposes of In-Service Training with quarterly meetings being held to plan joint training that is solely for the needs of VR program staff. There should not be expenditures of funds for duplication of training separately to each agency staff.

VI. To assure best possible Vocational Rehabilitation Services are available to residents of Delaware with a disability, quarterly staff communications between agencies will occur. This can be in the form of joint staff meetings, memorandums of current business practices/issues, sharing of newsletters or other publications, and informational/in-service sessions.

   

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

 

Goal 1:           Increase the Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes   Strategy 1:  Networking:  The DVI Agency Director, VR Counselors, and  Employment Service Specialists’ will become members of the State Chamber of Commerce to engage in networking opportunities at chamber sponsored events to identify and network with potential employers in a variety of occupations’  as a means of developing business partnerships leading to “hidden” employment opportunities. Our Employment Services Specialist will also participate in CSAVR’s National Employment Team meetings, webinars and conferences to keep abreast of all developed partnerships and strategies on the national level to foster business relationships at the local level.   Strategy 2:  Marketing:  Agency brochures will be updated for distribution during various attended networking events; Doctor’s offices will be targeted as a source of referral to DVI. Public advertisements will be developed by our agency Communication Specialist using various media and our Employment Services Specialist will promote use of on- the -job-training (OJT) funds for potential small business employers interested in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Title I funds and/or intensive supportive employment services utilizing Title VI Part B funds   Strategy 3:  Outreach:  A series of events will constitute efforts to encourage un-served and underserved populations to make application for VR services.   (a) Each DVI semi-annual[RLDIII1]  newsletter will feature a former VR client whom is successfully employed in hopes that this will encourage more minorities and older blind individuals on the blind registry to rethink their ability to prepare for and obtain competitive employment.   (b)  New mailing lists to include businesses, churches, doctor’s offices, community centers and community health centers catering to diverse ethnic groups will be sought for distribution of the DVI newsletter and brochures to encourage potentially eligible individuals to apply for VR services. (c) Facilitate awareness of VR services for job retention to prevent unserved individuals from considering application for Social Security Title XVI funds. (d) DVI agency personnel will offer workshops to businesses to educate employers and their employees on services provided by DVI.     Goal 2:           Improve Case Management   Strategy 1:     Monthly supervisory meetings: Case Reviews will be held between the VR Counselors and the VR District Administrator to ensure presumptive eligibility determinations are consistently utilized following verification that the applicant receives social security benefits based on significant disability. Additionally the VR District Administrator will provide consultation and guidance, in cases identified by the VR Counselor as proving difficult, to develop an employment plan within the 90 day time frame.   Strategy 2:               Revisions to Casework Manual:  The casework manual will be reviewed to update procedures in line with current practices and establish guidelines for self-employment.   Strategy 3:     Interdisciplinary Team Meetings:  To ensure a team approach for seamless service delivery that addresses each individual’s unique needs, on a monthly basis an interdisciplinary team meeting will be coordinated by the VR Counselor to involve all agency personnel providing simultaneous service to a VR consumer. The meeting shall include as necessary and appropriate a Certified Rehabilitation Instructor from the DVI Independent Living Services Program, a Trainer Educator from the DVI Technology Center, a Certified Orientation and Mobility Instructor, a DVI Itinerant Teacher Consultant and the DVI -VR Transition Counselor.   Strategy 4:                Professional Staff Development:  Newly hired VR Counselors that do not possess Certified Rehabilitation Counselor credentials will be required to enroll and participate in Rehabilitation Education graduate studies within 5 years from the date of hire. IST funds will be utilized for staff   Goal 3:                       Automation & Streamlining Strategy 1Enhancements to DVI’s electronic case management system: Modifications will be made to DE Blind’s information management system, the Visually Impaired Client Registry (VICR) to:   (a) Capture data elements for state/federal reports by automating specific forms. (b) Track consumer equipment purchases for inventory purposes. (c) Afford staff the ability to print client contact logs and other required case service record forms, at strategic intervals, directly from the system for filing in the hard copy Case Service Record. (d) Share non-confidential case notes across disciplines regarding progress towards goal attainment for those staff working collaboratively with individual agency consumers.      Strategy 2: Collaboration with SRC: DVI will continue to work with the State Rehabilitation Council for the Blind to evaluate aspects of the process that are unnecessarily burdensome and inefficient for clients and staff as a means to streamline systematic processes.  Goal 4:           Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction   Strategy 1:    Develop Consumer Satisfaction Surveys:  A Policy and Evaluation subcommittee of the State Rehabilitation Council will review the agency’s current instrument to make suggestions and recommendations to the full council for potential changes. Following acceptance of the proposed recommendations the survey instrument will be developed and implemented.  Strategy 2: Hold annual Town Hall Meetings:  In partnership with the SRC town hall meetings will be held to orient and describe how the array of DVI services, including how assistive technology services and devices are provided to individuals with blindness issues on a statewide basis, and to respond to general questions regarding agency policy and procedures for the provision of DVI services.    Strategy 3: DVI will respond to 100% of written consumer complaints within 10 business days of receipt: Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will develop marketing materials that highlight steps and resources for resolving concerns during their VR experience. This brochure will be made available to 100% of DVI’s VR consumers and each new applicant thereafter.   Innovation and Expansion  As identified through the FY 2010 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment there is a need to develop the capacity of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) for serving blind individuals with most significant disabilities to increase the quality and quantity of our employment outcomes as well as increase the number of service providers for DVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Innovation and Expansion dollars will be allocated to the following methods and strategies to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.   Strategy 1:    Consultation as a method to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities:   To increase the ability and comfort level of CRP’s to provide assessment services, vocational training services, and job placement services for individuals with a primary disability of blindness, basic grant funds for trainings in blindness related issues that will enable CRP staff to develop a sensitivity to blindness by demonstrating ADL and sighted guide techniques under blindfold and simulated blindness goggles will be offered as necessary and appropriate. Funds will also be used as necessary and appropriate to evaluate the capability of a CRP’s information technology network to interface with rehab technology such as speech software required for engaging in the full range of employment related services offered by that facility. If scripting is required to resolve compatibility issues the DVI Agency Director will negotiate with the CRP’s Chief Operating Executive for resolution.   The VR Program Specialist will work closely with the VR Counselors and the VR District Administrator to identify gaps in services and available service providers.  To fill these gaps, we will work closely with the Contract Manager for the Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) to issue Requests for Information as a means to increase our pool of service providers.   Strategy 2:    Expand employment opportunities within the BEP program: To expand employment opportunities the BEP Director DVI will contract the services of a Business Developer. It is the goal of the program to incorporate business opportunities beyond food service cafeterias in state and federal businesses. Franchises such as subways, Laundromats, vending carts, etc. will be explored.    Strategy 3: Expand the role of Delaware Industries for the blind to serve as a rehab facility: Innovative approaches are required to prepare individuals with the most significant disabilities for employment in today’s labor market. Delaware Industries for the Blind (DIB) secures state and federal contracts that offer a competitive wage and extensive contact with the public. DVI VR will work cooperatively with DIB’s Program Director to coordinate training opportunities that will enable VR consumers to acquire marketable job skills that lend themselves to transferable skills in various occupations such as customer service, engraving, embroidering, computer graphics, screen printing, production, material handling, shipping and receiving, and general office work. I&E funds will be used to create new employment opportunities to include purchase of computer hardware, software, and other related rehab technology devices as identified.   Goal 4: DVI will respond to 100% of written consumer complaints within 10 business days of receipt: Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will develop marketing materials that highlight steps and resources for resolving concerns during their VR experience. This brochure will be made available to 100% of DVI’s VR consumers and new applicants.  


 [RLDIII1]

 

This screen has never been updated.

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Goal 1: Increase quality and quantity of employment outcomes

Outcome: Although the program sustained a 15% decrease in the number of employment outcomes 77% that exited the VR program achieved an employment outcome and 93% of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome exited with earnings equivalent to the minimum wage.

While the Division experienced a 15% decrease in this period, data shows a 325% overall increase in employment outcomes comparing to the previous period.

Factors that impeded achievement included consumer demographics and staffing availability:

Consumer Demographics:

o More consumers were in training status in FFY 2012 – There were 11 more consumers in formal training programs such as college in FFY 2012 than in 2011. These consumers were not yet ready for employment and could not be placed in jobs.

o Consumers required more time for rehabilitation in 2012 - On average consumers closing in FFY 2012 required 112 days more to complete rehabilitation and achieve employment than in FFY 2011. Some of this is based on the consumers’ skills, aptitudes and individualized pace to complete rehabilitation.

o At the beginning of FFY DVI had 39% fewer consumers who were either ready to be (or who had just been)placed in jobs that eventually led to closure in FFY 2012.

Staffing:

o Staff were (and are currently) engaged in training to become highly qualified - During the same period, DVI had several employees begin Masters Programs to reach the credential level of Certified Rehabilitation Counselor. This is very positive for DVI consumers; however, this requires the agency to provide time to the staff during their work week for educational leave. This has an impact on services.

o Staff shortages- Key position vacancies (requiring 6 months to find a replacement). The replacement is still in training.

Goal 2: Increase Case Management Performance

Outcome: In Progress

Strategy 2.1: Monthly supervisory meetings

The provision of directional guidance as on-going training, and consultation has made a discernible impact on beginning assessments to identify the full scope of VR services immediately following application. The goal is decrease the need to obtain plan waivers from 44% to less than 10% of the time each fiscal year.

Strategy 2.2: Revise Casework Manual

Revisions to Casework Manual will be considered as necessary and appropriate following RSA monitoring activities.

Strategy 2.3: Coordinate Interdisciplinary Team Meetings

The VR Counselors continues to coordinate interdisciplinary Team Meetings to monitor the progress of services provided to individual consumers from other DVI programs and support services. Meetings are held twice a month.

Strategy 2.4: Professional Staff Development

To meet the federal standards of qualified rehabilitation counselor the VR Senior Counselor serving New Castle County continues in the Masters’ Program of Rehabilitation Education. She is scheduled to complete this course of study in December 2013 and will be eligible to sit for the CRC exam.

For professional growth, trainings were provided to VR staff by the TACE Center in the Rehab Act, Record Documentation and Assessments. VR staff also participated in Learning Communities for State Coordinators for the Deaf, DeafBlind and Hard of Hearing, Data Collection, Transition, Provider Liaisons’, and State Rehabilitation Council. A number of webinars were attended that included topics on Employment related issues and Transition Services. Quarterly trainings were arranged for agency staff that focused on team building, multi-generational differences, and community resources available to meet the unique needs of individuals with disabilities.

Strategy 3: Automation and streamlining of the case management process

Strategy 3.1: Automate client forms

During the reporting period, the counselors and the VR District Administrator identified several forms to be automated. Due to emergent technology priorities several will have to be completed in the new plan year. The automation of the job retention form has created efficiencies. The agency will continue to identify forms for automation that will decrease the time spent in completion of various paper forms.

Strategy 3.2: Streamline VR Systematic Processes

The VR District Administrator continues to collaborate with the Division of Management Services Information Resource Management Team to transform all aspects of the Individualized Plan for Employment into an electronic format that will result in efficiencies for data collection. A draft design has been completed for testing.

Factors impeding automaton and streamlining of the case management process

The system is not yet programmed to save the automated forms directly to the consumers’ electronic record of services.

A shift in the requests and maintenance priorities to address fixes to the Visually Impaired Client Registry will be on-going.

Finalization and implementation of an automated system may be delayed in order to make the reprogramming changes necessary for the RSA 911 data collection to be implemented for fiscal year 13.

Goal 4: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction

Outcome: In Progress

Strategy 4.1: Revise consumer satisfaction surveys

Draft revisions to ongoing consumer satisfaction surveys have been made, but not yet implemented. The new system will be implemented during the coming plan year.

Strategy 4.2: Conduct Town Hall meetings

In partnership with the SRC two Town Hall meetings were held during FY 12. The first Town Hall meeting was held February 2, 2012 for constituents residing in Kent and Sussex Counties. The second meeting was held for constituents residing in New Castle County. The meetings oriented the public to the programs and services provided through the Department of Health and Social Services\ Division for the Visually Impaired. Although consumer satisfaction was not directly measured by attendance, consumers were given the opportunity to discuss program needs and ways to improve service delivery. Participants expressed appreciation for the forums and offered feedback for enhancing service delivery.

Strategy 4.3: Respond to 100% of written consumer complaints within 10 business days of receipt.

The DVI agency director received informal inquiry calls regarding DVI process and procedural questions. The general nature of calls was related to the speed of service delivery. All inquiries were handled within the established ten business day time frame.

 

The established goal for FY’12 was to obtain seven (7) successful supported employment outcomes in a competitive environment.

One supported employment outcome was achieved in cooperation with Division of Developmental Delays and the Early Start to Supported Employment Program.

The DSU continues to struggle with attracting vendors with the capacity to train and provide job placement services for persons with multiple disabilities. A request for information will be released to in an effort to locate individuals and/or organizations interested in providing vocational training services as well as job placement services for persons with multiple disabilities

 

1.1 The number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an

Employment outcome during the current performance period compared to the number of individuals who exited the VR program after achieving an employment outcome during the previous performance period will equal or exceed the previous performance period.

Summary: 45 individuals achieved an employment outcome

Outcome/ Failed: 52 individuals exited the VR program with employment outcomes in the previous reporting period.

1.2 of all individuals who exit the VR program after receiving services, the percentage that are determined to have achieved an employment outcome will be at least 68.9%.

Summary: 45 individuals exited with an employment outcome compared to 13 that did not achieve an employment outcome after receiving VR services.

Outcome/ Passed: The percentage that are determined to have achieved an employment outcome is 77.5 % (13 + 45 = 58 or 45/58 = 77.5%)

1.3 Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, the percentage that exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage shall be minimally 35.4%.

Summary: 42 of 45 individuals achieving an employment outcome exited the VR program with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage for Delaware.

Outcome/Passed: Of all individuals having achieved an employment outcome with earnings equivalent to the minimum wage is 93.3% (42/45 = 93.3%)

1.4 Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage the percentage that are individuals with significant disabilities shall be minimally 89%.

Summary: 42 of 45 individuals exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment.

Outcome/ Passed: 100% of all individuals exiting the VR program with earnings equivalent to the minimum wage were identified as individuals with significant disabilities. (42/42=100%)

1.5 The average hourly earnings of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earning levels equivalent to at least the minimum wage as a ratio to the State’s average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed (as derived for the Bureau of Labor Statistics report “State Average Annual Pay” for the most recent available year) shall be 59%.

Summary: The average hourly earnings for those individuals exiting the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment is $14.84. Based on information obtained from Delaware Department of Labor, Office of Labor Market Information [September Occupational Employment Statistics measuring employment and wage rates for hourly and salaried workers in nonfarm industries] the average hourly earnings are recorded as $21.50

Outcome/Passed: The average hourly wage of all individuals exiting the VR program with earning levels equivalent to the minimum wage as a ratio to the Delaware’s average hourly wage is 69% (14.84/21.50 =69%)

1.6 Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage, the difference between the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they exited the VR program and the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they apply for VR service shall be 30.4%.

Summary: 8 of 42 individuals exiting the VR program with earning equivalent to the minimum wage reported their income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they applied for VR services (8/42= 19%). The number reporting their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they exited the VR program totaled 29 (29/42= 69%).

Outcome/Passed: The difference between the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they exited the VR program and the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they apply for VR service is 50% (69%-19%=50%)

2.1 The service rate for all individuals with disabilities from minority

backgrounds as a ratio to the service rate for all non-minority individuals with disabilities shall be .80%.

Summary: A total of 88 cases were closed during FFY’ 12

Outcome/ Passed: 42minorities:46non minorities = .91%

 

A total of $57,169.36 was spent in outreach activities to increase awareness of DVI services, outreach to unserved and underserved populations, and to increase agency referrals.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 12:06PM by sadebharperh

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

The quality of contracted vendors for Supported Employment (SE) services will be assessed based on the level of integration our eligible individuals have with non-disabled individuals performing the associated tasks of similar duties [which can also be customized based on functional capacities] occurring in an integrated setting with similar wages paid to other employees performing like duties. The number of hours worked per week will be dependent upon the eligible individuals’ functional capacities and in mutual agreement between the individual, the VR Counselor and as appropriate, the individuals representative. Additionally, all contracted vendors shall maintain a program of professional development for those employees within its organization who provide job placement services by participating in training opportunities for on-site trainers, employment specialists/job developers and SE managers. The scope and extent of contracted supported employment services shall include: 1.    Assessment services to evaluate the needs, strengths, skills and job preferences through 3-5 community based work assessments. Unless the nature of the Consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours each assessment will last a minimum of 4 hours. 2.    Job readiness skills training to assist the eligible individual with understanding appropriate work behaviors for job retention, appropriate grooming for the workplace, developing a resume, completing a criminal background check. 3.    Placement in a job that is commensurate with the eligible individuals’ skills, interests, functional capacities, aptitude, and informed choice following a job analysis. 4.    Provide a minimum of four weeks [up to a maximum of 18 months with supervisory approval] of intensive on-site job skills training to assist the eligible individual with new employee orientation, mastering the job tasks, establishing appropriate work habits, and meeting all required work standards of the job. 5.    On-site assistance at a rate 20% of the time or less for a minimum of four weeks to address any problems or concerns to ensure stabilization for a positive employment outcome. 6.    Follow-along services for 90 days post-stabilization for continued collaboration with the employer to address any issues arising that may potentially impact job retention. 7.    Extended services for continued monitoring and crisis intervention as necessary for as long as the eligible individual remains employed.   Payment for services will be made in milestones as follows:   Assessment (25% of payment) following a determination of the consumer’s rehabilitation needs through assessment of the consumer’s abilities and functional limitations will be made in a competitive setting. Placement (25% of payment) in an integrated setting that meets RSA supported employment guidelines and is commensurate with the eligible individuals’ skills, interests, functional capacities, aptitude, and informed choice. Stabilization (25% of payment) following demonstrated ability to perform the essential job tasks and ability to work as independently as possible with natural supports. Successful Closure (25% of payment) following 90 days of continuous employment to include the employers written report of satisfactory job performance   A vendor to provide Follow-Along services (extended services) will be identified at the time the plan for Supported Employment Services is developed for implementation. The eligible individual will transition to Extended Services following 90 days of continuous employment. Extended services will continue to be offered primarily through community rehabilitation programs. Due to budget cuts impacting the Division for Developmental Disability Services in the state of Delaware, as necessary extended services will be offered and provided by DVI’s Independent Living Services Program. Extended services will include a minimum of two worksite contacts each month to monitor stable job performance.  Should a situation arise that requires additional VR services for job retention, the case service record will be reactivated as Post Employment. If a breakdown in the employment occurs whereas the employment situation terminates a meeting with all relevant parties (individual, individuals’ representative, vendor, and VR Counselor) will occur to determine the best course of action based on the extenuating circumstances.

ontracted vendors (Community Rehabilitation Programs) such as Easter Seals, Goodwill, OCI, Heartwood, KSI, Horizon House and Chrysalis will provide supported employment services under a purchase of service agreement to DVI consumers referred for services who because of the nature and severity of their disabilities need intensive supported employment services and extended services after transition, in order to perform the specific job tasks to maintain and retain employment that are consistent with the current standards of industry and accreditation organizations. The vendor will be paid to: 1. Provide Supported Employment (SE) Assessment services to evaluate the needs, strengths, skills and job preferences of consumers to be served. Situation assessments will be a minimum of one and a maximum of three work experiences. Each experience will last a minimum of 6 hours unless the nature of the Consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours. 2. Provide SE Placement Services to assist the consumer in job search, in obtaining, and retaining employment; to provide job leads and to assist consumers with scheduling, attending job interviews, and navigating the hiring process. Consumers will be placed in jobs that offer a minimum of 20 hours of employment unless the nature of the consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours worked each week. 3. Provide a minimum of four weeks of intensive on-site SE training services to assist the consumer with new employee orientation, learning job skills, establishing work habits, and meeting all required work standards of the job. 4. Provide a minimum of four weeks of SE stabilization on the job that requires on-site assistance at a rate 20% of the time or less. 5. Provide follow-up services for 90 days post-stabilization to ensure consumer receives on-going support necessary to retain employment. All contracted vendors shall maintain a program of professional development for those employees within its organization who provide services under the terms of a purchase of service agreement by participating in training opportunities for on-site trainers, employment specialists/job developers and SE managers. Payment for services will be made in milestones as follows: 1. Assessment (10% of payment): maximum of 60 days • Determination of the consumer’s rehabilitation needs through assessment of the consumer’s abilities and functional limitations will be made in a competitive setting. 2. Placement (20% of payment): • Job Placement is made based on consumer’s identified abilities and functional limitations in a competitive setting. • A job-site analysis has been performed and completed. • The job in which the consumer has been placed meets all RSA supported employment guidelines, the consumer has made an informed choice in selection of the identified employer, and he/she is satisfied with the placement. 3. Four Week Job Retention (20% of payment): • The consumer has worked successfully for a period of four weeks at or above the number of hours based on his/her functional limitations. 4. Stabilization (20% of payment): • The consumer has been employed a minimum total of four weeks and requires assistance approximately 20% of the time of his/her total work week hours on the job. 5. Successful Closure (30% of payment): • Following withdrawal of intensive support the consumer has achieved 90 days of consecutive employment and meets all required RSA criteria to be considered having achieved a positive employment outcome by performing essential job functions in an independent manner. A vendor to provide Follow-Along services (extended services) will be identified at the time the plan for Supported Employment Services is developed for implementation. Consumers will transition to Follow -Along Services at time of closure. Extended services will continue to be offered primarily through community rehabilitation programs. Due to budget cuts impacting the Division for Developmental Disability Services in the state of Delaware, when appropriate extended services will be offered and provided by DVI’s Independent Living Services Unit. Extended services include a minimum of two worksite visits each month to monitor stable job performance. Other services as identified during the course of the vocational rehabilitation process that are required for an individual to maintain employment will be coordinated prior to case closure. Post Employment services will be provided as necessary and appropriate for job retention.

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2012 8:49AM by sadebharperh

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Last updated on:08/27/2013 4:09 PM

Last updated by:sadejenkinse

Completed on: 08/27/2013 4:09 PM

Completed by: sadejenkinse

Approved on: 08/29/2013 9:06 AM

Approved by: rsavroomanl