ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Published February 16, 2017.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2015 (submitted FY 2014)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The California Department of Rehabilitation is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the California Department of Rehabilitation [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Director, California Department of Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Director, California Department of Rehabilitation

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at https://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryJoe Xavier

Title of SignatoryDirector, California Department of Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/30/2014

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2015Yes

Comments:

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryJoe Xavier

Title of SignatoryDirector, California Department of Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/30/2014

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

The California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) works in partnership with the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) to evaluate and advise DOR regarding its specific and overall performance and effectiveness. The SRC works with DOR to develop, agree to, and evaluate the State Plan goals and priorities. Additionally, the SRC provides input and recommendations on policies and collaborates on projects including the State Plan, Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS), and the triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). Information on the complete scope of SRC activities can be found in the SRC Annual Report.

As a standing quarterly agenda item, the SRC discusses the State Plan at each full council meeting. Topics include State Plan goals, priorities, and updates on performance measures. Through this interactive process, the SRC has the opportunity to receive and discuss information with key DOR leadership, ask questions and identify areas of concern throughout the State Plan planning process. At the November 2013 quarterly meeting, the SRC adopted the following recommendations to DOR, which were submitted in a letter to the DOR Director dated January 8, 2014.

SRC Recommendation 2014.1: The DOR continue to implement effective soft skills assessment and training for consumers statewide.

DOR Response: The Soft Skills Training Pilot was completed in 2013, and statewide implementation continues through Federal Fiscal Year 2015. DOR will continue to provide soft skills training to Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) team members and consumers. Additionally, DOR has begun a new project, the Placement Plus Proof of Concept (PPPOC), which provides enhanced employment preparation including the soft skills curriculum and assessments. The DOR will continue to update the SRC on both projects.

SRC Recommendation 2014.2: The DOR continue to incorporate, statewide, a process to provide consumers with benefits planning services aimed at maximizing their employment potential.

DOR Response: The DOR agrees with the SRC’s recommendation that benefits planning services is an essential element to assisting consumers in reaching their employment goals. In order to reach this goal, DOR has initiated the PPPOC as well as the Work Incentives Planning Pilot created to enhance benefits counseling for consumers receiving Social Security Income (SSI)/Social Security Disability Income. In addition to these projects, California was awarded the federal Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (PROMISE) grant which will fund enhanced services for SSI recipients age 14 to 17, and the services will include benefits counseling for youth and their families. DOR will continue to update the SRC on these projects.

SRC Recommendation 2014.3: The DOR continue Business Partner Forums to be conducted quarterly with DOR Executive Staff and to include a broad sector representation.

DOR Response: The DOR will continue with the Business Partner Forums, and to make the forums more valuable, will work with the SRC to explore the creation of a regional model for the Business Partner Forum to develop stronger local business relations. Once the model is created, DOR will explore how often to conduct the Business Partner Forums in partnership with the SRC. DOR agrees with the SRC regarding the need for broad sector representation at the Business Partner Forums.

Additional Information: In April 2013, DOR held the first Business Partner Forum, in which six employers participated. DOR will convene one statewide Business Partner forum and continue supporting local events such as Job Placement Circles and reverse job fairs.

SRC Recommendation 2014.4: The DOR implement a process for employers and for staff to expedite the identification of job ready DOR consumers for employers.

DOR Response: The DOR recognizes the need for connecting job ready consumers to available employment opportunities. Currently, DOR is implementing the Talent Acquisition Portal, which is estimated to be fully implemented by May 2014. DOR is creating a reporting function in Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) identifying job ready consumers and is developing consistent methods that will assist with the referrals of job ready consumers to employers with job openings. In addition, the PPPOC will assist with further defining job readiness and will validate the measures needed to ensure that consumers referred to employment services are job ready. DOR will continue to partner with the SRC on these efforts.

Additional Information: The DOR is developing the reporting function and consistent methods to refer job-ready consumers to employers with job openings. DOR will explore the internal recommendation of sending consistent reminders to DOR field staff about appropriately placing job-ready consumers into “Service-J” status and ensuring the consumer’s accurate vocational goal is reflected in AWARE.

SRC Recommendation 2014.5: The DOR better utilize existing and emerging labor market and economic data.

DOR Response: The DOR will continue to provide access to resources for existing and emerging labor market and economic data to VRSD teams, as part of the Individualized Plan for Employment development process. The Workforce Development Section will utilize emerging labor market and economic data as an ongoing topic for statewide Employment Coordinator meetings, which they will share with all members of the VRSD team.

SRC Recommendations 2014.6 a and b: a) The CSS results be shared with field staff to discuss results and make improvements with management on how to better serve consumers in their districts. b) The DOR improve the response rate and the methodology of CSS by instituting prior year’s recommendations and continuing to partner with the SRC.

DOR Response: The DOR agrees to continue sharing the CSS results with VRSD teams to improve DOR’s services. Additionally, DOR has posted the report on the intranet and the internet, has shared the results with the Executive Team, the District Administrators, and sent out a DORALL notifying all staff of the results. By 2015, DOR anticipates the survey will available online year-round and will institute marketing efforts to increase the response rate.

Additional Information: Since DOR’s response, DOR has met with District Administrators to review the CSS results, issued reminder notifications to survey recipients for the 2014 CSS to further encourage responses, and established a workgroup to research and develop an on-line survey. DOR continues to use the data collected to better align service delivery, policies, and procedures with consumers’ expectations.

SRC Recommendation 2014.7: The DOR, if feasible, will evaluate consumers before and after they receive benefits planning services or soft skills training to measure the effectiveness of the services.

DOR Response: The DOR appreciates the SRC’s recommendation to measure the effectiveness of the services. DOR will continue its VR modernization efforts which are providing ongoing improvement to the quality of vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services provided to individuals with disabilities. Soft skills training and benefits counseling/work incentive planning are among the services provided by DOR; however, it is difficult to isolate these two services to evaluate the specific impact as noted in this recommendation. The DOR believes that by adding specific questions related to these service areas in the 2015 CSS may provide the SRC with additional information regarding the impact of these services.

SRC Recommendation 2014.8: The DOR develop specific questions that address prior year’s CSNA survey responses and use those during the State Plan public hearings.

DOR Response: The DOR will continue to partner with the SRC to develop questions from the CSNA for the State Plan public meeting questions. DOR recognizes the importance of our continued partnership in addressing the needs of individuals with disabilities and other interested persons by including questions generated from the results of the CSNA.

Additional Information: Since DOR’s response, DOR held an interactive discussion with the SRC during the SRC public quarterly meeting in March 2014 on the State Plan and public meetings. DOR used the input provided to develop the questions for the State Plan public meetings held on March 27, 2014 and April 3, 2014 to solicit consumer and stakeholder input on VR services delivery and barriers to services.

Consumer Satisfaction Survey

The CSS is conducted annually, jointly by the SRC and DOR, to evaluate consumers’ satisfaction of the services provided by DOR and vendors. In 2013, the CSS survey instrument was changed from four surveys to one survey. Further improvements to the survey allowed DOR to distinguish the consumer’s disability, through a self-identification question on the survey, and specific questions geared towards those that achieved an employment outcome and those that did not. The SRC provided comments for the CSS, including their interest in improving the survey response rate and sharing the survey tool more effectively, as identified in SRC Recommendations 2014.6 a and b.

Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment

The CSNA is conducted jointly with the SRC annually over a three-year period to identify the VR service needs of Californians with disabilities. At each full council quarterly meeting, SRC receives updates on the CSNA triennial progress and has the opportunity to provide input into the design and methodology. In FFY 2014, the SRC reviewed the CSNA and provided comments including agreeing to retain the methodology for the External Stakeholder Surveys; and suggesting revision of the questions posed for the State Plan public meeting, identified in SRC Recommendation 2014.8.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 12:52AM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) requests a continuation of its waiver of statewideness for third-party cooperative agreements with local education agencies (LEA), public higher education agencies, and county human services agencies. These agreements between DOR and local public agencies are designed to increase the availability and quality of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services leading to employment outcomes. Although cooperative agreements exist in each DOR district, DOR does not have sufficient staff or budget authority to contract with every potential cooperative partner in the State. In geographic areas where a cooperative agreement is not available, individuals can apply for VR services at any local DOR field office.

Cooperative agreements include the following required federal assurances: • Local funds used as match are certified as non-federal monies. The non-federal share of funds are made available by the local public agencies to DOR and are either paid through a cash match contribution or reported as certified expenditures of redirected agency staff time to provide a unique pattern of VR services exclusively to DOR applicants/consumers. Each cooperative agreement identifies the type and amount of match to be provided by the local public agency. • The types of VR services provided to DOR applicants/consumers by the local public agency or associated vendor are identified by the VR Counselor. • Prior written approval is issued by DOR to the local public agency or associated community rehabilitation provider (CRP), which designates the specific type of VR services to be provided to DOR applicants/ consumers. • The VR services provided are only for DOR applicants/consumers and are new services that have a VR focus or existing services that have been modified, adapted, expanded, or reconfigured to have a VR focus; and, that are not customary services the local public agency is legally mandated to provide. The services included in each cooperative agreement are based on the local needs of DOR applicants/consumers and the local public agency. • Program expenses for cooperative agreement services are under the administrative supervision of DOR through the cooperative agreement. • Each cooperative program and DOR District establishes a mutual referral system for individuals to apply for VR services. • All State Plan requirements will apply to all services provided to DOR applicants/consumers under the cooperative agreement, including the Order of Selection identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(3).

The DOR administers VR services through the following cooperative programs for which the waiver of statewideness is requested:

Transition Partnership Programs (TPP)

The DOR administers 106 TPP cooperative programs with LEAs or Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPA) and with nine case service contracts through associated CRPs. The goal of the TPPs is to serve high school students with disabilities by facilitating the effective transition from school to meaningful employment. Selected TPP cooperative programs may only serve targeted populations of students with disabilities in response to the specific local service area needs including youth who are in foster care; adjudicated (at-risk); blind; deaf; or have a mental health disability. The LEA or SELPA will refer students with disabilities to DOR who can benefit from VR services. The assigned VR Counselor will then open a case and work in partnership with the individual to complete an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) before the consumer leaves school. Through the cooperative agreement or case service contract, the participating LEA, SELPA, or CRP provides one or more new or expanded VR services to the DOR applicant/consumer in their senior year and after the consumer leaves high school. The VR services provided include new vocational assessments, new or expanded work experience, new employment preparation and vocational instruction, new job development, placement, and job retention, and new non-supported employment job coaching.

WorkAbility I (WAI) Program

The WAI program is administered through the state Department of Education.

WorkAbility II (WAII) Cooperative Programs

The DOR administers six WAII cooperative programs with LEAs, Adult Schools, or Regional Occupational Programs (ROP). The goal of the WAII is to assist adult and out-of-school youth with disabilities to obtain successful employment. Through the cooperative agreement, the participating LEA, Adult School, or ROP provides one or more new or expanded VR services to the DOR applicant/consumer. The VR services provided include new vocational assessment, new employment preparation and vocational instruction, new job development, placement, and job retention, and new non-supported employment job coaching.

WorkAbility III (WAIII) Cooperative Programs

The DOR administers 26 WAIII cooperative programs with community colleges. The goal of the WAIII is to assist college students with disabilities to obtain successful employment. Through the cooperative agreement, the participating community college provides one or more new or expanded VR services to the DOR applicant/consumer. These VR services provided include new vocational assessment, new employment preparation, new or expanded job development, placement, and job retention services.

WorkAbility IV (WAIV) Cooperative Programs

The DOR administers 12 WAIV cooperative programs with the California State University (CSU) or University of California (UC). The goal of the WAIV is to assist college students with disabilities to obtain successful employment. Through the cooperative agreement, the participating CSU or UC provides one or more new or expanded VR services to the DOR applicant/consumer including new or expanded internships, new or expanded employment preparation, new or expanded job development, placement, and job retention services.

Mental Health (MH) Cooperative Programs

The DOR administers 24 MH cooperative programs with county mental health agencies and 32 case service contracts with associated CRPs. The goal of the MH cooperative programs is to assist individuals with mental health disabilities live independently in the community through obtaining successful employment. Through the cooperative agreement and/or associated case service contract, the participating local county mental health agency or CRP provides one or more new or expanded VR services to the DOR applicant/consumer. The VR services provided include new vocational assessments, new personal vocational and social adjustment, new work adjustment, new employment preparation, new job development, placement, and job retention services, as well as new non-supported employment job coaching.

Welfare Cooperative Programs

The DOR administers two Welfare cooperative programs with county human services agencies. The goal of the Welfare cooperative programs is to assist individuals with disabilities who receive Temporary Assistance to Needy Families to become employed. Through a cooperative agreement, the participating county human services agency provides one or more expanded VR services to the DOR applicant/consumer. County Welfare programs provide work related programs for recipients of TANF, but have exempted people with disabilities. The services they have available for non-disabled TANF recipients do not meet the needs of people with disabilities. The VR services provided include new vocational evaluation, new employment preparation, new job development, placement, and job retention services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 7:03PM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) maximizes resources to assist individuals with disabilities access other programs by working cooperatively with State and local agencies through Memorandum of Understandings (MOU), Interagency Agreements (IA) or grants. These agencies do not carry out activities under the statewide workforce investment system: California Association of Student Financial Aid Administrator MOU: Guidelines for Joint Financial Support-establishes guidelines for the joint financial support of DOR student consumers to achieve their educational goals, eventually leading to employment. This MOU supports students enrolled in the California post-secondary setting with a financial aid office on campus.

California State University (CSU) MOU: Service Commitment for CSU Students/DOR Consumers-details the commitment of the CSU and DOR to work cooperatively to provide services to eligible CSU students/DOR consumers with disabilities.

California State University, Sacramento (CSUS) IA 1: Supervisory Training-provides 80 hours of supervisory training to DOR supervisors and managers and reflects the mission and goals of the California Health and Human Services Agency.

IA 2: Project, Meeting, and Workgroup Consultation-CSUS, Center for Collaborative Policy provides the California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities with strategic consultation for project planning, meeting support, and facilitation of work groups.

Department of General Services (DGS) Statewide Contracts: DOR Purchasing Agreements-DGS oversees the statewide contracts for purchasing where agreements establish a pre-qualified list of vendors and simplify the purchasing process. Cooperative agreements are available to all State of California governmental entities, including DOR, that expend public funds for the acquisition of both goods and services. The California Multiple Award Schedules offers a wide variety of commodities, non-information technology (IT) services and IT products and services at prices which have been assessed to be fair, reasonable and competitive. The Western States Contracting Alliance is used for cooperative purchasing agreements with other states for information technology hard/software and non-IT products.

IA 1: DOR Applicant/Consumer Mediation Assistance-the DGS, Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) mediators assist applicants and consumers who request fair hearing or mediation to explore options for mutual resolution of a dispute in a timely, non-confrontational manner. Through mediation, applicants and consumers can better understand DOR regulations and policies, and DOR can better understand the individual’s needs.

IA 2: Business Enterprise Program (BEP) Fair Hearing Services-DGS, OAH provides fair hearing services for DOR BEP vendor appeals.

IA 3: DOR Applicant/Consumer Fair Hearing Services-DGS, OAH provides fair hearing services to review determinations made by DOR that affect vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities and applicants and consumers.

IA 4: BEP Insurance Management-DGS, Office of Risk and Insurance Management provides management of the BEP Statewide insurance program funded from food service vending machine locations.

Department of Health Care Services Information Exchange IA: Verification of DOR Applicant’s Benefit Status-used by DOR to verify an applicant’s Supplemental Security Income/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/SSDI) benefit status to assist in determining eligibility for DOR services including application of the presumptive eligibility rules for SSI/SSDI beneficiaries in accordance with Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Department of Technology Services IA: Data Processing-provides DOR data processing services.

Independent Living Centers (ILC) Statewide Grants: Administration and Oversight of Independent Living (IL) Services-Title VII Rehabilitation Act Funds are used to administer the DOR independent living program and monitor 28 ILCs that provide federally required services, including IL skills and assistive technology services to individuals with disabilities.

Grant 1: Provision of IL Services-Assembly Bill 204 grants issued to non-profit ILCs to provide IL services that assist individuals with disabilities in achieving social and economic independence. Core services provided include peer counseling, advocacy, attendant referral, housing assistance, and IL skills training; and others services and referrals deemed necessary such as transportation, job development, equipment maintenance and evaluation, and mobility assistance and communication.

Grant 2: IL Long-term Stability-Title VII B grants funds used for technical assistance and capacity building to achieve greater long-term stability for IL networks.

Older Individuals who are Blind (OIB) Grants: OIB Program Administration and Services-Title VII, Chapter 2 Rehabilitation Act funds used to administer and monitor local OIB program services to visually impaired individuals age 55 and older to assist them to live independently, including funding 16 vendors to provide training and skill building services to eligible individuals.

The Regents of the University of California (UC) MOU: Service Commitment for CSU Students/DOR Consumers-details the commitment of the UC and DOR to work cooperatively to provide services to eligible UC students/DOR consumers with disabilities.

State Controller’s Office (SCO) IA 1: Claim Processing-expedites services to process claim schedules containing vendor invoices for goods and services provided to DOR staff and consumers to ensure timely payment for continuance of services and compliance with the Prompt Payment Act.

IA 2: Employee Leave System-provides DOR Human Resource (HR) staff access and use of the SCO California Leave Accounting System for DOR employees to perform a variety of functions necessary to accurately record and track leave system eligibility, balances, state service credits, and leave benefit activity.

IA 3: HR Reports-provides DOR HR staff access and use of the Management Information Retrieval System to generate pre-written reports or create ad hoc reports on DOR employee employment history, payment history, employer-sponsored deductions, and position inventory.

State Independent Living Council (SILC) Grants: SILC Operation-Title VII B, Rehabilitation Act funds used to operate the SILC and provide SILC funds for various sub-grants and contracts necessary to carry out objectives of the State Plan for IL by programs for people with disabilities.

State Personnel Board (SPB) IA 1: Training Agreement-DOR provides training on the Introduction to Fair Employment and Housing Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act, Practical Solutions to Reasonable Accommodation, and Writing an Effective Duty Statement.

IA 2: Exam Access-SPB’s Selection System provides DOR computer access to conduct departmental civil service examinations, as well as process and maintain civil service eligible lists and certification lists.

U.S. Department of Agriculture The DOR is not a part of a interagency cooperation on the utilization of services and facilities of the programs carried out by the Undersecretary for Rural Development of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. However, DOR field offices in rural areas do collaborate with local farm worker programs, such as CalAgrAbility, to coordinate and deliver services to farmworkers with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 25 2014 4:24PM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

As required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act and the Rehabilitation Act, the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) participates with the California Department of Education (CDE) through an Interagency Agreement (IA) to create a coordinated system of educational and vocational rehabilitation (VR) services for eligible students with disabilities. This agreement helps to facilitate an effective transition for students with disabilities from school to employment in addition to addressing consultation and technical assistance, transition planning, identifying roles and responsibilities, and outreach activities.

The DOR provides consultation and technical assistance to assist State and local agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities. Locally, Transition Liaison staff in each DOR District provides consultation and technical assistance to Local Education Agencies (LEA) seeking information on VR services for students with disabilities. In addition, DOR participates in the Communities of Practice (CoP), which is supported by the National Association of Special Education Administrators and has created a shared work website for programs that support transition practices for students with disabilities. The CoP leadership team includes representatives from DOR, CDE, Department of Developmental Services, Department of Social Services, Employment Development Department, State Independent Living Council, educators, and parents who all share the goal of providing a seamless delivery of transition services to students with disabilities that lead to positive post school outcomes.

In keeping with the goal of collaboration to support transitioning students with disabilities, DOR provides a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum to local DOR and LEA staff and partners. Expert consultants provide training on topics related to vocational services and supports leading to employment for transition age youth. The training topics include: Employment Preparation, Job Development and Placement; Transition-Age Youth; Disability, Medication, and Vocational Impact; Benefits Planning and Management; and Collaboration/Team Building. These trainings help support the further success of DOR consumers who are students with disabilities in securing and maintaining employment.

In the coordination of goals, objectives, and services for transitioning students with disabilities, DOR and LEAs are encouraged to use a collaborative team process to develop the transition services section of the Individualized Education Program (IEP) for students determined eligible for VR services. This process should include the involvement of the student, family, representatives of the LEA, DOR staff, and other service providers, as appropriate.

The DOR and CDE’s specific responsibilities are defined in the IA by each agency’s applicable rules and regulations. The LEA is identified as the lead agency responsible for providing transition services by qualified personnel to students with disabilities to the point of exit from school. In planning for transition, the school should inform the parents and the student with a disability no later than age 16 about DOR services and facilitate the referral process.

The DOR is responsible to determine eligibility for VR services needed to prepare for or obtain employment and is designated as the lead agency responsible for providing VR services by qualified personnel to students meeting eligibility and Order of Selection (OOS) requirements, as identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(3). When students referred to DOR are determined eligible and are able to be served under OOS, DOR develops the consumer’s Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) within 90 days or by an agreed-upon extension date, and before leaving the school setting. DOR is responsible for providing and paying for the transition services agreed upon in the IPE for the period the consumer is participating in the VR program.

The DOR and CDE’s responsibilities include the provision of services outlined and required by the IEP or IPE. When developing these plans, both agencies work to ensure duplication of services does not occur. Where responsibilities overlap the primary responsibility for specific services rests with the most appropriate agency, as determined by the consumer’s present status and when an agency is legally obligated and funded to provide that service. The local agency (LEA, SELPA, or other entity) that develops the eligible students’ IEP is responsible for paying for the agreed upon transition services required to be provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. DOR is responsible for providing and paying for the VR services included in the consumer’s agreed upon IPE for the period the consumer is participating in the VR program.

Currently, DOR does not have the fiscal and staffing resources available to cover statewide transition needs for students with disabilities through third-party cooperative agreements, as identified in Attachment 4.7(b)(3). However, DOR implements procedures for enhancing outreach and identification of students with disabilities in need of transition services. DOR provides local presentations and informational literature to LEAs, educators, student associations, and parents about DOR eligibility and program services. Additionally, DOR assigns liaison VR Counselors to many secondary schools as a single point of contact for Special Education departments.

The DOR collaborates with partners who have a shared responsibility and interest in serving students with disabilities by serving on local Workforce Investment Act (WIA) youth boards. This helps to coordinate youth services and outreach strategies with WIA partner agencies and the LEAs. DOR communicates the value and benefits of DOR services by reaching out to organizations that serve and represent students with disabilities, including parent resource centers, Independent Living Centers, Regional Centers, and organizations that serve youth blind or visually impaired or deaf or hard of hearing.

In an effort to support the provisions of this IA, DOR established a Cooperative Programs Advisory Committee (CPAC) comprised of representatives from CDE, LEAs, mental health agencies, and community based organizations. CPAC assists DOR in the development of policies and procedures to promote the movement of DOR student consumers from secondary school to post-secondary school vocational and training activities. CPAC members present on the availability and benefits of DOR services to students with disabilities and advocacy groups such as the Developmental Disability Council, County Mental Health Directors, and the Special Education Council.

This screen was last updated on Jul 24 2014 10:04AM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) develops federally-required cooperative agreements with private non-profit organizations consistent with California State Contracting Rules, DOR Title 9 Regulations, and internal policy and procedures for the establishment, development, or improvement of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP). DOR pays CRPs through fee-for-service or contractual agreements to deliver authorized assessment, training, employment, and specialized support services provided to DOR applicants/consumers.

Fee-for-services are paid to certified, approved vendors per DOR’s Uniform Fee Structure for CRP Providers. The Uniform Fee Structure applies only to those CRPs in a fee-for-service relationship with DOR. The Uniform Fee Structure does not apply to services provided under a cooperative program or case service contract as described in Attachment 4.7(b)(3). The need for new services or expansion of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services by a CRP may be identified by the DOR District, through a needs assessment process, requests by consumers, or upon a recommendation from a CRP. When a needed VR service is identified for a consumer, DOR will first seek services from current DOR certified CRPs. In establishing a new vendor, or a new or added service, DOR staff considers District priorities using the following criteria: • There is an identified need for the service, and a sufficient number of DOR applicants/consumers exist to sustain the service; • There are no other providers; • Current providers or cooperative partners cannot fill the need; and • The new service or vendor will fill a service gap for the unserved or underserved population.

The DOR’s Community Resources Development (CRD) section is responsible for the certification and vendorization functions of CRPs. All new CRPs go through a certification approval process. Further, any new or expanded services beyond those currently approved and offered by a current vendor is subject to the approval procedures in place at the time of the submission of the request. Approval may be required at the DOR Executive Management level.

Once vendorized to provide VR services, each CRP is formally notified of the approved VR service type(s), along with the corresponding DOR approved standardized fee rate(s) established in 2009.

When DOR identifies a need for VR services to be provided by CRPs to consumers served through local public agency cooperative agreements identified in Attachment 4.7(b)(3), DOR’s Educational and Human Service Cooperative Program Units assist Districts and CRPs in developing Case Service Contracts (Contracts). These Contracts are negotiated between DOR and the CRPs to indicate the specific VR services, the number of consumers to be served, expected contract outcomes, and the costs needed to provide these services to consumers. Currently, the majority of these Contracts are developed to provide VR services to consumers participating in the Mental Health cooperative agreements.

All CRPs are required to maintain their certification, and those providing work-related programs are required to be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities. CRD reviews CRPs consistent with DOR Title 9 Regulations to assure the quality of services, as well as the safety of consumers, and identify any needed improvements. For CRPs associated with cooperative agreements, Educational and Human Service Cooperative Program Units will also perform program reviews to evaluate their effectiveness in meeting the contract VR service objectives and identify any needed improvements. In addition, CRD and/or Educational and Human Service Cooperative Program Units will provide technical assistance in response to CRPs’ questions or concerns when needed or upon request.

As identified in the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) findings described in Attachment 4.11(a), CRPs have expressed concerns regarding the standardized fee rates for serving consumers. The fee rates have an impact on services provided to consumers as well as placement rates due to frequent staff turnover, fewer services to provide consumers, or incentives to provide quality services.

During 2014, DOR is evaluating the CRPs uniform fee rates as part of the Vendor Utilization Management (VUM) project. This evaluation is being conducted to explore CRPs concerns around rates, structure, referrals, and job readiness of DOR consumers. To inform DOR regarding alternative options to the fee structure and rates, the Placement Plus Proof of Concept (PPPOC) was initiated in January 2014 with selected CRPs. The PPPOC is testing the viability of incorporating Work Incentive Counseling, embedding soft skills within the Job Readiness Training, enhancing communication and consumer support, and adjusting rates to reward outcomes for DOR consumers who are Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Insurance recipients. When the PPPOC concludes in January 2015, DOR will analyze the data collected to redesign the fee structure and rates. In addition, the PPPOC is also expected to improve the employment services delivery model for enhanced quality placements for consumers. This project was supported by public comments received during the CSNA, as identified in Attachment 4.11(a).

In an effort to provide quality resources to assist consumers in making an informed choice regarding VR services, DOR developed and maintains the Rehabilitation Resource Directory (RRD). The RRD contains information specific to each CRP vendor including the services offered, the number of referrals, the number of successful VR closures, and the overall placement rate at each facility. The RRD also lists the disability specialty, accessibility information, transportation access, and the CRP vendor’s qualifications to provide services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 12:56AM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) identifies and makes arrangements with private non-profit organizations, as identified in Attachment 4.8(b)(3), to provide Supported Employment (SE) and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities.

DOR collaborates with the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), Regional Centers, and Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide SE services to eligible consumers. For individuals with other disabling conditions, DOR collaborates with local county mental health agencies, CRPs, and Independent Living Centers to provide SE services. Currently there are 245 vendors statewide to provide SE services.

In California, the rates for SE job coaching, intake, placement, and retention services are statutorily-defined. The current rates were set in 2008 (Assembly Bill 1781). DOR sets a rate structure policy that is consistent with state statutes and policies, including the State Administration Manual, and the Department of General Services requirements. The DDS Community Rate Section is responsible to set and maintain billing rates for the Work Activity Program. DDS funds the Work Services Program (WSP) for extended services to consumers with developmental disabilities who achieve SE outcomes through DOR’s vocational rehabilitation program and who are eligible for WSP services.

For consumers not served under the WSP, other extended services can be used. These sources vary depending on the individual’s eligibility for other programs or availability of other resources. Funding for extended services for individuals with mental illness may be provided by county mental health agencies, which may allocate Medi-Cal, Mental Health Services Act, or Short-Doyle funds as determined by each county. Social Security Administration Work Incentives, such as Impairment Related Work Expense or an approved Plan for Achieving Self Support, may be used. SE services provided under Veteran’s Health Administration Compensated Work Therapy Program may also be used to fund extended services.

California State regulations do not allow Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) state match funds to be used for extended services. Consumers with a TBI that require extended services such as ongoing support needed to maintain SE, such as job coaching can be served through additional resources at local Independent Living Centers.

Whenever possible, building natural supports at the workplace for consumers with SE needs is encouraged. Natural supports allow the strengthening of the employer/consumer relationship, thus supporting long-term successful outcomes.

California Initiatives

California has enacted legislation that has had an impact on the provision of SE services to individuals with intellectual disabilities. These are the Lanterman Act, Assembly Bill (AB) 846 (1977), and Persons with Developmental Disabilities-Employment, AB 287 (2009).

The Lanterman Act provides Californians with intellectual disabilities the right to obtain the services and supports to enable them to live a more independent life; this includes the funding for SE extended services.

AB 287 (2009) established the Employment First Policy, which led to a standing Employment First Committee formed by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities. The bill expands employment opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities, and identifies best practices and incentives for increasing integrated employment and gainful employment opportunities for people with intellectual disabilities.

The Employment First policy requires Regional Centers to develop Individual Program Plan to ensure individuals with intellectual disabilities beginning at age 14 are provided options for integrated competitive employment and post-secondary education to enable the consumer to transition from school to work. DOR is an active participant in the Employment First Committee to help with transition planning.

The DOR, in collaboration with the California Community College Chancellor’s office, has also developed the College to Career project with five local community colleges. The projects provide students with intellectual disabilities who are both DOR and Regional Center consumers with supports to be successful in college courses, gain work experience, and become competitively employed in the community using natural supports. DOR is planning to expand this project to an additional three community college campuses in Federal Fiscal Year 2014-15.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 12:57AM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), in partnership with the State Rehabilitation Council, develops and maintains a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) to ensure a sufficient workforce of qualified state rehabilitation personnel, including professionals and paraprofessionals, is in place for the timely and successful delivery of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to Californians with disabilities.

After years of planning and completion of a 15-month pilot, during Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2013, DOR implemented the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) team model statewide to increase the efficiencies, timeliness, and quality of services to their consumers. As of May 15, 2014, 100% or 104 of the VRSD teams have formed. DOR is developing an evaluation and assessment plan that will be used during FFY 2015 to collect and analyze VRSD team data to measure the impact of the new approach and identify improvements on program design and implementation.

DATA SYSTEM ON PERSONNEL AND PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT

The DOR has a comprehensive system for collecting, maintaining, and analyzing, on an annual basis, data on qualified personnel needs, training, and development.

Data on Qualified Personnel

With the implementation of the new VRSD team, DOR tracks the following CSPD positions: VR Counselor; Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind (Teacher, O&M); Medical Consultant (MC); Dental Consultant (DC); and, beginning July 1, 2014, Consulting Psychologists. Employees in these positions are required to meet education and/or certification standards as a condition of employment, which are tracked in a database and validated with the appropriate programs. Current staffing patterns and projected vacancies, including personnel expected to retire or leave positions, over the next five years are outlined in the Chart below.

Chart 1: Current staffing patterns as of February 28, 2014 (See Table)

*These position titles are not CSPD tracked positions, but are involved in the provision of VR services to consumers as a VRSD team member. ** As of July 1, 2014, this position title is a new CSPD tracked position.

CSPD Personnel and Caseload Projections

As of November 30, 2013, 62,153 applicants were determined eligible for VR services. DOR is currently operating under an Order of Selection, as identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(3), and is serving individuals determined eligible for VR services under the categories of Individual with a Most Significant Disability, Individual with a Significant Disability and All Other Eligible Individuals if they applied on or before May 9, 2014.

Statewide, 104 VRSD teams will provide services to an estimated 72,000 individuals in open status. In the VRSD team, the VR Counselors are exclusively responsible for the five non-delegable functions (eligibility determination; priority of Service; Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) approval and signature; IPE revisions or amendments; and determination that a successful employment outcome has been achieved and the record of services can be closed). Collectively, the VR Counselor, Service Coordinator (SC), Employment Coordinator (EC), and Case Support Staff focus on providing VR services necessary for consumers to prepare for, find, and retain employment. Each VRSD team typically includes 10 direct service personnel: five VR Counselors; two Service Coordinators; one Employment Coordinator, and two Case Support Staff; however, specific team(s) could vary due to resource or operational needs. On average, each VRSD team provides services to approximately six hundred ninety individuals, or about 69 individuals per team member.

The DOR operates the Orientation Center for the Blind (OCB) to foster independent living for selected DOR consumers who are blind or visually impaired. The Teachers, O&M provide training and services to DOR consumers at OCB including independent travel, daily living skills, communication skills, and pre-vocational preparation.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 VR Counselor 536 6 159
2 Teacher, O&M 6 0 2
3 Medical Consultant 3 0 1
4 Dental Consultant 1 0 0
5 Team Manager* 104 3 31
6 Service Coordinator* 208 4 62
7 Employment Coordinator* 84 0 25
8 Case Support Staff* 208 0 62
9 Consulting Psychologists** 5 5 1
10 0 0 0

 

The Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) provides academic preparation for professional rehabilitation counseling positions and undergraduate programs in Rehabilitation and Disability Studies. DOR ensures effective systematic coordination with the CORE-accredited programs by: 1) meeting annually to discuss the utilization of In-Service Training (IST) grant dollars to fund tuition-related expenses for DOR staff participating in the Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling programs; and 2) at least biannually discussing the progress of DOR staff participating in the Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling programs.

In California, there are six CORE-accredited Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling programs and one CORE-accredited undergraduate Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Rehabilitation Services program through the following universities: California State University (CSU) Fresno (CSUF), CSU Los Angeles (CSULA), CSU Sacramento (CSUS), CSU San Bernardino (CSUSB), San Diego State University (SDSU), and San Francisco State University (SFSU). Only CSULA offers a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Rehabilitation Services.

Charts 2 and 3, below, provide data on the number of students enrolled in or graduated from a CORE-accredited Master’s or Bachelor’s Degree program and the numbers of students sponsored by DOR and/or the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA).

Chart 2: Students Enrolled in or Graduated from a CORE-accredited Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling Program for Academic Year 2013-14 University: CSUF Students Enrolled: 102 Employees Sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 0 Graduates sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 30 Graduates from the previous academic year: 35

University: CSULA Students Enrolled: 53 Employees Sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 0 Graduates sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 2 Graduates from the previous academic year: 20

University: CSUS Students Enrolled: 40 Employees Sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 0 Graduates sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 8 Graduates from the previous academic year: 7

University: CSUSB Students Enrolled: 61 Employees Sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 10 Graduates sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 2 Graduates from the previous academic year: 14

University: SDSU Students Enrolled: 107 Employees Sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 8 Graduates sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 31 Graduates from the previous academic year: 47

University: SFSU Students Enrolled: 34 Employees Sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 17 Graduates sponsored by DOR and/or RSA: 5 Graduates from the previous academic year: 9

Total Students/Graduates (See Table, Row 1)

Chart 3: Students Enrolled in or Graduated from a CORE-accredited Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Rehabilitation Services Program for Academic Year 2013-14

University: CSULA (See Table 1, Row 2)

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Total-MS Degree, Rehabilitation Counseling 397 35 78 132
2 CSULA, BSc Degree, Rehabilitation Services 160 0 0 47
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

The DOR is committed to recruiting and hiring employees representative of California’s multicultural population including people with disabilities that support the vision of employment, independence, and equality for all Californians with disabilities. As of December 31, 2013, DOR employed 1,865 staff. Of those, 609, or 32.7% indicate they are a person with a disability. DOR fosters a workplace environment that respects the diversity of its staff and consumers. DOR’s Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee, composed of DOR management and staff, meets quarterly to discuss practices to ensure a culturally competent and diverse workforce is in order to meet consumer’s needs.

The DOR has a Recruitment and Retention Plan (Plan) that is reviewed, implemented, monitored, and updated annually by the Department’s Diversity Officer. The Plan provides a comprehensive strategy to recruit, prepare, and retain educated, high quality, and culturally competent employees by identifying specific goals and strategies. Factors that include achieving and maintaining diversity in the workplace, unserved and underserved population needs by District, alternative communication needs, and DOR’s long-term succession planning were also crucial to the development of the Plan. The strategies involve collaborative approaches among DOR’s field offices, CORE, and DOR Executive Management team.

The DOR is focused on addressing succession planning challenges including recruitment, retention, knowledge transfer, and management of a high performance workforce that possesses the necessary skills to meet DOR’s goals. DOR’s workforce succession plan will encompass the entire department to ensure it has the talent needed to maintain core services, lead the department into the future, and provide first class services to increase employment, equality, and independence for consumers. The workforce succession plan is in the development and approval process, and implementation is anticipated in 2015.

Throughout the year, DOR coordinates activities with the CORE-accredited programs, including on-campus presentations, job fairs, and the dissemination of marketing materials and job applications to attract and recruit professional students for employment or for internships, job shadowing, coaching, and mentorship opportunities.

In an effort to maximize the candidate pool, DOR advertises its VR Counselor and paraprofessional position exam bulletins and vacancy notices on the California Department of Human Resources’ (CalHR) website, which is a major public job board for individuals interested in a civil service career with the State of California. Potential job applicants may search for exams or vacancies in the civil service classifications of their choice and sign-up for email notifications of newly posted job openings. Additionally, DOR offers Limited Examination and Appointment Program positions which is designed to facilitate the recruitment and hiring of persons with disabilities into California civil service employment, and outreaches to multicultural task forces and DOR board and committee members regarding DOR employment.

When available, DOR also offers Student Assistant (SA) and Graduate Student Assistant (GSA) positions, which provide an opportunity for post-secondary students to work at DOR in a position related to their major, including Rehabilitation Counseling. SAs perform administrative, technical, and research duties to gain practical experience. GSAs may assist in the delivery of VR services, including vocational assessments and placement services; analyze and interpret medical, psychological, and vocational records; develop and maintain timely and necessary case documentation; counsel with, plan, arrange for, and coordinate VR services for consumers; and serve as a liaison and consultant to community organizations regarding opportunities and considerations related to hiring DOR consumers.

In collaboration with CORE, DOR created an internship internet portal for students interested in rehabilitation counseling internships in a local District office. DOR internship opportunities allow students to gain experience and develop skills while supporting DOR’s succession planning efforts.

Through the DOR Intranet portal, DOR employees have access to view current departmental job openings and exam offerings. To foster ongoing employee development, training, knowledge transfer, and assignment opportunities are often offered to give staff the experience to acquire new skills and perform different tasks.

In an effort to retain VR Counselors, DOR in partnership with CalHR successfully negotiated with State control agencies and unions for general salary increases (GSI) for VR Counselors. As of July 1, 2014, VR counselors will receive a GSI of 4% with another 4% on July 1, 2015. Through the GSI, DOR is hopeful this will help retain more VR Counselors, which may result in decreased turnover, training, and recruitment costs. Also, VR Counselors and SCs in the Oakland field office and San Francisco District currently receive State approved $200 per month pay differentials.

During FFY 2015, DOR will conduct its triennial Organizational Climate Survey, which collects data to identify employee perceptions, experiences, and satisfaction levels at DOR. The last Organizational Climate Survey was conducted in 2012. The results of the survey will give DOR better insight on employee motivation, engagement, and well-being, which will be used to develop strategies that contribute to or enhance overall job satisfaction and retention.

 

The DOR adheres to the highest personnel standards to ensure professional and paraprofessionals are adequately trained and prepared for employment. Candidates applying for all positions must meet California’s personnel standards prior to appointment, including proof of possession of degree, certification, licensing, and registration requirements applicable for each position.

To meet the FFY 2018 CSPD personnel standard, DOR utilizes the national standard for certification of counselors rather than the standard established by the State of California in 2009, which licenses and regulates professional clinical counselors through the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. DOR only hires VR Counselors that: 1) have a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from a recognized institution; or 2) possess a Master’s Degree in Counseling or a closely related field from a recognized institution; and 3) have successfully completed one graduate course with a primary focus on the Theories and Techniques of Counseling.

The DOR also strategizes with the CORE-accredited programs to develop and implement additional outreach for existing DOR employees to ensure DOR has a sufficient number of VR Counselors that meet CSPD personnel standards. DOR recruits entry level SCs and ECs using the state civil service Staff Services Analyst classification. For any SCs interested in becoming a VR Counselor, DOR may provide support towards the employee’s costs in obtaining the required Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, when IST funds are available.

Candidates applying for the Teacher, O&M, MC, DC, and Consulting Psychologist classifications must also meet California’s personnel standard prior to appointment. California’s standard for the Teacher, O&M, MC, DC, and Consulting Psychologist classifications includes certification, licensing, and registration requirements.

 

The DOR is committed to maintaining a training system that ensures all personnel receive the professional development and education necessary for success. DOR’s Staff Development Section (SDS) supports this commitment by providing training designed to: develop employee competencies, knowledge, skills and abilities; provide staff retraining; and comply with mandated training requirements. The SDS provides internal, as well as logistical support for external trainings. In addition, SDS tracks all work-focused training attended by staff in a database, monitors their progress towards meeting the established standards, and validates the information with the appropriate programs.

In FFY 2014, DOR, in collaboration with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Region IX, will complete the departmental training needs assessments. Three different surveys were conducted in phases, which targeted the following: 1) VRSD training; 2) Senate Bill 105 training; and 3) all departmental staff training. The final results help DOR determine the focus for the next In-Service Training (IST) grant (FFYs 2015-20) and other resource training plans for professional and paraprofessional training opportunities.

From the prior departmental training needs assessment results identified for the 2010-15 IST Grant and subsequent management training needs, DOR will or plans to offer a variety of professional development training opportunities to professional and paraprofessional staff throughout the year including: • New Counselor Academy, which provides an overview of DOR VR process, expands capacity to provide services to consumers, identifies partners and resources available at Central Office, and provides an opportunity to meet and hear from DOR’s executive leadership. • Health and Benefits Training on Work and Disability, which spans Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Income (SSI/SSDI), work incentives, public and private health, benefits, employment programs and protections, benefits planning calculators, and updates on the Ticket-to-Work Program. • Rehabilitation Technology, which provides information on rehabilitation technology and assistive devices available to consumers; and, where and how to obtain appropriate assessments and recommendations for these devices. • Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS), to help increase awareness of PASS, understand PASS regulations, and identify consumers who could benefit from PASS. • Enhanced or new Academies, with resource materials, for SC, EC, Case Support Staff, and District Operations Support staff, which include information on topics applicable to each position, including counseling, administrative, and fiscal policies, procedures, and guidance. • Soft Skills Training, to help DOR staff build consumer competencies necessary to compete in today’s job market. • Medical Aspects of Disability, to provide an overview and basic understanding of medical aspects of disabilities. • Diversity training for staff to develop the ability in valuing differences and similarities. • Statewide Quarterly Administrative Forums to provide updates and support on new or changing administrative requirements. • Monthly statewide District Operations Support staff conference call meetings to provide updates and support. • Monthly statewide EC conference call meetings to share information and updates on their activities. • Quarterly Knowledge-Based Training, which covers various state administrative and governmental topics.

To enhance the quality of leadership within DOR professionals, supervisory staff may participate in: • Expanded academic development and certification leadership opportunities through TACE Region IX and education institutions including: VRSD Team Manager Academy, designed to increase knowledge and skills in supervision, management, and leadership. • National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute Executive Leadership Seminar, designed to expand the leadership capacity of senior executives in state VR rehabilitation agencies. • Post Employment Training-Rehabilitation Administration to prepare rehabilitation professionals to understand how entities engage in collaborative partnerships to improve and expand services to people with disabilities. • Research Technical Assistance Center informational webinars, in which VR state and agencies share information on research projects to inform other participating VR agencies on best practices for policy development and operational program business improvements. • California Health and Human Services Agency Supervisor’s Academy and Leadership Development Academy. • Diffusing Difficult Situations training to effectively managing challenging situations. • Managing Diversity training for management to develop the ability in valuing differences and similarities and towards a commitment to diversity and inclusion. • Statewide Quarterly Leadership Forums updating DOR leadership staff on departmental news. • Leadership training to maximize organizational accountability, shape a positive culture, and promote responsibility and productivity. • Leadership and management training to strengthen competencies in customer focus, decision making, knowledge base, teamwork, communication and personal leadership in the specialized work of VR and independent living.

To further support staff’s personal professional development and research dissemination, SDS maintains the DOR Resource Library intranet webpage accessible to all employees, which contains materials on VR and professional development topic areas. Additional internet links to resources are also available on the DOR Intranet for research and sharing of information on best practices, assistive technology, and employment information. Resources include: information available from the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues; labor market information; resources from the National Clearinghouse on Rehabilitation Training Materials Library, and information on the Supported Employment services program.

The DOR utilizes web conferencing as a user-friendly and cost efficient way to build staff’s development. Web conferencing has allowed employees to watch seminars or interactive conferences online. During FFY 2014, topics included: Making Research Work for VR agencies; Annual Compendium of Disability Statistics, and the Youth Transitions Collaborative. DOR is now working to develop a master calendar to include all trainings, webinars, conferences, and events, which will be posted on the intranet available to all DOR employees. Once established, DOR will issue a notification to all staff that provides information and instructions on how to access the centralized master calendar.

Three initiatives under DOR’s Vendor Utilization Management project, the Placement Plus Proof of Concept, Centralized Invoicing Pilot, and Work Incentives Planning Pilot, may also result in additional training for professional and paraprofessional staff. These initiatives address the delivery of employment services to consumers, a new centralized vendor invoicing process, and assisting SSI/SSDI consumers understand the impact of employment on their benefits. The trainings will educate professional and paraprofessional staff on new or enhanced department procedures designed from these initiatives.

 

California is a culturally diverse state and DOR believes strongly in providing timely and quality services. California State departments are required to conduct a biennial language survey to assess language needs. Based on the results, DOR identifies the bilingual services and needs for applicants, consumers, and individuals with disabilities.

To ensure effective communication with applicant and eligible individuals with disabilities, DOR provides the following through certified employee or contracted personnel: bilingual translation for individuals with limited English proficiency, telephonic interpretation, American Sign Language, and written materials provided in Armenian, Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. Appropriate auxiliary aids and services are also provided, where necessary, to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in DOR services. Auxiliary aids include services or devices such as qualified interpreters; assistive listening headsets; real time, open, closed captioning; teletypewriters or Telecommunications Relay services; videotext displays; readers; taped texts; Braille materials; and large print materials.

 

The DOR has an interagency agreement (IA) with the California Department of Education (CDE) supporting the provisions outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. Through the IA, DOR and CDE coordinate statewide educational and VR services for eligible secondary students with disabilities to result in an effective transition from school to employment.

The DOR and CDE are jointly responsible for providing Local Education Agencies (LEAs) and DOR staff with leadership, monitoring, and training. DOR and CDE facilitate the development of cooperative programs for secondary students to increase the number of secondary and post-secondary transition-age youth with disabilities who receive services from DOR. To foster state collaboration, a CDE representative is also a member on the SRC. DOR also contributed to CDE’s Transition to Adult Living Guide which helps students and their families, local education agencies, teachers, communities, and state agencies facilitate the movement from school to post-school activities.

The DOR and CDE established a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for DOR and LEA staff. These trainings are initiated by cooperative program partners and include topics on VR-relevant subjects such as Employment Preparation, Job Development and Placement; Transition-Age Youth; Disability, Medication, and Vocational Impact; Benefits Planning and Management; Collaboration/Team Building; and Strategies for Veterans Entering/Reentry into the Civilian Workforce. Additionally, DOR provides cross-training to LEAs with designated school district VRSD teams to inform and support educators on DOR services and application processes.

This screen was last updated on Jul 24 2014 4:17PM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) jointly conducted an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities living in California, as well as the needs for Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) within the state.

The results of the triennial Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) conducted annually during Federal Fiscal Years (FFY) 2012-14 are based on the review and analysis of information obtained from Year One (2012), Year Two (2013), and Year 3 (2014). All activities for this CSNA concluded in April 2014. The strategies included collecting and comparing population data, gathering and analyzing external stakeholder comments made at statewide public meetings, and analyzing the results of the Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) and external stakeholder surveys.

SUMMARY CSNA RESULTS AND FINDINGS FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES AND COMMUNITY REHABILITATION PROGRAMS

The feedback received from stakeholders and consumers from the State Plan public meetings, Business Partner Forum, and surveys were supportive of the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) services provided by DOR. Individuals providing input continue to express their appreciation for the efforts DOR has initiated over the past three years to continuously improve services and business operations. Projects such as the VR Services Delivery Team and the Vendor Utilization Management project have been well-received, resulting in recognized improvements in communication and more timely processing activities to further enhance DOR’s ability to provide quality and timely services to consumers.

The feedback provided areas where DOR could further improve or enhance VR and SE services to address consumer, individuals with disabilities, and stakeholder needs. Based on public meeting and business forum comments, stakeholder and CSS results, and demographic analysis during this triennial CSNA, the following needs were identified: • Unserved or underserved populations identified include: o Individuals with the most significant disabilities in Fresno, Kern, San Joaquin, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, and Santa Clara counties. o Individuals with disabilities who are Asian American (AA) or Hispanic/ Latino (H/L). o Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or with Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI). • Expanded employment options, soft skills, social skills, and benefits planning. • Timely communication between DOR and consumers and other stakeholders. • Streamlined VR service delivery system. • Timely and consistent provision of VR services. • Increased awareness of DOR and the VR and SE services available. • Strengthened employer education and partnerships. • Improved ability to link employers to job-ready consumers. • Quality employment opportunities. • Culturally competent VR service providers. • Cross-training between America’s Job Centers of California (AJCC) staff and DOR staff. • Improved administrative processes for authorizations and payments to vendors for VR goods and services.

DOR reviewed the findings identified in the CSNA to develop the Goals and Priorities, as identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1), and the State’s Strategies, as identified in Attachment 4.11(d).

CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The CSNA results are used by DOR to help guide future State Plan’s goals, priorities, and strategies to best meet the needs of Californians with disabilities and provide a better foundation of VR and SE services. This triennial assessment year provided an opportunity to identify the needs of those with most significant disabilities including the need for SE, under/unserved populations, those served through other components of the Workforce Investment Boards, and the need to develop and improve CRP. It is recommended DOR: • Increase consumer benefits planning opportunities. Consumers need more information and resources on how paid employment can work together with disability and other public benefits. • Outreach to AA, H/L, individuals with TBI, and individuals with ASD by increasing awareness of DOR services and improving relationships with Community Business Organizations, schools, development centers, faith-based organizations, and hospitals/clinics that serve these potentially unserved and underserved populations. • Improve the timeliness of communication and services delivery between DOR, consumers, and stakeholders. • Increase DOR staff and VR service providers’ awareness about assistive technology and reasonable accommodation options that assist consumers in finding and maintaining employment. • Expand quality employment opportunities through increased and focused job development activities and resources. • Provide cross-training for DOR and AJCC staff regarding Employment Development Department and VR regulations, policies, and procedures to improve service delivery provided by AJCCs to individuals with disabilities. • Modify the vendor fee-for-service structure and reimbursement rates for CRPs to support provision of needed VR services. The fee structure and rate reviews are to strengthen consumer outcomes through enhancing the mutually beneficial relationship between DOR and CRPs.

METHODOLOGY

In February of 2012, DOR and SRC jointly agreed to use a CSNA model with strategies including a demographic analysis, statewide public meetings, and a CSS in Year 1 (FFY 2012), Year 2 (FFY 2013), and Year 3 (FFY 2014). Year 3 included an external stakeholder survey.

A demographic analysis was conducted to develop an understanding of the composition of DOR consumers, Californians with disabilities, and to identify potentially unserved or underserved populations. California’s population data, disability statistics, and demographic data from the DOR Database, U.S. Census, Department of Finance, and geographical data from the Department of Social Services, and the American Community Survey were used to identify populations potentially unserved or underserved by DOR. Year 1 of this analysis focused on identifying individuals with the most significant disabilities, individuals who are minorities, and individuals with disabilities who may be potentially unserved or underserved by DOR. In Year 2, DOR compared demographic trends, as identified in the 2014 State Plan from the previous year to the prior triennial CSNA. In Year 3, selected demographic data not measured in the prior triennial CSNA was collected and analyzed.

The statewide public meetings provided comments from external stakeholders and were analyzed to identify the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities including their need for SE, individuals with disabilities who are minorities, individuals with disabilities who may be potentially unserved or underserved, and individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system, as well as the need to establish, develop, or improve CRPs.

Annually, the CSS is developed jointly by DOR and the SRC to ask consumers to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of the services they received. These results were further analyzed to identify needs, barriers, and how to better serve DOR consumers and individuals with disabilities.

In Year 3 external stakeholder surveys were distributed to CRPs, Cooperative Programs, AJCCs, formally known as One-Stops, employers, and/or specific community based organizations representing individuals with the most significant disabilities, individuals with disabilities who are minorities, individuals with disabilities who are potentially unserved or underserved and individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system. The survey results were used to gather quantitative and qualitative data to identify programmatic needs to better serve individuals with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jul 28 2014 7:25PM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

The U.S. Census Bureau, 2012 American Community Survey estimates that 1,880,072 adults ages 18-64 with a disability reside in California. These individuals may qualify for vocational rehabilitation services under Title I, Part B or Title VI, Part B.

During Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015, DOR estimates it will provide a range of services to approximately 110,000 individuals with disabilities who will meet the Order of Selection policy, as identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(3). Approximately 40,000 applications will be received from individuals with disabilities; of which 27,300 may be determined eligible consumers. Individuals determined eligible for services and assigned to Category 3 may not be served during FFY 2015 due to budget restrictions. The chart below includes the estimated costs of services and number of individuals to be served for each priority category.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
1: Individual With a Most Significant Disability Title I $104,268,180 60,455 $1,724
1: Individual With a Most Significant Disability Title VI $2,759,000 500 $5,518
2: Individual With a Significant Disability Title I $73,774,820 49372 $1,494
3: All Other Eligible Individuals Title I $600,000 500 $1,200
Totals   $181,402,000 110,827 $1,636

This screen was last updated on Jun 25 2014 5:28PM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) jointly developed, reviewed, and agreed to the State Plan Goals and Priorities for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015. DOR and the SRC agreed to maintain the three goals from FFY 2014.

Goal 1: Increase the quality and quantity of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) employment outcomes for DOR consumers, including unserved and underserved individuals with disabilities. Goal 2: Advance accessibility and equality to improve opportunities for individuals with disabilities to achieve their employment goals and independence. Goal 3: Continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations to better serve consumers.

These goals were developed based on input received from stakeholder public meetings, Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA), Standards and Performance Indicators, Consumer Satisfaction Surveys, DOR’s 2013-18 Strategic Plan, and the results of monitoring activities on DOR’s operation and effectiveness received from oversight agencies.

Goal 1 may include individuals identified as unserved and underserved in the findings of the CSNA, as identified on page two in Attachment 4.11(a).

Priorities The DOR and SRC jointly reviewed and agreed to the goals and the statewide needs noted in Attachment 4.11(a), and identified the following priorities in carrying out the VR and SE programs: • Modernize the DOR VR services delivery system to provide effective and timely VR services to applicants and consumers. • Better utilize existing and emerging labor market and economic data to help inform consumers of employment opportunities useful in selecting an achievable employment goal. • Implement a process for employers and DOR staff to expedite the identification of job ready consumers for employers. • Expand outreach and services for transition-age youth. • Improve consumers’ VR services experience by investing in developing and retaining a well-qualified, diverse workforce. • Enhance outreach methods to raise awareness of and reduce barriers in accessing VR services to unserved and underserved individuals with disabilities and other stakeholders. • Strengthen relationships with employers, including through a Business Partner Forum model developed in partnership with the SRC.

Standards and Performance Indicators (S&PI) The DOR successfully passed the S&PIs in 2012 and 2013 and anticipates passing in FFY 2014. DOR will focus on the strategies identified in Attachment 4.11(d) to meet the S&PIs for this State Plan year.

State Plan Goal 1 (quality and quantity of employment outcomes) and 3 (continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations) directly relate to performance indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, and 1.6. State Plan Goal 2 (advancing accessibility and equality) relates to performance indicator 2.1.

This screen was last updated on Jul 24 2014 10:05AM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Since 1995, the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has operated the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program under an Order of Selection (OOS) due to insufficient resources to provide VR services to all individuals with disabilities in California. Each year, DOR evaluates whether to continue OOS based on the use of funds in preceding years, projected funding, projected number and types of referrals, number of eligible individuals, and VR Counselor case loads. If DOR concludes the funding and staff resources needed to serve all eligible individuals will not be available in the following year, an OOS announcement is issued by June 30. Through this announcement, DOR informs the public that projected resources are not adequate to serve all eligible individuals, and lists the priority categories which can be served during the next State fiscal year.

 

Description of Priority categories

Under the OOS process, California has three priority categories in the following order: Priority Category 1, Individual With A Most Significant Disability; Priority Category 2, Individual With A Significant Disability; and Priority Category 3, All Other Eligible Individuals.

After an individual is found eligible for VR services, the VR Counselor evaluates the functional limitations, anticipated services needed, and duration of the services to identify the level of significance of disability (LSOD). Factors that cannot be used in determining the LSOD of eligible individuals include: residency, type of disability, age, race, or national origin, referral source, type of expected employment outcome, need for or anticipated cost of specific VR services required for an individual’s plan for employment, nor an individual’s or family’s income level. The LSOD is used to determine the applicable OOS priority category Priority Category 1: Individual With A Most Significant Disability An individual with a disability who: has a serious limitation in terms of employment in at least four functional capacity areas; is expected to require multiple VR services over an extended period of time (more than six months); and has one or more physical or mental disabilities.

Priority Category 2: Individual With A Significant Disability An individual who the Social Security Administration has determined is eligible for Social Security benefits as a result of a disability or blindness; or, an individual who meets the following three criteria: has a serious limitation in terms of employment in at least one functional capacity area; is expected to require multiple VR services over an extended period of time (more than six months); and has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from another disability or a combination of disabilities as determined by the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and VR needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitation.

Priority Category 3: All Other Eligible Individuals An individual with a disability who: has at least one limitation in terms of employment in any functional capacity area; and, is not expected to require multiple VR services over an extended period of time.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

The DOR formally notifies all VR program applicants of their OOS Priority Category in writing. Currently, the full range of VR services may be provided to consumers assigned to Priority Categories 1 and 2 regardless of application date. Individuals in Priority Category 3 are receiving VR services if they applied on or before May 9, 2014. The remaining Priority Category 3 individuals are placed on the waiting list, and may receive information and referral services. All Priority Category 3 individuals are contacted annually to request information that may impact their LSOD determination. If funds become available, Priority Category 3 individuals on the waiting list will be notified they may receive VR services.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

During Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015, DOR estimates it will serve approximately 110,000 individuals with disabilities who will meet the OOS policy. The total spending for all consumers served is estimated at $181,402,000. DOR estimates 12,251 individuals will be Closed- Rehabilitated, of which 6,738 will be in Priority Category 1, 5,451 will be in Priority Category 2, and 62 will be in Priority Category 3.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 60,955 6,738 12,315 24 $107,027,180
2 49,372 5,451 10,013 24 $73,774,820
3 500 62 63 19 $600,000

This screen was last updated on Jul 24 2014 10:09AM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) will utilize an estimated $2,759,000 in funds received under the Rehabilitation Act Title VI, Part B to provide Supported Employment (SE) services for eligible individuals with most significant or significant disabilities. During Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015, DOR anticipates 2,460 consumers will receive SE services under Title VI, Part B and Title I funds. Of this number, approximately 500 consumers will be funded from Title VI, Part B funds. When these funds are exhausted, DOR will utilize Title I funds as necessary to meet the needs of remaining consumers determined eligible and in need of SE services.

The DOR’s goal with respect to the distribution of Title VI, Part B funds is identified in attachment 4.11(c)(1), Goal 1: Increase the quality and quantity of Vocational Rehabilitation and SE employment outcomes for DOR consumers, including unserved and underserved individuals with disabilities.

The priorities to advance the employment of consumers receiving SE services include: • Identifying additional funding sources for extended services. • Exploring natural supports as a source for extended services. • Working collaboratively with all extended service providers. • Utilizing DOR Districts to identify outreach strategies and procedures to unserved and underserved populations including minority groups, transition-age youth with disabilities, and individuals in rural areas who may be eligible for SE services.

The DOR’s collaboration efforts regarding SE services and extended services are identified in Attachment 4.8(b)(4).

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 1:07AM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) developed measurable objectives to support DOR’s achievement of the Goals and Priorities as identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1). These program goals and objectives represent DOR’s approach to strengthen employment outcomes, engage the unserved or underserved populations, increase relationships with employers, improve service delivery, and attract and retain a skilled workforce. DOR will implement strategies to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities in Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2015. As well as implement projects and initiatives to support the objectives, innovation and expansion activities, and overcome barriers to accessing the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) programs.

GOAL 1: Increase the quality and quantity of VR and SE employment outcomes for DOR consumers, including potentially unserved or underserved individuals with disabilities.

Objective 1.1: By September 30, 2015, DOR will increase the average hourly wage earned by consumers in competitive employment by 5% to improve placement outcomes in higher-wage positions. Based on FFY 2013 results of $11.76, the FFY 2015 average hourly wage is projected to be $12.35.

Objective 1.2: By September 30, 2015, increase the number of consumers achieving successful employment outcomes by 10%. Based on FFY 2013 results of 12,239, the FFY 2015 number of consumers achieving successful employment outcomes is projected to be 13,463.

The DOR will develop On-the-Job Trainings (OJT) to provide consumers with training opportunities by employers in a work setting. OJTs include a commitment by the employer to retain the consumer as an employee, after successful completion of training, if the consumer meets the essential performance standards of the job. DOR will expand district use of the Talent Acquisition Portal (TAP) to match job ready consumers with private industry employers who are hiring; and will expand consumer access to government job opportunities. To increase relationships with employers, DOR will convene a statewide Business Partner Forum and support local events including Job Placement Circles where employers from specific fields are invited to meet consumers with the skills, qualifications, and experience employers are seeking. DOR management and District Administrators will monitor regular performance reports evaluating the DOR’s performance in meeting statewide employment and wage goals and take appropriate action.

Objective 1.3: Increase the number of successful employment outcomes for transition-age youth (age 16 to 24) with disabilities by 5%. Based on FFY 2013 results of 4,120, the FFY 2015 number of transition-age consumers achieving successful employment outcomes is projected to be 4,326.

The DOR will collaborate with the California Department of Education, Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, California State University, and University of California Offices to address the educational and training needs to be competitive in achieving successful employment in the evolving employer labor force. DOR will work with transition-age youth to increase work experience opportunities through work training and internship programs. DOR will expand collaborative College to Career training programs with California Community Colleges for transition aged youth with intellectual disabilities; and, will monitor the outcome data and take appropriate action.

GOAL 2: Advance accessibility and equality to improve opportunities for individuals with disabilities to achieve their employment goals and independence.

Objective 2.1: By September 30, 2015, DOR will provide work incentives and benefits planning services to 1000 consumers on Social Security Income and/or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/SSDI).

In FFY 2014, DOR established a two-year Work Incentives Planning (WIP) Pilot project aimed at increasing employment outcomes and self-sufficiency for consumers who are job ready. Staff were hired and trained to be Work Incentive Planners to assist job ready SSI/SSDI consumers understand the impact of employment on their cash and health benefits. DOR is monitoring WIP services provided to consumers to determine the effectiveness of in-house benefits planning towards increasing employment outcomes for SSI/SSDI consumers, earnings above Substantial Gainful Activity, and Social Security Administration (SSA) cost reimbursements to DOR. The program impact will be monitored through an analysis of the outcome data.

Objective 2.2: By September 30, 2015, individuals with disabilities who gain state employment with a Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) certificate will increase by 30%. Based on FFY 2013 results of 344, the FFY 2015 number of individuals is projected to be 447.

The DOR will educate VR consumers about employment opportunities about the LEAP, including how to apply for and obtain these positions. Through the California Model Employer Initiative, DOR will provide a training program for California state employment supervisors, managers, and human resource professionals in recruiting, interviewing, hiring, retaining, and accommodating individuals with disabilities. These efforts include providing presentations to State Disability Advisory Councils and State hiring officials about LEAP, the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities, and providing assistance with workplace accommodations.

Goal 3: Continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations to better serve consumers.

Objective 3.1: By September 30, 2015, Team Employment Coordinator (EC) and Service Coordinator (SC) academies will be implemented.

In FFY 2013 and 2014, DOR established the New Counselor’s Academy for new VR Counselors and Case Support staff to develop knowledge of the entire case management process and key concepts of team service delivery in a streamlined and timely manner. DOR will identify training needs targeted to EC and SC responsibilities and implement a staff training plan. DOR will structure the EC and SC academies similarly to the current academies. The full scope of these academies will provide Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) teams with the knowledge and tools needed to provide effective and timely services to applicants and consumers; and, to ensure they have an understanding of the evolving employer labor force needs.

Objective 3.2: By September 30, 2015, reduce the timeline from DOR receipt of an acceptable vendor invoice to payment by the State to 30 calendar days.

In FFY 2014, DOR initiated efforts to redesign and streamline the invoice approval and payment processes. The Centralized Invoicing Pilot (CIP), designed to test transferring vendor invoice processing from branch offices to the Districts, concluded in April 2014 and information was collected to evaluate and determine next steps. Based on initial results, DOR is developing a plan to implement the CIP statewide in all remaining Districts. Statewide rollout is anticipated to be completed by FFY 2015. Monitoring reports will be distributed monthly to inform the District managers and additional strategies may be considered to improve timelines if needed.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

The DOR provides AT services and devices for applicants and consumers based on their need at each stage of the rehabilitation process, from initial interview through case closure and post-employment services, to help achieve their employment goal. AT services include providing devices, equipment, hardware, and/or software to promote greater independence. DOR informs applicants and consumers with their rights and remedies for decisions made regarding AT services and devices.

To educate VR Counselors, SCs, and ECs about AT options for applicants and consumers, DOR offers a Rehabilitation Technology two-day training class at least once per year. This training includes reviewing the different types of assistive devices available to consumers, and where and how to obtain appropriate assessments and recommendations for these devices. A statewide DOR AT Services Coordinator is available to assist DOR staff with technical assistance and guidance.

Through a statewide contract, DOR also provides AT services through the California AT Systems, a statewide program federally funded through the AT Act of 1998, as amended in 2004 including: • Device Loan Program: Short-term loans can be provided up to one month to qualifying individuals and can be renewed. • Device Reutilization Program: A web-based program for individuals and organizations to list AT devices for sale. There are five centers providing reused equipment to their communities at low or no cost. • AT and Transportation Loan Guarantee Program: An individual with a disability, family member or legal guardian of a child with a disability, and an employer (only for the AT Loan Program) can apply for a loan to purchase a vehicle, modifications for a vehicle, AT services and AT devices.

Individuals with disabilities can now access DOR’s Internet website for information on AT program resources and services. To address ongoing issues with timely delivery of AT goods and services for consumers, DOR worked with the Department of General Services (DGS) to streamline the procurement process. In 2013, DGS agreed to allow DOR the option to procure AT goods and services through the State Price Schedule (SPS). As a result, DOR field staff can select one of more approved vendors throughout the state to procure AT evaluations, goods, and training for consumers. DOR continues to evaluate ways to increase the number of vendors and the timeliness of services to meet consumer AT needs.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

The DOR assesses the level of its outreach to individuals with disabilities, including those who are minorities, with the most significant disabilities, and may be unserved or underserved by the VR program, through the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA), as identified in Attachment 4.11(a). From these results, DOR determines which minority groups, disability groups, and other individuals with disabilities may be unserved or underserved by the VR program.

The DOR established bi-monthly meeting taskforces to address the needs, barriers, and services deficits of individuals with disabilities who are Asian American, African American, and Hispanic. In FFY 2013, DOR and the Technical Assistance Continuing Education (TACE) Region IX held two DOR-Tribal VR Partnership meetings, which provided a forum for dialogue about Native American vocational service delivery issues, best practices, and the establishment of objectives to achieve Memorandum of Understanding goals. In the future, these meetings will be held annually.

The DOR also established the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Committee (DIAC) to conduct outreach to unserved and underserved individuals and consumers, and to diversify DOR employee applicant pools to ensure a diverse workforce in order to meet consumer needs. The DIAC meets quarterly to identify outreach and diversity gaps and determine potential solutions for consideration by DOR executive management.

To enhance DOR’s ability to reach out to individuals with disabilities, consumers, and stakeholders electronically, DOR maintains Facebook, Twitter, You Tube, Vimeo, and intranet and internet websites. Through these sites, DOR provides information about current events, resources, consumer highlights, and VR services for staff, consumers, and the public. Future efforts include evaluating and implementing strategies to increase viewership of DOR social media and DOR websites; and identifying a more effective way to easily distribute targeted VR services and operational information to interested individuals, including consumers and vendors.

To promote deaf awareness and sensitivity, DOR provides annual training to VRSD team members on how to effectively serve individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and deaf-blind. Training is expected to be completed by FFY 2015.

To further improve VR services delivery to unserved and underserved individuals, DOR continues to enhance the Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) case management system. System enhancements to the case management and financial modules will be implemented in 2014 and more will continue into FFY 2015. The overall objective of these enhancements is to further increase efficiencies in the case recording and fiscal processes that allow VRSD staff more time to effectively provide VR services to consumers.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The DOR continues to implement plans to establish, develop, and improve CRPs that will address the needs of consumers. In FFY 2014, DOR established the Placement Plus Proof of Concept to test a new employment services delivery model and fee structure for consumers receiving SSI/SSDI. The goals of this project are to ensure quality placements for DOR job ready consumers, adequately compensate providers for quality services, and maximize SSA reimbursements to DOR.

Also, DOR will be revising processes and guidance to be issued to SE vendors to ensure quality services are provided and appropriate administrative processes are applied. The SE Group Authorization and Invoicing sub-project established under the Vendor Utilization Management (VUM) project will review and revise the billing and services support processes, which seeks to improve and streamline these processes.

In order to make vendor performance data available to CRPs, districts, and applicants and consumers, DOR will enhance the Rehabilitation Resources Directory (RRD) in FFY 2015. The RRD, launched in 2012, provides DOR staff, applicants and consumers, CRPs, and the public with information about CRPs providing VR services locally and throughout the state. DOR will enhance the RRD to allow for improved access, the addition of other categories of service providers, identified performance measures and other data, and improved reporting features. The DOR continues to identify improvements to DOR program evaluation processes for CRPs. Established in 2012, DOR created a review process to increase efficiencies, particularly for CRPs receiving payments to provide DOR services to applicants and consumers under different VR and SE programs. The team continues to evaluate the effectiveness of the review processes and update the master program review calendar each year.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

During FFY 2014, DOR anticipates passing S&PIs 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6, and 2.1; but experienced challenges in meeting performance measure 1.2. Employment Outcomes above 55.8%; and 1.5. Average Hourly Earnings. The DOR will implement current and new strategies to improve the performance of the S&PIs, including monitoring S&PI data monthly, supporting and training the VRSD team for improved service delivery, increasing employment outcomes and consumer self-sufficiency for consumers who are job ready through WIP, establishing new partnerships with employers through the National Employment Team, and maximizing use of the TAP to link job ready consumers with employers. These efforts are expected to contribute towards passing the S&PIs in FFY 2015.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

The DOR collaborates with the California Workforce Investment Boards (WIB) as an active partner with 49 Local WIBs. DOR is also co-located at 20 local workforce investment centers.

In 2013, DOR partnered with local WIBs to recruit five Disability Resources Coordinators (DRC) for the America’s Job Centers of California (AJCC). The DRCs were established to increase employment and access to services for individuals with a disability, which will provide technical assistance and guidance to the AJCC and DRCs. In FFY 2015, DOR field offices will also increase their collaboration with local Workforce Investment Boards and associated AJCCs to develop linkages with employers and stakeholders.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

The DOR will achieve the goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) through the strategies identified above and in other State Plan attachments. In addition, in support of achieving the goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1), DOR continues to establish projects and initiatives designed to improve service delivery, outreach, and administrative business operations, including: • The VUM project, which was chartered in May 2013 to redesign and streamline the authorization, invoicing, payments, and disencumbering processes; and, modernize DOR’s business model for establishing, purchasing, monitoring, and evaluating internal and external VR employment services. • The TAP, as referenced in Objective 1.2, above, which was developed to match employers and job ready consumers together towards successful employment. • The District Quality Assurance Project (DQAP), which was initiated to support operational excellence and quality service delivery through the provision of management tools, activities and resources for performance management, quality assurance and oversight of districts. The project deliverables will be distributed for implementation by FFY 2015. • The Promoting the Readiness of Minors in Supplemental Security Income (PROMISE) grant, which was awarded to DOR in October 2013 and will conclude in September 2018. Through the grant, DOR will improve the provision and coordination of services and supports for transition-age youth and their families to achieve better outcomes and decrease reliance on SSI.

The DOR will use Section 110 funds of the Rehabilitation Act towards improvements to the AWARE case management and financial modules and to support the activities of the SRC. Working closely with the AWARE vendor, DOR will implement enhancements for the case services and financial modules to continuously improve the user interface and provide a more streamlined business process. In FFY 2015, it is projected there will be two new releases of AWARE.

Section 110 funds will be used to support SRC travel and administrative costs. The SRC meets at least eight times a year as a full council or for executive planning. The SRC is a partner with DOR in major programs, policies, and projects including the State Plan, CSNA, and Consumer Satisfaction Survey.

The DOR’s policy is to serve all qualified individuals with a disability without discrimination based on their protected status, including: physical or mental disability, age, sex, color, ethnic group, race, national origin, ancestry, religion, medical condition, sexual orientation, or marital status. Through the triennial CSNA conducted by DOR, potential barriers identified in Attachment 4.11(a) include: • Awareness of VR services, including individuals or groups unaware of DOR and the type of VR services available to eligible individuals, or applicants and consumers experiencing VR services not meeting their needs. • Communication, including non-English speaking individuals and disability types (e.g., deaf consumers). • Cultural, particularly for minority groups that have difficulty seeking help from public agencies or acknowledging their disabilities. • Geographical access, including difficulties in accessing reliable transportation to or live a long distance from a local field offices. • Employer, including continued misperceptions that discourage recruitment for and hiring of employees with disabilities.

In compliance with Section 427 of the U.S. Department of Education’s General Education Provisions Act, DOR continuously plans to identify and provide services to individuals with disabilities to ensure equitable access to and participation in VR and SE services. To ensure equal access to all individuals with disabilities, DOR will: • Enhance the skills of VR service providers to improve services to individuals with disabilities, including applicants and consumers. • Provide applicants and consumers with improved information with which to make informed choices regarding their VR services. • Provide translation services and written materials in alternative languages that meet the communication needs of applicants and consumers. • Enhance recruitment and selection of qualified VR service providers who are able to meet the needs of unserved and underserved populations. • Improve outreach and partnerships with employers to market the benefits of hiring qualified consumers with disabilities.

 

This screen was last updated on Jul 28 2014 2:58PM by sacakidderd

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), jointly with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), established six program goals for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2011, which were carried forward to the 2012 and 2013 State Plans. These program goals were developed based on information gathered from the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA), requirements related to the Standard and Performance Indicators, and stakeholder input.

2013 STATE PLAN PROGRAM GOALS Goal 1: Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) consumers will achieve quality employment outcomes through DOR services, as measured by wages, employer-provided benefits, and consumer satisfaction.

Objective 1.1 Increase the number of consumers earning at or above $7.25 per hour from that achieved in FY 2012. FY 2013 target: 10,064 achieved: 10,954

Objective 1.2 Increase the number of consumers with health insurance available through the employer at closure from that achieved in FY 2012. FY 2013 Target: 2,292 Achieved: 2,295

Objective 1.3 Increase the percentage of CSS respondents who report they strongly agree or agree with the statement “I am satisfied with services from DOR” to 74.8%. FY 2013 Achieved: 71.4%.

Objective 1.4 Increase the number of individuals receiving SE services who attend post-secondary training to 129, an increase of 18 over that in FY 2012. FFY 2013 Target: 129 Achieved: 129

Goal 2: The DOR will increase the quantity of VR and SE employment outcomes.

2.1 Increase the number of successfully rehabilitated consumer case closures over that in FY 2012. FY 2013 Target: 11,188 Achieved: 12,239

2.2 Increase the number of successfully rehabilitated consumer case closures over that in FY 2012 for those who at application were 24 years of age or younger. FY 2013 Target: 3,727 Achieved: 4,120

2.3 Increase the number of successfully rehabilitated SE consumer case closures compared to FY 2012. FY 2013 Target: 1,415 Achieved: 1,498

Goal 3: The DOR will advance equality, accessibility and independence for persons with disabilities, including unserved and underserved populations.

3.1 Increase the percentage of Asian Americans (AAs) and Hispanic/Latinos (H/Ls) with disabilities who apply for services in relation to all applicants by 10 percent over FY 2012. FY 2013 Target: 4.51% AA and 34.15% H/L Achieved: 3.22% AA and 33.25% H/L.

3.2 Increase the percentage of AA and H/L consumers who have an IPE in relation to all implemented IPEs by 7% over FY 2012. FY 2013 Target: 4.99% AA and 36.10% H/L Achieved: 3.98% AA and 32.60% H/L.

Goal 4: The DOR will actively engage employers to achieve quality employment outcomes for persons with disabilities.

4.1 DOR will create at least 20 new employer accounts in each of the 14 DOR districts. FY 2013 Target: 20 employer accounts in each of 14 districts Achieved: 20 new employer accounts in 12 districts and less than 20 in 2 districts.

4.2 Increase the number of total successful Federal government employment outcomes over that in FY 2012. Target: data not available Achieved: data not available.

4.3 Increase the number of successful State government employment outcomes over that in FY 2012. Target: data not available Achieved: data not available

Goal 5: The DOR will continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations to better serve consumers.

5.1 BY September 30, 2013, 100% of DOR districts will utilize the AWARE system’s referral module to track and monitor individuals with disabilities who request Limited Examination and Appointment Program or Schedule A Certificates, request referral to a One-Stop or other agency, or express an interest in VR services. FY 2013 Target: 100% by 9-30-13 Achieved: 100% by 3-30-13.

5.2 By September 30, 2013, DOR will implement three new releases of AWARE and initiate enhancements to fully integrate the existing financial systems into AWARE. FY 2013 Target: three new releases Achieved: two new releases.

5.3 By December 31, 2012, DOR will develop and communicate internally and externally the plans for statewide implementation and roll-out of the new VRSD Model. Target: Communicate plans for Roll-out by 12-31-12 Achieved: by 12-31-12.

Goal 6: As a model employer, DOR will attract, develop, and retain a diverse and highly skilled workforce.

6.1 DOR will achieve a 65% or higher response rate on the EEQ. Achieved: 20% response rate.

6.2 Reduce the number of SVRC, QRP resignations, other than those leaving due to retirement, by 30%. FY 2013 Target: 30% reduction Achieved: 16% reduction.

6.3 By 9-30-13, 20% of newly hired SVRC,QRPs will be culturally competent, as measured by the increase of applications, developed IPEs and successful employment outcomes of the unserved and underserved populations. FY 2013 Target: 20% of newly hired SVRC,QRPs will be culturally competent. Achieved: Data not available.

EVALUATION AND REPORTS OF PROGRESS ON VR GOALS

Factors Contributing to the Achievement of VR Goals

The DOR was successful in achieving Goals 1, 2, and 5. The strategies that contributed to the success included: VRSD team Employment Coordinators working directly with consumers to prepare for and seek employment opportunities; VR staff providing consumers with soft skills training; educating school personnel, students, and their parents or guardians about DOR services; and providing DOR management with regular updates on the progress in meeting the Standards & Performance Indicators, including the number of closed-rehabilitated consumers, and DOR communication through internal and external websites and stakeholder meetings on the VRSD team model implementation.

Factors Limiting the Achievement of VR Goals

The DOR had challenges in achieving Goals 3, 4, and 6. Factors limiting the successful achievement of these goals included: challenges in obtaining relevant data to measure the goal targets; and, the vacancy of the Workforce Succession Planning and Diversity Outreach position.

To improve on the unsuccessful performance measures, DOR will: prepare the VRSD teams with training opportunities, resources, and tools to monitor the effectiveness of services delivery to consumers; increase the targeted outreach to unserved and underserved populations through community outreach and the DOR Asian American and Hispanic /Latino task forces.

 

EVALUATION AND REPORTS OF PROGRESS ON SE GOALS

Factors Contributing to the Achievement of SE Goals

The DOR was successful in achieving Goals 1 and 2. For the SE program, the success was attributed to several strategies including: DOR’s collaboration and partnership with California’s Employment First Committee, which partnered with families, schools, regional centers, and service providers to achieve integrated competitive employment and/or post-secondary education leading to career advancement for individuals receiving SE services; and, the development of the College to Career project with five local community colleges, which provided students with intellectual disabilities, who are both DOR and Regional Center consumers, with supports to be successful in college courses, gain work experience, and become competitively employed in the community using natural supports.

 

PERFOMANCE ON THE STANDARDS AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

The DOR met the federally-required performance for Evaluation Standard 1- VR’s Impact on Employment and Evaluation Standard 2 - Equal Access Opportunity for Individuals of All Groups and Backgrounds.

To meet Evaluation Standards, federal regulations require VR agencies to pass at least four of the six performance indicators (PI): Change in Employment Outcomes (1.1), Percent of Employment Outcomes (1.2), Competitive Employment Outcomes (1.3), Significance of Disability (1.4), Earnings Ratio (1.5), and Self-Support (1.6); and Minority Background Service Rate (2.1). Also, federal regulations require passing at least two of the three performance indicators 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5.

Strategies Contributing to the Successful Passing of Performance Indicators

The DOR passed PIs 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.6, and 2.1 and credited its success to the combined efforts of DOR staff and community providers. DOR engaged in local partnerships with community partners to help provide VR services to consumers. These partners included third-party cooperative programs, CRPs, and Individual Service Providers who contributed to or supported the consumers’ employment outcomes.

Factors Limiting the Successful Passing of Performance Indicators

The DOR was unable to pass 1.2 and 1.5. DOR has established several initiatives identified in Attachment 4.11(d), including the Talent Acquisition Portal and the College to Career Programs, to increase successful employment outcomes and wages.

 

INNOVATION AND EXPANSION (I&E) ACTIVITIES

During FFY 2013, I&E funds were used to support the development and implementation of the AWARE releases which expanded and improved the provision of VR services to individuals with disabilities, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the CSNA and the State’s program goals and priorities. Between July 2013 and July 2014, DOR released AWARE version updates 5.13, 5.14, and 5.15 to increase efficiencies in recording and monitoring VR case services, authorizations, and payments; the field was trained on the new releases.

I&E funds were also used to support the activities of the SRC including their travel costs. The SRC meets at least quarterly in person and teleconferences between full council meetings. In addition to direct participation in the development of the State Plan, the SRC partners with DOR in major programs, policies, and projects including the CSNA, Consumer Satisfaction Survey, and Business Partner Forum as identified in Attachment 4.2(c).

This screen was last updated on Jul 30 2014 1:25PM by Janette Shell

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) provides Supported Employment (SE) services to eligible consumers with the most significant disabilities. This attachment outlines how DOR monitors the quality of the services consumers receive, scope of services provided, extent of SE services, and timing of transition to extended services. Additional information on extended services for SE are identified in Attachment 4.8(b)(4).

Quality of SE Services

SE services are mostly provided to consumers by Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) and partner agencies. In areas where CRP vendors are not available, or an individual has needs beyond those that can be met by a CRP, DOR may authorize approved individual service providers to provide job coaching services.

CRP vendors providing SE services follow guidelines provided by DOR Community Resources Development (CRD) section. These guidelines include submitting reports timely to Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Counselors as well as providing efficient services to consumers. Located at the DOR Central Office is a statewide liaison to assist local DOR Districts and CRPs with technical assistance and identify training needs. Locally, CRD Specialists conduct on-site reviews, monitor DOR certifications, Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities accreditation of CRPs, and ongoing assessment and evaluation of consumers.

Scope of SE Services

The VR process for SE is the same used for all consumers when establishing eligibility and the level of severity of the disability. The difference applies once the consumer and VR Counselor has identified SE services are required to reach an employment outcome. SE services for a consumer begins with a comprehensive assessment to identify strengths for employment, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. DOR provides the full scope of SE services to individuals who: • Are determined eligible with the most significant disabilities; • Require extended services to maintain employment; and • Have at least a reasonable expectation that a source of extended services will be available at the time of transition to extended services.

As consumers’ needs vary, DOR provides additional options for SE programs, including Transitional Employment for consumers with mental health disabilities and the Work Activity Program for consumers with intellectual disabilities.

SE services are provided to consumers with varying disabilities, including but not limited to consumers with traumatic brain injuries (TBI), acquired brain injuries (ABI), mental health disabilities, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and intellectual disabilities. The SE services provided meet the specialized needs of each consumer and include: • A general meeting to review the SE job placement parameters used in developing a plan for employment. • An evaluation of labor market and identification of suitable employment sites; employer contacts; job seeking skills training; work site assessment; task analysis; evaluation and recommendation for a job coaching plan. • If necessary, external situational assessments through trial work experiences (TWE) assess the consumer’s interests and abilities and allow the individual to consider different jobs, environments, settings, and tasks to maximize his/her potential. TWE is also used to determine the techniques best suited to assist the consumer to learn the work skills and behaviors necessary for employment. • On-site job coaching support services in a group or individual placement at the work place, and off-site services in an individual placement if they are needed to maintain the consumer’s employment including training, destination training, advocacy, and job loss intervention. • As needed, coordinated benefits planning discussions with the consumer, Community Work Incentives Coordinators and/or other third parties to identify appropriate work incentive programs as well as potential sources for ongoing support. • As appropriate, benefits advisement and work incentive information for transition-age youth with intellectual disabilities to go from school to post-secondary training and work. • Post employment services, if needed to support and maintain employment and are not available through extended services, are available for Closed-Rehabilitated SE consumers in integrated settings.

Extent of SE Services

The DOR provides SE services to eligible consumers for a period of time not to exceed 18 months, unless under special circumstances that may require additional supports such as a new job, change in specific duties, or change in management.

The DOR also offers unique services for consumers with development disabilities and who are clients of the Regional Centers. The VR Work Activity Program (VR-WAP) provides VR services in a non-integrated setting to eligible consumers as an interim step toward achieving an employment outcome in an integrated setting. The intent of VR-WAP is to remove or reduce barriers to employment so that the eligible consumer can move into an integrated employment setting.

Timing of Transition to Extended Services

Once a consumer has maintained stability on the job for at least 60 days, the funding for and provision of job coaching transitions to an extended services provider. The VR Counselor continues to track the consumer’s progress and job stability during the transition period. If the consumer maintains stabilization for 60 days after transition to extended services, the case is Closed-Rehabilitated.

Transition to extended service providers is essential to maintain consistency and support for consumers receiving SE services. DOR works to identify funding sources for extended services, collaborates with extended service providers, and identifies sources of extended services, including natural supports which are vital for the long-term success of the consumer. Sources of extended services for a consumer eligible for SE services include: public resources such as the Department of Developmental Services, County Mental Health, Social Security Ticket to Work Incentive Programs; private resources such as trust funds, private non-profits, religious or community organizations, and family; and, natural supports to ensure the consumer receiving SE services has greater success in the work environment.

Through outreach efforts, DOR works closely with the Cooperative Programs identified in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) for transition-age youth and individuals with mental health disabilities to identify those in need of SE services. Also, DOR works directly with the California TBI Program to identify consumers with TBI/ABI who could benefit from SE services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2014 12:47AM by sacakidderd