ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2013 (submitted FY 2012)

1.1 The California Department of Rehabilitation is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the California Department of Rehabilitation [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Department of Rehabilitation Director

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Department of Rehabilitation Director

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Anthony "Tony" P. Sauer, EMMDS

Title of Signatory
Director, California Department of Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/22/2012

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2013
No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

State Plan Partnership

In accordance with its federal mandate to jointly develop, agree to, and annually review State goals and priorities, the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) has been a partner with the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) in development and approval of the 2013 State Plan Update. This partnership, which has continued to strengthen over the years, is summarized below and also referenced in Attachment 4.11(c)(1). The information contained herein focuses on SRC activities and collaboration as it pertains to the State Plan and related projects. Information on the complete scope of SRC activities and recommendations can be found in the SRC Annual Report, submitted to the Rehabilitation Services Administration each December.

The State Plan has been a major discussion/action item on every SRC meeting agenda since last year’s State Plan was submitted. At each meeting, the SRC had the opportunity to receive and discuss information with key DOR leadership, ask questions and identify any areas of concern.

The DOR and SRC last modified the State Plan goals in February 2011 for inclusion in the 2012 State Plan. The new goals were the outcome of the DOR’s expanded and inclusive planning process, which integrated the comments from the State Plan public meetings, Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment findings, and SRC and DOR staff input.

In May 2011, the SRC met to review and discuss the 2012 State Plan public comments received. SRC members discussed their participation and observations regarding the public meetings with DOR staff including informal recommendations on increasing public participation. In November 2011, the SRC received an update on the 2012 State Plan implementation and began developing its priorities for the 2013 State Plan. In February 2012, the SRC adopted and submitted the following 2013 State Plan recommendations to the DOR:

SRC Recommendation 2012.1 The SRC recommends the DOR carry forward the six 2012 State Plan Goals into the 2013 State Plan, as presented to the SRC on February 8, 2012.

DOR Response The DOR agrees these goals are still appropriate and will include them in the 2013 State Plan.

SRC Recommendation 2012.2 The SRC recommends the DOR establish an objective in the 2013 State Plan to develop and implement a soft skills training program for all consumers within each district.

DOR Response The DOR will include a strategy within the 2013 State Plan to explore and identify ways to improve the consistency and effectiveness of soft skills services and training provided to consumers.

SRC Recommendation 2012.3 The SRC recommends the DOR establish an objective in the 2013 State Plan to provide DOR staff with detailed training in consumer benefits affecting employment.

DOR Response The DOR agrees with the SRC that consumer benefits planning should be a priority in the 2013 State Plan. Health Benefits and Work Incentives trainings have historically been part of the strategies and objectives in DOR State Plan. This training will continue in the 2013 State Plan as a strategy supporting Goal 1 and the associated measureable objectives. SRC Recommendation 2012.4 The SRC recommends the DOR establish an objective in the 2013 State Plan, within Goal 6, to provide all DOR counselors training on community partner relations.

DOR Response The DOR will include a strategy within the 2013 State Plan to develop a Community Partner Relations training curriculum and delivery timeline.

The DOR invites the SRC to work with the department during FFY 2013 to help identify the knowledge gaps (for both DOR and Community Rehabilitation Program staff), to be used in developing the Community Partner Relations training objectives and curriculum.

SRC Recommendation 2012.5 The SRC recommends the DOR establish an objective in the 2013 State Plan, within Goal 4, to establish a business advisory group to encourage better knowledge and understanding of business’ needs.

DOR Response The DOR will include a strategy within the 2013 State Plan Goal 4 to obtain employer input using the expertise of, and partnering with existing statutory and community-based boards and councils (e.g. California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, Workforce Investment Boards, Business Leadership Network, Mayor’s Committees, etc). The DOR invites the SRC to partner with the DOR to develop and advance this strategy.

The DOR appreciates the SRC commitment to get employer input in the effort to achieve quality employment outcomes for consumers and collaboration within existing systems and resources is imperative.

In April 2012, the DOR and SRC conducted two (2) State Plan public meetings in five (5) geographic areas of California. SRC members partnered with the DOR to attract speakers by inviting stakeholders from their respective constituency groups. A total of 10 SRC members participated in one of the meetings.

In May 2012, the SRC discussed the 2013 State Plan public comments and informally recommended additions, based on member observations, to the DOR Summary of Public Comments. Additionally, the SRC adopted the following 2013 State Plan recommendations:

SRC Recommendation 2012.6 The SRC recommends the DOR include a priority in the 2013 State Plan to partner with the SRC to develop goals and strategies for a soft skills training program for consumers statewide.

DOR Response In addition to the DOR response to related SRC Recommendation 2012.2, the DOR will include a strategy within the 2013 State Plan to develop and pilot a soft skills training curriculum for consumers.

SRC Recommendation 2012.7 The SRC recommends the DOR include a priority in the 2013 State Plan to ensure consumers have access to benefits planning.

DOR Response In addition to the DOR response to related SRC Recommendation 2012.4, the DOR will include a strategy within the 2013 State Plan to evaluate the feasibility of developing establishment projects with Independent Living Centers and community based organizations to develop fee for service benefits planning.

Partnership in Planning-Related Programs and Projects

In addition to direct participation in the development and approval of the 2013 State Plan Update, the SRC has been an active partner with the DOR in the major programs, policies and projects on which the 2013 State Plan Update is based. Since the submission of the 2012 State Plan Update in June 2011, this partnership has included the following: Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment; Consumer Satisfaction Survey; Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization; and the Rehabilitation Resources Directory. The SRC’s involvement with each of these is summarized below: Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA)

The SRC works in partnership with the DOR throughout the CSNA as required in Section 101 (a)(15)(i) of the Rehabilitation Act. The SRC and DOR jointly conducted the last triennial CSNA in three (3) phases from FFY 2009 through FFY 2011. The CSNA has been a discussion/action item on every SRC meeting agenda. At each meeting, the SRC received updates on progress and had opportunity to provide input into design and method. The SRC evaluated and used the phased results to inform its recommendations to the DOR and 2013 State Plan.

In February 2012, the SRC received and began discussing the needs identified over the entire CSNA including findings from the community-based organization surveys. The SRC generally supported the DOR proposal to use a similar strategy for conducting the next triennial CSNA (FFY 2012-14). In May 2012 the SRC began more detailed discussion of goals and design for the 2012-14 CSNA, which resulted in a recommendation to emphasize resource needs of individuals with disabilities in rural areas.

Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS)

In accordance with Section 105 (c)(4) of the Act, the SRC and DOR work in partnership to conduct periodic assessments of consumer satisfaction. The SRC and the DOR together in 2008 developed the content of the current four-part CSS. The four-part CSS assesses consumer satisfaction at four different points of the vocational rehabilitation service cycle (pre-plan, in-plan, closed-employed and closed-not employed).

At the recommendation of the SRC, the 2010 CSS was conducted primarily through an online survey format. The shift to an online survey format resulted in the ability to reach a significantly larger sampling than previous years -- 10,800 in 2011 and 2010 vs. 4000 (2009) and 3000 (2008). This resulted in a total of 1,794 completed surveys returned in 2011, far exceeding the two prior method years’ responses of 690 (2008) and 920 (2009). The results of the 2011 CSS were submitted to the Rehabilitation Services Administration in the SRC’s 2011 Annual Report.

In May 2012 the SRC began discussing needs for further improving the design, response rate, and analysis of the CSS. Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization (VR Mod)

VR Mod is a major departmental project that includes replacing the DOR Field Computing System with a new Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) and the design and implementation of a new Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery model. The SRC has been represented and informed on this project at major collaboration points, and has had opportunities to raise concerns and provide input through various project phases.

Rehabilitation Resources Directory

In 2010, the DOR launched the first phase of the Rehabilitation Resources Directory (formerly known as the Community Resource Development Informed Choice Database). The directory provides consumers, applicants, vendors, and DOR staff access to specific information about Community Rehabilitation Programs and the rehabilitation services they provide. The SRC was represented on a project workgroup, which also included consumers and vendors. The SRC has received periodic updates and demonstrations on this multi-year project and will continue to provide feedback to the DOR.

About the SRC

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended in 1998 (the Act), requires that consumers, advocates and other representatives of individuals with disabilities be integral to the administration and oversight of a state’s vocational rehabilitation services. In California, this mandate is fulfilled by the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), established in accordance with Section 105 of the Act. The Governor-appointed SRC consists of a diverse membership interested in, and representative of, Californians with disabilities. It is the mission of the California SRC, in partnership with the DOR, to assure that all Californians with disabilities are represented, informed, and empowered; receive necessary, sufficient and timely individualized services; and that these services are excellent and lead to meaningful employment and independent living.

It is the role of the SRC to review, evaluate and advise the DOR regarding its specific and overall performance and effectiveness to ensure the highest possible level of service delivery, employment outcomes, and consumer satisfaction. In partnership with the DOR, SRC develops, agrees on, and reviews State Plan goals and priorities, and evaluates the effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation services provided under the Act. SRC also advises and assists the DOR in the preparation of the plans, reports, needs assessments and evaluations required by the Act.

This screen was last updated on Jun 18 2012 12:27PM by sacakidderd

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) requests a Waiver of Statewideness. The DOR maintains interagency agreements (IAs) with the California Department of Education (CDE), California Employment Development Department (EDD), California Department of Developmental Services (DDS), as well as institutions of higher education. These Statewide agreements provide leadership, oversight, and administrative support to locally developed cooperative agreements and programs. Locally, the DOR has entered into cooperative agreements with entities such as public universities and community colleges, local education agencies (LEAs), county mental health, and social service agencies. Although the DOR has local cooperative agreements in each DOR district, the DOR does not contract with every LEA, county, or other potential cooperative partner in the State. Therefore, these cooperative programs are not Statewide. The DOR does not have sufficient staff or budget authority to work with every potential cooperative partner. Also, these are voluntary programs, so they are contingent upon the interest of the local partner agency. State Plan requirements apply to all services approved under the waiver. Additionally, the DOR approves each service proposed under the waiver before it is put into effect.

The locally developed cooperative agreements include the following programs that exceed the minimum requirements, as directed by mandate, and provide new or enhanced services to meet the specific needs of the eligible DOR consumer:

Transition Partnership Projects

The Transition Partnership Projects service secondary and post-secondary students with disabilities by facilitating the effective transition of the DOR’s student consumers from school to meaningful employment. Statewide, these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with the LEAs and the Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPAs).

Under these agreements, the DOR assigns Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals (SVRC, QRP) to be active members of the program team. The DOR opens cases and provides enhanced VR services for at least one (1) year prior to the student consumers leaving high school. The LEAs and the SELPAs furnish the non-Federal share of costs either through certified expenditures or cash match. The certified expenditures from the LEAs and the SELPAs are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services exclusively to DOR student consumers. The LEA provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to the DOR consumers to enable them to achieve employment utilizing community based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow-up services. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, follow-up, and non-supported employment job coaching. The contracted services are not educational services the LEA is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services and are available only to DOR consumers.

WorkAbility II

The WorkAbility II Program is administered through cooperative agreements with LEAs, adult schools, and Regional Occupational Programs (ROPs) to serve adult and out-of-school youth with disabilities who are DOR consumers.

DOR consumers are referred to the WorkAbility II Programs by their SVRC, QRP for enhanced in-plan VR services which include vocational and basic skills assessment, specific job skills training, pre-employment preparation, worksite evaluation, job placement, job coaching, and ongoing follow-up after vocational placement. These programs furnish the non-Federal share of costs either through a certified expenditure or cash match. The certified expenditures from the LEAs and ROPs are provided by redirected education staff that provide unique patterns of VR services exclusively to the DOR consumers. The contracted services are not educational services the LEA is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services and are available only to DOR consumers.

WorkAbility III

The WorkAbility III Program serves individuals with disabilities who are both community college students and DOR consumers desiring and are in need of employment. Statewide, these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with community colleges.

DOR consumers are referred to the WorkAbility III Programs by their SVRC, QRP for enhanced in-plan vocational services. Services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training and job development and placement. The community colleges furnish the non-Federal share of costs either through certified expenditures or cash match. The certified expenditures from the community colleges are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to the DOR consumers. The contracted services are not educational services the community college is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services and are available only to DOR consumers.

WorkAbility IV

The WorkAbility IV Program serves individuals who are DOR consumers and either California State University (CSU) or University of California (UC) students who desire and are in need of employment. Statewide, these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with the CSU and UC.

Consumers are referred to the WorkAbility IV program by their SVRC, QRP for in-plan VR services such as job development and placement, job search skills instruction, work experience and internships, employment related counseling, and job retention services to student consumers and employers. The universities furnish the non-Federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the universities are provided by redirected university staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to DOR student consumers. These contracted services are not educational services the CSU or UC campus is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services available only to DOR consumers.

Mental Health Cooperative Programs

The Mental Health Cooperative Programs serve county Mental Health consumers with severe psychiatric disabilities who are also DOR consumers by assisting them to obtain employment and to live independently in their communities. Statewide, these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with County Mental Health agencies and private non-profit organizations.

Consumers are referred to DOR by participating Mental Health agencies for VR services. The cooperative agreements develop linkages to community agencies such as private non-profit agencies specializing in employment service programs for persons with severe psychiatric disabilities. The Mental Health Cooperatives provide unique vocational service options for consumers, which include vocational assessment and evaluation, personal vocational and social adjustment, work adjustment, employment preparation, job development and placement, and job coaching. County Mental Health agencies furnish the non-Federal share of costs through certified expenditures or cash contribution. The certified expenditures from the County Mental Health agencies are provided by redirected County Mental Health staff providing unique VR services exclusively to DOR consumers. The services in the Mental Health Cooperative Program agreements are not the mental health treatment services that the County is legally mandated or otherwise required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services available only to DOR consumers.

Traumatic Brain Injury Cooperative Program

The Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Cooperative Program serves DOR consumers with TBI through contracted community based organizations. The TBI projects are required to provide supportive services to consumers to enable them to live as independently as possible in the community, including vocational services. Services provided include vocational assessment, personal vocational and social adjustment, work adjustment, employment preparation, job development and placement, and job coaching. The services in the TBI agreements are not services legally mandated by any other agency. They are new, enhanced or added services and are available only to DOR consumers with TBI.

AB 398 allocated TBI funding into the DOR State budget to fund both administrative and program costs. The DOR chose to utilize a percentage of State funds to match Federal VR funds to expand employment services for the DOR TBI population. The portion of the State special assessment used to provide match for the VR program is not sufficient to provide these services Statewide.

Welfare Cooperative Program

The Welfare Cooperative Program serves DOR consumers who receive Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). The DOR and the county social service agencies have collaborated in developing IAs that provide the basis for local county cooperative projects. These projects provide enhanced VR services to consumers with disabilities who meet the eligibility criteria for both CalWORKS (California’s Welfare Program) and DOR services. These consumers maintain direct access to CalWORKS program services. The DOR consumers receive the following vocational services: vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, and job development and placement. Local county social service agencies furnish the non-Federal share of costs through a cash match, which supports new SVRC,QRP allocations and case services funds. The services in the welfare cooperative agreements are not services the County Welfare agencies are legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services and are available only to DOR consumers.

Foster Youth Cooperative Program

The Foster Youth Cooperative Program serves 17-18 year old youth residents with disabilities. The goal of this program is to better coordinate and serve foster youth with disabilities interested in obtaining employment in conjunction with their exit from the foster youth system and to bridge the gap between the foster care system and the community. In collaboration with local agencies such as local workforce investment area One-Stop operators, youth service providers, foster youth group home operators, and a private not-for-profit corporation, the DOR developed a transition program for youth with disabilities exiting (aging-out) of the foster youth system. These youth are selected from foster group homes. Referrals to this program are made by the group home operators to the community program responsible for the education and training of youth. The program then refers the youth to the DOR, which opens a case and begins developing a plan to provide services, when appropriate. Once a case has been opened and eligibility established, DOR refers the consumer to a private not-for-profit agency for supportive services, including arranging for an external situational assessment. The DOR consumers receive employment services which include vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, work experience, job development and placement, and non-supported employment job coaching. The services in the Foster Youth agreement are not services the County is legally mandated or otherwise required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services only available to DOR Consumers.

Written Assurances

Each local agreement contains written assurance that the cooperative partner agency will make the non-Federal share of funds available to the DOR. These third-party cooperative agreements are binding State contracts that are approved by local governmental boards and are jointly signed and executed by the DOR and local governmental agency representatives prior to the delivery of services. Through the third-party cooperative agreements, local and State public agencies certify to the State, on a monthly or quarterly basis, the actual expenditure of funds that comprise the contribution of non-Federal funds. All certified match and cash match expenditures received are under the administrative supervision of the DOR and no portion of the match expenditures come from Federal funds. The total cooperative agency certified expenditure share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 25%. The total cooperative agency cash match share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 21.3%. The DOR has developed fiscal monitoring and reporting procedures and tools for both the DOR district staff and cooperative program contract administrators. The DOR Audit Services Section has developed a Contractor Self Assessment tool, and the Contract Manual provides detailed information on invoicing and supporting documentation requirements. The DOR provides annual training to local contract administrators regarding the development of contracts, and has additional training available regarding contract monitoring and invoicing. The DOR also keeps data and conducts oversight of contract match and payment invoicing. This information is used to provide local technical assistance during program reviews site visits, on an as needed basis. If the value of the actual time certified by the cooperative agency falls below the actual total program cost, the DOR reserves the right to reduce the program costs accordingly. All VR services provided to the DOR consumers, through a third party cooperative agreement, are contractually identified with negotiated service goals. The provision of each vocational service is monitored and reported by the local DOR contract administrator. The DOR reports and distributes the outcome goals for each program on both a monthly and annual basis. All VR services provided under third party cooperative agreements must be authorized or otherwise approved by the SVRC, QRP in consultation with the DOR consumer in advance of provision of services. All DOR consumers, regardless of the service provider, are subject to the DOR Order of Selection (OOS) policy as stated in 2013 State Plan attachment 4.11(c)(3). To assure compliance with the OOS policy, only consumers who meet the OOS service criteria receive services from cooperative partners through third-party agreements.

Unique Services Provided

The vocational services provided under the DOR third party cooperative agreements comply with Federal regulations requiring a unique pattern of service. Specifically, the regulations require that the services provided by the cooperating agency are not the customary or typical services provided by that agency, but are new services that have a VR focus or existing services that have been modified, adapted, expanded, or reconfigured to have a VR focus. The DOR has built in assurances that the third party cooperative programs will meet this Federal requirement. New programs are required to explain how the services in the proposed contract will meet this requirement when they apply for funding. Each cooperative contract also contains duty statements for staff that contrast the cooperative program functions to duties performed under their traditional agency role. Standard contract language also refers to the requirements to adhere to the Rehabilitation Act, and specifically to the requirement of a new pattern of service. The vocational services provided under the DOR third party cooperative agreements comply with all provisions of the DOR State Plan, including both application and plan services.

This screen was last updated on Aug 16 2012 5:00PM by sacakidderd

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

At this time, the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) is not a part of any interagency cooperation on the utilization of services and facilities of the programs carried out by the Undersecretary for Rural Development of the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

Required State Purchasing Contracts:

The California Department of General Services (DGS) oversees the statewide contracts for purchasing. DGS classifies the following mandatory statewide contracts for use by all California departments: Commodity Contracts, Food Contracts, Western States Contracting Alliance and Master Agreements.

Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) and Interagency Agreements (IAs):

The DOR has MOUs and IAs carrying out activities of the workforce investment system through the California Department of Education, California Department of Industrial Relations, California Employment Development Department, Chancellor’s Office of the California State University, Chancellor’s Office of the California Community Colleges, Office of the President of the University of California, and Social Security Administration.

To maximize limited resources and assist individuals to access other programs, the DOR also works cooperatively with State and local agencies and programs that are not part of the Statewide workforce investment system. These collaborative efforts are manifested through MOUs and IAs coordinated throughout the State as follows:

California Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators MOU: Establishes guidelines for the joint financial support of DOR student-consumers to achieve their educational goals, eventually leading to employment. This agreement supports students enrolled in the California post-secondary setting with a financial aid office on campus.

California Health and Human Services Agency (CHHSA) Computer Matching and Privacy Act IA: designates the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) as the single point of contact for accessing disclosed data from the Social Security Administration needed to administer federally funded benefit programs. All data is disclosed in accordance with the requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974.

California State University, Sacramento IA: Provides 80 hours of supervisory training for departments of the CHHSA and is specifically designed to reflect the Mission and Goals of the CHHSA. The DOR has been participating in this training since 2004, where 61 DOR supervisors from throughout the State have already participated. This is the primary supervisory training provided to and regularly attended by DOR supervisors and managers.

Department of Corporations IA: The DOR provides access surveys and reports for Corporation offices in Sacramento, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego; a two (2) day training on Americans with Disabilities Act self evaluation process; half day training on emergency management for persons with disabilities; three (3) hour training on program accessibility and disability awareness; planning accessibility meetings; consultation regarding methods of obtaining input from persons with disabilities, examine self evaluation results, and make recommendations regarding policy and policy implementation.

Department of Corporations IA: The DOR provides Reasonable Accommodation (RA) Services to the Department of Corporations. Working in cooperation with the Department of Corporations, the DOR uses an interactive process to analyze RA requests on a case-by-case basis to come to an equitable and informed resolution in accordance with Federal and State laws.

Department of Education IA: The contractor provides leadership and monitoring to local education agencies and local DOR offices to facilitate the development of cooperative programs for secondary students with disabilities.

Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) Information Exchange IA: Allows the DOR to verify benefit status and other information with the DHCS as it pertains to Supplemental Security Income/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/SSDI) consumers. The DOR utilizes this Social Security Administration information for the purpose of determining eligibility for DOR services including application of the presumptive eligibility rules for SSI/SSDI beneficiaries in accordance with Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Department of Technology Services IA: Allows the DOR to obtain routine data processing services, as described by State Administrative Manual Section 5210.1.

Employment Development Department (EDD) IA: This Agreement is established for the purpose of the EDD producing and providing the DOR with confidential Unemployment Insurance wage and claim data as specified herein. The DOR agrees to use the confidential information provided by the EDD under this Agreement for the purpose of: (1) verifying that their consumers who are also on SSI/SSDI have nine (9) months of continuous employment, and (2) obtaining reimbursement from the Social Security Administration for successfully rehabilitated SSI/SSDI clients for case services expenditures.

General Services, Department of Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) IA: Provides mediation services to DOR consumers/applicants who have requested a fair hearing and/or requested to participate in mediation. The OAH mediators assist the DOR and the consumer/applicant in exploring options for mutual resolution of a dispute in a timely, non-confrontational manner. Through mediation, individuals can better understand the application of Department regulations and policies, and staff can better understand an individual’s needs.

General Services, Department of Office of Risk and Insurance Management IA: Provides management of the DOR Business Enterprise Program (BEP) Statewide insurance program funded from food service vending machine locations.

General Services, Office of Administrative Hearings IA: Provides administration of hearings for the BEP vendor appeals.

State Controller’s Office IA: Expedites services to process claim schedules containing vendor invoices for services/goods provided to DOR staff and consumers. Timely payment is required for continuance of services and to comply with the Prompt Payment Act.

State Independent Living Council (SILC) IA: Funds the operations of the SILC and provides SILC funds for various subgrants and contracts necessary to carry out certain objectives of the State Plan for Independent Living. All funds are for programs for people with disabilities. Source of funds are from Title VII B, Rehabilitation Act and are renewed annually.

State Personnel Board (SPB) IA: The DOR provides training on Introduction to Fair Employment and Housing Act and the ADA, Practical Solutions to Reasonable Accommodation, and Writing an Effective Duty Statement.

State Personnel Board IA: The SPB’s Selection System provides online computer access for the purpose of conducting departmental civil service examinations, as well as processing and maintaining civil service eligible lists and certification lists.

This screen was last updated on Aug 16 2012 5:00PM by sacakidderd

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has developed strategic plans, policies, and procedures that are designed to facilitate the transition of students who are receiving Special Education or Section 504 (of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973) services from an educational agency to the provision of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services provided by the DOR.

Commensurate with the requirements of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) and the Rehabilitation Act, the DOR has collaborated with the California Department of Education (CDE) through an IA specifically to address consultation and technical assistance, transition planning, roles and responsibilities, and outreach for secondary students with disabilities. This IA provides for the following:

1. Consultation and Technical Assistance

The DOR participates in a group comprised of representatives from multiple agencies and stakeholders, who have a shared responsibility and interest in serving transition age youth. The Statewide initiative entitled Communities of Practice (CoP) was created and supported by the National Association of Special Education Administrators. The program is developing links to shared work websites nationally and sponsors State level conferences sharing best practices for youth with disabilities. The leadership team for this project includes management from the following State departments: the DOR, CDE, California Department of Social Services, California Department of Developmental Services, California Employment Development Department, along with the California State Independent Living Council.

The DOR has identified State and District level specialists responsible for developing and monitoring transition programs, grants, and initiatives as well as developing and providing training opportunities. State and local staff from each agency work together to plan and implement evaluation activities, including individual accountability measures for shared student-consumers. These activities address interagency effectiveness, longitudinal outcomes, cooperative research and pilot projects and other joint efforts to document and improve the effectiveness of transition services. In some instances, the DOR Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors provide a general consultative role for students receiving free and appropriate public education who are not DOR consumers.

In addition, the DOR has developed a resource manual that facilitates the development of local Memorandums of Understanding (MOU) with evaluation tools to gauge the success of interagency collaboration with education agencies at the local level.

2. Transition Planning

Transition Planning by the DOR and Local Educational Agencies (LEA) that facilitate Individual Education Plans (IEP):

The LEA and the DOR use a collaborative team process to develop the transition services section of the IEP and Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) for the transitioning student. This process includes the involvement of the student-consumer, his/her family, and representatives of education, the DOR, and other service providers, as appropriate. This process assists in the coordination of goals, objectives, services and timeframes.

The transition services section of the IEP and IPE include the provision to share documents that provide current information for the planning and decision-making process for each agency, provided appropriate signature authorizations have been given for the release of information. Both the IEP and IPE include, if appropriate, a statement of interagency responsibilities detailing how such services shall be provided.

The DOR has established transition programs called Transition Partnership Programs (TPP), designed to build partnerships between LEAs and the DOR for the purposes of successfully transitioning student-consumers into meaningful employment and/or secondary education. These programs have been developed with consumer and family member participation, and closely adhere to the values of comprehensive service linkages, career development, placement in a competitive integrated environment, and reasonable accommodations. These programs serve over 20,000 consumers annually.

3. Roles and Responsibilities

The IA identifies the local school district as the lead agency responsible for providing transition services by qualified personnel to students with disabilities to the point of exit from school. The DOR is designated as the lead agency responsible for providing services by qualified personnel after the point of exit to those students meeting eligibility and Order of Selection (OOS) requirements for VR services.

The DOR and CDE have specific responsibilities as delineated by the agencies’ applicable rules and regulations. These responsibilities include the provision of services as delineated, and required by the individual’s individualized plan with each respective agency. In the development of these plans, both agencies staff will ensure that duplication of services, which may occur in those instances where responsibilities overlap, does not occur. In those cases, the primary responsibility for those services would rest with the most appropriate agency, as determined by the student’s present status and when an agency is legally obligated and funded to provide that service.

For students served by Special Education programs, the LEA has additional, specific responsibilities prescribed by the IDEA. Under the IDEA, the LEA is required to provide services the student with a disability requires to benefit from a free and appropriate public education, including transition services beginning no later than age 16. The DOR has responsibility for determining eligibility for VR services that are needed to prepare for or obtain employment. The DOR is responsible for providing and paying for the transition services agreed upon in the IPE for the period that the individual is participating in the VR program as reflected in the individual’s IPE.

If the student-consumer’s assessed needs require the use of assistive technology (AT) in order to provide a free and appropriate public education, such equipment must be provided by the LEA for use by the student as indicated in his/her IEP or Section 504 plan, but remains the property of the State. Similarly, if the AT is needed to prepare the student for the world of work, then its need must be related to the employment outcome for the transitioning student, provided in accordance with the IPE, and provided by the DOR. Equipment purchased by the DOR will remain the property of the DOR until the student’s case is successfully closed, at which time the property is given to the student.

The LEA and DOR may develop a MOU that includes procedures for invoicing and reimbursement of services provided or paid for by each respective agency that is determined to be the responsibility of the other.

4. Outreach

The DOR implements several methods and procedures for enhancing outreach to and identification of students with disabilities in need of transition services, including those students with disabilities who qualify for assistance under Section 504.

Outreach at the State Level

The IA between the DOR and CDE identifies outreach and referral procedures. Outreach procedures include students with disabilities served through an IEP, but also those who qualify for assistance under Section 504.

The DOR and CDE have posted the IA on each respective Department’s website. The DOR has distributed the IA to interested partner agencies and all DOR field staff in tandem with a comprehensive questions and answers memorandum, addressing joint responsibilities in providing vocational services to transition age youth with disabilities, as well as the coordinated planning process necessary to facilitate the intermediate vocational objectives and long-term rehabilitation goals for the DOR student-consumers as they leave school.

In an effort to support the provisions of the IA, the DOR has established a collaborative partner Advisory Committee comprised of representatives from State and local partner agencies, including the CDE, LEAs, mental health agencies, and community organizations. This Advisory Committee assists the DOR in the development of policies and procedures that promote the movement of the DOR student-consumers from secondary school to post-secondary school vocational and training activities. This Advisory Committee has developed a LISTSERV, an automatic mailing list server, to their unique constituencies that allow the DOR to communicate the availability of the DOR programs and services. Members of the advisory groups present the availability and benefits of the DOR services to students with disabilities and advocacy groups such as the Developmental Disability Council, County Mental Health Directors, and Special Education Council on the availability and benefits of the DOR services to students with disabilities.

Outreach at the Local Level

The DOR collaborates with the LEAs to provide assistance and support identifying students with disabilities that may require the DOR assistance. The DOR provides local presentations to parent/teacher/student association meetings on eligibility and program services. The DOR provides VR informational literature, DVDs, and other materials regarding potential services to the LEAs and families. The DOR assigns liaison Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to many secondary schools to provide a single point of contact for Special Education departments.

The DOR serves on local Workforce Investment Act youth boards to coordinate youth services and outreach strategies with Workforce Investment Act partner agencies and the LEAs. The DOR maintains an active presence in the community with contacts through religious and civic organizations and non-profit organizations that serve and represent students with disabilities. This includes parent resource centers, Independent Living Centers, Regional Centers, and organizations that serve youth that are visually impaired or deaf or hard of hearing.

The DOR conducts various local activities such as disability awareness community job fairs and workshops where youth with disabilities may be seeking employment support.

Policy and Procedures

To the extent possible, interested and eligible students should become DOR consumers before they leave high school. For students between the ages of 14 and 16, the primary role of VR will be to provide general coordination with the LEAs regarding information and outreach activities about VR services for use in transition planning. Appropriate service coordination activities include resource information about VR, presentations, consultation and technical assistance, and handouts.

Code of Federal Regulations, Title 34 [34CFR361.22(a)(2)] requires that students with disabilities who are eligible for VR services have properly signed IPEs in place prior to the students’ exit from school. The DOR’s plans, policies, and regulations clearly articulate this provision and the Federal requirement that all individuals be served according to the designated agency’s OOS for services. The DOR has undertaken efforts to ensure that VR transition services are provided according to State and Federal requirements. Numerous directives and questions and answers documents have been distributed to the DOR District Administrators clarifying transition issues. Most of the DOR State VR regulations have been reviewed and adapted as necessary to ensure that the regulations apply to youth and adults without regard to age. Supported employment memorandums have been sent to the LEAs and DOR staff to clarify supported employment services for youth.

In an effort to develop the IPE for all consumers, including eligible students with disabilities, in an expedited time frame, State regulations require an IPE to be developed within 90 days of date of eligibility for an individual who has been determined eligible to receive services from the DOR and is in a priority category being served under the OOS.

To promote and facilitate coordination from the State level to the local level, the DOR and CDE identify local level administrators from their respective agencies. Each local administrator, or designee, is responsible for the coordination of transition-related activities both within his or her own agency and with other agencies. This will serve a variety of purposes, including but not limited to, the following: coordination of resource information, outreach, program information dissemination, research and evaluation, including student follow-up studies, serve secondary students with disabilities for the provision of transition services.

The DOR and CDE recommend and encourage the development of local MOUs, or IAs, developed at the local level to facilitate and coordinate transition services for secondary students with disabilities. State technical assistance is provided to form such agreements. To improve the coordination of transition services between education and VR at the local level, the DOR District Administrators and their staff develop MOUs, cooperative programs, and other collaborative relationships that address outreach and referral of students to the DOR. Recognizing that each of the DOR districts, county Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPAs), and the LEAs may have unique operational and staffing characteristics, local agencies work together to develop policies and procedures to ensure that there will not be a gap in the referral process for students who may need the DOR services.

The DOR District Administrators and local education administrators identify procedures for student referrals to the DOR which address the following:

• Secondary students receiving Special Education services in State special schools, county offices of education, and school districts; • Secondary students with disabilities who are not receiving Special Education services (e.g., students served under Section 504); • Secondary students with disabilities enrolled in court or community schools; • Secondary students receiving Special Education services that are enrolled in certified, nonpublic schools; • Secondary students served under a third party agreement (e.g., Transition Partnership Program, WorkAbility II); • Student referral form; • Procedures for the release of student information, and designate the specific individual(s) including position, school/district, address, and telephone number who will be responsible to respond to requests for student information from the DOR; • Operational procedures to manage student referrals under OOS; and • Guidelines related to written consent.

Programs and Initiatives (Local Level Staff and Coordination Activities)

Qualified Personnel Responsible for Transition Services - The DOR and CDE establish and maintain standards which are consistent with State-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or other comparable requirements that apply to the area in which such personnel are providing Special Education or related services in educational agencies and in which such personnel are providing the DOR VR services. In keeping with the goal of collaboration to support transitioning students, both the DOR and CDE will promote the inclusion of cross-disciplinary training through both Special Education and VR pre-service programs.

To the extent possible, the Rehabilitation Act calls for the provision of training to staff of other agencies as to the availability and benefits of, and eligibility standards for, VR services, in order to enhance the opportunity of individuals receiving the transition services to obtain VR services.

The DOR has provided training to SELPA Administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the VR system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities. The CDE has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by the LEAs and DOR staff.

The DOR has established a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for the local DOR and LEA staff. Expert consultants in their respective fields provide training modules on such topics as:

• Service Provision and Planning for Transition Age Youth with Mental Illness and with Autism Spectrum Disorder; • Benefits Planning and Management; • Employment Preparation, Job Development, and Placement; • System/Program Assessment, Planning, and Development; and • Business Marketing, Microenterprise, and Strategic Planning

The DOR has provided training to SELPA administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the VR system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities, including outreach activities. The CDE has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by the LEAs and DOR staff.

Procedures for Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities that Need Transition Services who are not in Special Education

Under the Rehabilitation Act, transition services are provided to eligible students with disabilities whether or not they are receiving Special Education services. This includes secondary students who have a disability who receive services and/or accommodations as required by Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. This population also includes transitioning secondary students with disabilities enrolled in public programs for general education, alternative education, and adult education. These students with disabilities are not receiving Special Education services and, therefore, do not have an IEP. General education instructors, Special Education instructors, school nurses, the LEA administrators, and One-Stop Programs serving youth with disabilities refer students to the DOR. Additionally, the DOR works with county foster care programs, adjudicated youth programs, and county mental health agencies to identify at-risk students who may not be identified by Special Education.

The DOR counselor will process referrals of students served under Section 504 and other students with disabilities in the same manner as those made for students served by Special Education.

This screen was last updated on Aug 17 2012 10:02AM by sacakidderd

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has procedures for establishing written service agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP)s, including private non-profit and for-profit vocational rehabilitation (VR) service providers. These procedures emphasize the role of the DOR in identifying needs for specific VR services responsive to the needs of persons with significant disabilities in their areas. The procedures also emphasize the role of DOR and CRP staff in monitoring the agreements, and identifying usage and effectiveness of services provided.

The DOR has a variety of fiscal reimbursement methods with non-profit VR service providers. These include contracts, fee-for-service, and rates set per regulation. For-profit providers may provide services on a fee-for-service basis. Non-financial agreements with CRPs may occur through Memorandums of Understanding.

The DOR conducts annual trainings and workshops with contract service providers, the main purpose of which is to solidify and improve collaborative relationships for the enhancement of service delivery for persons with disabilities. The major areas of discussion in the workshops include the following:

• Methods to improve the partnership through open communication; • Strategies to formalize regularly scheduled meetings; • Ways of improving the partners’ collaborative vocational activities; • The DOR’s contract process; and • Strategies to improve service provider program outcomes.

Contracts, and fee-for-service agreements with CRPs are developed for the delivery of assessment, training, employment, and specialized support services. All new providers of service for DOR consumers must go through a certification and approval process. The DOR reviews and certifies the qualification of vendors providing services to their consumers in order to assure the quality of these services, as well as the safety of consumers. All VR service providers are required to maintain their Community Resources Development certification, according to the DOR Guidelines for Certification and Vendorization. CRPs providing work-related programs are required to be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).

This screen was last updated on Aug 17 2012 10:03AM by sacakidderd

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) identifies and makes arrangements with stakeholders to provide SE and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. For individuals with intellectual disabilities, pursuant to the Lanterman Act, California collaborates with the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), Regional Centers (RC) and Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) to provide SE services. For individuals with other disabling conditions, the DOR collaborates with local county mental health agencies, CRPs, and other partner agencies to provide for SE services. In accordance with 34 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 361.46 (b)(3), an Individualized Plan for Employment for consumers with an employment outcome including SE services must identify or describe a source of extended services.

A primary source of extended services for the DOR’s consumers with intellectual disabilities is the Work Services Program (WSP). Pursuant to the Lanterman Act, California provides a variety of services to persons with intellectual disabilities through the DDS’ RCs located throughout the State. Administration of the WSP was transferred from the DOR to the DDS effective July 1, 2004. The WSP provides extended services to DOR consumers with intellectual disabilities who achieve SE outcomes through the DOR’s vocational rehabilitation (VR) program and who are eligible for WSP services. The specifics of this collaboration are detailed in California Welfare and Institutions Code Section 4850 et. seq. The WSP also provides placement and job coaching services to RC consumers who are placed on the waiting list when they apply to the DOR for VR services under the Order of Selection.

The DOR refers to any source of extended services other than WSP as Non-Habilitation. These sources vary depending on the individual’s eligibility for other programs or availability of other resources. Extended services for individuals with mental illness may be provided by county mental health agencies, which may allocate Medi-Cal, Mental Health Services Act, or Short-Doyle funds as determined by each county. Social Security Administration Work Incentives, such as Impairment Related Work Expense or an approved Plan for Achieving Self Support, may be used. SE services provided under Veteran’s Health Administration Compensated Work Therapy Program may be used for extended services. Natural supports or private resources may also be used.

This screen was last updated on Aug 17 2012 10:03AM by sacakidderd

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), as the designated State agency, maintains a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) designed to ensure there is an adequate supply of qualified, prepared, and trained rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the successful delivery of services to Californians with disabilities including those identified as unserved and underserved populations.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Modernization (VR Mod)- VR Mod is a major departmental project that is integral to the DOR’s effort in its CSPD and includes the recent replacement of the Field Computing System with a new Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment (AWARE) and design and implementation of a new Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) model. The AWARE system provides staff with better tools for case documentation, service authorization, and communication with consumers while the VRSD model is designed to increase efficiencies and quality of services for consumers.

Progress on the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) Substantive progress continues on the implementation of an updated VRSD program. Implementation of the new model began July 2011 and is being rolled out in three phases:

Phase I - Preparation and team training (July 2011 -September 2011) Phase II - Pilot the new model (October 2011 - March 2012) Phase III - Statewide implementation (January 2013 - March 2014)

Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery Pilot The pilot consists of sixteen (16) teams Statewide and the following members:

Rehabilitation Supervisor (RS)- The RS supervises a unit of staff to deliver VR services to consumers and ensures compliance and consistency with Federal and State laws, regulations, and policies.

Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor-Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (SVRC, QRP)- The SVRC, QRP facilitates the effective delivery of services to consumers in a VRSD team and provides VR counseling including the five (5) non-delegable functions.

Service Coordinator (SC)- The SC provides, arranges, coordinates, and monitors VR service activities, researches information to facilitate assessments for eligibility, Individualized Plan for Employment, and case closure by the SVRC, QRP.

Employment Coordinator (EC)- The EC provides employment preparation, job development and placement and builds relationships with businesses.

Office Technician - General (OT(G))- The OT(G) provides clerical support to team members.

Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery Pilot Training In August and September 2011, team members learned about their new roles and responsibilities, new VR business processes, and strategies for team effectiveness during Pilot Team Formation training. The combination of ECs and Community Rehabilitation Programs ensures that DOR consumers receive the necessary services in a timely manner.

VRSD Steering Committee- The VRSD Steering Committee is comprised of DOR executive, administrative, and District management as well as subject matter experts (SME) to successfully design and implement the new service delivery model.

State Rehabilitation Council (SRC)- The SRC continues to be an integral partner in the Statewide implementation and evaluation of the VR Mod and is provided opportunities to review and comment on the development of plans, policies, and procedures necessary to meet CSPD requirements.

DATA SYSTEM ON PERSONNEL AND PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT

Data on Qualified Personnel Needs

Until the VRSD model is implemented Statewide, the DOR currently tracks the following CSPD classifications: • SVRC, QRP* • SVRC • Teacher (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind)* • Dental Consultant (DC)* • Medical Consultant (MC)* • District Administrator (DA) • Employment Coordinator (EC) • Rehabilitation Supervisor (RS) • Rehabilitation Specialist

Employees in the above classifications with an asterisk are required to submit documentation of their education and certification. All employees required to meet an education or certification standard as a condition of employment are tracked in a database and validated with the appropriate programs.

Current Status of CSPD Personnel and Caseload Projections

As of February 29, 2012, the DOR has:

• 735 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) SVRC, QRP and SVRC positions serving 70,047 applicants and eligible individuals with disabilities, for a ratio of counselor to applicant and eligible individuals of 1:95. • 6 FTE Teacher (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind) positions serving 21 eligible individuals with visual impairments at the California Orientation Center for the Blind, for a ratio of instructors to eligible individuals of 1:3.5. • 8 FTE MC positions serving 70,047 applicants and eligible individuals with disabilities, for a ratio of MC positions to applicants and eligible individuals of 1:8,648. DOR’s one (1) DC is an intermittent employee who provides consultation, as necessary, for all DOR consumers and is not calculated as a FTE.

For State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2012-13, DOR will have a budgeted total of 1,731 permanent positions which includes all the FTEs listed above plus 18 Rehabilitation Specialists, 130 RSs, 14 DAs, and 15 ECs. The remaining 805 positions are comprised of leadership, administrative, program, and support staff located in DOR’s field and central offices.

As of February 29, 2012, DOR’s current vacancies are:

44: SVRC, QRP 0: SVRC 1: District Administrator 0: Employment Coordinator 1: Medical Consultant 0: Dental Consultant 4: Rehabilitation Specialist 6: Rehabilitation Supervisor 0: Teachers (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind) 56: Total

Expected Status of CSPD Personnel and Caseload Projections

The DOR annually serves 115,000 individuals with disabilities and expects the following:

• DOR estimates there will be approximately 40,000 new applications for services, as noted in Attachment 4.11(b). • DOR will continue to operate under Order of Selection, as noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(3). • DOR counselors will maintain an average of 103 cases, for each of the next five (5) years. • CSPD staff age fifty (50) and above will be eligible for retirement within the next five (5) years. Between March 1, 2011 and February 29, 2012, the average age of retirement of CSPD classified staff is 63 years old. • Projects the percentage of CSPD staff that may retire within the next five (5) years to be:

100%: Dental Consultant 70%: District Administrators 57%: SVRCs 56%: Employment Coordinators 56%: Teachers (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind) 41%: Medical Consultants 25%: Rehabilitation Supervisors 13%: SVRC, QRPs 10%: Rehabilitation Specialists

• Projects the FTEs required within five (5) years to maintain existing allocations to be:

78: SVRC, QRP 0: SVRC** 8: District Administrator 9: Employment Coordinator 3: Medical Consultant 1: Dental Consultant 2: Rehabilitation Specialist 28: Rehabilitation Supervisor 3: Teachers (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind) 132: Total

** The DOR will not use the SVRC classification to perform the five (5) non-delegable functions after Statewide implementation of the new VRSD.

• Projects up to an additional 30 SVRC, QRPs (2 Rehabilitation Specialists + 28 RSs) that may be needed to fill promotion-related vacancies within the next five (5) years, since Rehabilitation Specialists and RSs are typically promoted from the SVRC, QRP classification.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Counselor (SVRC-QRP/SVRCs) 735 44 78
2 Teacher (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind) 6 0 3
3 Dental Consultant 1 0 1
4 Medical Consultant 8 1 3
5 District Administrators 14 1 8
6 Employment Coordinator 15 0 9
7 Rehabilitation Supervisor 130 6 28
8 Rehabilitation Specialist 18 4 2
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

The development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing data on an annual basis on personnel development is coordinated between the CORE accredited programs and the DOR.

To ensure effective coordination, the DOR:

• Coordinates academic activities for existing staff; • Coordinates Federally funded academic and training activities; • Collaborates with the CORE accredited programs to maximize applications for Federal grant funding; • Collaborates with the CORE accredited programs to disseminate application information and vacancy notifications; and • Collaborates with the CORE accredited programs to maximize application for, and utilization of, all available Federal, CSPD, and Long-Term Training Grant funding.

Status of Current Enrollment at the California State Universities (CSU) for Academic Year 2011-12

The following six (6) California State Universities support CORE accredited programs leading to a Masters Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling:

CSU Fresno (CSUF) 93: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants) 0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 2: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 34: Graduates from the previous year

CSU Los Angeles (CSULA) (CSULA is the only CORE University with both a Masters and Bachelor’s Degree program)

Masters Degree 36: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants) 0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 30: Graduates from the previous year

Bachelors Degree 121: Students enrolled 0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 44: Graduates from the previous year

CSU Sacramento (CSUS) 39: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants) 1: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 4: Graduates from the previous year

CSU San Bernardino (CSUSB) 52: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants) 0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 20: Graduates from the previous year

San Diego State University (SDSU) (SDSU has both an On-Campus and Distance Learning Program) 119: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants) 21: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 25: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 63: Graduates from the previous year

San Francisco State University (SFSU) 45: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants) 0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 11: Graduates from the previous year

Total (Enrollment in Academic Year 2011-12)

Masters Degree 384: Students enrolled 22: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 27: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 162: Graduates from the previous year

Bachelors Degree 121: Students enrolled 0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA 0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA 44: Graduates from the previous year

Of the number of graduates during this CSPD reporting period, two (2) were RSs and the remaining were SVRCs.

Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind - Graduates and Ongoing Students

The following are graduates and enrolled students within the two (2) CSU Orientation and Mobility teacher-training programs:

CSULA: Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 11: Confirmed graduates 2010-11 12: Enrolled students 2011-12 12: Expected graduates 2011-12 12: Expected continuing students in Academic Year 2012-13

SFSU: Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 10: Confirmed graduates 2010-11 23: Enrolled students 2011-12 8: Expected graduates 2011-12 21: Expected continuing students in Academic Year 2012-13

Total (Enrollment in Academic Year 2011-12) 19: Confirmed graduates 2010-11 27: Enrolled students 2011-12 23: Expected graduates 2011-12 16: Expected continuing Students in Academic Year 2012-13

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 California State Universities (6) 384 22 27 162
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

The DOR has a recruitment and retention plan that addresses the current and projected needs to recruit and retain high-quality talent. This includes the collaboration with institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare, and retain a diverse workforce (including minorities and individuals with disabilities). The annual implementation of this plan will ensure there is an adequate supply of qualified rehabilitation personnel (including professionals and paraprofessionals) available to the DOR.

The DOR analyzes the current workforce demographics and trends as reported in the CSPD to identify classifications that are at risk for high turnover and develops strategies to retain staff. One of those strategies includes collaborating with California’s six (6) CORE accredited programs to recruit students enrolled in the Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Programs.

The DOR’s current efforts for recruitment and retention include a new marketing brochure for the CORE accredited programs, recruitment of consumers who identify VR counseling as an employment goal, and the analysis of surveys like the Employee Exit Questionnaire to address staff retention. The DOR’s expected efforts include educating the community regarding the opportunities at the DOR through a collaborative effort with internal stakeholders to strengthen relationships with schools, colleges, and universities. After system updates, students in the Masters Rehabilitation Counseling programs nationwide and Statewide will be notified quarterly of exam notices for the SVRC, QRP classification. The Department will target and retain a diverse and knowledgeable workforce by expanding traditional work schedule options and allow retiring personnel to train new hires.

The DOR’s Staff Development Section (SDS) leads the Department in preparing qualified personnel in training DOR staff to provide services to consumers.

 

To ensure designated State unit professionals and paraprofessionals are adequately trained and prepared, the DOR establishes and maintains the following personnel standards:

Personnel Standard for the SVRC, QRP

Standard - The DOR utilizes the national standard for certification of counselors (SVRC, QRP), rather than the standard established by the State of California in 2009 (Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Act, Chapter 619, Statutes 2009), which licenses and regulates professional clinical counselors through the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. The DOR will hire only individuals that meet the personnel standard for QRP counselors to perform the five non-delegable functions.

Personnel Standard for the Teacher (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind), Medical Consultant, and Dental Consultant

Standard - There are currently State approved certification, licensing, or registration requirements for the Teacher (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind), MC, and DC. Candidates applying for the Teacher (Orientation and Mobility for the Blind), MC, and DC must meet California’s personnel standard prior to appointment. Proof of Possession of Degree - Proof of possession of degree and/or licensure or certification must be provided before an applicant can be considered eligible for employment. DOR follows State standards and is currently in compliance with 34 CFR 361.18(c)(1)(i).

Personnel Standard for the Employment Coordinator

Standard - There are neither Federal nor State approved certification standards for the EC. Therefore, DOR will be using an existing State civil service classification, the California Employment Development Department’s (EDD) Employment Program Representative (EPR) civil service classification. Candidates applying for the EC must meet California’s personnel standard prior to appointment.

Current Efforts

Rehabilitation Supervisor Job Specifications - Proposed updates to add the Masters Degree requirement in the minimum qualifications have been delayed until Statewide VRSD implementation.

Tuition Support - During FFY 2012, forty (40) DOR employees participated in the Masters Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling program and are expected to complete their Masters program in the next four (4) years. Of these employees, thirty-three (33) received tuition support through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) and seven (7) were supported through the RSA In-Service Training (IST) Grant. Between March 1, 2011 and February 29, 2012, DOR utilized $122,400 in ARRA funds and $25,890 in Quality IST Grant funds to support the DOR employees pursing Masters Degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling.

Collaboration with the Six (6) CORE Accredited University Programs - DOR will continue to encourage student participation in the SVRC, QRP exam by notifying the CORE accredited university programs of the on-line exam; expand access to provide IST Grant funding (based on availability) to all DOR staff (including SVRCs) to obtain QRP status at CORE accredited Distance Leaning and on-campus Rehabilitation Counseling Masters Degree programs; and collaborate with university partners to develop and implement additional outreach strategies for existing SVRCs.

Expected Efforts

VRSD Model - The VRSD 15-month Pilot is currently in Phase II, which is scheduled to end in December 2012.

Procedure for the Evaluation of Personnel Retraining Progress

On September 2, 2011, the RSA approved DOR’s request to amend its Quality IST Grant to fund Master in Rehabilitation Counseling degrees for DOR employees in any classification. To ensure there is an adequate number of QRPs, the DOR utilized IST Grant dollars to fund tuition for seven (7) qualified DOR employees (in good standing) in the CORE accredited Master Degree programs. The DOR has identified the optimal number of staff needed to provide VR services to consumers under the new VRSD Model. The DOR monitors and collaborates with internal partners to develop strategies to ensure the DOR meets the FFY 2018 CSPD personnel standards.

 

Current Efforts

The DOR is committed to maintaining a training system that ensures all personnel receive the development and education necessary for success. DOR’s SDS provides IST to staff and collaborates with partners on annual Statewide Training Needs Assessments that identifies, updates, and develops a curriculum to meet those needs. The SDS provides logistic support for DOR staff pursuing both IST and Out-Service Training (OST) and:

• Ensures Department professionals and paraprofessionals are properly trained to provide VR services to consumers. IST class curriculum is provided to new SVRC, QRPs within nine (9) months of appointment and to long-term staff members that will enhance their knowledge of: o Case Assessment and Documentation o Diversity o Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling o Job Placement o Medical Aspects o Plan Development o Plan for Achieving Self Support / Health Benefits 101 o Rehabilitation Process o Rehabilitation Technology o Social Security Work Incentives • Collaborates with Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Region IX to develop, disseminate, then analyze a Statewide Training Needs Assessment to identify the training needs and ensure the Department’s paraprofessional staff have the knowledge, skills, and abilities to provide services to consumers. • Ensures appropriate research (e.g., Institute on Rehabilitation Issues publications, SMEs, TACE centers, academic institutions) is posted on the Department’s Intranet site and/or incorporated into their training curriculum; • Delivers or facilitates IST via classroom instruction and virtual learning; • Facilitates OST to offer growth opportunities for personal development and advancement; • Leverages Department and IST Grant funding to support training and development. For FFY 2012, DOR was awarded a Basic IST Grant in the amount of $280,873 in Federal funds with the State providing a match of $31,205, where it funded curriculum development and 15 classes on subjects ranging from Medical Aspects (Traumatic Brain Injury) to Health and Benefits Training on Work and Disability. For FFY 2012, DOR was awarded a Quality IST Grant in the amount of $85,000 in Federal funds with the State providing a match of $9,444, where it funded DOR employees pursuing a Master Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling; three (3) Diversity training classes; and training to utilize videoconferencing and computer-based training technologies; • Collaborates with Department SMEs to update course curriculum to reflect the needs identified in the Statewide Training Needs Assessment; changes in statutes, regulation, policy, research; and best practices. All courses meet the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor continuing education requirements; • Collaborates with internal partners to provide mandated Senate Bill 105 (Chapter 1102, Statutes 2002) training for staff who provide VR services to its deaf and hard of hearing as well as blind and visually impaired consumers. In January 2012, DOR provided District-wide training focused on the services of, and effective collaboration with, the Department’s Business Enterprises Program and Orientation Center for the Blind; • Coordinates virtual learning through Quarterly Knowledge Based Training, which are broadcast via videoconferencing and research related webinars; • Collaborates with multiple partners to ensure the following leadership development programs are available to their employees: o Expanded academic and certification opportunities through TACE Region IX and educational institutions throughout the nation; o Rehabilitation Supervisor Academy, where the objective is increased knowledge and skills in supervision, management, and leadership. During this CSPD reporting period, ten (10) RSs participated in this Academy; o National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute (NRLI) Executive Leadership Seminar, where thirty-five (35) DOR staff have attended, since June 2004 and three (3) will graduate in June 2012. o California Health and Human Services Agency leadership programs that include: • Supervisor Training, where sixty-one (61) DOR staff have participated in eighty (80) hours of mandatory supervision training, since June 2004. During FFY 2012, twenty (20) DOR supervisors completed this training; • Leadership Development Academy, where nine (9) DOR staff have participated, since June 2004. During FFY 2012, three (3) managers graduated from and three (3) managers are currently enrolled in the academy. o Post Employment Training-Rehabilitation Administration (PET-RA), where DOR currently has four (4) RSs participating and where the program prepares rehabilitation professionals to understand how entities engage in collaborative partnerships to improve and expand services to people with disabilities. • Provides training support to their Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Blind Field Services Sections; and • Collaborates with State and national partners to develop and disseminate webinars to provide continual learning opportunities.

Expected Efforts

During FFY 2013, DOR will:

• Work closely with the field to provide VR Mod training; • Provide Knowledge Based Training to all staff; • Provide training support to their Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Blind Field Services Sections; • Work closely with internal and external partners to train staff on the newly implemented AWARE system; • Provide training utilizing videoconferencing and webinar technology; • Develop paraprofessional staff training; • Develop and pilot a New Counselor Academy; • Develop and pilot soft skills training; and • Provide training support to all VRSD Pilot team members.

 

To communicate in the native language or in appropriate modes of communication of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability, the DOR:

• Provides effective communication to persons who are monolingual, non-English speaking, or have limited English proficiency through bilingual and multilingual staff, or leveraging one of its 20 American Sign Language contracts to help DOR staff communicate with deaf and hard of hearing consumers. DOR initiated a telephonic interpretation contract as an additional resource which provides services, at a minimum, for the following languages: Armenian, Cantonese, Mandarin, Cambodian, Farsi, Hindi, Punjabi, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. Forms and documents are translated into Armenian, Cambodian, Chinese, Hindi, Korean, Punjabi, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese, as mandated by the 2010 Statewide Biennial Language Survey; and • Utilizes Video phones and Mobile Counselor equipment, and a microphone system that integrates with the Department’s existing Deaf-related Assistive Listening Devices to ensure the inclusion of colleagues and consumers using the Deaf-related Assistive Listening Devices in meetings and trainings.

 

The California Department of Education (CDE) has sponsored a series of community trainings on the Individuals with Disability Education Act (IDEA) reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by Local Education Agencies (LEA) and DOR staff. DOR and the CDE have the responsibility for providing LEAs and DOR staff with leadership, monitoring, and training; providing training to Special Education Local Planning Area Administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the VR system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities; and establishing a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for LEAs and DOR staff. Expert consultants in their respective fields provide training modules on subjects ranging from Autism Spectrum Disorder to Employment Preparation, Job Development and Placement.

The DOR:

• Provides cross-training to LEAs utilizing multiple strategies; • Designates SVRC liaisons to school districts to inform and support educators on DOR services and application processes; and • Participates in regional trainings, annual kick-off meetings and/or teacher in-service trainings with school districts.

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Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), jointly with the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), is conducting a Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) annually over a three year period during Federal Fiscal Years (FFY) 2012-14 (from October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2014) in accordance with Federal requirements and Section 101 (a)(15)(i) of the Rehabilitation Act. The DOR will complete the triennial assessment by the end of FFY 2014 and will report the complete CSNA findings in the 2015 State Plan.

This attachment includes

Part 1: Plan for Each Year of the Triennial CSNA (FFYs 2012-14)

Part 2: Summary of Progress in Year 1 (FFY 2012)

Part 3: Public Comment at Statewide Public Meetings (FFY 2012)

Part 4: Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS)

PART 1: Plan for Each Year of the Triennial CSNA (FFYs 2012-14)

To allow for trend analysis, the DOR and SRC jointly agreed to continue using a model with strategies similar to those used during the last triennial CSNA (FFY 2009-2011). The strategies include:

Year 1 (FFY 2012) • Demographic Analysis • Statewide Public Meetings • Consumer Satisfaction Survey

Year 2 (FFY 2013) • Demographic Analysis • Statewide Public Meetings • Consumer Satisfaction Survey

Year 3 (FFY 2014) • External Stakeholder Survey • Statewide Public Meetings • Consumer Satisfaction Survey The following is a brief description of each CSNA strategy:

1. Demographic Analysis – Review and compare population data, including disability statistics and other demographic data from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), DOR Database, U.S. Census, Department of Finance (DOF), Department of Social Services (DSS), and the American Community Survey (ACS) to identify populations potentially unserved and underserved by the DOR. Year 1 of this analysis will focus on identifying individuals with the most significant disabilities, individuals who are minorities, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the DOR. In Year 2, the DOR will compare demographic trends from the previous year and capture needs as identified in the demographic data. In Year 3, the DOR will continue to compare demographic trends from the previous two years.

2. Statewide Public Meetings – Annually gather and analyze qualitative (anecdotal) information from external stakeholders to assist in identifying the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities, individuals with disabilities who are minorities, individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved, and individuals with disabilities served through other components of the Statewide workforce investment system, as well as the need to establish, develop, or improve Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs).

3. Consumer Satisfaction Survey – Annually administer to identify how the DOR can better serve individuals with disabilities. The intent of the CSS is to maintain compliance with the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998, Title 1, Part A, Section 105 (c)(4).

4. External Stakeholder Survey – During Year 3, distribute and analyze online surveys to stakeholders such as CRPs, Disability Program Navigators, employers and/or specific community-based organizations representing individuals with the most significant disabilities, individuals with disabilities who are minorities, individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) programs, and individuals with disabilities served through other components of the Statewide workforce investment system. The stakeholder surveys will be used to gather quantitative data to identify programmatic needs to better serve individuals with disabilities, to the extent resources permit.

PART 2: Summary of Progress in Year 1 (FFY 2012)

Demographic Analysis Consistent with the prior CSNA, the DOR analyzed data on Social Security beneficiaries, race/ethnicity, population by county, and types of disabilities (major impairments).

Methodology

The DOR researched and analyzed data from the following sources to determine to what extent the VR service needs are of those individuals who have the most significant disabilities, individuals with disabilities who are minorities, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program:

1. Disability population statistics (FFY 2010-11); 2. Statistics from other Federal programs (FFY 2010-11); 3. State and local data and reports (FFY 2010-11); and 4. U.S. Census (2010).

Findings The following findings emerged after the DOR caseload data were compared: 1. Social Security beneficiaries who apply for DOR services are presumed eligible. As such, the DOR caseload data of consumers receiving Social Security benefits was compared to the number of individuals receiving Social Security benefits in the 54 counties within California. The counties with a higher number Social Security recipients but a lower number of DOR consumers indicates a potential for being unserved or underserved in the following six (6) counties: Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Fresno, Santa Clara, Kern, and San Joaquin.

2. Asian Americans were identified as a proportionally unserved and underserved race/ethnicity in the DOR’s caseload, in comparison to their racial/ethnic population in California. The Asian American population represents 4.24% of the DOR’s caseload, compared to 12.85% of California’s population. 3. Hispanics/Latinos were identified as a proportionally unserved and underserved race/ethnicity in the DOR’s caseload, in comparison to their racial/ethnic population in California. The Hispanics/Latinos represents 28.90% of DOR’s caseload, compared to 37.70% of California’s population.

4. The counties with lower percentages of DOR consumers in all five major impairment groups (visual, physical, communicative, cognitive, and psychological) were identified as: Alameda, El Dorado, Kern, Merced, Placer, Sacramento, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Tehama, Tulare, and Yolo. Consumers in these counties may be potentially unserved or underserved populations.

5. Students with autism who were served under an Individual Education Plan have seen an average growth rate of 18% Statewide. DOR’s caseload is at 2% and may indicate a potentially underserved population for students with autism.

6. Consumers with Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) represent 1.5% of DOR’s caseload. Given the most recent statistic from a publication by the California Department of Mental Health (DMH), “Advancing California’s Traumatic Brain Injury Service System,” DOR’s caseload represents 0.46% of those individuals with TBI in California, identifying a potential unserved and underserved population.

Trend Analysis

1. Year 1 of CSNA 2009-2011, reflected the counties with a higher number of Social Security recipients compared to DOR’s caseload as the following six (6) counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, Fresno, Stanislaus, Kern, and San Joaquin showing a potential unserved and underserved population.

2. Year 1 of CSNA 2009-2011 reflected that Asian Americans represented 4.3 % of DOR’s caseload and 11.8% of the California population, which maintains Asian Americans as a proportionally unserved and underserved population.

3. Year 1 of CSNA 2009-2011 reflected that Hispanic/Latinos represented 25.1% of DOR’s caseload and 36.7% of the California population, which maintains Hispanic/Latinos as a proportionally unserved and underserved population.

4. Year 1 of CSNA 2009-2011 stated that based on type of disability data the DOR consumers with Visual, Physical, Communicative, Cognitive and Psychological impairments may be potentially underserved within seven (7) counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, and Solano.

5. Year 1 of the CSNA 2009-2011 potentially indicated an unserved and underserved population for students with autism as DOR’s caseload was at 0.54%.

6. Year 1 of the CSNA 2009-2011 reported that based on information from the DMH individuals with TBI are proportionally unserved or underserved by existing VR services.

PART 3: Public Comment at the Statewide Public Meetings

The public meetings proved valuable to the DOR in identifying areas where it can improve or enhance services to those individuals who have the most significant disabilities, individuals with disabilities who are minorities, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program. The public meetings also identified the needs of individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system, and the need to establish, develop, or improve CRPs.

The DOR, jointly with the SRC, conducted two (2) Statewide public meetings in April of 2012 to obtain stakeholder input on the proposed 2013 State Plan and the Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization (VR Mod) Project. The meetings were held in Sacramento, Fresno, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, and San Diego and were connected through video and teleconferencing attracting 101 attendees, with 33 individuals presenting and/or submitting comments.

The following comments emerged from the meetings:

• Accommodations/Assistive Technology: Increase the knowledge of assistive technologies and other accommodations for DOR staff to better serve consumers. Improve DOR’s website to be more user friendly for those that use American Sign Language by having more video-based information. • Acquired or Traumatic Brain Injuries: Provide (1) assistance to establish routines and follow through; (2) flexibility, including options for self-employment due to the need to self-pace; (3) behavioral, medical, or speech therapy; and (4) need assessments to help establish functional abilities that may bridge communication barriers. • Aging Population: Review the age range of employable people and provide services to the aging population, to determine if they are unserved and/or underserved, since people are living longer. • Benefits Planning: Provide additional training and workshops to DOR staff on benefits planning for the consumer. • Disability Groups: Enhance vocational services for consumers, specifically transitioning high school students, who are deaf or hard of hearing, have traumatic brain injury, or have autism. Not all DOR staff have experience working with specialty groups especially individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing and consumers with mental health disabilities. • Employers: Continue to educate employers on DOR services including reasonable accommodation; continue presenting the Windmills curriculum to employers; encourage DOR Employment Coordinators to reach out to the one-stop centers and local employers. • Fee Structure: Examine the fee structure for employment services. CRPs need a rate fee that meets the needs of the most severely disabled (not all services provided fit into a specific service category). • Outreach: Increase outreach to the one-stop centers, employers, and CRPs. • Partnerships: Build relationships with the local workforce investment boards and the California Workforce Investment Board (CWIB); increase communication between agencies to assist consumers with disabilities; work collaboratively with businesses that work with the CWIB; develop cross training to strengthen professional development; and increase the knowledge base of staff to better serve Californians with disabilities. • Service Delivery Administration: Streamline the authorization process. Authorizations that take longer affect the consumer’s ability to receive services. • Sharing Data with Stakeholders: Share information such as CSNA data with stakeholders and CRPs. Expand electronic systems and data reporting functions in order to have data on common customers and consumers. • Soft Skills: Provide consumers with soft skills training, including, but not limited to, communication, interviewing, teamwork, attitude, networking, problem solving, and critical thinking. • Staff Training: Provide additional training to DOR staff and CRPs on diversity and working with underserved populations. Take steps to hire staff at DOR and CRPs who are trained in working with mental health consumers. Provide continuing education for DOR counselors on the assessment process for consumers wanting to drive. Educate the CRPs on the DOR’s goals as a VR program. • Transition Age Youth: Develop educational pieces about the DOR for individuals that are going to be served by DOR programs, particularly as they approach graduation and transition to an Individualized Plan for Employment. • Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD): Educate the community on the VRSD, team roles, and how teams will work in tandem with community partners and CRP’s; functions for the new VRSD should be consistent and communicated to the CRPs. CRPs should increase job development services and vendors in order to increase the positive outcomes.

PART 4: Consumer Satisfaction Survey

The DOR annually administers a CSS, developed jointly by the DOR and SRC, which asks consumers to appraise the quality and effectiveness of the services they receive. Ten thousand (10,000) consumers received an electronic survey while 800 consumers received their surveys by surface mail. The survey response rate was 19.8%. Response rates for the Pre-Plan, In-Plan, Closure Employed and Closure Not Employed groups were 18.3%, 22.6%, 18.9%, and 12.9%, respectively.

From consumer responses, 70.9% were generally satisfied with DOR services, with strongly agree at 38.0%, and agree at 32.9%. Respondents in the Closure Employed category reported higher satisfaction levels across a number of questionnaire statements as compared to respondents in the Closure Not Employed category.

Consumers who were not employed had the following comments about why they were not able to achieve a successful employment outcome: their need to develop soft skills and self-esteem, their decision to return to school, they moved out-of-state, they had felonies, they had health complications, they had cognitive difficulties, counselor turnover, poor communication, and the perception that DOR counselors did not understand their vocational goal.

A number of consumers commented they would like to have more job leads, and receive greater assistance with job search and job placement. The results suggest that increasing the communication and time spent between counselors and consumers would likely contribute to an increase in consumer satisfaction.

This screen was last updated on Aug 20 2012 7:45PM by sacakidderd

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) currently operates under an Order of Selection (OOS), as noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(3) and has developed the following estimates for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2013:

• DOR annually provides a range of services to over 115,000 individuals with disabilities and will receive approximately 40,000 new applications for services. Of that number, approximately 25,400 new consumers will receive plan services under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and approximately 2,600 will receive plan services under a combination of Part B of Title I of the Act and Part B of Title VI of the Act. • Of the 28,000 new consumers, DOR estimates approximately 19,600 will be consumers with the most significant disabilities in Category 1 and approximately 8,400 will be consumers with significant disabilities in Category 2. • The projected average cost per plan (for the life of each plan) is $4,600 under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and $6,800 under Part B of Title VI of the Act.

Below are the estimated number of consumers to be served and related cost of services for FFY 2013.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Consumers with the Most Significant Disabilities Title I $123,856,000 80,197 $1,544
Consumers with the Most Significant Disabilities Title VI $2,960,000 538 $5,501
Consumers with Significant Disabilities Title I $54,350,000 34564 $1,572
Consumers with Disabilities Title I $236,000 150 $1,573
Totals   $181,402,000 115,449 $1,571

This screen was last updated on Aug 16 2012 5:23PM by sacakidderd

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Comments from the State Plan public meetings, CSNA findings, State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), and California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) staff were integrated to develop the 2013 State Plan objectives and strategies. The SRC developed and presented their recommendations on the 2013 State Plan to the DOR Director in February 2012 and approved the continued use of the following six (6) goals: Goal 1: VR and SE consumers will achieve quality employment outcomes through DOR services, as measured by wages, employer-provided benefits, and consumer satisfaction. Goal 2: The DOR will increase the quantity of VR and SE employment outcomes. Goal 3: The DOR will advance equality, accessibility, and independence for persons with disabilities, including unserved and underserved populations. Goal 4: The DOR will actively engage employers to achieve quality employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. Goal 5: The DOR will continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations to better serve consumers. Goal 6: As a model employer, the DOR will attract, develop and retain a diverse and highly skilled workforce.

(See Attachment 4.11(d), State Strategies, for the objectives and strategies to achieve these goals.) Two (2) statewide public meetings were held in April 2012 for public comment on the DOR goals, objectives, and strategies as well as the VR Mod. Stakeholders represented community organizations, public agencies, employers, and consumers.

(See Attachment 4.11(a), Statewide Assessment for Public Comment at the Statewide Public meetings.)

Priorities During FFY 2013, the DOR will continue to implement significant system changes, including the VRSD Project and the implementation and enhancement of AWARE, which are linked to Goal 5 (continuous improvement) and Goal 6 (meeting workforce needs) which, in turn, positively impact the quality and quantity of employment outcomes (Goals 1 and 2).

RSA Standards and Indicators Goals 1 and 2 (quality and quantity of employment outcomes) directly relate to performance Indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5. Goal 5 (continuous improvement) is expected to result in improved performance on the Standards and Indicators and Goal 3 (advancing equality) will examine RSA performance Indicator 2.1 on Minority Background Service Rate.

The DOR has successfully passed the RSA Standards and Indicators for FFYs 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2011. In FFY 2010, the DOR did not pass, primarily as a result of California’s economic crisis.

The 2013 State Plan goals and priorities were developed with serious consideration of passing the RSA Standards and Indicators. The DOR will continue to focus on specific targets identified in the State Strategies to meet these Standards and Indicators for FFY 2013.

This screen was last updated on Aug 16 2012 5:27PM by sacakidderd

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Since 1995, the California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has operated its VR services program under an Order of Selection (OOS). The OOS is utilized to ensure that individuals who are the most significantly disabled have priority for services and was last changed in the 2003 State Plan to significantly streamline and shorten the time required to assess priority status of individual consumers.

The DOR is operating under its OOS process based on a State Fiscal Year (SFY) cycle (July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012) to be consistent with the Governor’s State budget. If DOR cannot serve all individuals who are eligible, it will place them on a Statewide waiting list. The waiting list is reviewed annually to assure that services are being provided on a Statewide basis and that the determination of priority category does not bar or discriminate against any eligible individual based on the factors specified in California Code of Regulations (CCR) §7050(b). DOR ensures that those eligible individuals who do not meet the OOS criteria will have access to services provided through information and referral pursuant to CCR §7037.

 

Description of Priority categories

Once the consumer is determined to be eligible for services based on the requirements specified in CCR §7062, the level of significance of disability (LSOD) is determined. LSOD categories include: Most Significantly Disabled, Significantly Disabled, and Disabled. The CCRs referenced below are specific to the OOS.

"Most Significantly Disabled" is defined by CCR §7051(a)(5)(C) as an eligible individual who has a serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in at least four (4) functional capacity areas; whose VR can be expected to require multiple services and an extended period of time; and who has one (1) or more physical or mental disabilities or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility.

"Significantly Disabled" is defined by CCR 7051(a)(5)(B) as an individual who has a serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in at least one (1) functional capacity area; whose VR can be expected to require multiple services and an extended period of time; and who has one (1) or more physical or mental disabilities or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility.

"Disabled" as defined by CCR §7051(a)(5)(A) is not consistent with Federal requirements. The DOR has initiated work to revise this CCR section to align it with Federal laws and regulations.

On August 10, 2012, DOR provided guidance to staff that to complete the Priority for Services Determination, an eligible individual must have a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits one or more functional capacities in terms of an employment outcome. Upon promulgation of the revised regulations, DOR will provide additional guidance and training to staff.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Under its OOS process, the DOR will provide services in the following order:

Priority Category 1: Individuals with the most significant disabilities Priority Category 2: Individuals with significant disabilities Priority Category 3: Individuals with disabilities

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

The DOR will provide the full range of services to those individuals with the most significant disabilities regardless of application date and to those with significant disabilities who apply for services on or before June 30, 2012. The following reflects DOR estimates for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2013:

This is the current year ORDER OF SELECTION policy, operational from July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013.

DECLARATION OF ORDER OF SELECTION FOR VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES

Whereas, on August 18, 1995, the Department of Rehabilitation (Department) first declared that the Department was under Order of Selection for Vocational Rehabilitation Services and determined that no priority categories could then be served, and,

Whereas, on June 21, 2011, effective July 6, 2011, the Department’s Director declared that projected resources were not adequate to serve all consumers within all categories and that resources were adequate to serve those priority categories that include those individuals with the most significant disabilities, also known as Category One, regardless of the date of application, those individuals with significant disabilities, also known as Category Two, who applied on or before June 30, 2012, and those individuals with disabilities, also known as Category Three, who applied on or before March 30, 2011, and,

Whereas, the Department has reviewed projected resources and projected costs for state fiscal year 2012-13, which starts July 1, 2012 and ends June 30, 2013, as provided by California Code of Regulations, title 9, section 7052(a) and determined that projected resources continue to be inadequate to meet all the projected costs for the remainder of the fiscal year; and that projected resources remain sufficient only to continue to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities, who apply on or before June 30, 2013, individuals with significant disabilities, who apply on or before June 30, 2013, and, all other eligible individuals with disabilities who previously applied on or before March 30, 2011.

Now, therefore, I, Anthony “Tony” P. Sauer, Director of the Department of Rehabilitation, declare that effective July 2, 2012, priority categories that include individuals with the most significant disabilities, also known as Category One, who apply on or before June 30, 2013, and individuals with significant disabilities, also known as Category Two, who apply on or before June 30, 2013, and other eligible individuals, known as Category Three, who applied on or before March 30, 2011, shall be served.

Dated: June 15, 2012

Original Signed by the Director _________________________ ANTHONY “TONY” P. SAUER DIRECTOR

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 80,735 8,140 8,192 FFY 2013 $126,816,000
2 34,564 3,488 3,511 FFY 2013 $54,350,000
3 150 15 15 FFY 2013 $236,000

This screen was last updated on Aug 16 2012 5:30PM by sacakidderd

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) utilizes all funding provided under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of Supported Employment (SE) services for eligible individuals. DOR’s goals with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 are to provide SE services to a wide variety of individuals with disabilities, including but not limited to persons with traumatic brain injury/acquired brain injury, mental health disability, autism spectrum disorders, and intellectual disabilities. The priorities are to identify funding sources for extended services; advocate for evidence-based practices, where appropriate; and work collaboratively with extended service providers and sources of extended services, including natural supports.

Individuals provided with SE services:

• Are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, • Are determined to be individuals with the most significant disabilities, and • Have selected SE as the appropriate employment outcome, following a comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation career and job needs.

SE services include situational assessment, job placement, and job coaching. For the 2013 State Plan, it is expected that DOR will expend all funds made available under Section 622. It should be noted, that Title VI, Part B Funds make up 9.6% in FFY 2012 and 9.6% in FFY 2013 of the DOR’s annual commitment of resources for SE programs that serve the most significantly disabled consumers. In addition to the funds available under Section 622, DOR utilizes Title I funds as necessary to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities who are determined, based on the above criteria, to be eligible for SE services. The DOR goals and priorities for the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for Supported Employment are also noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and further described in Attachment 4.11(d) under Goal 1, Goal 2, and objectives and strategies for the SE program.

This screen was last updated on Aug 17 2012 10:09AM by sacakidderd

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) established the following Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) program goals, measureable objectives, and strategies for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2013.

Section 1: Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment Program Goals, Objectives, and Strategies

Goal 1: VR and SE consumers will achieve quality employment outcomes through DOR services, as measured by wages, employer-provided benefits, and consumer satisfaction.

Objective 1.1:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of consumers earning at or above federal minimum wage from FFY 2012 as measured by earnings data at case closure. The projected number for FFY 2013 is 9,700 consumers.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Orient the DOR counselors to emerging labor market trends and 21stCentury job seeking strategies including the use of social media and strategies for the electronic job application process. 2. Promote public employment initiatives at all levels of government, including Schedule A and the Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP).

Objective 1.2:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of consumers at successful closure with health insurance available through the employer, at the same level as FFY 2012, as measured by whether or not health insurance is provided via employment at case closure.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Outreach to employers who offer employer-sponsored health benefits. 2. Assist consumers receiving public and Veterans benefits in accessing and navigating the www.disabilitybenefits101.org website to address concerns regarding the impact of employment on their benefits. The DOR will offer consumer workshops on Work Incentives in local field offices and through partnerships with Independent Living Centers and Work Incentives Planning Assistance programs. 3. Evaluate the feasibility of developing establishment projects with the Independent Living Centers and community-based organizations to develop fee-for-service benefits planning. 4. Provide training and technical assistance to DOR staff, community partners, stakeholders, and consumers related to Social Security Administration (SSA) work incentives including Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) plans, on-line benefits planning tools and benefits calculators.

Objective 1.3:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the percentage of Consumer Satisfaction Survey respondents who cumulatively respond they either strongly agree or agree with the statement, “I am satisfied with services from DOR,” at the same level as FFY 2012, or 74.8%.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Provide DOR counselors with training opportunities on assessment and current career counseling trends and practices to enhance their ability to support consumer informed choice in the selection of Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) goals and services leading to successful employment. 2. Prioritize case reviews for quality assurance using the most current monitoring and tracking tools available. 3. Implement the new Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) model designed to increase the quality of services and improve the frequency of contact with consumers.

Objective 1.4:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of individuals receiving SE services who attend post-secondary training by 18 individuals, from FFY 2012. The projected target for FFY 2013 is 25 individuals. Strategies: The DOR will: 1. Enhance collaboration with local and Statewide SE partners and stakeholders, including institutions of higher education, to identify patterns and trends for the purpose of supporting the “Employment First” initiative. 2. Research and evaluate innovative programs and practices to identify the most effective academic, vocational, and social interventions for persons with intellectual disabilities in a post-secondary setting.

Goal 2: The DOR will increase the quantity of VR and SE employment outcomes.

Objective 2.1:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of successfully rehabilitated consumer case closures compared to FFY 2012 as measured by RSA performance Indicator 1.1. The projected target for FFY 2013 is 11,604 case closures.

Strategies: The DOR will: 1. Provide technical assistance for Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) with vocational services to consumers with Acquired Brain Injuries (ABI) and Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI). 2. Develop a Community Partner Relations training curriculum and delivery timeline for DOR counselors and CRPs. 3. Reinforce tools for developing On-the-Job Training (OJT) agreements. 4. Provide enhanced support for consumers in the job search process. 5. Explore and identify ways to improve consistency and effectiveness of soft skills services and training provided to consumers. 6. Develop and pilot a soft skills training curriculum for consumers including areas such as the development of self-esteem, self-advocacy, appropriate work attitudes, and ethics. 7. Partner with the Office of Federal Contract Compliance (OFCC) programs to provide consultation and technical support. 8. Present Windmills training to Federal Contractors and other employers throughout the State to address misconceptions about employees with disabilities and to reduce barriers to employment resulting from these misconceptions.

Objective 2.2:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of successfully rehabilitated consumer case closures compared to FFY 2012 for those who at application for VR services were 24 years of age or younger, regardless of the date of application. The projected target for FFY 2013 is 3,200 case closures.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Address outreach strategies, establish resources, service coordination, vocational preparation and support for Transitional Age Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). 2. Sponsor the California Youth Leadership Forum for youth that demonstrate leadership potential to make a successful transition from school to work. 3. Support and develop programs with local and state education agencies that meet the unique needs of transition age youth including foster care youth with disabilities, youth who are deaf or hard of hearing, and youth who are blind or visually impaired.

Objective 2.3:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of successfully rehabilitated SE consumer case closures compared to FFY 2012. The projected target for FFY 2013 is 1,500 case closures.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Support pilot projects with community colleges to provide academic support, increase access to financial aid grants, and employment services to persons with intellectual disabilities. 2. Provide short-term, community-based training to community partners, businesses, and DOR staff to increase awareness and enhance the provision of VR services and placement strategies for persons with ASD. 3. Explore and disseminate information to DOR staff and CRPs on job retention strategies including work incentives and the availability of extended services for various disability groups such as veterans with TBI and individuals with mental health disabilities. 4. Encourage SE consumers to become more aware of their natural supports, such as personal associations and relationships they have within their community.

Goal 3: The DOR will advance equality, accessibility and independence for persons with disabilities, including unserved and underserved populations.

Objective 3.1:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the percentage of Asian Americans and Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities who apply for services as measured in relation to all applicants by 10% over FFY 2012. [Target = % of FFY 2012 applicants x 1.10 (10%)]

Objective 3.2:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the percentage of Asian American and Hispanic/Latino consumers who have an IPE as measured in relation to all implemented IPEs by 7% over FFY 2012. [Target = % of FFY 2012 consumers whose IPEs are implemented x 1.07 (7%)]

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Prioritize the development of Cooperative programs targeting schools that have unserved or underserved groups. 2. Recruit bilingual and culturally competent staff to fill Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (SVRC, QRP) positions. 3. Develop and provide diversity training to staff. 4. Work with community leaders to identify potential unserved or underserved populations, such as rural and urban communities, Social Security recipients, disability groups, and ethnic groups.

Goal 4: The DOR will actively engage employers to achieve quality employment outcomes for persons with disabilities.

Objective 4.1:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will create at least twenty (20) new employer accounts in each of the fourteen (14) DOR Districts.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Partner with One Stop Centers, United States Business Leadership Network, and other entities to develop employer accounts. and increase outcomes for the DOR consumers. 2. Outreach and network with businesses in the community to include promoting and marketing the benefits of employing DOR consumers (i.e., tax incentives, OJT). 3. Obtain employer input by partnering with existing statutory and community-based boards and councils (e.g., California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, Workforce Investment Boards, Business Leadership Network and Mayor’s Committees). 4. Provide Windmills training to local employers to increase disability etiquette awareness and increase networking and employment outcomes for DOR consumers. 5. Develop partnerships through the Council for State Administrators for Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and the National Employment Team (NET).

Objective 4.2:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of total successful Federal government employment outcomes over the FFY 2012 level, as measured by how many successful job placements are with the Federal government.

Strategies: The DOR will: 1. Facilitate training of DOR staff and community partners to fulfill the Federal mandate by placing people with disabilities in Federal government Schedule A positions. 2. Outreach to each regional OFCC office to increase employment outcomes of people with disabilities and those with ethnic and cultural differences, especially Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, and African Americans.

Objective 4.3:- During FFY 2013, the DOR will increase the number of successful State government employment outcomes over the FFY 2012 level, as measured by how many successful job placements are with the State government.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Provide DOR staff information on California’s “State as a Model Employer” initiative to increase employment in State government using the LEAP and other hiring initiatives. 2. Support and guide consumers through the LEAP process.

Goal 5: The DOR will continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations to better serve consumers.

Objective 5.1:- By September 30, 2013, one hundred percent (100%) of DOR Districts will utilize the AWARE system’s referral module to track and monitor individuals with disabilities who request LEAP or Schedule A Certificates, request referral to a One-Stop or other agency, or express an interest in VR services.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Reinforce existing policy for referral sources and outcomes including referrals of individuals made through the One-Stop service delivery systems established under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998. 2. Revise the Rehabilitation Administrative Manual (RAM) 30 - Record of Services.

Objective 5.2:- By September 30, 2013, the DOR will implement three new releases of AWARE and initiate enhancements to fully integrate the existing financial systems into AWARE.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Work with appropriate program and administration staff to review, test, and implement new versions of AWARE bringing DOR in line with the AWARE release schedule. 2. Assist appropriate program staff to develop training for new releases. 3. Work with the appropriate program staff to monitor, assess, and develop enhancements for financial and case service interfaces in order to plan for full decommissioning of the Field Computer System (FCS).

Objective 5.3:- By December 31, 2012, the DOR will develop and communicate internally and externally the plans for Statewide implementation and roll-out of the new VRSD Model.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Work with the VR Modernization (VR Mod) Steering Committee, State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), Pilot Team participants, and VR Mod Project Management Team to refine the new VRSD Model. 2. Conduct State Plan/Strategic Plan listening sessions to obtain external input on the VRSD Model Pilot outcomes and on the DOR’s future plans for Statewide implementation. 3. Work with the VR Mod Steering Committee and the appropriate internal/external stakeholders to develop a Statewide transition implementation plan for roll-out of the new VRSD Model beginning in 2013. 4. Work with the VR Mod Steering Committee, SRC, VR Mod Evaluation and Assessment Team, and other stakeholders to develop a plan to periodically evaluate Statewide implementation outcomes.

Goal 6: As a model employer, the DOR will attract, develop, and retain a diverse and highly skilled workforce.

Objective 6.1:- By September 30, 2013, the DOR will achieve a 65%, or higher, response rate on the Employee Exit Questionnaire. In February 2012, the response rate was 41%.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Increase awareness and educate employees on the questionnaire through the DOR’s Intranet website and training using video conferencing. 2. Design and implement a marketing campaign that emphasizes the importance of the questionnaire and encourages an employee’s timely response. 3. Evaluate the questionnaire to provide the Department with valuable information needed to effectively collect data to increase the response rate.

Objective 6.2:- By September 30, 2013, the DOR will reduce the number of SVRC, QRP resignations, other than those leaving due to retirement, by 30%.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Analyze data from the Employee Exit Questionnaire to identify the reasons for separation. 2. Work toward compensation for VR staff that is competitive in the labor market and commensurate with industry standards. 3. Promote the benefits of Individual Development Plans to establish an employee’s personal plan for career development growth, upward mobility, and cross-training opportunities.

Objective 6.3:- By September 30, 2013, 20% of newly hired SVRC, QRPs will be culturally competent, as measured by the increase of applications, developed IPEs, and successful employment outcomes of the unserved and underserved populations.

Strategies: The DOR will:

1. Identify methods to increase diversity to meet the hiring needs for a culturally competent staff. 2. Develop and implement an innovative outreach and marketing campaign to recruit highly skilled, bilingual, culturally competent qualified rehabilitation professionals to consider a career with the DOR and serve the unserved or underserved populations. 3. Outreach to CORE Accredited VR programs to increase a diverse group of students.

Section 2: Additional Required Strategies

1. Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities. The DOR will:

a. Provide Statewide leadership on methods to conduct local outreach to transition age youth and their parents regarding DOR services, including those with ABI, TBI, Asperger’s, and ASD. b. Provide training opportunities to DOR staff using Windmills and other methodologies to ensure customer service competencies for assisting people with disabilities are attained. c. Provide training opportunities to DOR staff on Social Security work incentives, including PASS Plans. d. Continue use of videophone equipment for counselors serving deaf and hard of hearing consumers to enable direct (visual) telephonic communication with deaf and hard of hearing consumers. e. Develop an orientation video in American Sign Language (ASL) to better educate deaf and hard of hearing persons and consumers who rely on ASL as their primary mode of communication on DOR services.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

The DOR has emphasized that providing AT services and devices is an important goal for each consumer at every stage of the rehabilitation process. The DOR’s State regulations and policies support the availability of AT services and devices at all stages of the rehabilitation process from initial interview through case closure, including training on the use of AT devices.

a. California Code of Regulations (CCR) Sections 7029.1, 7051, 7062 and 7131 clearly indicate AT services and devices should be considered at each stage of the rehabilitation process for all applicants and consumers. b. The California Welfare and Institutions Code, Section 19096(d)(6), provides for technical assistance to the DOR in the area of AT needs for individuals who are blind, visually impaired, deaf and hard of hearing. c. Pursuant to Senate Bill 105, the DOR provides annual in-service training to the Rehabilitation Counselors for the Blind (RCBs) and Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf (RCDs) to enhance their professional competencies, including in the area of AT.

The DOR provides access to technical assistance and a wide range of trainings in the area of AT.

a. The DOR employs a Statewide AT Services Coordinator to assist the DOR staff with technical assistance and guidance. b. The DOR offers Mapping Rehabilitation Technology, Rehabilitation Technology and an overview of AT services and devices during Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling training. c. Additional no-cost training was made available to DOR staff through the AT Network beginning in 2012.

The DOR also provides consumers with their rights and remedies for all decisions made during the life of their case, including decisions made for AT services and devices.

3. Describe how AT services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a Statewide basis.

The DOR provides Statewide leadership in the area of AT services and devices. The DOR houses the California Assistive Technology Systems (CATS), a Statewide program federally funded through the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as amended in 2004. Through a Statewide contract, CATS provides a variety of AT services including:

a. Device Loan Program: Short-term loans (up to one month and can be renewed). b. Device Reutilization Program: a web-based program for individuals and organizations to list devices for sale. c. AT and Transportation Loan Guarantee Program: an individual with a disability, family member or legal guardian of a child with a disability and an employer (only for the AT Loan Program) can apply for a loan to purchase a vehicle, modifications for a vehicle, AT services and AT devices. The DOR guarantees all approved loans.

In addition, the Statewide contractor provides public education, outreach, technical assistance, coordination and collaboration, and information and referral services throughout the State as required under the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as amended in 2004, as well as through Social Security Reimbursement funds (AB 204) as specified in the California Welfare and Institutions Code 19800-19806.

In order to provide Statewide information and referral services, known as the AT Network, the contractor has an 800 number (800-390-2699) as well as a website, www.atnet.org. This website offers an AT services directory to find AT service providers and AT devices as well as links to find service providers for the AT Device Loan Program and a searchable database for the AT Reutilization Program.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

The DOR’s outreach strategies are identified in Section 1, Goal 3, of this attachment.

The DOR’s Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) FFY 2009-2011 identified Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations as underserved on a Statewide basis. The DOR will identify population demographics for the State and the DOR district catchment areas, including information on ethnicity. This, combined with caseload information, will further determine geographical areas in which outreach efforts are successful and are warranted. Outreach strategies include counselors having access to mobile technologies.

The DOR hired a Diversity Officer in October 2011 who will collaborate with each District to develop and implement focused recruitment and outreach efforts. The DOR will develop multi-cultural and multi-lingual outreach materials to assist the DOR staff in outreach efforts to Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations locally. The DOR staff will work in remote underserved locations to provide outreach and improve access to services for Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations. The DOR will develop collaborative working relationships with community based agencies that serve Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations and develop these agencies as referral sources. The DOR will also identify community based organizations that have an expertise providing VR services to Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations to improve outreach and increase VR services and outcomes.

As part of the DOR’s ongoing broad based outreach effort to hire staff, to meet the linguistic and cultural needs of identified unserved and underserved populations, this, in part, will be accomplished through collaboration with the six (6) CORE accredited university programs to maximize the number of students participating in internships at the DOR.

The DOR will monitor its caseload as it relates to ethnicity, particularly for Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations to measure, evaluate, and assess the result of outreach efforts.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The DOR works with CRPs to ensure services provided by community partners address the needs of DOR consumers and will:

a. Work with CRPs to establish performance measurements. b. Work with CRPs to enhance and expand employment services when appropriate and fiscally feasible. c. Work with CRPs to develop and establish new or enhanced services where appropriate and fiscally feasible. d. Explore and implement the most effective model of delivering services provided by CRPs and Individual Service Providers (ISPs) in rural and remote areas. e. Partner with CRPs in building collaborative relationships with employers and businesses. f. Use CSNA findings to determine the scope of the next establishment project cycle to address the unmet needs of individuals with disabilities.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

The DOR developed a Program Improvement Plan (PIP) pursuant to 34 CFR 361.89 (a) during FFY 2011. The PIP included goals, performance targets and a significant number of strategies to meet performance indicators 1.1, 1.2, and 1.5 for FFY 2011 and 2012. The PIP goals, performance targets, and strategies were developed in conjunction with the SRC through a fully vetted process for the 2012 State Plan Attachment 4.11 (d), State Strategies. Strategies over and above those outlined in the 2012 State Plan include:

• Verification of consumer employment outcomes through system access to California Employment Development Department wage and hour data; • VR Mod project pilot with a team service delivery model which began October 2011 in every District; • VR Mod Employment Coordinator position will provide employment preparation, job development and placement, Job Clubs, and Placement Circle programs to consumers; and disability etiquette training and promote tax incentives to employers; • Training DOR staff to assist in fulfilling the Presidential Executive Order Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities; • Developing and fostering partnerships with the business community in order to increase meaningful employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities; • Developing partnerships through the CSAVR and NET; and • Developing relationships with several staffing agencies such as Adecco, Manpower and Ramstad.

The DOR expects to utilize the identified strategies beyond completion of the PIP to continue improvement with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

The DOR will be actively involved in the new California Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities (California Committee). The California Committee consults with and advises the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the California Health and Human Services Agency on all issues related to full inclusion in the workforce of persons with disabilities. The California Committee provides a forum through which State departments, boards, councils, local service providers, business leaders, and the disability community collaborate to develop a comprehensive strategy. Achievement of the goals and actions identified in the comprehensive strategy is expected to result in an increased rate of employment for people with disabilities.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

a. Achieve the goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1)

The strategies indentified in Section 1 of this Attachment are directly tied to and in support of the goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1).

b. Support innovation and expansion activities

For FFY 2013, the DOR has set aside a portion of funds allotted under Section 110 of the Act to make the following enhancements to the AWARE electronic case management system;

• Expansion of the financial system, including upgrades to the invoicing process; • Improvement of the IPE documentation process to be more user-friendly; • Development of a module for the Business Enterprises Program, a mandated program under the Randolph-Sheppard Act; • Social Security tracking and reimbursement; • Improvements to Sensitive Case architecture; • Multiple Primary Contract fund source improvements; and • Maintenance and Transportation variable cost functionality improvements.

c. Overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State VR Services Program and the State SE Services Program.

The DOR identified individual and system barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities from comments at the State Plan Public Meetings held in 2012, responses to the CSNA surveys administered in FFY 2012, and feedback from focused meetings with the DOR staff in developing the 2013 State Plan (see Attachment 4.11(a), Statewide Assessment, for more details). Identified barriers include, but are not limited to:

1) Service Awareness • In some instances, populations are unaware of the breadth of the DOR services and eligibility requirements; and • Potential employers and referral sources, including medical rehabilitation service providers, are unaware of the breadth of the DOR services and eligibility requirements.

2) Communication and Linguistic • Non-English speaking consumers experience barriers when CRP staff do not have sufficient language competence; and • Deaf and Hard of Hearing consumers experience barriers when CRP staff do not have sufficient language competence.

3) Cultural • Cultural beliefs about disability contribute to under-representation of some ethnicities in the DOR caseload; • Cultural beliefs about seeking services from public agencies contribute to under-representation of some ethnicities in the DOR’ caseload; and • Cultural differences between provider CRP staff and consumers and lack of CRP staff cultural competence presents barriers to receiving services.

4) Geographic Access • Applicants and consumers experience barriers due to location of the DOR facilities; and • Applicants and consumers experience barriers due to public transportation gaps.

5) Employer • Applicants and consumers experience barriers to successful employment outcomes due to employer perceptions related to recruitment, development, and retention of employees with disabilities.

Many of the strategies identified in this Attachment aim to address the barriers identified above. These strategies will assist in overcoming the barriers by:

1) Enhancing the skills of the DOR counselors and providers to improve services to consumers; 2) Providing applicants and consumers with improved information with which to make informed choices; 3) Recruiting staff and working with community partners, 4) Outreaching to unserved and underserved populations and their families; and 5) Actively engaging employers in the hiring and employment process.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 17 2012 11:57AM by sacakidderd

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The California Department of Rehabilitation’s (DOR) progress toward achieving the performance measures established for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2011 (October 1, 2010-September 30, 2011) reflect the following:

Part 1 – This section identifies all Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program goals consistent with the goals described in the FFY 2011 Attachment 4.11(c)(1), including an evaluation of the extent to which the VR program goals were achieved.

Program Goal 1.1: The DOR will maintain the quality and quantity of employment outcomes.

Objective 1.1.1: The DOR will maintain the number of employment outcomes and the earnings ratios during FFY 2011.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

1.1.1.1. During FFY 2011, the DOR will maintain the number of successful employment outcomes at the same level as FFY 2010.

FFY 2011 target: 10,719 outcomes FFY 2011 achieved: 11,602 outcomes

The DOR met this target by developing relationships with employers; providing technical assistance and training to DOR field staff and the business community on employment-related issues including disability awareness, and hiring incentives, such as tax credits and on-the-job trainings, and utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) dollars to increase the utilization of on-the-job training, and self-employment. 1.1.1.2. During FFY 2011, the DOR will maintain the number of consumers who identify employment as their primary source of income at successful closure in competitive employment at the same level as FFY 2010.

FFY 2011 target: 7,788 consumers FFY 2011 achieved: 7,193 consumers

The DOR did not meet this target. From October 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011, 7,193 out of 9,706 (or 74%) consumers identify employment as their primary source of support at closure. The DOR believes that coding discrepancies in the data converted from the Field Computer System (FCS) to the new Electronic Records System, AWARE, resulted in an lower than expected number of consumers who identified employment as the primary source of support.

1.1.1.3. During FFY 2011, the DOR will maintain the earnings ratio of all individuals in competitive employment at the same level as FFY 2010.

FFY 2011 target: 49.2% FFY 2011 achieved: 48.4%

The DOR did not meet this target due to the very high average hourly wage within the State (the Department of Labor’s preliminary 2011 California wage is $25.23). The earnings for both DOR consumers and all employed Californians increased in FFY 2011, however the gap between them did not decrease.

Program Goal 1.2: The DOR will improve the effectiveness and efficiency of vocational rehabilitation services delivery.

Objective 1.2.1: The DOR will increase efficiencies in Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) development, effectively measure consumer satisfaction and continue plans to improve the DOR service delivery system.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

1.2.1.1 During FFY 2011, 80% of eligible individuals able to be served by the DOR will have their IPE developed within 90 days of date of eligibility determination or removal from the waiting list.

FFY 2011 target: 80% FFY 2011 achieved: 81%

The DOR met this target. Districts utilized case process reports to ensure that IPEs were developed within 90 days of eligibility determination or removal from the waiting list.

1.2.1.2 During FFY 2011, 70% of respondents to the Consumer Satisfaction Survey will cumulatively respond that they either strongly agree or agree with the statement, "I am satisfied with the services from the Department of Rehabilitation."

FFY 2011 target: 70% FFY 2011 achieved: 70.9%

The DOR met this target. The Consumer Satisfaction Survey collected data from four (4) groups, based upon the status of a consumer: 1) Closure Employed, 2) In Plan, 3) Pre Plan, and 4) Closure Not Employed. There was one question in all surveys that represented a broad measure of satisfaction, “I am satisfied with services from the Department of Rehabilitation.” For this item, the Closure Employed group had the highest level of agreement with 77.7%, followed by the In-Plan group with 76.5%, the Closure Not Employed group with 56.8%, and the Pre-Plan group with 55.8%. Cumulatively, the respondents indicated either they strongly agreed or agreed with this statement 70.9% of the time.

1.2.1.3 During FFY 2011, the DOR will continue to develop transition and implementation plans for VR Modernization (VR MOD).

FFY 2011 target: Continue to develop plans FFY 2011 achieved: Continued to develop plans

The DOR met this target. The DOR released AWARE in the summer of 2011 which provided staff with better tools for case documentation, service authorization, and communication with consumers. The Department also piloted the new Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) Model in preparation for Statewide implementation in 2013. The new VRSD Model will streamline service delivery and enhance the quality and effectiveness of the services provided to consumers.

Program Goal 1.3: The DOR will maintain the quantity of employment outcomes of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries.

Objective 1.3.1: The DOR will maintain the number of employment outcomes of DOR SSI/SSDI beneficiary consumers and will provide training and technical assistance to maximize access to and understanding of Social Security Administration (SSA) work incentives.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

1.3.1.1 During FFY 2011, the DOR will maintain the number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries who apply for DOR services at the same level as FFY 2010.

FFY 2011 target: 11,670 FFY 2011 achieved: 11,100

The DOR did not meet this target. Factors contributing to the decline in SSI/SSDI beneficiaries applying for DOR services included an:

• Increased number of Ticket to Work Employment Networks (ENs) and Tickets in assignments to ENs. SSI/SSDI beneficiaries could choose to seek employment services from an EN or a State VR Agency; and • Increase in the new Social Security Disability awards which may have suggested that many workers with disabilities who lost their jobs left the labor force rather than continue to seek employment.

1.3.1.2 During FFY 2011, the DOR will maintain the number of successful employment outcomes (status 26) of SSI/SSDI consumers at the same level as FFY 2010.

FFY 2011 target: 4,097 FFY 2011 achieved: 3,485

The DOR did not meet this target. The downturn in the economy may have contributed to the decline in the number of successful closures for SSI/SSDI beneficiaries. Some consumers may have also opted premature closure of their DOR case so they could assign their Ticket to an EN.

1.3.1.3 During FFY 2011, the DOR, with partners, will provide 10 training/technical assistance sessions for the DOR staff, community partners and other stakeholders related to the utilization of SSA work incentives, on-line benefits planning tools and calculators.

FFY 2011 target: 10 sessions FFY 2011 achieved: 21 sessions

The DOR met this target. The DOR conducted more than the targeted 10 training sessions in FFY 2011 due to the increased demand on Social Security Work Incentives and the Plan to Achieve Self Support (PASS).

1.3.1.4 During FFY 2011, 150 DOR, mental health, education and stakeholder staff will receive Benefits Planning and Management training.

FFY 2011 target: Train 150 stakeholder staff FFY 2011 achieved: 225 trained

The DOR met this target. Eight (8) trainings were delivered to mental health cooperative partners due to an increased request from these partners. One (1) training was delivered to Education coop partners.

Program Goal 1.4: The DOR will develop and implement efficient and effective workforce development and leadership succession plans.

Objective 1.4.1: During FFY 2011, the DOR will develop a Recruitment and Retention Plan.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

1.4.1.1 The DOR will prepare a Recruitment and Retention Plan by February 28, 2011. FFY 2011 target: Complete by February 28, 2011 FFY 2011 achieved: Not Completed

The DOR did not meet this target. The DOR was unable to complete the Recruitment and Retention Plan due to limited resources. Completion of the Recruitment and Retention Plan has been assumed by the DOR’s new Diversity Officer.

Objective 1.4.2: During FFY 2011, the DOR will initiate two (2) strategies toward improving the recruitment and retention of qualified rehabilitation professionals.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

1.4.2.1 The DOR will develop an exit survey instrument to gather data from qualified rehabilitation professional staff who leave the DOR by December 31, 2010.

FFY 2011 target: Complete by December 31, 2010 FFY 2011 achieved: Completed August 2010

The DOR met this target. The DOR developed an Employee Exit Questionnaire (EEQ) to capture data regarding Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors; Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals; and Rehabilitation Supervisors separating from the Department. The EEQ captured data pertaining to length of State service, potential reasons employees leave their current positions, and where employees will be going after separating from the DOR.

1.4.2.2 The DOR will analyze and report on exit survey data for retention purposes by February 28, 2011.

FFY 2011 target: Complete by February 28, 2011 FFY 2011 achieved: Completed February 28, 2011

The DOR met this target. The DOR compared separated employee data against the number of separating employees utilizing the EEQ. This comparison gave the Department an overall success rate and could be analyzed for specific classifications.

Objective 1.4.3: During FFY 2011 the DOR will develop and implement a Staff Development and Training Plan. Performance Measures to be achieved:

1.4.3.1 The DOR will prepare a Staff Development and Training Plan by July 2011.

FFY 2011 target: Complete by July 2011 FFY 2011 achieved: Completed February 2, 2011

The DOR met this target. The DOR developed a Training Plan and disseminated it on February 2, 2011. This plan identified the IST courses that the DOR provided between October 1, 2010 and September 30, 2011 and included IST classes identified in the DOR’s IST grant, program, and District-specific training.

1.4.3.2 During FFY 2011, the DOR will offer classes monthly to managers and supervisors (including incumbents and those preparing to promote into qualified rehabilitation professional jobs) in a variety of critical knowledge-based areas.

FFY 2011 target: Offer classes monthly FFY 2011 achieved: Classes offered monthly (beginning July 2011, transitioned to quarterly)

The DOR met this target. The DOR provided monthly Knowledge Based Trainings (KBT) to DOR manager, supervisors, and staff on a variety of topics with the intention of building supervisorial and leadership capacity.

1.4.3.3 During FFY 2011, the DOR will administer a training needs assessment survey and use it as the basis for the Staff Development and Training Plan.

FFY 2011 target: Administer survey FFY 2011 achieved: Completed July 5, 2011

The DOR met this target. The DOR collaborated with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) center Region IX to develop and disseminate a Statewide Training Needs Assessment (STNA) in May and June 2011. The STNA was analyzed by the DOR and TACE to determine critical training needs. The DOR will incorporate the training needs identified in the STNA into future training curriculum, as appropriate.

Program Goal 1.5: The DOR will promote equality for persons with disabilities through systems change.

Objective 1.5.1: The DOR will support Statewide systems change activities to improve access for individuals with disabilities.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

1.5.1.1 During FFY 2011, the DOR’s Disability Access Services (DAS) will provide at least 30 training sessions to California departments and agencies regarding employment law and architectural and program access.

FFY 2011 target: 30 training sessions FFY 2011 achieved: 34 training sessions

The DOR met this target. The DOR provided 34 training, presentations, and webinars on disability employment/reasonable accommodation, disability awareness, physical accessibility, and program access, including information technology accessibility for various State of California departments. The interest in these topics by participating departments, including but not limited to, the DOR, State Personnel Board, Department of Health Care Services, and Department of Personnel Administration, exceeded initial expectations, thereby exceeding the FFY 2011 target.

The DOR also hosted its 2011 DISABILITY Summit from June 28-30, 2011 which drew over 415 attendees from public and private sector entities, employers, and private individuals attending in the Sacramento and Los Angeles areas. Continuing education credits for disability awareness and physical accessibility requirements were provided to architects renewing their license. Major presenters included the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing, Job Accommodation Network, and the U.S. Department of Justice. The Summit workshops covered topics such as Federal and State regulations (Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, and Fair Employment and Housing Act), design of housing and public accommodations, accessible electronic and information technology, accessibility compliance standards, reasonable accommodations and workplace accessibility.

1.5.1.2 During FFY 2011, the DOR will participate in the annual Golden Guardian testing exercise providing technical assistance and support to mass care and shelter of persons with disabilities.

FFY 2011 target: DOR participation in exercise FFY 2011 achieved: Completed

The DOR met this target. The annual Golden Guardian testing exercise was conducted in May 2011. The DOR participated through 1) the identification of staff to deploy in support of mass care and shelter of individuals with disabilities; and 2) advisement regarding notification and evacuation impacts to individuals with disabilities and special needs. Lessons learned were incorporated and practices and protocols were being refined as a result of the DOR’s participation.

1.5.1.3 During FFY 2011, the DOR, as a standing member, will participate in all meetings of the Governor’s Emergency Operations Executive Council (GEOEC) and CA Health and Human Services Agency’s Disaster Coordinating Council (DCC).

FFY 2011 target: 3 meetings FFY 2011 achieved: 3 meetings

The DOR met this target. The last GEOEC meeting was held on June 25, 2009 (the GEOEC has been eliminated from the current State budget). Yet, related work continued, including meetings with the DCC, which works to be more inclusive and foster the integration of persons with disabilities into each phase of emergency preparedness, response, mitigation, and recovery. In January 2011, the DOR also began participating in meetings of the California Public Health and Medical Emergency Function (EF 8), an alliance of California State entities with common emergency management responsibilities and/or statutory authorities for emergencies with a public health and medical component, whose purpose is to effectively and efficiently mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from emergencies.

 

SE Goal 2.1: The DOR will maintain competitive, integrated employment outcomes for consumers accessing SE services.

Objective 2.1.1: The DOR’s SE program will maintain access to competitive, integrated employment outcomes.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

2.1.1.1 During FFY 2011, at least 48% of successful SE outcomes will be individual placements in integrated employment settings.

FFY 2011 target: 48% FFY 2011 achieved: 38%

The DOR did not meet this target. Competition for jobs in California has increased due to the downturn in the economy which has led to decreased individual placements.

2.1.1.2 During FFY 2011, the DOR will maintain the number of SE individual successful employment outcomes (status 26) at the same level as FFY 2010.

FFY 2010 achieved: 731 consumers FFY 2011 achieved: 629 consumers

The DOR did not meet this target. Competition for jobs in California has increased due to the downturn in the economy which has led to decreased SEP employment outcomes.

SE Goal 2.2: The DOR will continue to enhance staff knowledge of SE regulations by providing training and technical assistance to staff.

Objective 2.2.1: The DOR’s SE staff will have necessary tools and technical assistance incorporating research-based practices and a variety of modalities.

Performance Measure to be achieved:

2.2.1.1 During FFY 2011, the DOR will coordinate and implement two (2) regional VR WAP and Supported Employment liaison teleconferences with DOR staff. This group shall include but not be limited to staff serving individuals with developmental, mental health and brain injury disabilities. FFY 2011 target: 2 teleconferences FFY 2011 achieved: 2 teleconferences

The DOR met this target. The DOR held two (2) regional VR WAP and SE liaison teleconferences with DOR staff during the month of September 2011.

SE Goal 2.3: Promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders.

Objective 2.3.1: The DOR will collaborate with SE partners and stakeholders to maximize opportunities for applicants and eligible individuals accessing supported employment services.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

2.3.1.1 During FFY 2011, the DOR will hold biannual meetings with the California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) to promote and enhance collaboration.

FFY 2011 target: 2 meetings FFY 2011 achieved: 2 meetings

The DOR met this target. The DOR held two (2) meetings with DDS during FFY 2011. The first meeting was held in April 2011 and the second meeting was held in August 2011.

2.3.1.2 During FFY 2011, the Workforce Development Section will hold monthly meetings with DDS to enhance employment opportunities and expand linkages to business partners.

FFY 2011 target: 12 meetings with DDS FFY 2011 achieved: 6 meetings with DDS

The DOR did not meet this target. Due to numerous scheduling issues, the goal was not met and will be discontinued as it was decided to incorporate this goal into the Bi-annual meetings.

2.3.1.3 By the end of FFY 2011, the DOR will develop and provide recommendations for improving SE stakeholder collaboration effectiveness to SE stakeholders including DOR staff, service providers and sources of extended services such as regional centers.

FFY 2011 target: Deliver recommendations to SE stakeholders FFY 2011 achieved: Delivered recommendations to SE stakeholders

The DOR met this target by:

• Sharing and analyzing employment outcome data in collaboration with the Association of Regional Center Agencies (ARCA) Employment Committee’s Transition Services subcommittee; • Designing a qualitative "best practices" survey in cooperation with the ARCA Employment Committee; • Developing contacts with the Department of Veterans Affairs through efforts of the DOR’s Independent Living section; and • Maintaining collaboration through quarterly meetings with each of their cooperative program partners and centrally through Mental Health Cooperative Programs.

 

The DOR passed the Rehabilitation Services Administration’s (RSA) Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators for FFY 2011. The DOR will use the strategies outlined in State Strategies, Attachment 4.11(d) to improve performance during FFYs 2012 and 2013.

Indicator 1.1: Change in Employment Outcomes

RSA Definition: The difference between the number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the current performance period and the number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the previous performance period.

DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. The RSA requires that employment outcomes equal or exceed previous performance. For FFY 2011, there were 11,602 employment outcomes, whereas in the prior FFY 2010, there were 10,719 employment outcomes, an increase of 883 employment outcomes.

Indicator 1.2: Percent of Employment Outcomes

RSA Definition: The percentage of individuals exiting the program during the performance period who have achieved an employment outcome after receiving services.

DOR Results: The DOR did not pass this indicator. In FFY 2011, for those individuals who exited the DOR VR program after receiving services, the DOR assisted 43.3% in achieving a successful employment outcome. This figure is lower than the RSA required 55.8%.

The economic downturn, high unemployment rates, and increase in the minimum wage negatively impacted successful employment outcomes Statewide. Unemployment rates increased from 7.2% in 2008, 12.2% in 2009, 12.5% in 2010, 11.7% in 2011. The DOR continues its efforts to increase employment outcomes by conducting job fairs, job clubs, referring consumers to on-line resources and providing collaborative networking opportunities for consumers, District staff, community agencies, and local employers.

Indicator 1.3: Competitive Employment Outcomes

RSA Definition: This measures the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with or without ongoing support services, self-employment, or Business Enterprise Program employment with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the Federal or State minimum wage rate, whichever is higher, based on all the individuals exiting the program who have achieved an employment outcome after receiving services.

DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, 86.7% exited the VR program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage. This percentage, which is higher than the RSA required 72.6%, reflects the DOR’s strong emphasis on its goals to increase both the quality and quantity of consumer employment outcomes.

Indicator 1.4: Significance of Disability

RSA Definition: The percentage of those individuals identified in Indicator 1.3 who have significant disabilities.

DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to or at least the minimum wage, 99.8% were individuals with significant disabilities, which exceeds the RSA requirement of 62.4%. Since 1995, the DOR has operated its VR services program under an Order of Selection (OOS) process. As noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(3), Order of Selection, the DOR expects to continue the OOS process throughout FFY 2011, FFY 2012, and FFY 2013.

Indicator 1.5: Earnings Ratio

RSA Definition: The ratio of the average hourly earnings of all individuals in competitive employment to the average hourly earnings of all employed individuals in the State.

DOR Results: The DOR did not pass this indicator. The DOR achieved a ratio of 0.484, which did not meet the RSA required ratio of 0.52, due to the very high average hourly wage within the State (Department of Labor’s preliminary 2011 California wage is $25.23). The earnings for both DOR consumers and all employed Californians increased in FFY 2011 and the gap between them did not decrease. Indicator 1.6: Self-Support

RSA Definition: For those identified in Performance Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit.

DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator with 69%, exceeding the RSA requirement of 53%. The success reflects the commitment to outreach to individuals who require services in order to obtain employment.

Indicator 2.1: Minority Background Service Rate

RSA Definition: The ratio of the percent of individuals with a minority background to the percent of individuals without a minority background exiting the program who received VR services.

DOR Results: The DOR’s ratio of 1.05 is above the RSA required 0.80 ratio, and reflects DOR’s commitment to the rich diversity of California.

 

Innovation and Expansion Goal 3.1: Electronic Records System (ERS)

Objective 3.1.1: The DOR has set aside a portion of funds allotted under Section 110 of the Act to replace its outdated mainframe system with a new ERS. The new ERS will be a commercial-off-the-shelf application that will improve accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of the VR services program for individuals with disabilities.

Performance Measures to be achieved:

3.1.1.1 The DOR will successfully complete the user acceptance testing by February 2011.

FFY 2011 target: Complete by February 2011 FFY 2011 achieved: Completed July 2011

The DOR did not meet this target due to an impasse the project faced with originally developed requirements. The requirements were inadequate to complete the full design and development necessary to meet completion of the user acceptance testing. At that time, the DOR split the project into two (2) critical paths in order to mitigate this condition. Eventually, acceptance testing was completed through trial and pilot phases of the project.

3.1.1.2 The DOR will implement a two-month pilot in two (2) districts from May 2011 to July 2011.

FFY 2011 target: Complete by July 2011 FFY 2011 achieved: Completed August 2011

The DOR did not meet this target. The date to begin the pilot was extended out until June 2011 due to the issues related to user acceptance testing. The pilot was completed when Statewide implementation began in August 2011.

3.1.1.3 The DOR will roll out the new ERS in July 2011 to the districts.

FFY 2011 target: Complete by July 2011 FFY 2011 achieved: Completed September 2011

The DOR did not meet this target. The date to begin Statewide implementation began in August 2011 and was completed at the beginning of September 2011. This was due to the extension of the pilot, which was continued to address user acceptance testing. 3.1.1.4 The DOR will complete the roll out of the new ERS to all districts by September 2011.

FFY 2011 target: Complete by September 2011 FFY 2011 achieved: Completed September 2011

The DOR met this target. The DOR successfully completed full Statewide implementation with application acceptance gained with AWARE version 5.8.2.7 on September 4, 2011, two (2) days ahead of schedule.

Innovation and Expansion Goal 3.2: Establishment Grants (E-Grants)

Innovation and expansion activities for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2010-11*

*The DOR has awarded E-grants on the SFY cycle (July 1 - June 30). As such, the following information is reported over SFY cycles.

The DOR has historically set aside $4,000,000 annually to establish, develop, and improve services to VR consumers through the use of E-Grants to Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). E-Grant funds can only be used to support CRP staffing and/or equipment costs necessary to provide direct consumer services. E-Grant recipients must provide a (non-Federal) cash match in the amount of 21.3% of the total budget. E-Grants are initially awarded for a 36-month period, with the potential to be extended for an additional 12 months.

In SFY 2008-09, the DOR encumbered $451,492 to continue funding 14 E-Grants. As of June 30, 2011, all funding for these E-Grants was concluded. The DOR did not fund a new cycle of E-Grants for SFY 2010-11, as Innovation and Expansion Activities for that fiscal year involved completing and implementing AWARE.

This screen was last updated on Aug 16 2012 5:40PM by sacakidderd

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Scope of Supported Employment Services The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) provides the full scope of Supported Employment (SE) services to individuals who:

• Are Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) eligible with the most significant disabilities; • Require extended services to maintain employment; and • Have at least a reasonable expectation that a source of extended services will be available at the time of transition to extended services.

Quality of Supported Employment Services The DOR provides services that facilitate successful job matches and lead to successful job placements in integrated settings, primarily supported by Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) and partner agencies. In areas where provider organizations are not available, or an individual has needs beyond those that can be met by a CRP, an individual service provider approved by the district to provide job coaching services may be authorized.

In order to ensure quality services, the DOR has developed strategies that include but are not limited to:

• Service specification guidelines; • Training and technical support through Community Resource Development Specialists out-stationed throughout the State; • DOR Certification and Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) accreditation of CRP’s; and • Ongoing assessment and evaluation of end users.

Extent of Supported Employment Services SE services are ongoing support and other appropriate services needed to maintain an individual with a most significant disability. SE services are provided by the DOR for a period of time not to exceed 18 months, unless under special circumstances.

SE services encompass the following:

• SE Intake Services which include, but are not necessarily limited to, an initial meeting with the eligible individual; a review of the Supported Employment - Job Placement Parameters; and the development of a plan of action for job placement. • SE Placement Services which include evaluation of labor market and identification of suitable employment sites; employer contacts; job seeking skills training; work site assessment; task analysis; evaluation and recommendation for job coaching plan; destination training; and other services necessary to secure and establish employment. • Consumers of SE services who actively participate in a comprehensive assessment to identify quality employment outcomes that meet the individual’s strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. • If necessary, situational assessments through trial work experiences (TWE) to assess the individual’s interests and abilities and to allow the individual to consider multiple jobs, environments, settings, and tasks to maximize his/her potential. TWE is also used to determine the techniques best suited to assist the individual to learn the work skills and behaviors necessary for employment. • The DOR, as appropriate, coordinates benefits planning discussions with the consumer, Community Work Incentives Coordinators and/or other third parties to identify appropriate work incentive programs as well as potential sources for ongoing support. • Efficient and effective dissemination of information and providing technical assistance related to work incentive programs. • School-to-work transition services to ensure that transition aged youth with intellectual disabilities go from school to post-secondary training and work. • Individuals with mental health disabilities who are served on a limited basis through transitional employment services. Many of these individuals receive employment services that may rely on natural supports for extended services.

Timing of Transition to Extended Services Once an appropriate SE position is identified for an individual, the DOR provides job coaching services, which is an ongoing support service that cannot exceed 18 months from time of job placement, unless under special circumstances, and upon agreement of the consumer and counselor. The VR program funds job coaching until the individual is determined to be stable and has maintained that stability for at least 60 days.

Job coaching services vary from one-to-one support on the job in individual placements, to one-to-eight support on the job when individuals are working together in a group placement in the community. Job coaching services may also be provided off the job as necessary when working with employers, care providers, advocacy groups, or in the provision of other services necessary to assist the individual in maintaining employment.

Once the individual has maintained stability on the job for at least 60 days, the funding for and provision of job coaching transitions to an extended services provider. The rehabilitation counselor continues to track the individual’s progress and job stability during the transition period. If the individual maintains stabilization for 60 days after transition to extended services, the case is closed successfully.

Sources of extended services for SE consumers are detailed in Attachment 4.8(b)(4): Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services.

This screen was last updated on Aug 16 2012 5:48PM by sacakidderd

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Last updated on 08/20/2012 at 7:47 PM

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Completed on 08/20/2012 at 7:47 PM

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Approved on 08/21/2012 at 3:21 PM

Approved by Janette Shell

Published on 09/18/2012 at 1:59 PM

Published by Ken Schellenberg

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