ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
California Department of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The California Department of Rehabilitation is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the California Department of Rehabilitation [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Department of Rehabilitation Director

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Department of Rehabilitation Director

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Anthony "Tony" P. Sauer, EMMDS

Title of Signatory
Director, California Department of Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/27/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

In accordance with its federal mandate to jointly develop, agree to, and annually review State goals and priorities, the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) has been an integral partner with the DOR in development and approval of the 2012 State Plan Update. This partnership, which has continued to strengthen over the years, is summarized below and further described in Attachment 4.11(c)(1). The information contained herein focuses on SRC activities and collaboration as it pertains to the State Plan and related projects. Information on the complete scope of SRC activities and recommendations can be found in the SRC Annual Report, submitted to RSA each December.

To further strengthen the collaborative partnership with the DOR, as of 2010, the SRC adjusted its meeting cycle to coincide with pivotal decision-making timeframes for the State Plan and other major areas of collaboration, including the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment and Consumer Satisfaction Survey, as well as its own SRC Annual Report.

The State Plan has been a major discussion/action item on every SRC agenda since last year’s State Plan was submitted. At each meeting, the SRC had the opportunity to receive and discuss substantive information with key DOR leadership, ask questions and identify any areas of concern.

In June 2010, the SRC met to review and discuss the 2011 State Plan public comments received. Recurring themes were identified and assigned to work teams for development and consideration of possible SRC recommendations. In September 2010 the SRC received information regarding the status of each of the concurrent Plan cycles (2010, 2011 and 2012). Following discussion and deliberation, the SRC adopted and presented 16 recommendations to DOR. Those recommendations and the DOR responses were submitted to RSA last December in the SRC’s 2010 Annual Report.

The SRC then turned its attention to the development of the 2012 State Plan. In November 2010, the SRC adopted the following 2012 State Plan recommendations to the DOR. The DOR also adopted these recommendations, which are reflected in the State Plan goals and objectives (Attachment 4.11 (d)).:

SRC Recommendation 2011.1

The SRC recommends that the DOR identify needs for services in growing and emerging disabilities for inclusion in the 2012 State Plan.

SRC Recommendation 2011.2

The SRC recommends that the DOR increase consumer opportunities to look at non-traditional pathways to employment for inclusion in the 2012 State Plan.

SRC Recommendation 2011.3

The SRC recommends that the DOR expand its efforts to increase employment opportunities in emerging industries for inclusion in the 2012 State Plan.

SRC Recommendation 2011.4

The SRC recommends that the DOR develop strategies to gather input from business and industry for inclusion into the 2012 State Plan.

SRC Recommendation 2011.5

The SRC recommends that DOR include the following in the 2012 State Plan:

1 The DOR will maintain the quality and quantity of employment outcomes.

2 The DOR will improve the effectiveness and efficiency of vocational rehabilitation services delivery.

3 The DOR will maintain the quantity of employment outcomes of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries.

4 The DOR will develop and implement efficient and effective workforce development and leadership succession plans.

5 The DOR will promote equality for persons with disabilities through systems change.

6 The DOR will maintain competitive, integrated employment outcomes for consumers accessing SE services.

7 The DOR will continue to enhance DOR staff knowledge of SE Regulations and processes by providing training and technical assistance.

8 The DOR will promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders.

It should be noted that the SRC made the deliberate decision not to specify whether the topics contained in these recommendations were to be goals, objectives or strategies, leaving that decision to the DOR staff. Information on the DOR’s incorporation of the SRC recommendations into the 2012 State Plan is contained in Attachment 4.11(c)(1).

In January 2011, a teleconference was held to ensure SRC’s full participation in the continuing development of the 2012 State Plan Goals. During this meeting, DOR staff presented an overview of its proposed approach to integrate the State Plan public comments, Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) findings, and SRC input. This resulted in the following recommendation:

SRC Recommendation 2011.6

The SRC recommends the DOR continue its development of the 2012 State Plan Goals and Objectives consistent with the information and approach presented to the SRC on January 25, 2011.

The SRC met again in February 2011, at which time the proposed draft Goals were presented. This resulted in the following recommendation:

SRC Recommendation 2011.7

The SRC recommends the DOR adopt the six 2012 State Plan Goals as presented to the SRC on February 10, 2011.

The SRC is meeting with the DOR planning staff again in April 2011 to see if it wishes to offer any informal ideas related to the strategies contained in the public review version of the 2012 State Plan.

In April and May 2011, the DOR and SRC together are conducting a series of State Plan public meetings in three geographic areas of California, with a fourth location connected via videoconference. SRC members worked jointly with the DOR planning unit to identify key stakeholders who have been invited to provide testimony. A total of 13 SRC members are participating in one of the meetings, with SRC representation at each location including the videoconference location. In addition, all members will be provided access to the entire body of verbal and written testimony received during the public comment period.

The SRC will meet in May 2011 following the conclusion of the State Plan meetings. Any resulting SRC recommendations will be presented to the DOR for response, and reported to RSA in future submissions.

Partnership in Planning-Related Programs and Projects

In addition to direct participation in the development and approval of the 2012 State Plan Update, the SRC has been an active partner with the DOR in the major programs, policies and projects on which the 2012 State Plan Update is based. Since the submission of the 2011 State Plan Update in June 2010, this partnership has included the following: Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA); Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS); Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization Project (VR-Mod); AWARE (formerly known as the Electronic Records System or ERS); and the Community Resources Database (CRD) Informed Choice Database Project. The SRC’s involvement with each of these is summarized below:

Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment

The SRC has worked in partnership with the DOR throughout the three-phase Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) to satisfy federal requirements and comply with Section 101 (a)(15)(i) of the Rehabilitation Act. The multi-phase CSNA began in October 2008 and will conclude by September 2011. Working jointly with the SRC, the Planning Unit administered the completion of both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of CSNA with the SRC. CSNA Phase 3 has a two-prong approach:

1. Gathering qualitative data via public meetings while also hearing comments on the proposed State Plan, and

2. Gathering quantitative data via four electronic surveys, developed in partnership with the SRC.

In addition to SRC participation in State Plan public meetings which is described elsewhere in this document, the SRC provided valuable feedback and recommendations to enhance the CSNA survey process. Specifically, the SRC:

1. Supported implementation of four targeted surveys, intended for the following recipients: a. Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) b. Disability Program Navigators (DPNs), through the Workforce Investment system’s One-Stop Career Centers c. Employers d. Community-Based Organizations (CBOs)

2. Recommended utilizing online surveys.

3. Provided the DOR Planning Unit with contact information for possible survey recipients.

4. Approved the Planning Unit’s suggested survey dissemination strategies.

5. Provided suggestions and recommended approval of the types of survey questions proposed by the Planning Unit.

6. Recommended survey enhancements during the testing phase.

Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS)

In accordance with Section 105 (c)(4) of the Act, the SRC and DOR work in partnership to conduct periodic assessments of consumer satisfaction. The SRC and the DOR together in 2008 developed the content of the current four-part CSS. The four-part CSS assesses consumer satisfaction at four different points of the vocational rehabilitation service cycle (pre-plan, in-plan, closed-employed and closed-not employed).

At the recommendation of the SRC, the 2010 CSS was conducted primarily through an online survey format. The shift to an online survey format resulted in the ability to reach a significantly larger sampling than previous years -- 10,800 in 2010 vs. 3000 (2008) and 4000 (2009). This resulted in a total of 2,339 completed surveys returned, far exceeding the two previous years’ responses of 690 (2008) and 920 (2009).

The results of the 2010 CSS were submitted to the RSA in the SRC’s 2010 Annual Report.

Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization Project

The intent of the Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization Project (VR-Mod), is to increase quality services through efficient use of staffing resources, and allow counselors to spend more time in direct interactions with consumers. The SRC has been represented on this project at all major collaboration points, and will continue to be represented in the coming year.

AWARE (also known as Electronic Records System or ERS)

The SRC has been a partner with the DOR in a multi-year project that will replace its decades-old field computer system with a new Electronic Records System (ERS) known as AWARE. The AWARE case management software allows the DOR to comply with federal reporting requirements as well as fully automate consumer case management. The SRC has been an integral part of this project since it commenced in July 2007. The former SRC Chair has served on the ERS Steering Committee throughout this multi-year project, and the SRC’s rehabilitation counselor member has been active in field level readiness and implementation.

The full SRC continues to receive updates and briefings at key points in AWARE’s development and implementation, and has provided feedback to the DOR and AWARE contractors. In February 2011, the SRC recommended approval of DOR policy and procedure changes consistent with implementation of the new system.

Community Resources Database (CRD) Informed Choice Database Project

In 2010, the DOR launched the first phase of the Community Resource Development (CRD) Informed Choice Database Project. The SRC is receiving periodic updates and briefings on this multi-year project and will continue to provide feedback to both the DOR and the Project consultants.

About the SRC

The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended in 1998 (the Act), requires that consumers, advocates and other representatives of individuals with disabilities be integral to the administration and oversight of a state’s vocational rehabilitation services. In California, this mandate is fulfilled by the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), established in accordance with Section 105 of the Act. The Governor-appointed SRC consists of a diverse membership interested in, and representative of, Californians with disabilities. It is the mission of the California SRC, in partnership with the DOR, to assure that all Californians with disabilities are represented, informed, and empowered; receive necessary, sufficient and timely individualized services; and that these services are excellent and lead to meaningful employment.

It is the role of the SRC to review, evaluate and advise the DOR regarding its specific and overall performance and effectiveness to ensure the highest possible level of service delivery, employment outcomes, and consumer satisfaction. In partnership with the DOR, SRC develops, agrees on, and reviews State Plan goals and priorities, and evaluates the effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation services provided under the Act. SRC also advises and assists the DOR in the preparation of the plans, reports, needs assessments and evaluations required by the Act.

This screen was last updated on Aug 30 2011 3:35PM by sacaumemotok

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) requests a waiver of statewideness.

The DOR maintains interagency agreements (IAs) with the California Department of Education (CDE), California Department of Mental Health (DMH), California Employment Development Department (EDD), California Department of Developmental Services (DDS), as well as institutions of higher education. These statewide agreements provide leadership, oversight, and administrative support to locally developed cooperative agreements and programs. Locally, the DOR has directly entered into agreements with public entities such as public universities and community colleges, local education agencies (LEAs), county mental health and social service agencies. Although the DOR has local cooperative agreements in each DOR district, the DOR does not contract with every LEA, county, or other potential cooperative partner in the State. Therefore, these cooperative programs are not statewide. The DOR does not have sufficient staff resources or budget authority to work with every potential cooperative partner. Also, these are voluntary programs, so they are contingent upon the interest of the local partner agency. State plan requirements apply to all services approved under the waiver. Additionally, the DOR approves each service proposed under the waiver before it is put into effect.

The locally developed cooperative agreements include:

Transition Partnership Projects

The Transition Partnership Projects service secondary and post-secondary students with disabilities by facilitating the effective transition of the DOR’s student consumers from school to meaningful employment. Statewide, these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with the LEAs and the Special Education Local Plan Areas (SELPAs). These LEAs and the SELPAs furnish the non-federal share of costs either through certified expenditures or cash match. The certified expenditures from the LEAs and the SELPAs are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services exclusively to DOR student consumers. Under these agreements, the DOR assigns Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (SVRC) to be active members of the program team. The DOR opens cases and provides enhanced VR services for at least one year prior to the student consumers leaving high school. The LEA provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to the DOR consumers. This is to enable the DOR consumers to achieve employment utilizing community based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow-up services to exiting DOR student consumers. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, follow-up, and non-supported employment job coaching. These contracted services are not the educational services that the LEA is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of the DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, the DOR has 106 Transition Partnership Projects agreements in all of the 14 DOR districts.

WorkAbility II

The WorkAbility II Program serves adults and out-of-school youth with disabilities. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with the LEAs, adult schools, and Regional Occupational Programs (ROPs). These LEAs, adult schools and ROPs all furnish the non-federal share of costs either through a certified expenditure or cash match.

The certified expenditures from the LEAs/ROPs are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to the DOR student consumers. Consumers are referred to the WorkAbility II Programs by their SVRC for enhanced in-plan VR services which include vocational and basic skills assessment, specific job skills training, pre-employment preparation, worksite evaluation, job placement, job coaching, and ongoing follow-up after vocational placement. These contracted services are unique or expanded from the educational services the LEA is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of the DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, the DOR has 8 WorkAbility II agreements in 5 DOR districts.

WorkAbility III

The WorkAbility III Program serves individuals with disabilities who are both community college students and DOR consumers desiring and in need of employment. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with community colleges. The community colleges furnish the non-federal share of costs either through certified expenditures or cash match. The certified expenditures from the community colleges are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to the DOR student consumers.

Consumers are referred to the WorkAbility III Programs by their SVRC for enhanced in-plan vocational services. Augmented services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training and job development and placement. The services in the WorkAbility III agreements are not the educational services that the Community College is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of the DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, the DOR has 30 WorkAbility III agreements in 11 DOR districts.

WorkAbility IV

The WorkAbility IV Program serves individuals who are DOR consumers and either California State University (CSU) students or University of California (UC) students, desiring and in need of employment. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with CSU and UC. These universities furnish the non-federal share of costs through certified expenditures. The certified expenditures from the universities are provided by redirected university staff providing unique patterns of VR services exclusively to DOR student consumers. Consumers are referred to the WorkAbility IV program by their SVRC for in-plan VR services.

The DOR consumers receive specialized vocational services such as job development and placement, job search skills instruction, work experience and internships, employment related counseling, and job retention services to student consumers and employers. The services in the WorkAbility IV agreements are not educational services that the CSU or UC campus is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, the DOR has 11 WorkAbility IV contracts in 8 DOR districts.

Mental Health Cooperative Programs

The Mental Health Cooperative Programs serve county Mental Health consumers with severe psychiatric disabilities who are also DOR consumers by assisting them to obtain employment and to live independently in their communities. Statewide these programs are administered through cooperative agreements with County Mental Health agencies and private non-profit organizations. County Mental Health agencies furnish the non-federal share of costs through certified expenditures or cash contribution. The certified expenditures from the County Mental Health agencies are provided by redirected County Mental Health staff providing unique VR services exclusively to DOR consumers. Consumers are referred to DOR by participating Mental Health agencies for VR services. The cooperative agreements develop linkages to community agencies such as private non-profit agencies specializing in employment service programs for persons with severe psychiatric disabilities. The Mental Health Cooperatives provide unique vocational service options for consumers, which include vocational assessment and evaluation, personal vocational and social adjustment, work adjustment, employment preparation, job development and placement, and job coaching. The services in the Mental Health Cooperative Program agreements are not the mental health treatment services that the County is legally mandated or otherwise required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of the DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR. Currently, DOR has 25 Mental Health Cooperative Program agreements in 13 DOR districts.

The DOR/DMH Long Term Care Interagency Agreement provides funding for the DOR to deliver VR services to individuals discharged from the Metropolitan State Hospital. The services in the Interagency Agreement are supported by a cash match from the Department of Mental Health. The cash match funds a portion of a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor position and case service funds. The purpose of the IA is to facilitate the provision of vocational services for individuals transitioning from the state hospital environment to the community. Through a coordinated referral process, individuals pending discharge are referred to DOR in their home community. Upon DOR eligibility determination DOR consumers receive vocational services, which include vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, and job development and placement. The DMH State Hospitals are required to provide intensive mental health treatment to patients while they are in the hospital. They are not required to provide services, vocational or otherwise, once the individual is discharged. This Interagency Agreement (IA) serves to bridge the referral gap between the State Hospital and DOR for individuals seeking vocational services.

Traumatic Brain Injury Cooperative Program

In 1998, SB 2232 authorized funding for a new California Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) pilot program. The program was administered by the Department of Mental Health (DMH) and was designed to assist individuals with TBI to attain independent and productive lives which may include paid employment. The legislation stipulated that a percentage of the state fund imposed on every fine, penalty or forfeiture collected through the courts for vehicular offenses be contributed to this TBI fund. The fund total varies but it is approximately $1M per year. The DMH established seven pilot sites utilizing these funds.

In January 1, 2010, AB 398 transferred the administration of the TBI project from the Department of Mental Health to the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR). AB 398 allocated the TBI funding into the DOR state budget to fund both administrative and program costs. The project consists of the seven long-standing community based organizations that provide services under contract to the DOR. The DOR chose to utilize a small percentage of this state fund to match federal VR funds to expand employment services for the DOR TBI population. The portion of the state special assessment used to provide match for the VR program is not sufficient to provide these services statewide.

The TBI Program serves the DOR consumers with traumatic brain injuries within Los Angeles, Orange, Sacramento, San Francisco, Santa Cruz counties through contracted community based organizations. They provide a variety of services including vocational assessment, personal vocational and social adjustment, work adjustment, employment preparation, job development and placement, and job coaching. The TBI projects are required to provide supportive services to consumers to enable them to live as independently as possible in the community, including vocational services. The services in the TBI agreements are not services legally mandated by any other agency. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the exclusive local needs of the DOR consumers with TBI.

Welfare Cooperative Program

These cooperative programs serve the DOR consumers who receive Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). The DOR and the county social service agencies for San Francisco and San Mateo have collaborated in developing IAs that provide the basis for local county cooperative projects. These projects provide enhanced VR services to consumers with disabilities in San Mateo and San Francisco Counties who meet the eligibility criteria for both CalWORKS (California’s Welfare Program) and DOR services. These consumers maintain direct access to CalWORKS program services. Local county social service agencies furnish the non-federal share of costs through a cash match, which supports new SVRC allocations and case services funds. The DOR consumers receive the following vocational services: vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, and job development and placement. The services in the welfare cooperative agreements are not services that the County Welfare agencies are legally mandated or required to provide. It provides funding for the DOR to provide VR services to selected County TANF recipients who have a disability. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of the DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR.

Foster Youth Cooperative Program

In collaboration with local agencies such as local workforce investment area One-Stop operators, youth service providers, foster youth group home operators, and a private not-for-profit corporation, the DOR has developed a transition program for youth with disabilities exiting (aging-out) of the foster youth system. The goal of this program is to better coordinate and serve foster youth with disabilities interested in obtaining employment in conjunction with their exit from the foster youth system. This program was created to serve 17-18 year old youth residents with disabilities in Placer County. These youth are selected from foster group homes. Referrals to the foster youth cooperative program are made by the group home operators to the community program responsible for the education and training of youth in Placer County. The community program then refers the youth to the DOR, which opens a case and begins developing a plan to provide services, when appropriate. Once a case has been opened and eligibility established, the DOR refers the consumers to a private not-for-profit agency (Pride Industries), for supportive services, including arranging for an external situational assessment. The cases continue to be co-managed by the DOR, Pride Industries and the Placer County youth services until such time as a successful placement has been achieved and the case can be closed. The DOR consumers receive employment services which include vocational assessment, career development, job search skills training, work experience, job development and placement, and non-supported employment job coaching. This agreement serves to bridge the gap between the foster care system and the community. The services in the Foster Youth agreement are not services that the County is legally mandated or otherwise required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services that meet the local needs of the DOR consumers and are available only to consumers of the DOR.

The local public agencies with which the DOR has cooperative agreements provide the DOR with written assurances that they will make available to DOR the non-federal share of the funds. Each local agreement contains language that assures that the cooperative partner agency will make the non-federal share available to the DOR, and also specify the amount of the funds as well as time frames for submission. These third-party cooperative agreements are binding state contracts that are approved by local governmental boards and are jointly signed and executed by the DOR and local governmental agency representatives prior to the delivery of services. Through the third-party cooperative agreements, local and state public agencies certify to the State, on a monthly/quarterly basis, the actual expenditure of funds that comprise the contribution of non-federal funds. All certified match and cash match expenditures received are under the administrative supervision of the DOR and no portion of the match expenditures come from Federal funds. The total cooperative agency certified expenditure share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 25%. The total cooperative agency cash match share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 21.3%. The DOR has developed fiscal monitoring and reporting procedures and tools for both the DOR district staff and cooperative program contract administrators. The DOR Audit Services Section has developed a Contractor Self Assessment tool, and the Contract Manual provides detailed information on invoicing and supporting documentation requirements. The DOR provides annual training to local contract administrators regarding the development of contracts, and has additional training available regarding contract monitoring and invoicing. The DOR also keeps data and conducts oversight of contract match and payment invoicing. This information is used to provide local technical assistance during program reviews, site visits, and on an as needed basis.

These agreements, including the federally written assurances, are available upon request at the DOR.

If the value of the actual time certified by the cooperative agency falls below the actual total program cost, the DOR reserves the right to reduce the program costs accordingly. All VR services provided to the DOR consumers, through a third party cooperative agreement, are contractually identified with negotiated service goals. The provision of each vocational service is monitored and reported by the local DOR contract administrator. The DOR reports and distributes the outcome goals for each program on both a monthly and annual basis. All VR services provided under third party cooperative agreements must be authorized or otherwise approved by the SVRC in consultation with the DOR consumer in advance of provision of services.

The vocational services provided under the DOR third party cooperative agreements comply with federal regulations requiring a unique pattern of service. Specifically, the regulations require that the services provided by the cooperating agency are not the customary or typical services provided by that agency, but are new services that have a vocational rehabilitation focus or existing services that have been modified, adapted, expanded, or reconfigured to have a vocational rehabilitation focus. The DOR has built in assurances that the third party cooperative programs will meet this federal requirement. New programs are required to explain how the services in the proposed contract will meet this requirement when they apply for funding. A description of the services to be provided is contained in each contract’s scope of work. Each cooperative contract also contains duty statements for staff that contrast the cooperative program functions to duties performed under their traditional agency role. Standard contract language also refers to the requirements to adhere to the Rehabilitation Act, and specifically to the requirement of a new pattern of service. These agreements are available upon request at the DOR.

The vocational services provided under the DOR third party cooperative agreements comply with all provisions of the DOR State Plan, including both application and plan services. All DOR consumers, regardless of the service provider, are subject to the DOR Order of Selection (OOS) policy. To assure compliance with the OOS policy, only consumers who meet the OOS service criteria receive services from cooperative partners through third-party agreements.

The DOR will continue, under this State Plan, to work with its existing cooperative partners in providing VR services. The DOR will also continue its efforts to increase the statewide availability of enhanced VR services through both formal agreements and Memorandums of Understandings, and will demonstrate administrative oversight of these programs through comprehensive program evaluations and site visits.

This screen was last updated on Aug 30 2011 4:30PM by sacaumemotok

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) and Interagency Agreements (IAs) carrying out activities of the workforce investment system through the California Department of Education, California Department of Industrial Relations, California Employment Development Department, Chancellor’s Office of the California State University, Chancellor’s Office of the California Community Colleges, Office of the President of the University of California, and Social Security Administration.

To maximize limited resources and assist individuals to access other programs, the DOR also works cooperatively with state and local agencies and programs that are not part of the statewide workforce investment system. These collaborative efforts are manifested through MOUs and IAs coordinated throughout the State as follows.

California Health and Human Services Agencies (CHHSA)

• Department of Mental Health (DMH) System of Care IA: Provides staff and resources to provide statewide administrative and program support for public mental health and vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to consumers with severe psychiatric disabilities.

• DMH Long Term Care Division IA: Supports the referral to DOR and provision of vocational services for individuals discharged from Metropolitan State Hospital.

• California Department of Developmental Services (DDS) IA: regarding Vocational Rehabilitation Work Activity Program (VR/WAP) Participant Transportation: Allows the DOR to provide transportation services to developmentally disabled DDS consumers who are served through the VR/WAP Program.

• Computer Matching and Privacy Act IA: designates the California Department of Health Care Services as the single point of contact for accessing disclosed data from the Social Security Administration needed to administer federally funded benefit programs. All data is disclosed in accordance with the requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974.

• Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) Information Exchange IA: allows DOR to verify benefit status and other information with the DHCS as it pertains to Supplemental Security Income/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSI/SSDI) consumers. The DOR utilizes this Social Security Administration information for the purpose of determining eligibility for DOR services including application of the presumptive eligibility rules for SSI/SSDI beneficiaries in accordance with Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

California State University, Sacramento IA: Provides eighty hours of supervisory training for departments of the CHHSA and is specifically designed to reflect the Mission and Goals of the CHHSA. DOR has been participating in this training since 2006, where dozens of DOR supervisor’s from throughout the state have already participated. This is the primary supervisory training provided to and regularly attended by DOR supervisors and managers.

California Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators MOU: Establishes guidelines for the joint financial support of DOR student-consumers to achieve their educational goals, eventually leading to employment. This agreement supports students enrolled in the California post-secondary setting with a financial aid office on campus.

General Services, Department of; OAH IA: Provides administration of hearings for the DOR Business Enterprise Program (BEP) vendor appeals.

General Services, Department of; Office of Risk and Insurance Management IA: Provides management of the BEP’s statewide insurance program funded from food service vending machine locations.

State Controller’s Office IA: Expedites services to process claim schedules containing vendor invoices for services/goods provided to DOR staff and consumers. Timely payment is required for continuance of services and to comply with the Prompt Payment Act.

State Independent Living Council (SILC) IA: Funds the operations of the SILC and provides SILC funds for various subgrants and contracts necessary to carry out certain objectives of the State Plan for Independent Living. All funds are for programs for people with disabilities. Source of funds: Title VII B, Rehabilitation Act; renewed annually indefinitely.

Technology Services, Department of, IA: Allows the DOR to obtain routine data processing services, as described by State Administrative Manual Section 5210.1.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2011 5:24PM by sacahoshovskyn

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has developed strategic plans, policies, and procedures that are designed to facilitate the transition of students who are receiving special education services from an educational agency to the provision of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services provided by the DOR.

Commensurate with the requirements of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the Rehabilitation Act, the DOR has collaborated with the California Department of Education (CDE) through an Interagency Agreement (IA) specifically to address consultation and technical assistance, transition planning, roles and responsibilities, and outreach for secondary students with disabilities. This agreement provides for the following:

1. Consultation and Technical Assistance:

The DOR participates in a group comprised of representatives from multiple agencies and stakeholders, who have a shared responsibility and interest in serving transition age youth. The statewide initiative entitled Communities of Practice (CoP) was created and supported by the National Association of Special Education Administrators. The program is developing links to shared work websites nationally and sponsors state level conferences sharing best practices for youth with disabilities. The leadership team for this project includes management from the following state departments: The DOR, CDE, California Department of Social Services, California Department of Developmental Services, California Department of Mental Health, California Employment Development Department, along with the California State Independent Living Council.

The DOR has identified state level and district level specialists responsible for developing and monitoring transition programs, grants and initiatives as well as developing and providing training opportunities. State and local staff from each agency work together to plan and implement evaluation activities, including individual accountability measures for shared students/consumers. These activities address interagency effectiveness, longitudinal outcomes, cooperative research and pilot projects and other joint efforts to document and improve the effectiveness of transition services.

In some instances, the DOR Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors provide a general consultative role for students receiving free and appropriate public education who are not the DOR consumers.

In addition, the DOR has developed a resource manual that facilitates the development of local Memorandums Of Understanding (MOU) with evaluation tools to gauge the success of interagency collaboration with education agencies at the local level.

2. Transition Planning:

Transition Planning by the DOR and Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) that Facilitate Individual Education Plans (IEPs):

The LEA and the DOR use a collaborative team process to develop the transition services section of the IEP and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for the transitioning student. This process includes the involvement of the student/consumer, his/her family, and representatives of education, the DOR, and other service providers, as appropriate. This process assists in the coordination of goals, objectives, services and timeframes.

The transition services section of the IEP and the IPE include the provision to share documents that provide current information for the planning and decision-making process for each agency, provided appropriate signature authorizations have been given for the release of information. Both the IEP and the IPE include, if appropriate, a statement of interagency responsibilities detailing how such services shall be provided.

The DOR has established transition programs called Transition Partnership Projects, designed to build partnerships between LEAs and the DOR for the purposes of successfully transitioning student/consumers into meaningful employment and/or secondary education. These programs have been developed with consumer and family member participation, and closely adhere to the values of comprehensive service linkages, career development, placement in a competitive integrated environment, and reasonable accommodations. These programs serve over 19,000 consumers annually.

3. Roles and Responsibilities:

The IA identifies the local school district as the lead agency responsible for providing transition services by qualified personnel to students with disabilities to the point of exit from school. The DOR is designated as the lead agency responsible for providing services by qualified personnel after the point of exit to those students meeting eligibility and order of selection requirements for VR services.

The DOR and the CDE have specific responsibilities as delineated by the agencies’ applicable rules and regulations. These responsibilities include the provision of services as delineated, and required by the individual’s individualized plan with each respective agency. In the development of these plans, both agencies staff will ensure that duplication of services, which may occur in those instances where responsibilities overlap, does not occur. In those cases, the primary responsibility for those services would rest with the most appropriate agency, as determined by the student’s present status and when an agency is legally obligated and funded to provide that service.

For students served by special education, the LEA has additional, specific responsibilities prescribed by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Under IDEA, the LEA is required to provide services the student with a disability requires to benefit from a free and appropriate public education. The LEA is responsible for providing a free and appropriate public education according to his/her IEP, including transition services beginning no later than age 16. The DOR has responsibility for determining eligibility for VR services that are needed to prepare for or obtain employment. The DOR is responsible for providing and paying for the transition services agreed upon in the IPE for the period that the individual is participating in the VR program as reflected in the individual’s IPE.

If the student’s/consumer’s assessed needs require the use of assistive technology in order to provide a free and appropriate public education, such equipment must be provided by the LEA for use by the student as indicated in his/her IEP or Section 504 plan, but remains the property of the state. Similarly, if the assistive technology is needed to prepare the student for the world of work, then its need must be related to the employment outcome for the transitioning student, provided in accordance with the IPE, and provided by the DOR. Equipment purchased by the DOR will remain the property of the DOR until the student’s case is successfully closed, at which time the property is given to the student.

The LEA and the DOR may develop a memorandum of understanding that includes procedures for invoicing and reimbursement of services provided or paid for by each respective agency that is determined to be the responsibility of the other.

4. Outreach:

The DOR implements several methods and procedures for enhancing outreach to and identification of students with disabilities in need of transition services, including those students with disabilities who qualify for assistance under §504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Outreach at the State Level:

The IA between the DOR and the CDE identifies outreach and referral procedures. Outreach procedures include students with disabilities served through an IEP, but also those who qualify for assistance under section 504.

The DOR and the CDE have posted the IA on each respective department’s website. The DOR has distributed the IA to interested partner agencies and all the DOR field staff in tandem with a comprehensive questions and answers memorandum, addressing joint responsibilities in providing vocational services to transition age youth with disabilities, as well as the coordinated planning process necessary to facilitate the intermediate vocational objectives and long-term rehabilitation goals for the DOR student/consumers as they leave school.

In an effort to support the provisions of the IA, the DOR has established a collaborative partner Advisory Committee represented by state and local partner agencies representatives, including the CDE, LEAs, mental health agencies and community organizations. This Advisory Committee assists the DOR in the development of policies and procedures that promote the movement of the DOR student/consumers from secondary school to post-secondary school vocational and training activities. This Advisory Committee has developed a LISTSERV, an automatic mailing list server, to their unique constituencies that allow the DOR to communicate the availability of the DOR programs and services. Members of the advisory groups present the availability and benefits of the DOR services to students with disabilities and advocacy groups such as the Developmental Disability Council, County Mental Health Directors, and Special Education Council on the availability and benefits of the DOR services to students with disabilities.

Outreach at the Local Level:

The DOR collaborates with the LEAs to provide assistance and support identifying students with disabilities that may require the DOR assistance. The DOR provides local presentations to Parent/Teacher/Student Association meetings on eligibility and program services. The DOR provides VR informational literature, DVDs and other materials regarding potential services to the LEAs and families. The DOR assigns liaison Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors to many secondary schools to provide a single point of contact for special education departments.

The DOR serves on local Workforce Investment Act youth boards to coordinate youth services and outreach strategies with Workforce Investment Act partner agencies and the LEAs. The DOR maintains an active presence in community with contacts through religious and civic organizations and non-profit organizations that serve and represent students with disabilities. This includes parent resource centers, Independent Living Centers, Regional Centers, and organizations that serve youth that are visually impaired or deaf or hard of hearing.

The DOR conducts various local activities such as disability awareness community job fairs, and workshops where youth with disabilities may be seeking employment supports.

Policy & Procedures:

To the extent possible, interested and eligible students should become DOR consumers before they leave high school. For students between the ages of 14 and 16, the primary role of VR will be to provide general coordination with the LEA regarding information and outreach activities about VR services for use in transition planning. Appropriate service coordination activities include resource information about VR, presentations, consultation and technical assistance, and handouts.

34 C.F.R. 361.22(a)(2) requires that students with disabilities who are eligible for VR services have properly signed IPE in place prior to the students’ exit from school. The DOR’s plans, policies and regulations clearly articulate this provision and the federal requirement that all individuals be served according to the designated agency’s order of selection for services (OOS). The DOR has undertaken efforts to ensure that VR transition services are provided according to state and federal requirements. Numerous directives and Questions and Answers documents have been distributed to the DOR District Administrators clarifying transition issues. Most of the DOR state VR regulations have been reviewed and adapted as necessary to ensure that the regulations apply to youth and adults without regard to age. Supported employment memorandums have been sent to the LEA and the DOR staff to clarify supported employment services for youth.

In an effort to develop the IPE for all consumers, including eligible students with disabilities, in an expedited time frame, state regulations require an IPE to be developed within 90 days of date of eligibility for an individual who has been determined eligible to receive services from the DOR and is in a priority category being served under the OOS.

To promote and facilitate coordination from the state level to the local level, the DOR and CDE identify local level administrators from their respective agencies. Each local administrator, or designee, is responsible for the coordination of transition-related activities both within his or her own agency and with other agencies. This will serve a variety of purposes, including but not limited to, the following: coordination of resource information, outreach, program information dissemination, research and evaluation, including student follow-up studies and facilitating annual meetings of interagency personnel who serve secondary students with disabilities for the provision of transition services.

The DOR and the CDE recommend and encourage the development of local MOUs, or IAs, developed at the local level to facilitate and coordinate transition services for secondary students with disabilities. State technical assistance is provided to form such agreements. To improve the coordination of transition services between education and VR at the local level, the DOR District Administrators and their staff develop MOUs, cooperative programs, and other collaborative relationships that address outreach and referral of students to the DOR. Recognizing that each of the DOR districts, county Special Education Local Program Areas (SELPAs), and the LEAs may have unique operational and staffing characteristics, local agencies work together to develop policies and procedures to ensure that there will not be a gap in the referral process for students who may need the DOR services.

The DOR District Administrators and local education administrators identify procedures for student referrals to the DOR which address the following:

• Secondary students receiving special education services in state special schools, county offices of education, and school districts.

• Secondary students with disabilities who are not receiving special education services (e.g., students served under Section 504).

• Secondary students with disabilities enrolled in court or community schools.

• Secondary students receiving special education services that are enrolled in certified, nonpublic schools.

• Secondary students served under a third party agreement (e.g., Transition Partnership Program, WorkAbility II).

• Student referral form.

• Procedures for the release of student information and designate the specific individual(s) including position, school/district, address, and telephone number who will be responsible to respond to requests for student information from the DOR.

• Operational procedures to manage student referrals under Order of Selection.

• Guidelines related to written consent.

Programs and Initiatives:

Identification of Local-Level Staff and Coordination Activities:

Qualified Personnel Responsible for Transition:

The DOR and the CDE establish and maintain standards which are consistent with state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or other comparable requirements that apply to the area in which such personnel are providing special education or related services in educational agencies and in which such personnel are providing the DOR VR services. In keeping with the goal of collaboration to support transitioning students, both the DOR and the CDE will promote the inclusion of cross-disciplinary training through both special education and VR pre-service programs.

To the extent possible, the Rehabilitation Act calls for the provision of training to staff of other agencies as to the availability and benefits of, and eligibility standards for, VR services, in order to enhance the opportunity of individuals receiving the transition services to obtain VR services.

The DOR has provided training to SELPA Administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the VR system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities.

The CDE has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by the LEAs and the DOR staff.

The DOR has established a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for the local DOR and the LEA staff. Expert consultants in their respective fields provide training modules on such topics as:

• Service Provision and Planning for Transition Age Youth with Mental Illness and with Autism Spectrum Disorder;

• Benefits Planning & Management;

• Employment Preparation, Job Development & Placement;

• System/Program Assessment, Planning and Development; and

• Business Marketing, Microenterprise, and Strategic Planning

The DOR has provided training to SELPA administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the VR system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities, including outreach activities. The CDE has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by the LEAs and the DOR staff.

Procedures for Outreach and Identification of Students with Disabilities that Need Transition Services who are not in Special Education:

Under the Rehabilitation Act, transition services are provided to eligible students with disabilities whether or not they are receiving special education services. This includes secondary students who have a disability who receive services and/or accommodations as required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the ADA. This population also includes transitioning secondary students with disabilities enrolled in public programs for general education, alternative education, and adult education. These students with disabilities are not receiving special education services and, therefore, do not have an IEP. General education instructors, special education instructors, school nurses, the LEA administrators, and One-Stop Programs serving youth with disabilities refer students to the DOR. Additionally, the DOR works with county foster care programs, adjudicated youth programs and county mental health to identify at-risk students that may not be identified by Special Education.

The DOR counselor will process referrals of students served under Section 504 and other students with disabilities in the same manner as those made for students served by special education.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2011 5:26PM by sacahoshovskyn

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has procedures for establishing written service agreements with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP)s, including private non-profit and for-profit Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) service providers. These procedures emphasize the role of the DOR in identifying needs for specific VR services responsive to the needs of persons with significant disabilities in their areas. The procedures also emphasize the role of DOR and CRP staff in monitoring the agreements, and identifying usage and effectiveness of services provided.

The DOR has a variety of fiscal reimbursement methods with non-profit VR service providers. These include contracts, grants, fee-for-service, and rates set per regulation. For-profit providers may provide services on a fee-for-service basis. Non-financial agreements with CRPs may occur through Memorandums of Understanding.

The DOR conducts annual trainings and workshops with contract service providers, the main purpose of which is to solidify and improve collaborative relationships for the enhancement of service delivery for persons with disabilities. The major areas of discussion in the workshops include the following:

• Methods to improve the partnership through open communication,

• Strategies to formalize regularly scheduled meetings,

• Ways of improving the partners’ collaborative vocational activities,

• The DOR’s contract process, and

• Strategies to improve service provider program outcomes.

Contracts, grants, and fee-for-service agreements with CRPs are developed for the delivery of assessment, training, employment, and specialized support services. All new providers of service for DOR consumers must go through a certification and approval process. The Community Resources Development (CRD) unit reviews and certifies the qualification of vendors providing services to DOR consumers in order to assure the quality of these services, as well as the safety of consumers. All VR service providers are required to maintain their CRD certification, according to the DOR Guidelines for Certification and Vendorization. CRPs providing work-related programs are required to be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).

In 2008, the DOR amended it’s regulations to include a provision to waive the CARF requirements for those CRPs for which the Department has reimbursed only an average $50,000 per year. The DOR believes having the discretion to waive CARF accreditation for these CRPs will reduce the smaller CRP’s costs and encourage CRPs in rural areas where employment preparation services are scarce. The threshold level of $50,000 will be reviewed and adjusted by the Department no less than every three fiscal years, to monitor the number of rural programs serving Department consumers within the Department’s service delivery system.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2011 11:17AM by sacahoshovskyn

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) identifies and makes arrangements with stakeholders to provide supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. For individuals with intellectual disabilities, pursuant to the Lanterman Act, California collaborates with the Department of Developmental Services (DDS), Regional Centers (RCs) and Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide supported employment services. For individuals with other disabling conditions, the DOR collaborates with local county mental health agencies, CRPs, and other partner agencies to provide for supported employment services. In accordance with 34 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 361.46 (b)(3), an Individualized Plan for Employment for consumers with an employment outcome including supported employment services must identify or describe a source of extended services.

A primary source of extended services for the DOR’s consumers with intellectual disabilities is the Habilitation Services Program (HSP). Pursuant to the Lanterman Act, California provides a variety of services to persons with intellectual disabilities through the DDS’ RCs located throughout the State. Administration of the HSP was transferred from the DOR to the DDS effective July 1, 2004. The HSP provides extended services to DOR consumers with intellectual disabilities who achieve supported employment outcomes through the DOR’s vocational rehabilitation program and who are eligible for HSP services. The specifics of this collaboration are detailed in California Welfare and Institutions Code Section 4850 et. seq. The HSP also provides placement and job coaching services to RC consumers who are placed on the waiting list when they apply to the DOR for vocational rehabilitation services under the Order of Selection.

The DOR refers to any source of extended services other than HSP as Non-Habilitation. These sources vary depending on the individual’s eligibility for other programs or availability of other resources. Extended services for individuals with mental illness may be provided by county mental health agencies, which may allocate Medi-Cal, Mental Health Services Act, or Short-Doyle funds as determined by each county. Social Security Administration Work Incentives, such as Impairment Related Work Expense or an approved Plan for Achieving Self Support, may be used. Supported Employment services provided under Veteran’s Health Administration Compensated Work Therapy Program may be used for extended services. Natural supports or private resources may also be used.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2011 7:03PM by sacahoshovskyn

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), as the designated State agency, maintains a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) designed to ensure there are an adequate supply of qualified, prepared, and trained rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the successful delivery of services to Californians with disabilities including those identified as unserved and underserved populations.

Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization (VR Mod)- VR Mod is a major departmental project that is integral to the DOR’s effort in its CSPD and includes the implementation of a new electronic records system, AWARE, and the design and implementation of a new Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) model.

Progress on the VR Mod

Substantive progress continues on the DOR initiative to implement an updated Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) service delivery program, which is designed to increase efficiencies and quality of services for consumers and which preparation for implementation began in Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010. The VRSD model is based on the formation of service delivery teams to function as an interdependent system with a consumer-centric focus to improve service delivery through clear points of contact and provide consumers with accurate information. Implementation of the VR Mod will be incremental and is designed to ensure compliance with CSPD and State regulatory requirements. The DOR will use the California Employment Development Department’s Employment Program Representative civil service classification as the Employment Coordinator (EC) for the VRSD model. The EC will provide VR services to DOR consumers and will be tracked as a CSPD classification.

Implementation of the new VRSD model began July 2011 and will be rolled out in three phases:

Phase I - Preparation and team training (July 2011-September 2011)

Phase II - Pilot the new model (October 2011-December 2012)

Phase III - Statewide implementation (January 2013-March 2014)

Phase I included preparation of procedural manuals and team training for piloting the new model. Phase II will encompass a fifteen-month Pilot of the new model in each District. During Phase III, the DOR will implement the new VRSD Statewide.

VRSD Pilot

Beginning October 3, 2011, a Pilot will be conducted on the VRSD model to identify best practices for the delivery of VR services and confirm team success in both physically co-located and geographically dispersed locations. The Pilot will consist of 16 teams Statewide and the following team members:

Rehabilitation Supervisor (RS)- The RS will supervise a unit of staff to deliver VR services to consumers; ensure consistency and compliance with Federal and State laws, regulations, policies; achieve DOR goals and objectives; coach, mentor, develop, and provide effective leadership to ensure successful VR team service delivery; direct and manage the facility operations of the team or branch office; represent the District within the unit service area; and develop and maintain effective community relationships.

Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor-Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (SVRC-QRP)- The SVRC-QRP will facilitate the effective delivery of services to consumers in a VRSD team; complete the five non-delegable functions; provide VR counseling and guidance; coordinate the team to identify the need for assessments and services; and assure the effective use of team members to monitor case movement and services.

Service Coordinator (SC)- The SC will provide, arrange, coordinate, and monitor VR service activities; collect and research information to facilitate assessments for eligibility, Individualized Plan for Employment, and case closure by the SVRC-QRP; manage case records; and complete referral packages for diagnostic services. Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (SVRCs) who are selected for the new VRSD Pilot will perform the SC duties. SCs will implement plan services and coordinate the receipt of information during the VRSD process.

Employment Coordinator (EC)- The EC will provide consumer employment preparation, job development and placement; serve as the liaison to businesses through networking, outreach, and meetings; provide disability etiquette training to businesses; promote tax incentives and On-The-Job-Trainings; and provide Job Placement Circle programs, Job Clubs, and reverse job fairs.

Office Technician - General (OT(G))- The OT(G) will provide clerical support to team members; communicate with VR consumers to expedite services; independently receive and prepare Limited Examination and Appointment Program (LEAP) and Schedule A certification for the SVRC-QRP; schedule and conduct consumer orientations; schedule and provide support to the EC at Job Placement Circles and Job Clubs; and assist consumers with the completion of authorizations for services.

VRSD Pilot Training

All team members will receive training in preparation for their roles in the Pilot. In August 2011 and September 2011, team members will learn about their new roles and responsibilities, new VR business processes, and strategies for team effectiveness during Pilot Team Formation training. In addition, the ECs will attend four days of training to prepare for their new roles, which will include labor market analysis, job clubs, and job placement circles as well as consumer employment preparation, job development, and placement services. The ECs will be helpful in rural areas where there are no external providers to perform these services. The combination of ECs and Community Rehabilitation Programs will help ensure that DOR consumers receive the necessary services in a timely manner.

State Rehabilitation Council- The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is provided an opportunity to review and comment on the development of plans, policies, and procedures necessary to meet CSPD requirements. The SRC has been represented on the VR Mod at all major collaboration points, and will continue to be represented in the coming year.

CSPD Steering Committee and Subcommittees- The CSPD Steering Committee and subcommittees have been dissolved and replaced by the VRSD Steering Committee, which is comprised of senior members from the DOR Executive, administrative, and District management as well as Subject Matter Experts (SME) to successfully design and implement a new service delivery model. The VRSD Steering Committee reviews and resolves project issues not resolved at the lower level, provides advice and insight into project management issues, and assures that adequate resources are made available to the VR Mod.

Electronic Records System/AWARE- The DOR replaced its existing case service Field Computing system with a new Electronic Records System called AWARE (Accessible Web-based Activity Reporting Environment; please see Attachment 4.11(d)). The AWARE is critical to DOR’s modernization efforts and will provide staff with better tools for case documentation, service authorization, and communications with consumers. The AWARE and VRSD projects are aligned to ensure that DOR staff have the tools and resources necessary to effectively meet the needs of applicants and eligible individuals.

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)- The DOR utilizes ARRA funds to pursue training and capacity building opportunities so staff can increase their knowledge, skills, and abilities; prepare employees for promotional opportunities within the DOR; and fund paid internships to enhance the visibility of career opportunities at the DOR. Examples of training and capacity building opportunities include, but are not limited to, Microsoft Office and Outlook 2007 training for the DOR’s screen reader and screen magnification assistive technology users; upgrade to the current Learning Management System; paid student internships; tuition support; upward mobility classes; core and specialized training for counselors; and Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) certification. The availability of ARRA funds will end September 30, 2011.

DATA SYSTEM ON PERSONNEL AND PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT

Data on Qualified Personnel Needs

References: Preprint Section 4.10 (a), 34 CFR 361.18 (a)(1)

This section describes the maintenance of an existing system for collecting and analyzing data on an annual basis on the number of personnel who are:

• Employed by the State agency in the provision of VR services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

• Needed by the State agency to provide VR services, broken down by personnel category; and

• Projected, by personnel category, to be needed by the State agency to provide VR services in the State in five years, based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

The DOR currently tracks the following CSPD classifications:

• Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor-Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (SVRC-QRP)

• Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (SVRC)

• Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind

• Dental Consultant (DC)

• Medical Consultant (MC)

• District Administrator (DA)

• Rehabilitation Supervisor (RS)

• Rehabilitation Specialist

Employees in the above classifications are required to submit documentation of their education and certification. The ECs will also be tracked in the CSPD database as a classification that provides VR services. The DOR has been authorized to hire up to 103 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) ECs. However, as of February 28, 2011, the ECs had not yet been hired and are not projected to be hired until FFY 2012. Due to the redesign, the DOR expects that the role of the SVRC will change, however these decisions will be made subsequent to the completion of the pilot.

Current Status of CSPD Personnel and Caseload Projections

As of February 28, 2011, the DOR has:

• 747 FTE SVRC-QRP and SVRC positions serving 74,902 applicants and eligible individuals with disabilities, for a ratio of counselor to applicant and eligible individuals of 1:100. At this time of national economic and State fiscal uncertainty, there is no firm evidence to indicate additional funding will be made available to increase the number of consumers served in the near future. Therefore, the DOR expects the annual open caseload levels to remain the same (approximately 76,755 cases) for each of the next four years. By retaining approximately 747 counselors, each DOR counselor will maintain an average of 103 cases.

• 6 FTE Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind positions serving 16 eligible individuals with visual impairments at the California Orientation Center for the Blind (OCB), for a ratio of instructors to eligible individuals of 1:2.6.

• 7 FTE MC/DC positions serving 74,902 applicants and eligible individuals with disabilities, for a ratio of MC positions to applicants and eligible individuals of 1:10,700. The DOR’s one DC is an intermittent employee who provides consultation, as necessary, for the 74,902 applicants and eligible individuals, and therefore is not calculated as a FTE.

• Been budgeted a proposed total of 1,881.4 FTE positions (1,789.5 permanent and 91.9 temporary help) for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2011-12. This includes 790 SVRC-QRP and SVRC positions. Supporting the counseling positions are 18.5 Rehabilitation Specialists, 123 RSs, 14 DAs, and 103 ECs.

Expected Status of CSPD Personnel and Caseload Projections

The DOR annually serves 115,000 individuals with disabilities. As noted in Attachment 4.11(b), the DOR estimates that there will be approximately 39,000 new applications for services during FFY 2012. The DOR will continue to assess staffing levels necessary to serve these consumers based upon changes in its VR service delivery. In consideration of budget constraints and the number of expected eligible individuals with disabilities, the DOR will continue to operate under Order of Selection anticipating to serve 29,000 new consumers with plan services. Of these individuals, it is projected there will be 20,300 consumers with the most significant disabilities in Category 1 and 8,700 consumers with significant disabilities in Category 2. Other eligible individuals known as within Category Three, who applied on or before March 30, 2011, will, effective May 11, 2011, be served in addition to those individuals declared eligible by Declaration of Order of Selection. As of February 28, 2011, 169 eligible individuals with disabilities were on the DOR waiting list.

The following summary of budgeted and filled permanent positions for SFYs 2010-11 and 2011-12 (not including temporary help positions) provides critical trend information related to key staffing classifications tracked within this attachment as well as the projected number of new list appointments that will be required for each classification within the next five years. The following projections are provided in SFY to be consistent with the Governor’s proposed State budget:

FTEs Proposed, Budgeted, Filled, Net Gain/Loss

Counselors (SVRC-QRP and SVRC combined)

790.00: FTE proposed 7/1/2011

790.00: FTE budgeted 7/1/2010

0.00: Net gain/loss

747.00: FTE filled 2/28/2011

735.30: FTE filled 2/28/2010

11.70: Net gain/loss

402.00: Projected FTEs required within five years to maintain existing allocations

District Administrators

14.00: FTE proposed 7/1/2011

14.00: FTE budgeted 7/1/2010

0.00: Net gain/loss

13.90: FTE filled 2/28/2011

13.90: FTE filled 2/28/2010

0.00: Net gain/loss

11.00: Projected FTEs required within five years to maintain existing allocations

Medical Consultants

9.10: FTE proposed 7/1/2011

6.60: FTE budgeted 7/1/2010

2.50: Net gain/loss

6.00: FTE filled 2/28/2011

6.10: FTE filled 2/28/2010

-.10: Net gain/loss

4.00: Projected FTEs required within five years to maintain existing allocations

Rehabilitation Specialists

17.00: FTE proposed 7/1/2011

18.50: FTE budgeted 7/1/2010

-1.50: Net gain/loss

17.00: FTE filled 2/28/2011

15.00: FTE filled 2/28/2010

2.00: Net gain/loss

11.00: Projected FTEs required within five years to maintain existing allocations

Rehabilitation Supervisors

117.00: FTE proposed 7/1/2011

123.00: FTE budgeted 7/1/2010

-6.00: Net gain/loss

119.00: FTE filled 2/28/2011

103.00: FTE filled 2/28/2010

16.00: Net gain/loss

81.00: Projected FTEs required within five years to maintain existing allocations

Teachers, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind

5.00: FTE proposed 7/1/2011

5.30: FTE budgeted 7/1/2010

-0.30: Net gain/loss

6.00: FTE filled 2/28/2011

4.00: FTE filled 2/28/2010

2.00: Net gain/loss

4.00: Projected FTEs required within five years to maintain existing allocations

Total (FTEs Proposed, Budgeted, Filled, Net Gain/Loss)

952.10: FTE proposed 7/1/2011

957.40: FTE budgeted 7/1/2010

-5.30: Net gain/loss

908.90: FTE filled 2/28/2011

877.30: FTE filled 2/28/2010

31.60: Net gain/loss

513.00: Projected FTEs required within five years to maintain existing allocations

Retirement Projections

Retirement projections were based on the ages of existing employees in CSPD classifications and the average age of retirement. Between March 1, 2010 and February 28, 2011, the DOR tracked the 38 CSPD classified staff who retired from State service and found the average age at retirement was 63, with a range of 50-73 years of age. As of February 28, 2011, fifty-six percent (56%) of DOR staff are 50 and above and will be eligible for retirement within the next five years. Currently, there are pending executive and legislative initiatives that, if adopted, may result in substantive retirements.

Retirement Projections by Classification

The following data reflects the percentage (%) of staff that are age 50 and above who are eligible for retirement within the next five years:

79%: District Administrators

68%: Rehabilitation Supervisors

67%: Medical Consultants

67%: Teachers, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind

65%: Rehabilitation Specialists

54%: Counselors (SVRC-QRPs/SVRCs)

The DOR does not currently anticipate any retirement in the Dental Consultant classification.

Staffing Projections

DAs, RSs, and Rehabilitation Specialists are typically promoted from the SVRC-QRP classification. As a result, up to an additional 103 SVRC-QRPs (11 DAs + 81 RSs + 11 Rehabilitation Specialists) may be needed to fill promotion-related vacancies within the next five years based upon DOR’s existing CSPD plan. While State civil service policies do not require employees to identify their intention to retire, available DOR information provides documentation of hiring and separation patterns of SVRCs; SVRC-QRPs; Rehabilitation Specialists; RSs; DAs; Teachers, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind; MCs; and DCs. The hiring and separation patterns for ECs will be tracked when data become available.

Appointments and Separations

The DOR annually monitors appointment and separation data of critical CSPD classifications providing VR services. These data (which reflect hires, transfers, terminations, promotions, resignations, and retirements), combined with an ongoing analysis of age at the time of separation, inform the DOR on the following projected workforce and succession needs:

Counselors (SVRC-QRP and SVRC)

118 : Appointments

73 : Separations

Dental Consultants

0 : Appointments

0 : Separations

District Administrators

1 : Appointments

0 : Separations

Employment Coordinators

0 : Appointments

0 : Separations

Medical Consultants

1 : Appointments

0 : Separations

Rehabilitation Specialists

2 : Appointments

0 : Separations

Rehabilitation Supervisors

19 : Appointments

6 : Separations

Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind

2 : Appointment

2 : Separations

Total (CSPD Appointments and Separations)

143: Appointments

81: Separations

Of the CSPD classifications tracked, thirty-nine percent (39%) of the separations reflect resignations; forty-six percent (46%) reflect retirements; and fifteen percent (15%) reflect other categories such as promotions, transfers, and terminations.

Position and Vacancy Projections

In the next five years, the DOR projects the following vacancies by CSPD classification:

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Counselors (SVRC-QRPs/SVRCs) 747 80 505
2 Dental Consultants 1 0 1
3 District Administrators 14 0 11
4 Employment Coordinators (Hiring not yet initiated) 0 0 0
5 Medical Consultants 6 1 4
6 Rehabilitation Specialists 17 1 11
7 Rehabilitation Supervisors 119 11 81
8 Teachers, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind 6 0 4
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

The DOR requests data from the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredited programs reflecting the number of students and expected graduates. As available, the DOR continues to share succession planning data with the CORE accredited programs to maximize focused recruitment into graduate programs to ensure Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals (QRP) reflect the diverse communities the DOR serves.

This section describes the development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing data on an annual basis on personnel development with respect to the:

• Institutions of higher education in the State that are preparing VR professionals, by type of program;

• Number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

• Number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

Status of Current Enrollment at the California State Universities (CSU) for Academic Year 2010-11

In California, the following six State universities support CORE accredited programs leading to a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling:

CSU Fresno (CSUF)

96: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants)

0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA

0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA

43: Graduates from the previous year

CSU Los Angeles (CSULA)

(CSULA has both a Master’s and Bachelor’s Degree program)

33: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants)

7: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA

5: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA

30: Graduates from the previous year

CSU Sacramento (CSUS)

32: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants)

2: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA

0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA

3: Graduates from the previous year

CSU San Bernardino (CSUSB)

55: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants)

0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA

0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA

0: Graduates from the previous year

San Diego State University (SDSU)

(SDSU has both an On-Campus and Distance Learning program)

146: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants)

35: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA

16: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA

36: Graduates from the previous year

San Francisco State University (SFSU)

44: Students enrolled (DOR and non-DOR participants)

0: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA

0: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA

9: Graduates from the previous year

Total (Enrollment in Academic Year 2010-11)

406: Students enrolled

044: Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA

021: Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA

121: Graduates from the previous year

Of the number of graduates during this CSPD reporting period, one was a Rehabilitation Supervisor and the remaining were SVRCs.

Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind - Graduates and Ongoing Students

Not included in the previous information are graduates and ongoing students within the two CSU Orientation and Mobility teacher-training programs:

CSULA: Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind

14: Confirmed graduates 2009-10

11: Enrolled students 2010-11

11: Expected graduates 2010-11

11: Expected continuing students in Academic Year 2011-12

SFSU: Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind

15: Confirmed graduates 2009-10

23: Enrolled students 2010-11

13: Expected graduates 2010-11

23: Expected continuing students in Academic Year 2011-12

Total (Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind)

29: Confirmed graduates 2009-10

34: Enrolled students 2010-11

24: Expected graduates 2010-11

34: Expected continuing Students in Academic Year 2011-12

Coordination with the Six CORE Accredited University Programs

To ensure effective coordination between the CORE accredited programs and the DOR, the DOR:

• Coordinates academic activities for existing DOR staff who choose to participate in graduate-level courses to obtain a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling;

• Coordinates Federally funded post-employment academic and training activities with universities nationwide;

• Collaborates with the CORE accredited programs to maximize applications for Federal grant funding to further the State and Federal public VR programs;

• Collaborates with the CORE accredited programs to disseminate application information and vacancy notifications; and

• Collaborates with the CORE accredited programs to maximize application for, and utilization of, all available Federal, CSPD, and Long-Term Training Grant funding.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 California State Universities (6) 406 44 21 121
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

The DOR partners with the six CORE accredited university programs to fully develop and implement CSPD pre-service and retraining plans. Members of the DOR’s leadership serve on Advisory Committees to each of the graduate programs and DOR staff serve as guest presenters as well as facilitators and instructors.

The DOR additionally has developed and maintains effective collaborative relationships with graduate programs in counseling and closely related fields throughout the State to maximize recruitment efforts where CORE accredited programs do not exist.

This section describes the:

• Coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated State unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare, and retain qualified personnel, including individuals from minority backgrounds and individuals with disabilities; and

• Development and implementation of an annual plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel.

Current Recruitment Efforts

The DOR actively recruits from the CSUs and is dedicated in their efforts in ensuring they hire, prepare, and retain highly qualified personnel. During FFY 2011, the DOR has taken part in the following activities:

Exams- The DOR implemented an online continuous filing exam for the SVRC-QRP classification, where 99 new SVRC-QRPs were hired; implemented an online continuous filing exam for the Support Services Assistant (General) in February 2011; and is expected to release a RS online continuous filing exam by December 2011.

Internships- The DOR collaborated with the CSUS (University Enterprises, Incorporated) and dedicated $370,000 in ARRA dollars to fund student paid internships Statewide.

Unserved and Underserved Populations- Through collaboration with the six CORE accredited university and community rehabilitation programs, the DOR continues to recruit potential applicants who have language skills and/or cultural knowledge required to adequately serve the DOR’s unserved and underserved populations.

Consumer Employment Objectives- The DOR actively supports their consumers who choose VR counseling as an employment objective. As of February 28, 2011, 178 DOR consumers identified VR counseling as an employment goal, where 15 successfully fulfilled their goal, 152 remain DOR consumers, and 11 terminated services with DOR. Of the 178 consumers, 55 were from Blind Field Services and three indicated a primary language other than English (one self-identifying as Spanish and two self-identifying as "other").

Retention- The DOR encourages membership in national and State professional associations; provides academic release time for permanent staff; supports counselors who pursue or renew their CRC certification; and provides licensure renewal fees for the MCs and DCs.

Succession Planning- The DOR participates in quarterly California Health and Human Services Agency Succession Planning and Management Workgroup meetings to identify recruitment, retention, and succession planning strategies. In accordance with Attachment 4.11 (d), Goal 6 of the 2012 DOR State Plan, the DOR is committed to identifying the highest risk positions in the DOR and developing leadership succession plans for each of those classifications.

Networking- The DOR collaborates with the DAs across the State to increase awareness of recruitment activities and encourages them to visit the six CORE accredited universities to participate in on-campus recruiting opportunities.

Diversity Officer- In February 2011, the DOR began recruiting for a Diversity Officer who will lead DOR’s recruitment, retention, and succession planning functions. A candidate was selected and will begin serving as DOR’s Diversity Officer on October 1, 2011.

National Conferences- In October 2010, one DOR executive and one DOR Project Director attended the National Council on Rehabilitation Education (NCRE)/RSA/Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) conference in Washington D.C.

National and Regional Recruitment- The DOR continues their involvement in national and regional recruitment and retention activities and working closely with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center Region IX.

Expected Recruitment Efforts

As a result of retirement, separation, and promotional opportunities, the DOR projects it will need to hire 505 new SVRC-QRPs over the next five years. During FFY 2012, the DOR will take part in:

• Collaborating with the six CORE accredited universities and providing academic program options to non-QRP DOR counselors studying for a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling;

• Reducing the number of SVRC-QRP resignations by thirty percent (30%) from the prior Federal Fiscal Year, in accordance with Attachment 4.11 (d), Goal 6 of the 2012 DOR State Plan;

• Achieving a ninety percent (90%), or higher, response rate on the Employee Exit Questionnaire, where in February 2011 the response rate was fifty-eight percent (58%), in accordance with Attachment 4.11 (d), Goal 6 of the 2012 DOR State Plan;

• Identifying the highest risk positions in the DOR and developing leadership succession plans for each of those classifications, in accordance with Attachment 4.11 (d), Goal 6 of the 2012 DOR State Plan;

• Analyzing recruitment and employee exit survey data as a strategy for recruitment and retention; and

• Attending the annual NCRE/RSA/CSAVR conference in Arlington, Virginia in the Fall of 2011.

 

The DOR continues to implement a strict standard for QRP counselors and has proposed a similar standard for RSs.

This section describes the State agency’s policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure designated State unit professionals and paraprofessionals are adequately trained and prepared, including:

• Standards that are consistent with national or State approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration requirements, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including State personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which that category of personnel is providing VR services; and

• The extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the State, the steps the State is currently taking, and the steps the State plans to take to retrain or hire personnel to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the State, including measures to notify State unit personnel, institutions of higher education, and other public agencies of these steps and the timelines for taking those steps.

This section also addresses:

• Specific strategies for retraining and hiring personnel;

• Specific time periods by which all State unit personnel will meet those standards;

• Procedures for evaluating the designated State unit’s progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time periods;

• Identification of the initial minimum qualifications that the designated State unit will require of newly hired personnel when the State unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards; and

• Identification of a plan for training newly hired personnel who do not meet the established standards to meet the applicable standards within the established time period.

Personnel Standard for the SVRC-QRP

Standard- The DOR utilizes the national standard for certification of counselors (SVRC-QRP), rather than the standard established by the State of California in 2009 (Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor Act, Chapter 619, Statutes 2009), which licenses and regulates professional clinical counselors by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.

Education and Certification Qualification- The minimum qualification for the SVRC-QRP are:

• Possession of a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from a recognized institution, or possession of a Master’s Degree in Counseling or a closely related field from a recognized institution, and successful completion of one graduate course with a primary focus on the Theories and Techniques of Counseling, or

• Possession of a Doctorate Degree, with a specific program, and doctoral dissertation with an emphasis on rehabilitation from a recognized institution and successful completion of one graduate course with a primary focus on the Theories and Techniques of Counseling, or

• Possession of an active national certification as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor.

Since the adoption of the national standard in 2006, the DOR only hires SVRC-QRPs who meet the “Education and Certification Qualification” listed above. Based upon California Civil Service Standards for the SVRC-QRP classification, the DOR no longer uses the SVRC classification to perform the five non-delegable functions. Only SVRC-QRPs will perform these functions at the counselor level.

Proof of degree and successful completion in Theories and Techniques in Counseling must be provided before applicants are considered eligible for appointment.

Proposal to Update Job Specifications- During FFY 2011, the DOR submitted a proposal to update the SVRC-QRP job specifications to support the VR Mod. Currently, this proposal is pending further evaluation and control agency approval.

Personnel Standard for the Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind; Medical Consultant; and Dental Consultant

Standard- There are currently State approved certification, licensing, or registration requirements in California for the Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind; Medical Consultant; and Dental Consultant.

Proof of Possession of Degree- Proof of possession of degree and/or licensure or certification must be provided before an applicant can be considered eligible for employment. The DOR follows State standards and is currently in compliance with 34 CFR 361.18(c)(1)(i).

Education and Certification Qualification- The minimum qualification for the Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind; Medical Consultant; and Dental Consultant classifications are:

Teacher, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind

Possession of a valid California Teaching credential authorizing the teaching of orientation and mobility to the visually handicapped and either:

• Completion of an approved graduate curriculum leading to a Master of Arts degree in Orientation and Mobility Training or Peripatology. (Candidates who are within six months of completing the required education will be admitted to the examination, but they will not be appointed until they have completed the curriculum.), or

• Two years of experience working with the blind in training in mobility skills and physical conditioning (Completion of an approved training course in the orientation and mobility in a Veterans Administration Hospital may be substituted for up to one year of the required experience on the basis of one year of training for one year of experience.), and

• Equivalent to graduation from college.

Medical Consultant

Possession of legal requirements for the practice of medicine, as determined by the California Board of Medical Quality Assurance or the California Board of Osteopathic Examiners, in addition to one year of experience in the practice of medicine exclusive of internship. Applicants who are in the process of securing approval by the Board of Medical Quality Assurance or the California Board of Osteopathic Examiners will be admitted to the examination, but the Board to which the application is made must determine that all legal requirements have been met before candidate will be eligible for appointment.

Dental Consultant

Possession of the legal requirements for the practice of dentistry in California as determined by the California Board of Dental Examiners and one year of experience in the practice of dentistry. Applicants may be admitted to the examination before meeting these requirements, but the Board of Dental Examiners must determine that all legal requirements have been met before candidates will be eligible for appointment.

Personnel Standard for the Employment Coordinator (EC)

Standard- There are neither Federal nor State approved certification standards for the EC. Therefore, the DOR will be using an existing civil service standard, the California Employment Development Department’s Employment Program Representative civil service classification.

Education and Certification Qualification- The minimum qualification for the Employment Program Representative classifications is:

• Four years of experience with the California Employment Development Department. (Candidates who are within six months of completing the required experience will be admitted to the examination; however, they must meet the required experience before being considered eligible for appointment.), or

• One year of experience with the California Employment Development Department performing the duties of an Employment Program Assistant, Range B, or an Employment Program Technician, or

• Completion of 60 semester units or 90 quarter units of college course work and two years of public contact experience providing services or information, or

• Equivalent to graduation from college. (Must provide evidence of registration as a senior in a recognized institution to be admitted in the examination, and must secure evidence of graduation or its equivalent before being considered for appointment.)

Current Effort

Proposal to Update RS Job Specifications- Updates to RS job specifications to (1) eliminate the inconsistencies that speak only of the SVRC class is under proposal; and (2) add the Master’s Degree requirement in the minimum qualifications is pending control agency reconsideration. It takes a year to revise a job specification, which includes involvement from program and exam staff, control agencies, and the unions.

Tuition Support- During FFY 2011, 41 DOR employees participated in the Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling program and are expected to complete their Master’s program in the next four years. Of these employees, 31 received tuition support through ARRA funding and 10 were supported through the RSA In-Service Training Grant. Between March 1, 2010 and February 28, 2011, the DOR utilized $219,197 in ARRA funds and $36,705 in Quality IST Grant funds to support the DOR employees pursing Master’s Degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling.

Certification and Licensure Validation of CSPD Personnel

References: Preprint Section 4.10 (c), 34 CFR 361.18 (c)(1)(i)

The DOR continues to validate the education and certification levels of all SVRC-QRPs; Rehabilitation Specialists; RS’s; Teachers, Orientation and Mobility for the Blind; MCs; and DCs. The SVRCs who meet the personnel standard may be moved into the civil service SVRC-QRP classification.

The validation status of CSPD personnel are as follows:

Counselors

602: SVRC-QRP

31: Does not meet SVRC-QRP Standard, in training (SVRCs)

114: Does not meet SVRC-QRP Standard, not in training (SVRCs)

747: Total

Dental Consultant

1: Meets state certification/licensure standard

0: Certification renewal

1: Total

District Administrators

11: Meets SVRC-QRP standard

0: Does not meet SVRC-QRP standard, in training

3: Does not meet SVRC-QRP standard, not in training

14: Total

Medical Consultant

6: Meets state certification/licensure standard

0: Certification renewal

6: Total

Rehabilitation Specialists

9: Meets SVRC-QRP standard

2: Does not meet SVRC-QRP standard, in training

6: Does not meet SVRC-QRP standard, not in training

17: Total

Rehabilitation Supervisors

85: Meets SVRC-QRP standard

8: Does not meet SVRC-QRP standard, in training

26: Does not meet SVRC-QRP standard, not in training

119: Total

Teacher, Mobility and Orientation for the Blind

6: Meets state certification/licensure standard

1: Certification renewal pending as of February 28, 2011

7: Total

Expected Effort

References: Preprint Section 4.10 (c), 34 CFR 361.18 (c)(1)(ii)

VRSD Model- On May 2, 2011, the unions were notified on the VR Mod. Implementation of the new VRSD model began July 2011 and will be rolled out in three phases:

Phase I - Preparation and team training (July 2011-September 2011)

Phase II - Pilot the new model (October 2011-December 2012)

Phase III - Statewide implementation (January 2013-March 2014 )

Phase I included preparation of procedural manuals and team training for piloting the new model. Phase II will encompass a fifteen-month Pilot of the new model in each District. During Phase III, the DOR will implement the new VRSD Statewide.

Collaboration with the Six CORE Accredited University Programs- The DOR will continue to encourage student participation in the SVRC-QRP exam by notifying all CORE accredited university Rehabilitation Counseling Master’s Degree programs on the on-line exam; encourage SVRC participation in CORE accredited Rehabilitation Counseling Master’s Degree programs utilizing both Distance Learning and on-campus programs; and collaborate with university partners to develop and implement additional outreach strategies for existing SVRCs.

Procedure for Evaluation of Personnel Retraining Progress

References: Preprint Section 4.10 (c), 34 CFR 361.18 (c)(ii)

The DOR will continue to actively recruit RSs in good standing into the CORE accredited Master’s Degree program. The DOR will closely monitor its progress to ensure the deadline for the FFY 2018 CSPD personnel standards are met. At a minimum, on a quarterly basis, the DOR will monitor the academic progress of all DOR sponsored SVRCs in current retraining plans. The information will be reported to the Directorate and the VRSD Steering Committee to ensure the DOR is on track to meet deadlines. The annual summation of CSPD activities and goals are important components of the DOR State Plan.

 

The DOR is committed to maintaining a training system that ensures all personnel receive the development and education necessary for success. Additionally, the DOR is committed, within available resources, to provide access to In-Service Training, Out-Service Training, and internal work assignments to provide growth opportunities for personal development and advancement.

This section describes the State agency’s policies, procedures, and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated State unit receive appropriate and adequate training, including:

• A system of staff development for rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated State unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement, and rehabilitation technology; and

• Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination of significant knowledge from research and other sources to the designated State unit professionals and paraprofessionals.

Current Effort

For FFY 2011, the DOR was awarded a Basic In-Service Training Grant in the amount of $333,431 ($300,091 in Federal funds; $33,340 in State funds). The Basic In-Service Training Grant funds:

• Curriculum development to ensure rehabilitation professionals have the necessary tools and skills to serve consumers;

• Trainer and participant travel;

• Facility rental; and

• Consultant services.

For FFY 2011, the DOR was awarded a Quality In-Service Training Grant in the amount of $94,444 ($85,000 in Federal funds; $9,444 in State funds). The Quality In-Service Training Grant funds:

• SVRCs pursuing a Masters Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling;

• Diversity training; and

• Training programs to build the DOR’s capacity to train their employees to utilize videoconferencing and computer-based training technologies.

Training DOR Staff- The DOR disseminated a survey to staff to determine their training needs. Data from the survey, a review of the education and verification levels of staff, an analysis of the training needs for CSPD tracked classifications, program reviews, emerging issues, and specific succession planning needs were used to develop the training plan for the year.

In-Service Training- The DOR currently provides In-Service Training through VR courses for new counseling staff and to refresh the skills of long-term staff members. The In-Service Training class curriculum is updated annually to reflect changes in statutes, regulation, policy, and best practices and is the most effective and successful forum for distributing research findings and sharing knowledge with staff. Applicable research from the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues is an example of information that is disseminated by DOR and used in discussions with local Districts. The Client Assistance Program advocates are invited to participate in this training. All counseling courses have been approved to meet the continuing education requirements for the CRC. The DOR maintains training records for each employee who has participated in either In- or Out-Service Training and collaborates with Departmental SMEs to update the material for courses such as Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling, Plan Development, and Case Assessment and Documentation. These courses are offered multiple times during the year.

The DOR’s internal partners collaborate every year to provide mandated training under California Senate Bill (SB) 105 (Chapter 1102, Statutes 2002) for the DOR staff who provide VR services to its Deaf and Hard of Hearing consumers as well as Blind and Visually Impaired consumers. The following SB 105 training were provided during FFY 2011:

• In April 2011, American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association (ADARA) training was provided in San Diego, California and entitled, "America: Riding the Wave of Change". Training included vocational counseling for persons who are Low Functioning Deaf and hard of hearing; behavior modification resources; new and improved technology; and methodology and improvement of service provision to persons who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened, deaf blind, and low functioning deaf. Each year, the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services provide training for their 48 Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf, focusing on issues affecting this population which are presented by well qualified trainers and service providers.

• In April 2011, training was provided by the Blind Field Services Division and other service providers that work with the DOR in Ontario, California and entitled, "Paving the Way Towards Employment". Training included a variety of speakers and hands on demonstrations with Adaptive Technology equipment and provided an opportunity to learn about various rehabilitation practices, services, and resources to develop effective rehabilitation strategies in career counseling and assessment; outreach, plan development, and time management; and in working with individuals who are blind, Deaf-Blind, or those who have suffered traumatic brain injury and mental illness with related vision impairment.

In FFY 2011, the DOR developed an approved Project Charter to utilize $272,150 in ARRA dollars to augment the DOR’s In-Service Training Grant’s travel funds to fulfill the training needs identified in the DOR’s training plan. This additional funding allowed the DOR to provide up to:

• Four Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling classes;

• Five Plan Development classes;

• Seven Case Assessment and Documentation classes;

• Five Diversity classes;

• Six Rehabilitation Technology classes;

• Ten Plan for Achieving Self Support and Health and Benefits Training on Work and Disability classes; and

• Four Medical Aspects (Dental) classes.

The DOR also used ARRA funds to hire Retired Annuitants to assist with the delivery of these classes and collaborated with SMEs from the field to co-train on the Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling, Plan Development, and Case Assessment and Documentation classes.

Additional In-Service Classes/Training- The DOR also provided the following classes to DOR staff:

• Six Diffusing Difficult Situations; and

• ERS/AWARE.

Out-Service Training- The DOR identified Departmental and ARRA funds to build the capacity of staff. This enhanced job-performance and prepared staff for promotional opportunities. Funding included:

• $718,969 in Departmental funds, and

• $342,666 in ARRA funds.

An additional $1,604,950 in ARRA funds was budgeted to train DOR staff on the following:

$ 700,000 Microsoft IT Training

$ 500,000 Self-Directed District Training

$ 250,000 Windmills Disability Awareness Training

$ 80,000 Specialized Training for Counselors Series

$ 20,000 Information Mapping

$ 20,000 Deaf-Related Support Services Assistant – Interpreter Skills

$ 20,000 Deaf Awareness Training for Supervisors

$ 10,000 Investigative Training

$ 3,300 Motivational Interviewing Techniques

$ 1,650 Non-Violent Communications

Leadership Development- The DOR continues to collaborate with multiple partners to ensure effective leadership development programs are available for their employees. Those programs include:

• TACE Region IX- Coordination with TACE Region IX at SDSU and educational institutions throughout the nation to provide expanded academic and certificate opportunities and develop leadership skills.

RS Academy- The RS Academy was designed to increase knowledge and skills in supervision, management, and leadership to support and facilitate the mission and goals of the DOR. During this CSPD reporting period, 16 RS’s participated in this academy.

National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute (NRLI) Executive Leadership Seminar- Seven DOR executives had already participated or are currently participating in Cohort 6, 7, or 8 of the NRLI Executive Leadership Seminar, a series of four one-week courses offered over a 16-month period for Directors, Senior Administrators, and emerging leaders of VR programs. Two Cohort 6 participants graduated in June 2010, two Cohort 7 participants will graduate in June 2011, and three Cohort 8 participants began their sessions in May 2011.

• California Health and Human Services Agency- Departments within the Agency collaborated to develop a multifaceted approach to supervision and leadership training to meet the needs of rehabilitation staff.

Supervisor Training- Departments within the California Health and Human Services Agency developed an extensive curriculum consisting of 80 hours of mandatory supervision training at the CSUS, College of Continuing Education. During FFY 2011, 13 DOR supervisors have participated in this training.

Leadership Development Academy (LDA)- Four DOR managers had already participated or are currently participating in Cohort 4 or 5 of the LDA, an academy for top level managers that develops leadership skills over an intensive seven-month period. One Cohort 4 participant graduated in 2010 while three Cohort 5 participants began their academy in April 2011.

• Sierra Health Foundation’s Health Leadership Program- One DOR executive participated in Cohort 10 of the Sierra Health Foundation’s Health Leadership Program, a five-month leadership development program designed to strengthen the leadership skills of current and potential executives at non-profit organizations and public agencies. The DOR executive graduated from this program in March 2011.

• CSAVR Fall Conference- Six DOR executives, three DAs, and three SRC members participated in the CSAVR Fall Conference in November 2010 in San Diego, California.

• Western Regional Disability Conference- Three DOR Executives and two DAs participated in the Third Western Regional Disability Conference in November 2010 held in Fresno, California.

Additional Projects- The DOR is improving their training through:

• Logistical support for the DOR’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Section and Blind Field Services Section;

• An upgrade to the DOR’s Learning Management System, in order to better track the In-Service Training of all CSPD personnel; and

• An enhanced sound system in the largest training rooms to facilitate the delivery of training to all DOR staff.

Expected Effort

During FFY 2012, the DOR will:

• Continue to work closely with the field to provide VR Mod training;

• Continue to provide Knowledge Based Training to all supervisory staff;

• Provide training support to the DOR’s Deaf and Hard of Hearing Section and Blind Field Services Section;

• Collaborate with the TACE Region IX to develop and disseminate a comprehensive Statewide Training Needs Assessment to determine the training needs of CSPD tracked personnel;

• Work closely with the DOR’s internal and external partners to train staff on the newly developed ERS/AWARE system;

• Build capacity to provide training utilizing videoconferencing technology; and

• Provide training to all VRSD Pilot team members and prepare the Pilot ECs for their new roles, which includes labor market analysis, job clubs, and job placement circles as well as consumer employment preparation, job development, and placement services.

 

This section describes how the designated State unit has personnel or obtains the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

The DOR continues to provide effective modes of communication for staff, applicants, eligible individuals with disabilities and its community partners and stakeholders based upon individualized needs. Alternate formats include, but are not limited to, Braille, reader services, interpreters, and electronic formats. Salary incentives are provided to employees who utilize specialized language skills.

Current and Expected Effort

Communication with Diverse Populations

The DOR provides effective communication to persons who are monolingual, non-English speaking, or have limited English proficiency through bilingual staff or contracting with spoken language interpreters. The DOR has initiated a telephonic interpretation contract as an additional resource. The contract provides for services to/from English, at a minimum for the following languages: Armenian, Cantonese, Mandarin, Cambodian, Farsi, Hindi, Punjabi, Japanese, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese. Additionally, significant forms and documents are translated into seven languages, a need determined by a mandatory Statewide Biannual Language Survey. The current seven languages are: Armenian, Cambodian, Cantonese, Korean, Spanish, Tagalog, and Vietnamese.

Utilizing ARRA funds, the DOR’s new:

• Video phones and Mobile Counselor equipment will enable DOR’s counselors to provide services to all DOR consumers; and

• Microphone system will integrate with the DOR’s existing Deaf-related Assistive Listening Devices (FM systems that can interface with cochlear implant devices housed at DOR’s central office) to ensure the inclusion of colleagues and consumers using the Deaf-related Assistive Listening Devices in meetings and trainings.

 

This section describes the procedures and activities to coordinate the designated State unit’s CSPD with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA). The California Department of Education (CDE) has sponsored a series of community trainings on the IDEA reauthorization, including components on transition and interagency responsibilities, attended by Local Education Agencies (LEA) and DOR staff.

The DOR and the CDE have the responsibility for providing LEAs and DOR staff with leadership, monitoring, and training; have provided training to Special Education Local Planning Area Administrators on the joint and respective responsibilities of education and the vocational rehabilitation system in the provision of transition services to youth with disabilities; and have established a core series of regional training and technical assistance curriculum designed for LEAs and DOR staff.

Expert consultants in their respective fields provide training modules that include:

Transition Age Youth with Mental Illness

• Early identification of a psychiatric disability

• Access and entry to community mental health services

• Illness management

• Transition/vocational planning and placement strategies

Autism Spectrum Disorder

• Transition support for young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

• Social support and strategies for transitioning young adults from school to work

• Natural support systems and community resources

Benefits Planning and Management

• Overview of Supplemental Security Income/Social Security Disability Insurance, Medicare/Medi-Cal, and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Work incentives

• Plan for Achieving Self Support Plans

• Impairment Related Work Experience

• Student Earned Income Exclusion

• Ticket-to-Work

• Benefits management strategies

Employment Preparation / Job Development, and Placement

• Career/job development

• Self-marketing strategies

• Tracking contacts and follow up

System / Program Assessment, Planning, and Development

• Assessment of current interagency collaborations and partnerships

• Special needs and resource issues of rural communities

• Best practices/development of a collaborative process

Business Marketing, Microenterprise, and Strategic Planning

• Understanding and writing business plans

• Marketing and communication strategies

• Support for small business development planning with Social Security work incentives

The DOR:

• Provides cross-training to LEAs utilizing multiple strategies;

• Designates SVRC liaisons to school districts to inform and support educators on DOR services and application processes;

• Participates in regional trainings, annual kick-off meetings and/or teacher in-service trainings with school districts;

• Provides informational pamphlets on services to agencies providing youth services including schools, One-Stop Centers, Regional Centers and county mental health facilities;

• Is represented on many Workforce Investment Act youth boards with educators to ensure timely and coordinated services to youth with disabilities; and

• Participates in local job fairs where youth with disabilities are seeking employment opportunities.

This screen was last updated on Aug 31 2011 5:16PM by sacaumemotok

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR), jointly with the California State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), is completing a three-phase Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) occurring during Federal Fiscal Years (FFY) 2009-2011 (from October 2008 through September 2011) in accordance with federal requirements and Section 101 (a)(15)(i) of the Rehabilitation Act. The DOR is well on schedule to complete the triennial assessment by the end of FFY 2011.

This attachment includes:

Summary of Needs: A compilation of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) needs of individuals with disabilities, including those with most significant disabilities, as well as overarching needs related to systemic and administrative issues.

Part 1: A brief summary of the CSNA Phase 1, which included an analysis of the DOR’s consumer demographic data, and was completed during FFY 2009. A more extensive summary is available in the DOR’s 2010 State Plan Update (October 1, 2008-September 30, 2009).

Part 2: A brief summary of the CSNA Phase 2, which updated consumer demographic comparisons from Phase 1, and included qualitative (anecdotal) information obtained from stakeholders through four 2009 public meetings, held concurrently with the State Plan public meetings. A more extensive summary is available in the DOR’s 2011 State Plan Update (October 1, 2009-September 30, 2010).

Part 3: A summary of the CSNA Phase 3, which includes:

• Qualitative (anecdotal) information obtained from stakeholders during 2010 and 2011public meetings, held concurrently with the State Plan public meetings.

• Quantitative data from focused surveys of stakeholders so that the DOR can identify specific programmatic needs to better serve individuals with disabilities.

• Identification of needs.

Part 4: Results of Consumer Satisfaction Survey

SUMMARY OF NEEDS:

Over the three (3) phases of the CSNA, many consumers and stakeholders were supportive of the VR and SE services provided by the DOR. Many expressed appreciation for the DOR’s commitment to serve individuals with disabilities, its continuous efforts to collaborate, and provide stakeholders with the opportunity to comment at public meetings and through surveys. They identified VR and SE needs that were being met by the DOR, which included the entire scope of VR and SE services provided by the DOR.

Input from stakeholders also reflected ways that the DOR could provide higher quality service to address their needs. Below is a compilation of 1) VR and SE needs for individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities and 2) overarching systemic and administrative needs of individuals with disabilities.

The DOR reflects its prioritization of these needs through the following two (2) attachments:

• State’s Strategies, Attachment 4.11(d): This attachment links the needs identified below to the updated DOR goals, objectives, and strategies.

• State Goals and Priorities, Attachment 4.11(c)(1): This attachment highlights the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery Modernization (VRSD) Project and the implementation and enhancement of the Electronic Record System Project (AWARE), both which aim to address the needs identified below.

VR and SE Service Needs of Individuals with Disabilities

• Training/Education – The DOR identified the need for consumers to enhance their understanding in several areas, including but not limited to: benefits planning; Assistive Technology (AT); interpersonal skills; interview skills; and job coaching (an SE service), which is particularly important for those with the most significant disabilities.

• Employment Options – The DOR identified the need for consumers to participate in more flexible employment models, which includes, but is not limited to, mentoring, internships (paid and/or unpaid), on-the-job training, self-employment, apprenticeship training programs, volunteer/community service opportunities, and seasonal, temporary, part-time, contract, and on-call work

• Outreach – The DOR identified the need for unserved and underserved populations and their families to have information about the DOR and its services in order to access VR and SE services. The DOR identified the most unserved and underserved population as 1) racial/ethnic minorities, such as Asian Americans, Latinos/Hispanics, and American Indians and 2) individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and brain injury.

• Other Needs – The DOR identified transportation and adequate housing as potentially unmet associated needs of consumers. Both impact individuals with disabilities’ ability to participate in the DOR services. These needs are more often met by services provided by other State and local entities, including community-based organizations (CBO).

Systemic and Administrative Issues

• Collaboration – The DOR identified the need to expand collaborative efforts with stakeholders including, but not limited to, Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP), SE partners such as developmental and regional centers and mental health providers, employers, the six (6) Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) university accredited programs, chambers of commerce, Workforce Investment Boards, One Stop Career Centers, other government agencies, and CBOs.

• Training/Education – o The DOR identified the need to enhance the knowledge of staff of the DOR, CRPs, and other providers in the following areas: AT, dealing with difficult situations (related to individuals with disabilities), multi-cultural diversity, and various specific types of disabilities, including ASD and brain injury. o The DOR identified the need to ensure services are provided consistently throughout the service delivery system, particularly from district to district, between counselors within a district, and amongst providers, especially relating to regulations, policies, and procedures. o The DOR identified the need for 1) employers to be aware of the abilities of individuals with disabilities and 2) employer sensitivity training. o The DOR identified the need to improve the VR service delivery system and internal administrative processes.

PART 1: SUMMARY OF CSNA PHASE 1

In CSNA Phase 1, the DOR completed an analysis of the DOR’s consumer demographic data by comparing it to other existing data sets available from the US Census, the federal Rehabilitation Services Administration, the California Department of Finance (DOF), the Social Security Administration, the California Department of Education (CDE), the California Department of Social Services, and other institutions that collect demographic data.

The purpose of the comparative analysis was to identify subgroups of individuals who are potentially unserved or underserved by the DOR, in order to serve or better serve them. Since the individuals identified in the data sets that are being compared to those on the DOR’s caseload data are not necessarily eligible for the DOR services, the DOR identifies the subgroups as “potentially” unserved or underserved. The following findings emerged after the DOR caseload data were compared to the above-mentioned data sets:

1. Based on race/ethnicity data, Asian Americans represented 4.3% of the DOR’s caseload and 11.8% of the California population.

2. Hispanics/Latinos may be proportionally underrepresented in the DOR’s caseload. However, DOR determined that due to a procedural anomaly related to entering the data fields for race and ethnicity, there is an undercount of the number of Hispanics/Latinos in DOR’s caseload.

3. Based on Social Security beneficiary data, individuals with disabilities may be most underserved in six (6) California counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Fresno, Stanislaus, and Kern.

4. Based on type of disability data, the DOR consumers with Communicative, Physical, and Psychological impairments may potentially be underserved within seven (7) counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Monterey, San Francisco, and Solano.

5. For items 3 and 4 above, both Sacramento and San Bernardino counties are potentially underserving individuals with disabilities, based on Social Security Administration and type of disability data.

6. No general conclusion can be made about rural or urban counties being unserved or underserved when comparing county population and corresponding DOR caseload size.

7. According to the CDE, there was a 109.2% increase in the number of students with autism from 2000-2001 to 2004-2005.

8. The proportion of DOR’s caseload by major impairment is comparable to national RSA figures for FFY 2008.

9. During FFY 2009, the percentage of African Americans, American Indians, and Pacific Islanders applying for DOR services exceeded their respective population percentages in California. The percentage of Hispanic/Latino applicants has been increasing and is approaching the percentage of the Hispanic/Latino population in California. The percentage of Asian Americans applying for DOR services remains less than their percentage of the State population.

PART 2: SUMMARY OF THE CSNA PHASE 2

In CSNA Phase 2, the DOR updated consumer demographic comparisons from Phase 1, and obtained qualitative (anecdotal) data from its stakeholders, through four 2009 public meetings, held concurrently with the State Plan public meetings. The results of both efforts are summarized below.

Update of Consumer Demographic Comparisons

The following findings emerged in CSNA Phase 2 after the DOR caseload data were compared to existing state and federal data, including data from CDE regarding special education students:

1. Based on race/ethnicity data, Asian Americans are proportionally underrepresented in the DOR’s caseload as compared to DOF data, followed by Hispanics/Latinos. The finding is consistent with the analysis done in CSNA Phase 1.

2. Based on Social Security beneficiary data, individuals with disabilities may be most underserved in these counties: Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Joaquin, Fresno, Stanislaus, and Kern. This is also consistent with the analysis done in CSNA Phase 1. Given that these counties represent both urban and rural areas, no general conclusion can be made about rural or urban counties being unserved or underserved – a finding that is also consistent with CSNA Phase 1.

3. Based on CDE data, the number of special education students with autism in California schools inversely increases by age, given that there are more students identified with autism in the younger ages compared to each succeeding age through 18 years old.

4. Based on CDE data, in 2008, the most frequently spoken language at home of special education students was English at 63.6%, followed by Spanish at 30.1%, Vietnamese at 1.3%, then Cantonese, Tagalog, Mandarin, Hmong, and Korean.

Public Comment at the Statewide Public Meetings in 2009

The DOR, jointly with the SRC, conducted four (4) public meetings during the Spring of 2009. The following anecdotal findings emerged from the meetings, which attracted 244 individuals in attendance, with over 70 individuals presenting and/or submitting comments. The following represents perspectives of comments provided during public meetings:

1. The DOR Program Administration: need to streamline processes to more efficiently serve consumers, including procurement of assistive technology devices and training.

2. 121 Program (American Indians): need for improved collaboration with the 121 programs and the American Indian communities, particularly in the rural areas.

3. Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP): need for improved service delivery of CRPs, particularly related to securing employment for consumers.

4. Assistive Technology (AT): need for improving the provision of AT services, including AT training and knowledge of equipment availability by both consumers and DOR counselors.

5. Supported Employment: need for improved and expanded employment services related to job coaching and training to enhance employment outcomes.

6. Cooperatives-Collaboratives: need to mirror successful programs and expand: 1) education and mental health cooperative programs and 2) interagency and intergovernmental collaborative efforts.

7. Staff Development: need for improving 1) the knowledge base of DOR staff (training), including, but limited to, the areas of AT, dealing with difficult situations (related to individuals with disabilities), multi-cultural diversity, and various specific types of disabilities ASD and brain injury, and 2) the recruitment and retention of knowledgeable rehabilitation professionals.

8. Workforce Development: need to expand employer partnerships, and provide internships, mentors, on-the-job training, and self-employment opportunities for consumers, including the unserved and underserved populations such as individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), and developmental disabilities, and veterans, migrant farm workers, ex-felons, and racial/ethnic minorities.

9. Specialized Services: need to enhance services for the deaf, hearing impaired, blind, visually impaired, deaf/blind, and blind/deaf; improve their access to AT equipment and services; and improve the Business Enterprise Program.

10. Information Services: need for the DOR to more fully utilize current technology, including webinars and teleconferences, to outreach to consumers.

11. External Affairs & Outreach: need to outreach to the unserved and underserved populations in their respective communities and break down discriminatory barriers.

12. Transition Partnership Projects (TPP): need to improve partnerships between local educational agencies and the DOR to successfully transition student consumers; need to enhance partnerships with employers to provide employment opportunities (including internships), for students.

13. Independent Living Centers (ILC): need to provide ILC consumers, including those with limited English skills, with: 1) employment training services, 2) opportunities such as internships, and 3) independent living skills, including advocacy.

PART 3: SUMMARY OF CSNA PHASE 3

The DOR will complete a CSNA Phase 3 by the end of FFY 2011 (September 30, 2011). During Phase 3, the DOR obtained qualitative (anecdotal) data from its stakeholders, through its 2010 and 2011 public meetings, held concurrently with the State Plan public meetings. The DOR is also gathering quantitative data via stakeholder surveys to identify specific programmatic needs to better serve individuals with disabilities, to the extent resources permit. The results of both efforts are summarized below.

Public Comment at the Statewide Public Meetings in 2010

The DOR, jointly with the SRC, conducted three (3) public meetings during the Spring of 2010. Anecdotal findings emerged from the meetings, which drew 187 attendees, with 70 individuals presenting and/or submitting comments.

The DOR found the following Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) needs:

1. Improve VR and SE services to individuals with the most significant disabilities, by: a. Streamlining the Assistive Technology (AT) procurement process, particularly for deaf, hard of hearing, blind, and visually impaired consumers. b. Improving AT training for consumers and DOR counseling staff.

2. Improve VR and SE services to racial/ethnic minorities by: a. Outreaching to and educating consumers and their families, particularly Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, Latinos/Hispanics, and American Indians, via community-wide campaigns and other venues. b. Enhancing the professional skills of DOR counseling staff via training classes related to multi-cultural diversity and various disabilities.

3. Improve VR and SE services to individuals with disabilities, particularly those with most significant disabilities, who have been unserved or underserved by vocational rehabilitation by: a. Co-locating DOR staff in community facilities within unserved and/or underserved areas. b. Mirroring successful partnership programs related to mentoring, life coaching, and professional job development.

4. Improve VR and SE needs of individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment systems by: a. Outreaching to and educating employers and employer-networks, including chambers of commerce and service organizations like Kiwanis and Rotary regarding the benefits of hiring persons with disabilities. b. Supporting flexible employment models for consumers, such as internships, and seasonal, temporary, part-time, contract, and on-call work, particularly in the green economy.

5. Improve CRPs within the State by: a. Strengthening the partnerships between CRPs and the DOR and sharing successful methods in reaching, educating, and training persons with disabilities. b. Streamlining authorization procedures to speed up services for consumers.

Based on these findings from the 2010 public meetings, and from those delivered in the prior year, the DOR chose to update the DOR’s goals, an effort that became part of integrating the CSNA and State Plan. More information on the Integration Initiative can be found in the DOR’s 2012 State Plan Update, Attachment 4.11 (c)(1).

Public Comment at the Statewide Public Meetings in 2011

The DOR and the SRC jointly conducted public meetings in the spring of 2011 throughout the state to solicit public input on the proposed 2012 State Plan. The meetings were held in Sacramento, Fresno, Garden Grove, and Berkeley, with Sacramento and Fresno connected through both video and teleconferencing for anyone in California to participate. Although the DOR received valuable input from these meetings, there were no identified errors of fact within the Draft 2012 State Plan and no public comment required amending the 2012 State Plan goals and priorities. The meetings drew 158 attendees, with 69 individuals presenting oral comments. The DOR also received 26 comments in writing.

The DOR found the following VR and SE needs:

• Collaborate more with stakeholders, including employers, on their needs and identify successful models of training and job development.

• Increase the engagement of families of consumers in the rehabilitation process.

• Expand opportunities and partnerships with employers and community-based organizations (CBO) to provide more internships, on-the-job training, and volunteer/community service opportunities.

• Enhance advocacy efforts for individuals with disabilities, including self-advocacy.

• Improve outreach efforts to unserved and underserved populations, including racial/ethnic minorities, rural populations, and individuals with various disabilities.

• Enhance coordination of services with providers, including the provision of training and assistive technology.

• Streamline operations, such as the application process, referrals, and service authorizations through email and on-line filings.

• Enhance collaboration with the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredited programs and other related academic counseling programs to provide internships for students and seek a workforce to address the unserved and underserved populations, such as students who are bilingual, culturally competent, and understand the needs of individuals with specific disabilities.

Focused Surveys

As part of the CSNA Phase 3, the DOR, jointly with SRC, is also conducting focused surveys of stakeholders so that quantitative data can be gathered to identify specific programmatic needs to better serve individuals with disabilities.

The purpose of the surveys is to gather stakeholder input to identify 1) the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities, including racial/ethnic minorities, unserved, and underserved, and 2) the need to establish, develop, or improve CRPs. Both of these are mandated as part of the Rehabilitation Act.

The surveys, each conducted electronically, focused on the following audiences: 1) CRPs, 2) Disability Program Navigators (DPN) through the Workforce Investment system’s One-Stop Career Centers, 3) employers, and 4) CBOs. The CRP, DPN, and employer surveys have been completed, with the CBO survey expected to be completed in early Summer 2011.

Survey Methodology

Each survey involved extensive collaboration with internal and external stakeholders on the scope of the survey, to ensure compliance with the Rehabilitation Act and to provide utility of information within the DOR. A select group of stakeholders, including the SRC, were involved with testing each survey to ensure a successful roll-out of the final product.

Surveys were conducted utilizing SurveyMonkey software. A number of the survey questions contained multiple options from which respondents could select all that applied. In addition, the survey included several Likert-style questions which asked respondents to select a response category (for example, Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Neither Agree or Disagree, Agree, Strongly Agree). To provide meaningful results, the DOR combined the "agree" and "strongly agree" categories to obtain the percentages of overall agreement. Respondents were also offered opportunities to answer open-ended questions.

Key Findings

The following are the key findings from the CRP, DPN, and employer surveys. It’s important to note that the findings from these surveys should not be viewed in isolation from the CBO survey which is being completed.

1. CRP survey

The purpose of the CRP survey was to identify the need to establish, develop, or improve CRPs. In addition, CRPs were also asked to identify needs of persons with the Most Significant Disabilities and persons with disabilities who are racial/ethnic minorities. Of the DOR’s 357 active CRPs, 141 CRPs (or 30%) responded to the survey.

Need to establish, develop, or improve CRPs:

• All CRPs rated their services as successful to some degree. Yet, many of the CRPs that provide job development and placement services ranked the success of this service as the lowest of all services provided. This may reflect the challenges faced by CRPs to develop jobs and place consumers in the current economic climate.

• CRPs cited that job development and placement services should be expanded in their CRP or in the region.

• CRP cited that their services could be improved by having more effective collaboration between the CRP and community partners, including but not limited to other CRPs, government agencies, and community-based organizations.

• CRP cited that their staff need training on various disabilities, including ASD and TBI.

Persons with the Most Significant Disabilities

• CRPs cited that needs include: 1) "soft skills” training including interpersonal skills, interview skills, and money and time management skills, 2) more employment options such as part-time, contract, and temporary work in order to achieve successful employment, and 3) transportation, which impacts their ability to participate in the DOR services.

Persons with Disabilities who are Racial/Ethnic Minorities

• CRPs cited that needs include: 1) vocational training and/or tuition assistance, and 2) adequate housing, which impacts individuals’ ability to participate in the DOR services.

2. DPN Survey

The purpose of the DPN survey was to identify ways for the DOR to improve collaboration with One Stop Career Centers to better serve persons with disabilities. DPNs were selected as a survey audience, given that they link persons with disabilities to benefit planning resource assistance, employers, and outreach organizations. As part of the survey, DPNs were asked to identify gaps in service, and what services should be established and/or expanded for persons with disabilities, including unserved and underserved populations and racial/ethnic minorities. Of the 95 California One Stops served by DPNs, 47 One Stops (or 49%) were represented in the survey responses.

Improving One Stop Services:

• One Stop DPNs cited that their services for persons with disabilities could be improved by having more effective collaboration between staff at the One Stop and community partners, including but not limited to CRPs, government agencies, and CBOs. This finding correlates with the CRP survey finding above.

• One Stop DPNs cited that their staff need training on how to deal with difficult situations (related to persons with disabilities).

Persons with Disabilities

• For all persons with disabilities, DPNs identified needs to include: 1) job coaching (short term on-the-job training, help with problems on the job), 2) more employment options such paid/unpaid internships, on-the-job training, and apprenticeship training programs in order to achieve successful employment, and 3) transportation, which impacts their ability to participate in the DOR services. The need for transportation correlates with the CRP finding above.

Persons with Disabilities who are Racial/Ethnic Minorities

• DPNs identified needs of racial/ethnic minorities with disabilities to include: 1) personal care assistance / attendant care and 2) improved communication skills of the One Stop staff to serve deaf, hard of hearing, and persons with speech disabilities.

3. Employer Survey

The purpose of the Employer Survey was to identify needs to better serve persons with disabilities to achieve successful employment. In surveying organizations with whom the DOR currently may or may not have a business relationship, employers were asked how they successfully recruit, hire, retain, and even perceive employees with disabilities.

DOR’s survey distribution strategy was multifaceted and included dissemination from DOR’s Workforce Development Section and District Administrators to multiple endpoints, including opportunities to forward survey on to external organizations/functions. As such, it was impossible to determine the total number of surveys actually distributed in order to calculate a response rate. Regardless, the total number of survey responses (20 completed surveys) result in minimal statistical relevance. The DOR does not feel it can base strategic or operational decisions on findings from these surveys.

From what responses were obtained, it appears that the DOR has an overall favorable relationship with the employer-respondents, half of which were from the government sector. Survey results also suggest that the DOR, in working with these employers, is sufficiently meeting the needs of persons with disabilities. Yet, there are findings that indicate persons with disabilities may need:

• Enhanced skills to use social and professional networking sites, including but not limited to LinkedIn and Facebook, to obtain employment. Even though many of the survey respondents indicate that they never or rarely use these electronic tools, recent studies indicate significant growth in the use of these tools, not only by job seekers, but by employers who screen job applicants.

• Employers to have more information on disability awareness or sensitivity training.

• Supervisors to know how to better evaluate job performance of employees with disabilities.

Part 4: Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

The DOR administers a Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS), developed jointly by the DOR and SRC, which asks consumers in various stages of their plan trajectory to appraise the quality and effectiveness of the services they receive. The 2010 survey suggested that consumer satisfaction would likely be enhanced by increasing the communication and time spent between counselors and consumers.

NEXT STEPS:

In addressing the needs identified in the DOR’s triennial assessment, the DOR has updated its goals, measureable objectives, and strategies, which can be found in Attachment 4.11(d).

The DOR has an ongoing commitment to examining its goals, priorities, and strategies. In the next triennial of the CSNA (October 2011 - September 2014), the DOR will continue to gather quantitative and qualitative data to analyze counties, race/ethnicity groups, and disability groups that may be unserved or underserved.

This screen was last updated on Aug 30 2011 3:48PM by sacaumemotok

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has developed the following estimates for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2012.

The DOR will receive approximately 39,000 new applications for services. Of that number, approximately 26,300 new consumers will receive plan services under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act. Approximately 2,700 will receive plan services under a combination of Part B of Title I of the Act and Part B of Title VI of the Act.

The DOR currently operates under an Order of Selection (OOS). The OOS policy for the DOR identifies three categories of levels of severity. Priority Category 1 represents individuals with the most significant disabilities; Category 2 represents individuals with significant disabilities, and Category 3 represents individuals with disabilities. For those who DOR determines it cannot serve and are eligible, they are placed on the statewide waiting list. This policy is utilized to ensure priority is assigned to those with the most significant disabilities.

Of the 29,000 new consumers to receive plan services in FFY 2012, the DOR estimates:

• Approximately 20,300 will be consumers with the most significant disabilities in Category 1.

• Approximately 8,700 will be consumers with significant disabilities in Category 2.

The DOR annually provides a range of services to approximately 115,000 individuals with disabilities. During FFY 2012, DOR expects to provide plan services to 77,000 previously determined-eligible consumers and 29,000 new consumers. Additionally, approximately 175 consumers previously on the waiting list and who applied on or before March 30, 2011 will receive plan services. As of May 31, 2011, there were 166 eligible individuals with disabilities on the DOR waiting list (Category 3).

The projected average cost per plan (for the life of each plan) is $4,600 under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and $6,800 under Part B of Title VI of the Act.

Table 1 below reflects estimated number of consumers to be served and related cost of services for FFY 2012.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
1:Consumers with the most significant disabilities Title I $123,397,047 79,787 $1,546
1:Consumers with the most significant disabilities Title VI $2,963,000 538 $5,507
2: Consumers with significant disabilities Title I $54,270,600 34500 $1,573
3: Consumers with disabilities Title I $271,353 175 $1,550
Totals   $180,902,000 115,000 $1,573

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 2:54PM by sacahoshovskyn

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

The California Department of Rehabilitation and State Rehabilitation Council have jointly modified the 2012 State Plan goals from the 2011 State Plan to reflect the outcome of the DOR’s expanded and inclusive approach to develop federal fiscal year (FFY) 2012 goals and priorities, known as the Integration Project. The Integration Project integrated the comments from the State Plan public meetings, Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) findings, and State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and DOR staff input to develop strategic 2012 State Plan goals, objectives, and strategies.

Integration Project Summary and SRC Partnership

During the spring of 2010, the DOR and the SRC conducted a series of State Plan Public Meetings to solicit comments from a broad range of stakeholders. From these meetings, the DOR received several hundred comments and recommendations.

From August to November 2010, brainstorming sessions were held with the DOR personnel, including program managers and staff, to elicit information to develop strategic goals and objectives for the 2012 State Plan. Participants were asked to respond to key questions based on:

• Stakeholder input documented in the "Summary of Public Meeting Comments" from the 2010 public meetings;

• CSNA: Summary of Demographic Findings; and,

• Professional experience and knowledge.

[See attachment 4.11(a), Needs Assessment, for CSNA methodology and findings.]

Concurrently, the SRC conducted their brainstorming session and developed and presented their recommendations on the 2012 State Plan to the DOR Director. All of the input and SRC recommendations were analyzed and synthesized into themes, which were presented to the SRC for review and analysis in January 2011. With the SRC’s concurrence, the DOR further collapsed these themes to develop the 2012 State Plan goals, which were approved by the SRC in February 2011.

The final steps in the Integration Project involved continued collaboration among cross-functional DOR teams to develop specific measureable objectives and strategies in direct support of the newly established 2012 State Plan goals.

To complete the feedback loop to stakeholders, the new DOR goals, objectives, and strategies were made available for public comment at the three (3) statewide public meetings in April and May 2011. Stakeholders attending the meetings included a representative group from community organizations, public agencies, employers, and consumers.

During the public meetings, 69 stakeholders provided verbal testimony; 26 stakeholders submitted written testimony. As in the prior year, stakeholders generally complimented the DOR for its effort and partnership to serve individuals with disabilities. As a whole, stakeholders were very supportive of the six (6) updated DOR goals, and commended the DOR with its vision.

Of the 69 speakers, 34 speakers (or 49%) directly addressed the DOR goals. Of these 34 speakers, 11 speakers (or 32%) directly expressed favorable support of the goals; only 1 speaker expressed reservation about Goal 4 in which the DOR will actively engage employers to achieve quality employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. The remaining 22 speakers who addressed the goals generally commented on strategies and activities to achieve them.

[More details on the 2011 public meetings can be found in attachment 4.11(a), Needs Assessment, for CSNA methodology and findings.]

Priorities

The DOR will continue to implement significant system changes, including the Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery Modernization (VRSD) Project and the implementation and enhancement of the Electronic Record System Project (AWARE).

During FFY 2012, the DOR will continue advancing existing strategic initiatives, including the VRSD; AWARE; and other initiatives regarding DOR infrastructure. Since these initiatives seek to cost-effectively improve processes, they are linked to Goal 5, which focuses on continuous improvement and Goal 6, which focuses on meeting our workforce needs. Furthermore, it is expected that these initiatives will positively impact the quality and quantity of employment outcomes (Goals 1 and 2).

RSA Standards and Indicators

The State Plan goals are consistent with the RSA Standards and Indicators. The DOR’s goals regarding the quality and quantity of employment outcomes (Goals 1 and 2) directly relate to RSA Indicators 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5. The DOR’s continuous improvement goal (Goal 5) is expected to result in improved performance on standards and indicators. Within the advancing equality goal (Goal 3), the DOR examines RSA Standard 2.1 on Minority Background Service Rate.

The DOR has successfully passed the RSA Standards and Indicators for FFYs 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009. In FFY 2010, the DOR was not able to pass, primarily as a result of California’s economic crisis. The 2012 State Plan goals and priorities were developed with serious consideration of passing the RSA Standards and Indicators in FFY 2012.

2012 State Plan Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Program Goals

As a result of the fully integrated development process, the DOR amended the 2012 State Plan Update goals as follows:

Goal 1: VR and SE consumers will achieve quality employment outcomes through DOR services, as measured by wages, employer-provided benefits, and consumer satisfaction.

Goal 2: The DOR will increase the quantity of VR and SE employment outcomes.

Goal 3: The DOR will advance equality, accessibility, and independence for persons with disabilities, including unserved and underserved populations.

Goal 4: The DOR will actively engage employers to achieve quality employment outcomes for persons with disabilities.

Goal 5: The DOR will continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations to better serve consumers.

Goal 6: As a model employer, the DOR will attract, develop and retain a diverse and highly skilled workforce.

[See attachment 4.11(d), State Strategies, for discussion of objectives and strategies established to achieve these goals.]

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2011 6:51PM by sacahoshovskyn

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Since 1995, the Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) has operated its vocational rehabilitation services program under an Order of Selection (OOS) process. The OOS Policy is utilized to ensure that individuals who are the most significantly disabled have priority for services. The policy was last changed in State Plan 2003 to significantly streamline and shorten the time required to assess priority status of individual consumers. The DOR is operating under its OOS process in State Fiscal Year 2011-2012 (July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012), as requests for DOR services are expected to exceed budgetary and staff resources. The DOR establishes its OOS Declaration based on a State Fiscal Year cycle to be consistent with the Governor’s state budget.

If DOR cannot serve all individuals who are eligible, it will place them on a statewide waiting list. DOR ensures that those eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria will have access to services provided through information and referral pursuant to CCR §7037. The waiting list is reviewed annually to assure that services are being provided on a statewide basis and that the determination of priority category does not bar or discriminate against any eligible individual based on the factors specified in CCR §7050(b).

 

Description of Priority categories

Most significantly disabled is defined by California Code of Regulations (CCR) §7051(C) as an eligible individual who has a serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in at least four functional capacity areas; whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services and can be expected to require an extended period of time and who has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from amputation, arthritis, autism, blindness, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, acquired traumatic brain injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, HIV infection, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, musculo-skeletal disorders, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), spinal cord conditions (including paraplegia and quadriplegia), sickle cell anemia, specific learning disability, end-stage renal disease, or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitation.

Significantly disabled is defined by CCR §7051(B) as an individual who has a serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in at least one functional capacity area, whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services and can be expected to require an extended period of time and who has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from amputation, arthritis, autism, blindness, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, acquired traumatic brain injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, HIV infection, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, musculo-skeletal disorders, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), spinal cord conditions (including paraplegia and quadriplegia), sickle cell anemia, specific learning disability, end-stage renal disease, or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitation.

"Disabled" is defined by CCR §7051(A) as an individual who has no serious limitation in terms of an employment outcome in any functional capacity area; or whose vocational rehabilitation is not expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services; or whose vocational rehabilitation is not expected to require an extended period of time.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Under its OOS process, the DOR will provide services in the following order:

Priority Category 1: Individuals with the most significant disabilities

Priority Category 2: Individuals with significant disabilities

Priority Category 3: Individuals with disabilities

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

The DOR establishes its OOS Declaration based on a State Fiscal Year. From July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012, the DOR will provide the full range of services to those individuals with the most significant disabilities regardless of application date; to those with significant disabilities who apply for services on or before June 30, 2012; and, to all other eligible individuals with disabilities who applied on or before March 30, 2011.

Table 1 below reflects the DOR estimates for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2012.

The OOS Declaration for State Fiscal Year 2011-2012 is as follows:

*****************************************************************************

DECLARATION OF ORDER OF SELECTION FOR VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES

Whereas, on August 18, 1995, the Department of Rehabilitation (Department) first declared that the Department was under Order of Selection for Vocational Rehabilitation Services and determined that no priority categories could then be served, and,

Whereas, on June 21, 2010, effective July 7, 2010, the Department’s Director declared that projected resources were not adequate to serve all categories and that resources were adequate to serve those priority categories that include those individuals with the most significant disabilities, also known as Category One, regardless of the date of application, those individuals with significant disabilities, also known as Category Two, who applied on or before June 30, 2011, and those individuals with disabilities, also known as Category Three, who applied on or before March 30, 2011, and,

Whereas, on May 6, 2011, effective May 11, 2011, the Department Director declared that the annual declaration of order of selection issued June 21, 2010 was modified to serve individuals who are significantly disabled, known as within Category Three, who applied on or before March 30, 2011, and,

Whereas, the Department has reviewed projected resources and projected costs, for this next fiscal year as provided by Title 9, California Code of Regulations, Section 7052(a) and determined that projected resources continue to be inadequate to meet all the projected costs of applicants; and that projected resources remain sufficient only to continue to serve individuals with the most significant disabilities, regardless of application date, individuals with significant disabilities who apply on or before June 30, 2012 and, all other eligible individuals with disabilities who previously applied on or before March 30, 2011.

Now, therefore, I, Anthony “Tony” P. Sauer, Director of the Department of Rehabilitation, declare that effective July 6, 2011, priority categories that include individuals with the most significant disabilities, also known as within Category One, regardless of the date of application, and individuals with significant disabilities, also known as within Category Two, who apply on or before June 30, 2012, and other eligible individuals, known as within Category Three, who applied on or before March 30, 2011, shall be served.

Dated: June 21, 2011

Original Signed by Director Sauer

_________________________

ANTHONY “TONY” P. SAUER

DIRECTOR

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 80,325 8,092 8,144 FFY 2012 $126,360,047
2 34,500 3,493 3,515 FFY 2012 $54,270,600
3 175 58 59 FFY 2012 $271,353

This screen was last updated on Aug 30 2011 3:49PM by sacaumemotok

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

The DOR utilizes all funding provided under Section 622 of the Act for the provision of Supported Employment (SE) services for eligible individuals. The DOR’s goals with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 are to provide supported employment services to a wide variety of individuals with disabilities, including but not limited to persons with traumatic brain injury/acquired brain injury, mental health disability, autism spectrum disorders, and intellectual disabilities. The priorities are to identify funding sources for extended services; to advocate for evidence-based practices, where appropriate; and, to work collaboratively with extended service providers and sources of extended services, including natural supports.

Individuals provided with SE services:

• Are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services,

• Are determined to be individuals with the most significant disabilities, and

• Have selected SE as the appropriate employment outcome, following a comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation career and job needs.

SE services include situational assessment, job placement, and job coaching.

For the 2012 State Plan, it is expected that DOR will expend all funds made available under Section 622. It should be noted, that Title VI, Part B Funds only make up 8.9% in FFY 2010 and 8.9% in FFY 2011 of the DOR’s annual commitment of resources for SE programs that serve the most significantly disabled consumers. In addition to the funds available under Section 622, the DOR utilizes Title I funds as necessary to meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities who are determined, based on the above criteria, to be eligible for SE services

The DOR goals and priorities for the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Act for Supported Employment are also noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and further described in Attachment 4.11(d):

Goal 1: VR and SE consumers will achieve quality employment outcomes through DOR services, as measured by wages, employer-provided benefits, and consumer satisfaction.

Goal 2: The DOR will increase quantity of VR and SE employment outcomes.

Objectives and strategies for the Supported Employment Program are identified in Attachment 4.11(d): State Strategies.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2011 2:50PM by sacaadamsm

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

The California Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) established the following Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment program goals, measureable objectives and strategies for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2012.

Section I: Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Program Goals, Objectives and Strategies

Goal 1: VR and SE consumers will achieve quality employment outcomes through DOR services, as measured by wages, employer-provided benefits, and consumer satisfaction.

Objective 1.1: During FFY 2012, the DOR will maintain the number of consumers earning at or above federal minimum wage as measured by earnings data at case closure.

Objective 1.2: During FFY 2012, the DOR will maintain the number of consumers at successful closure with health insurance available through the employer, at the same level as FFY 2011, as measured by whether or not health insurance is provided via employment at case closure.

Strategies:

1. The Workforce Development Section (WDS) in collaboration with District Employment Specialists, Rehabilitation Counselors and Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) will outreach to employers who offer employer-sponsored health benefits.

2. The DOR will continue Public Employment Initiatives at all levels of government, including promoting Schedule A and Limited Examination and Appointment Program, an alternate process administered by the California State Personnel Board designed to facilitate the hiring of individuals with disabilities.

3. The CRPs and the DOR staff will assist consumers receiving public benefits in accessing and navigating the www.disabilitybenefits101.org website to address concerns regarding impact of employment on public benefits, including Veterans benefits.

Objective 1.3: During FFY 2012, the DOR will maintain the number of respondents to consumer satisfaction surveys who cumulatively respond that they either strongly agree or agree with the statement, “I am satisfied with services from DOR,” at the same level as FFY 2011.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Provide the DOR counselors with training opportunities on assessment and current career counseling trends and practices to enhance their ability to support consumer informed choice in the selection of Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) goals and services leading to successful employment.

2. Continue to prioritize case reviews for quality assurance using the most current monitoring and tracking tools available.

3. Provide statewide leadership on maximization of employment outcomes through meaningful employment and informed choice.

Objective 1.4: During FFY 2012, the DOR will maintain the average wage of SE consumers at case closure compared to the average wage of SE consumers at case closure in FFY 2011.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Disseminate information to the DOR staff and stakeholders on alternative and/or supplemental support strategies, such as "natural supports" to increase the effectiveness and availability of SE services.

2. Promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders for the purpose of exploring the "Employment First" model.

3. Research and evaluate innovative programs and practices to identify the most effective academic, vocational, and social interventions for persons with intellectual disabilities in a post-secondary setting.

4. Continue to provide statewide leadership to support the development of local/regional consortiums of SE Partners (e.g., local educational agencies, regional centers, employers, mental health providers, veterans organizations) to identify state and federal grants and other resources to augment state SE resources.

Goal 2: The DOR will increase the quantity of VR and SE employment outcomes.

Objective 2.1: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the number of successful employment outcome closures for all consumers compared to FFY 2011 as measured by RSA standard 1.1.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Provide comprehensive field training to Rehabilitation Counselors, the DOR partner agencies and CRPs on employment preparation, job development and placement for consumers with multiple barriers to employment.

2. With partners, provide training and technical assistance for the DOR staff, community partners and stakeholders related to SSA work incentives including Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS) plans, on-line benefits planning tools and benefits calculators.

3. Develop and expand resources for CRPs providing vocational services to consumers with Acquired Brain Injuries (ABI) and Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI).

4. Continue to reinforce tools for developing On-the-Job Training (OJT) agreements to provide the DOR consumers with opportunities for employment.

5. Equip the DOR offices with additional technology and internet access to provide consumers with greater supported and self-directed job search resources, including Assistive Technology that will support both blind and visually impaired consumers and deaf and hard-of-hearing consumers.

6. Partner with the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) to provide consultation, technical support and training to Federal Contractors to ensure compliance and facilitate the hiring and retention of individuals with disabilities.

7. Present the award-winning Windmills Program to Federal Contractors and other employers throughout the state to address misconceptions about employees with disabilities and to reduce barriers to employment resulting from these misconceptions.

8. Actively participate in local business organizations such as Chambers of Commerce to support business recruitment efforts of Persons with Disabilities and to provide technical support to member businesses to facilitate the hiring of individuals with disabilities, particularly by small business.

Objective 2.2: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the number of successful employment outcome closures compared to FFY 2011 for those who at application for vocational rehabilitation services were 24 years of age or younger, regardless of the date of application.

Strategies:

The DOR:

1. Will develop a Steering Committee to address outreach strategies, service coordination, and vocational preparation & support for Transitional Age Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

2. With local and state education agencies will establish programs for foster care youth with disabilities that provide successful training and employment services.

3. Will sponsor the California Youth Leadership Forum for youth that demonstrate leadership potential to make a successful transition from school to work.

4. Will continue to support and develop programs with the California Department of Education that meet the unique needs of transition age youth that are deaf and hard of hearing and/or blind and visually impaired.

Objective 2.3: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the number of successful SE employment outcome closures compared to FFY 2011.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Establish pilot projects with community colleges to provide academic supports, increased access to financial aid grants, and employment services to persons with intellectual disabilities.

2. Provide short-term, community-based training to community partners, businesses, and the DOR staff to increase awareness, and to facilitate and enhance the provision of VR services and placement strategies for persons with ASD.

3. Explore and disseminate information to the DOR staff on job retention strategies, work incentives, and resources to facilitate and increase the availability of extended services for a wide range of non-traditional disability groups, e.g., veterans with TBI, individuals with mental health disabilities, etc.

Goal 3: The DOR will advance equality, accessibility and independence for persons with disabilities, including unserved and underserved populations

Objective 3.1: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the percentage of Asian Americans with disabilities who apply for services as measured in relation to all applicants by 10% over FFY 2011. [Target = % of FFY 2011 Asian Americans applicants x 1.10 (10%)]

Objective 3.2: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the percentage of Hispanic/Latino with disabilities who apply for services as measured in relations to all applicants by 10% over FFY 2011. [Target = % of FFY 2011 Hispanic/Latino applicants x 1.10 (10%)]

Objective 3.3: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the percentage of Asian American consumers who develop an IPE as measured in relation to all developed IPEs by 7% over FFY 2011. [Target = % of FFY 2011 Asian American consumers whose IPEs are implemented x 1.07 (7%)]

Objective 3.4: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the percentage of Hispanic/Latino consumers who develop an IPE as measured in relation to all developed IPE’s by 7% over FFY 2011. [Target = % of FFY 2011 Hispanic/Latino consumers whose IPEs are implemented x 1.07 (7%)]

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Engage the Public Information Office (PIO) in conjunction with bilingual/bicultural staff to outreach to newspapers, radio, internet sites, and TV stations that serve the Asian American and Latino communities regarding the DOR services.

2. Develop collaborative relationships with community-based agencies that serve Asian American and Latino populations, and develop these agencies as referral sources. The DOR will also identify community-based organizations that have an expertise providing vocational rehabilitation services to Asian American and Latino populations to improve outreach and increase VR services and outcomes. The DOR will also develop and implement a sustainability plan to ensure the efforts are viable and have long-term supports.

As part of its ongoing broad based outreach effort to hire a culturally diverse staff to meet workforce planning needs, ensure staff are able to meet the linguistic and cultural needs of identified unserved and underserved populations. In part, this will be accomplished through continued collaboration with each of the six CORE accredited university programs to maximize the number of students participating in internships at the DOR.

Goal 4: The DOR will actively engage employers to achieve quality employment outcomes for persons with disabilities.

Objective 4.1: During FFY 2012, the DOR will create at least 5 new employer accounts in each District.

Strategies:

The DOR:

1. Workforce Development Section (WDS) will partner with Districts to develop new employer accounts.

2. Districts will continue to collaborate with local Workforce Investment Boards and associated One Stop Centers to develop employer linkages and increase outcomes for the DOR consumers.

3. Employment Preparation Services (EPS) staff will provide Windmills training to local Chambers of Commerce, Rotary Clubs, and other employers to increase disability etiquette awareness, and to increase networking and employment outcomes for the DOR consumers.

Objective 4.2: During FFY 2012, the DOR will increase the number of successful Federal employment outcome closures by at least 50 over the FFY 2011 level.

Strategies:

The DOR:

1. WDS will facilitate training of the DOR staff to fulfill the Federal mandate in California by placing people with disabilities in Schedule A positions.

2. Will develop webinars for federal employers, the DOR EPS staff, and community partners to train on the Schedule A hiring process.

3. Will outreach to each regional office of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance to increase quality employment outcomes of people with disabilities and those with ethnic and cultural differences, especially Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans and African Americans.

Goal 5: The DOR will continuously improve the service delivery system and administrative operations to better serve consumers.

Objective 5.1:

By June 30, 2012, 100% of the DOR geographic districts and Blind Field Services (BFS) district will implement and utilize the referral module in the DOR’s new electronic records system, AWARE, to track and monitor referrals of individuals with disabilities who express an interest in vocational rehabilitation services.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Reinforce its existing policy for processing incoming referral sources and tracking outgoing referral outcomes using AWARE with the concurrence of the SRC, including referrals of individuals made through the One-Stop service delivery systems established under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

2. Provide an AWARE Reference Guide to field staff with step-by-step instructions on the new procedures.

3. Revise Referral Forms in the AWARE forms and letters catalogue for effective communication of referral information to consumers.

4. Provide additional training on VRSD team roles & responsibilities pertaining to information and referral in Vocational Rehabilitation Modernization Project (VR Mod) Training.

5. Prepare for the revision of the Rehabilitation Administrative Manual (RAM) 30 - Record of Services and the RAM 30 Toolbox, including posting links on the DOR’s Intranet site (“InDOR”) for the DOR employees.

Objective 5.2: During FFY 2012, the DOR will reduce by 10% the number of consumers whose record of services is closed in status 08, 30, or 28 with a reported reason for closure as "unable to locate, contact, or moved."

Strategies:

1. The VR Mod Evaluation and Assessment Plan team will implement monitoring and evaluation of specific vocational rehabilitation service delivery (VRSD) business processes.

2. The VR Mod Training Plan Team will develop a centralized learning content management system (LCMS) to include a repository of training content and resources that will support the implementation and ongoing development of the VRSD teams.

3. The DOR will clearly articulate the VRSD team members’ roles and responsibilities in maintaining appropriate contact with applicants and eligible individuals.

4. All districts will be responsible to ensure that VRSD teams are empowered with the necessary knowledge, skills, and available training resources necessary to maintain regular contact with all applicants and consumers.

5. The DOR Information Systems and Services Branch (ISSB) will complete a written plan to further explore new/emerging information technologies to better equip our counselors to provide vocational rehabilitation services.

6. As part of that plan, ISSB will research, evaluate and develop a cost/benefit analysis to determine feasibility and usability of deploying supported emerging technologies statewide.

Objective 5.3: During FFY 2012, at least 85% of the consumers’ IPEs will be developed and approved within 90 days of date of eligibility or date of removal from the waiting list.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Review and revise the DOR case service forms for the purpose of consolidating and uploading relevant forms to the AWARE forms catalog.

2. Eliminate a self-imposed additional 30 days to determine Level of Significance of Disability (LSOD). The AWARE roll-out will include the combined Eligibility and Priority for Services processes.

3. Provide interim policy guidance to ensure that field staff follows the new streamlined process that eliminates a self-imposed Level of Significance of Disability (LSOD) procedure until a regulatory change can be made in the California Code of Regulations.

4. Information Systems Services Branch (ISSB) will lead the evaluation of the available AWARE modules (i.e., mobile desktop and contracts and procurement) to further streamline the DOR administrative processes.

Objective 5.4: By September 30, 2012, all DOR consumers and staff will have access to an internet-based data base to provide increased involvement and informed choice of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and Individual Service Providers.

Strategies:

1. CRD will assemble an ad hoc workgroup of representatives from CRPs to finalize all data elements to be included in the database.

2. In concert with the ad hoc workgroup, CRD will develop specific tools, including CRD database and AWARE reports, to effectively monitor and evaluate service provider performance and consumer outcomes.

Goal 6: As a model employer, the DOR will attract, develop, and retain a diverse and highly skilled workforce.

Objective 6.1: By September 30, 2012, reduce the number of SVRC-QRP resignations by thirty percent (30%) from the prior Federal Fiscal Year.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Review and analyze the DOR appointment and separation data from Federal Fiscal Year 2011.

2. Review and analyze data from the Employee Exit Questionnaire to identify the reasons for separation.

3. Design and implement an outreach campaign that will promote a positive image for the DOR and maintain career interest from existing, highly skilled, diverse, and qualified professionals.

4. Continue to work toward compensation for vocational rehabilitation staff that is competitive in the labor market and commensurate with industry standards.

5. Promote the benefits of and utilize information from employee Individual Development Plans to establish an employee’s personal plan for career development, upward mobility, and training opportunities.

Objective 6.2: By September 30, 2012, achieve a ninety percent (90%), or higher, response rate on the Employee Exit Questionnaire. In February 2011, the response rate was fifty-eight percent (58%).

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Increase awareness and educate employees on the questionnaire through the DOR’s Intranet website and video conferencing.

2. Design and implement a marketing campaign that emphasizes the importance of the questionnaire and encourages an employee’s timely response.

3. Track and analyze data results from the questionnaire to ensure we meet the target percentage.

4. Recruit and hire a Diversity Officer, as soon as allowed by State hiring freeze restrictions, to, along with other essential functions, maintain, administer, and evaluate the results from the questionnaire.

5. Annually review and evaluate questionnaire effectiveness.

Objective 6.3: By September 30, 2012, identify the highest risk positions in the DOR and develop leadership succession plans for each of those classifications.

Strategies:

The DOR will:

1. Identify the highest risk classifications.

2. Utilize the Federal Information Security Management Act assessment tool to assist with the risk analysis of the identified classifications.

3. Develop and implement leadership succession plans for each classification.

4. Design an outreach and marketing campaign that will recruit highly skilled and qualified professionals to consider a career with the DOR.

5. Continue participation with the California Health and Human Services Agency’s Workforce and Succession Planning and Workforce Management Workgroup and incorporate strategies appropriate for the DOR into the leadership succession plans.

6. Identify and recommend specific departmental or statewide open examinations in preparation toward workforce succession planning.

7. Collect and analyze data that projects retirement and employee attrition within the next five years.

Section 2: Additional Required Strategies

1. Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities. a. The Information Systems Services Branch (ISSB) will explore the DOR’s capacity to provide language translation software to appropriate field users to improve case recording efficiencies for those working with monolingual (non-English) or bilingual populations. b. The ISSB will work with the appropriate program staff to monitor, assess and develop enhancements for financial and case service interfaces in order to plan for full decommissioning of the Field Computer System. c. The ISSB will develop an itemized list of requirements for AWARE enhancements, and identify associated "Innovation & Expansion" costs necessary for the implementation of the VR Modernization project (VR MOD). d. The Employment Preparation Services (EPS) / Specialized Services will implement a referral module in AWARE to better identify and evaluate incoming "Interested Person" referral sources and track outgoing referral outcomes. e. The Collaborative Services Section will provide statewide leadership on methods to conduct local outreach to transition age youth and their parents regarding the DOR services, including those with Acquired Brain Injuries /Traumatic Brain Injuries, Asperger’s and Autism Spectrum Disorders. f. The Workforce Development Section (WDS) will provide training opportunities to EPS / Specialized Services staff using Windmills and other methodologies to ensure customer service competencies for assisting people with disabilities are attained. g. The WDS will evaluate the Mobile Counselor Project to develop recommendations for future consideration and statewide implementation. h. The WDS will purchase assistive technology for the DOR job clubs to enable consumers to access needed equipment and software necessary for career exploration and job search activities. i. The Social Security Programs Section will continue to provide training opportunities to EPS/Specialized Services staff on Social Security work incentives, including the Plan to Achieve Self-Support (PASS). j. The Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Section (DHHS) will procure videophone equipment for counselors serving deaf and hard of hearing consumers to enable direct (visual) telephonic communication with deaf and hard of hearing consumers, which will improve the delivery of vocational rehabilitation counseling and services. k. The DHHS will develop an orientation video in American Sign Language to better educate deaf and hard of hearing persons and consumers who rely on ASL as their primary mode of communication on the DOR services.

2. Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process.

The DOR has emphasized that providing assistive technology services and devices is an important goal for each consumer at every stage of the rehabilitation process.

The DOR’s State regulations and policies support the availability of assistive technology services and devices at all stages of the rehabilitation process from initial interview through case closure, including training on the use of assistive technology devices. a. California Code of Regulations (CCR) Sections 7029.1, 7051, 7062 and 7131 clearly indicate assistive technology services and devices should be considered at each stage of the rehabilitation process for all applicants and consumers. b. The California Welfare and Institutions Code, Section 19096(d)(6), provides for technical assistance to the DOR in the area of assistive technology needs for individuals who are blind, visually impaired, deaf and hard of hearing. c. Pursuant to Senate Bill 105, the DOR provides annual in-service training to the Rehabilitation Counselors for the Blind (RCBs) and Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf (RCDs) to enhance their professional competencies, including in the area of assistive technology.

The DOR provides access to technical assistance and a wide range of trainings in the area of assistive technology. a. The DOR employs a Statewide AT Services Coordinator to assist the DOR staff with technical assistance and guidance. b. The DOR Staff Development Section offers Mapping Rehabilitation Technology, Rehabilitation Technology and an overview of Assistive Technology services and devices during Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling. c. Beginning in 2012, additional no-cost trainings will be available to the DOR staff through the AT Network. Trainings will be posted monthly on the DOR Intranet in the AT Corner. In addition, information about AT devices will be posted for staff to learn about a variety of assistive technology services and devices.

The DOR also provides consumers with their rights and remedies for all decisions made during the life of their case, including decisions made for assistive technology services and devices.

3. Describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

The DOR provides statewide leadership in the area of assistive technology services and devices. The DOR houses the California Assistive Technology Systems (CATS), a statewide program federally funded through the Assistive Technology Act of 1998, as amended in 2004. Through a statewide contract, CATS provides a variety of assistive technology services including:

a. Device Loan Program: Short-term loans (up to one month and can be renewed)

b. Device Reutilization Program: a web-based program for individuals and organizations to list devices for sale. In 2012, a new program will begin for repair and refurbishment of assistive technology devices.

c. AT and Transportation Loan Guarantee Program: an individual with a disability, family member or legal guardian of a child with a disability and an employer (only for the AT Loan Program) can apply for a loan to purchase a vehicle, modifications for a vehicle, assistive technology services and assistive technology devices. The DOR guarantees all approved loans.

In addition, the statewide contractor provides public education, outreach, technical assistance, coordination and collaboration, and information and referral services throughout the state as required under the AT Act of 1998, as amended in 2004, as well as through Social Security Reimbursement funds (AB 204) as specified in the California Welfare and Institutions Code 19800-19806.

In order to provide statewide information and referral services, known as the AT Network, the contractor has an 800 number as well as a website, www.atnet.org. This website offers an AT services directory to find AT service providers and AT devices as well as links to find service providers for the AT Device Loan Program and a searchable database for the AT Reutilization Program.

4. Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities.

Please see outreach procedures identified in Section 1 of this attachment within Goal 3, Objective 3.1, and strategy number 4 of Objective 6.2.

5. Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

The DOR’s Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment identified Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations as underserved on a statewide basis.

The DOR will continue to identify population demographics for the state and the DOR district catchment areas, including information on ethnicity. This, combined with caseload information, will further determine geographical areas in which outreach efforts are successful and continue to be warranted. Outreach strategies include counselors having access to mobile technologies. Additionally, the DOR is hiring a diversity coordinator. This diversity coordinator will collaborate with each of our districts to develop and implement focused recruitment efforts.

The DOR will develop multi-cultural and multi-lingual outreach materials to assist the DOR staff in outreach efforts to Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations locally. The DOR staff will continue to work in remote underserved locations to provide outreach and improve access to services for Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations.

The DOR will develop collaborative working relationships with community based agencies that serve Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations, and develop these agencies as referral sources. The DOR will also identify community based organizations that have an expertise providing vocational rehabilitation services to Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations to improve outreach and increase VR services and outcomes.

As part of the DOR’s ongoing broad based outreach effort to hire staff, to meet the linguistic and cultural needs of identified unserved and underserved populations. In part, this will be accomplished through continued collaboration with each of the six CORE accredited university programs to maximize the number of students participating in internships at the DOR. In addition, the DOR will create a statewide Diversity Officer position at headquarters that will be responsible for the development and coordination of the DOR’s Diversity Outreach Program; to establish and lead a department-wide Diversity Advisory Council; and to develop methods to monitor, measure, and communicate the effectiveness of the DOR’s diversity initiative.

The DOR will continue to monitor its caseload as it relates to ethnicity, particularly for Asian American and Hispanic/Latino populations to measure/evaluate/assess the result of outreach efforts.

6. Identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs, if applicable.

The Community Resource Development unit and Collaborative Services Section of the DOR work with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) and the DOR districts to ensure services provided by community partners address the needs of the DOR consumers. a. The DOR will provide training to CRP staff in Essentials of Non-Profit Management, Benefits and Employment, Dealing with Difficult Clients, and Grant writing. b. The DOR will work with CRPs to establish performance measurements. c. CRD will train the DOR District staff on using the new CRD web enabled database system to gather and analyze data to assist in evaluating and monitoring CRP efficiencies. d. The DOR will work with CRPs to enhance and expand Employment Services when appropriate and fiscally feasible. e. The DOR will work with CRPs to develop and establish new or enhanced services where appropriate and fiscally feasible. f. The DOR will explore and implement the most effective model of delivering services provided by CRPs and ISPs in rural and remote areas. g. The DOR will partner with CRPs in building collaborative relationships with employers and businesses. h. The DOR will work with the CRP ad hoc workgroup to develop effective methodologies to communicate information regarding regulations, policies, and procedures to CRPs. i. The DOR will work with CRPs to ensure the DOR, CRP and consumer mutually agree on the consumer’s stated employment outcome as identified in the IPE and other relevant information. j. As resources permit, the DOR will use the findings of the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment to determine the scope of the next establishment project cycle to address the unmet needs of individuals with disabilities.

7. Describe strategies to improve the performance with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

The DOR identified a specific program goal, measurable objective, and strategies to highlight RSA Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicator 1.1. The DOR will continue to utilize effective strategies to monitor progress on all standards and indicators. These strategies include but are not limited to:

• Targeted Management reports will be provided at District, Branch and counselor level through the department’s new Electronic Case Recording System (ERS) which will provide real-time data to District Administrators, Supervisors and counseling staff.

• Provide Quarterly Reports on RSA Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators to all DOR Management prepared by Budgets and Fiscal Forecasting staff;

• Quarterly Order of Selection updates;

• Monthly monitoring of high-cost, long-term cases, inactive cases and cases approaching or exceeding the plan expiration date; and

• Specific monitoring and coordination of job placement services to consumers will occur at the District, Branch and Unit level to assure delivery of efficient high-quality job placement support.

8. Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

The DOR will continue participation on the California Governor’s Committee on the Employment of People with Disabilities

(Governor’s Committee). The Governor’s Committee consults with and advises the Labor and Workforce Development Agency and the California Health and Human Services Agency on all issues related to full inclusion in the workforce of persons with disabilities. The Governor’s Committee provided a forum through which state departments, boards, councils, local service providers, business leaders and the disability community collaborated to develop a comprehensive strategy. Achievement of the goals and actions identified in the comprehensive strategy is expected to result in an increased rate of employment for people with disabilities.

The DOR will remain actively involved in the Governor’s Committee’s subcommittees listed below.

Policy and Planning -

Purpose: Coordinate with other subcommittees, partners and stakeholders to identify barriers to employment.

Work collaboratively to develop policy recommendations that propose solutions to build a seamless, cohesive employment service delivery system. Convene all State agency decision-makers to bring about the implementation of recommended disability employment policies.

Education and Employment -

Purpose: Assist with making employment preparation and supports available and accessible for people with disabilities to enable them to be successful on the job and to advance in their careers.

Communications and Outreach -

Purpose: Engage the business community in the development of an inclusive workforce system that supports their changing business needs and provides people with disabilities opportunities for employment and advancement in the workplace.

9. Describe how the agency’s strategies will be used to: a. Achieve the goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);

The strategies indentified in Section 1 of this Attachment are directly tied to and in support of the goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1).

b. Support innovation and expansion activities;

Innovation and Expansion Activities

For FFY 2012, the DOR has set aside a portion of funds allotted under Section 110 of the Act to make necessary enhancements to its new Electronic Record System Project (AWARE) is a commercial-off-the-shelf application that will improve accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of the VR services program for individuals with disabilities.

The DOR has established a specific measureable objectives and strategies for AWARE in Section 1 of this Attachment (see Goal 5, Objectives 5.1 and 5.3) to directly support innovation and expansion.

c. Overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

The DOR identified both individual and systems barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities from input the DOR received through the comments at the State Plan Public Meetings held in 2010, responses to the comprehensive statewide needs assessment surveys administered in FFY 2011, and feedback from focused meetings with the DOR staff in developing the 2012 State Plan. More details are available in Attachment 4.11(a), Statewide Assessment. Identified Barriers include, but are not limited to:

1) Service Awareness Barriers:

• In some instances, populations are unaware of the breadth of the DOR services and eligibility requirements.

• Potential referral sources, including medical rehabilitation service providers, are unaware of the breadth of the DOR services and eligibility requirements.

2) Communication and linguistic Barriers:

• Non-English speaking consumers experience barriers when CRP staff do not have sufficient language competence.

• Deaf and Hard of Hearing consumers experience barriers when CRP staff do not have sufficient language competence.

3) Cultural Barriers:

• Cultural beliefs about disability contribute to under-representation of some ethnicities in the DOR’s caseload

• Cultural beliefs about seeking services from public. agencies contribute to under-representation of some ethnicities in the DOR’s caseload.

• Cultural differences between provider CRP staff and consumers and lack of CRP staff cultural competence presents barriers to receiving services.

4) Geographic Access Barriers:

• Applicants and consumers experience barriers due to location of the DOR facilities.

• Applicants and consumers experience barriers due to public transportation gaps.

5) Employer Barriers:

• Applicants and consumers experience barriers to successful employment outcomes due to Employer perceptions related to recruitment, development, and retention of employees with disabilities.

Many of the strategies identified earlier in this Attachment aim to address the barriers identified above. These strategies will assist in overcoming the identified barriers by:

1) Enhancing the skills of the DOR counselors and providers to improve services to consumers,

2) Providing applicants and consumers with improved information with which to make informed choices,

3) Recruiting staff and working with community partners,

4) Outreaching to unserved and underserved populations and their families, and

5) Actively engaging employers in the hiring and employment process.

Even with its limited resources, the DOR will continue its ongoing evaluation of vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services to mitigate identified barriers.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 30 2011 3:59PM by sacaumemotok

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) is providing a report reflecting the progress toward achieving the performance measures established for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2010 (10/1/2009 – 9/30/2010).

Program Goal 1.1: The DOR will Increase the quality and quantity of employment outcomes.

Objective 1.1.1:

The DOR will increase the number of employment outcomes and earnings ratios during FFY 2010.

1.1.1.1. Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will maintain or increase successful employment outcomes by one (1) over FFY 2009 (FFY 2009 outcome plus 1) as evidenced by RSA Standard 1.1.

FFY 2009 achieved: 11,605 outcomes

FFY 2010 target: 11,606 outcomes

FFY 2010 achieved: 10,719 outcomes

The DOR did not meet this target.

The economic downturn has resulted in a significantly higher unemployment rate in California, also resulting in a decrease in the quantity of employment opportunities and an increase in the number of job seekers. A reduction in the supply of jobs, coupled with greater competition for the fewer remaining employment openings, has negatively impacted DOR’s employment outcomes.

1.1.1.2. Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the number of consumers who identify employment as their primary source of income at successful closure in competitive employment by 1% over FFY 2009 (FFY 2009 outcome times 1.01).

FFY 2009 achieved: 8,451 consumers

FFY 2010 target: 8,536 consumers

FFY 2010 achieved: 7,788 consumers

The DOR did not meet this target.

7,788 consumers identified employment as their primary source of income at closure in FFY 2010, out of a total of 10,719 successful closures or 73%, which is virtually an identical percentage as FFY 2009. The decline in the number of consumers who identify employment as their primary source of income at successful closure in competitive employment may be attributed to an overall decrease in the number of successfully employed consumers due to the economic factors previously noted.

1.1.1.3. Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the earnings ratio of all individuals in competitive employment by 0.5% over the FFY 2009 (FFY 2009 outcome times 1.005).

FFY 2009 achieved: 49.20%

FFY 2010 target: 49.45%

FFY 2010 achieved: 49.2%

The DOR did not meet this target.

The DOR achieved a ratio of 0.492, which did not meet the targeted ratio of 49.45%, due to the very high average hourly wage within the State (Department of Labor’s preliminary 2010 California wage is $24.55). The earnings for both DOR consumers and all employed Californians increased in FFY 2010, however the gap between them did not decrease.

Objective 1.1.2:

Business Enterprises Program (BEP) will assist vendors to improve their earnings to a level that will provide adequate income for them and return on investment to the Program.

1.1.2.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, eight (8) DOR consumers will identify employment as their primary source of income at successful closure in BEP vending facilities.

FFY 2010 target: 8 consumers

FFY 2010 achieved: 5 consumers

The DOR did not meet this target.

The BEP revamped its training program and had 8 students enrolled in training. However, due to the personal circumstances of 3 students, only 5 students completed the training and achieved successful closure in BEP vending facilities. To improve the student success rate, the BEP started a marketing program aimed at student recruitment and is requiring prerequisites to ensure student readiness.

1.1.2.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, 60% of all BEP vendors operating vending facilities for 12 months will earn an average monthly net income of $3,300.

FFY 2010 target: 60%

FFY 2010 achieved: 38%

The DOR did not meet this target.

During FFY 2010, the DOR closed three (3) low performing locations, implemented a new training program and provided training to vendors in effort to improve vendor income. Despite these efforts, the high unemployment rate and three (3) days of state building closures each month due to the state worker furloughs significantly and adversely impacted the BEP vendor income with lower sales.

Program Goal 1.2: The DOR will increase the effectiveness and efficiency of DOR vocational rehabilitation services delivery.

Objective 1.2.1:

The DOR will increase efficiencies in Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) Development, effectively measure consumer satisfaction and evaluate current DOR service delivery system.

1.2.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, 80% of eligible individuals able to be served by DOR will have their IPE developed within 90 days of date of eligibility determination or removal from the waiting list.

FFY 2010 target: 80%

FFY 2010 achieved: 81%

The DOR met this target.

Districts utilize case process reports to track and monitor IPE time frames and ensure that IPEs are developed within 90 days of eligibility determination or removal from the waiting list.

1.2.1.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, 70% of respondents to the Consumer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) will cumulatively respond that they either strongly agree or agree with the statement, "I am satisfied with the services from the Department of Rehabilitation."

FFY 2010 target: 70%

FFY 2010 achieved: 73%

The DOR met this target.

The CSS collected data from four groups, based upon the status of a consumer: 1) Closure Employed, 2) In Plan, 3) Pre Plan, and 4) Closure Not Employed. There was one question in all surveys that represents a broad measure of satisfaction, “I am satisfied with services from the Department of Rehabilitation.” For this item, the Closure Employed group had the highest level of agreement with 82%, followed by the In-Plan group with 76%, the Pre-Plan group with 67%, and the Closure Not Employed group with 52%. Cumulatively, the respondents indicated either that they strongly agreed or agreed with this statement 73% of the time.

1.2.3 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will continue to develop and implement a strategic plan to re-evaluate the current DOR Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery (VRSD) system.

FFY 2010 target: VRSD Project Plan

FFY 2010 achieved: Achieved

The DOR met this target.

During FFY 2010, the DOR made substantive progress towards VRSD structure re-design and business process reengineering (BPR). The DOR will produce a Consumer Service Delivery Model Report (CSDMR) to share with our stakeholders and control agencies, and to guide development of a phased Implementation Plan. The DOR anticipates the CSDMR to be completed in FFY 2011.

• December 2009 to June 2010 - Employment Preparation Services Division (EPSD) and Specialized Services Division (SSD) Deputies and other appropriate staff participated in Action Planning Workshops to begin development of the VR Modernization (VR Mod) Project Charter, Project Management Plan, and a high-level Project Schedule to implement VRSD structure changes.

• June 2010 – Using ARRA funding, the DOR awarded a contract to (1) secure a certified Project Manager to develop a detailed project work plan and schedule/engage the DOR staff in developing the final BPR strategies; (2) assist with the production of the CSDMR to document VRSD structure changes; and (3) begin development of a formal transition plan.

• July 2010 to September 2010 – EPSD and SSD staff participated in VRSD Business Process Mapping (BPM) activities to address program, policy and staffing considerations in the CSDMR, and the Project Manager began working with staff to draft the high-level transition plan for a phased implementation of the proposed VRSD structure changes.

Program Goal 1.3: The DOR will increase the number of Supplemental Security Income (SSI)/Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries at or above Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA).

Objective 1.3.1:

The DOR will increase the number of DOR SSI/SSDI beneficiary consumers at or above SGA and will provide training and technical assistance to maximize access to and understanding of Social Security Administration (SSA) work incentives.

1.3.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries earning at or above SGA by 1% over FFY 2009 (FFY 2009 outcome times 1.01).

FFY 2009 achieved: 1,468 consumers

FFY 2010 target: 1,483 consumers

FFY 2010 achieved: 1,174 consumers

The DOR did not meet this target.

There is a tendency for beneficiaries to keep their earnings under SGA to maintain their cash benefits, especially in today’s economy with increasing layoffs. SGA is a difficult measure to achieve because it’s ultimately the consumer’s choice on how many hours they want to work and how much they want to make in monthly earnings. There are major disincentives to work above SGA particularly for beneficiaries in the Title II (SSDI) program where a beneficiary is not entitled to SSDI cash payment for every month he/she earns wages above SGA while in Extended Period of Eligibility (EPE). Additionally, SGA rate increases annually which makes it more difficult for some consumers to achieve.

1.3.1.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR, with partners, will provide 10 training/technical assistance sessions for the DOR staff, community partners and other stakeholders related to the utilization of Social Security Administration (SSA) work incentives, on-line benefits planning tools and calculators.

FFY 2010 target: 10 sessions

FFY 2010 achieved: 11 sessions

The DOR met this target.

The DOR exceeded this goal. As of September 30, 2010, ten (10) Health & Benefits in-service training sessions were held in collaboration with the California Health Incentives Improvement Project, World Institute on Disability, DOR Staff Development Section, and DOR Social Security Programs Section. Additionally, one (1) Social Security Work Incentives District training session was held in partnership with the Social Security Area Work Incentives Coordinator, DOR Social Security Programs Section, and the Santa Barbara DOR District. Collaboration with key partners in coordinating and delivering these trainings enabled the DOR to exceed this target.

1.3.1.3 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, 150 DOR, mental health, education and stakeholder staff will receive Benefits Planning and Management training.

FFY 2010 target: 150 stakeholders trained

FFY 2010 achieved: 70 stakeholders trained

The DOR did not meet this target.

Some of the training sessions were canceled due to scheduling conflicts and/or budget constraints. With the continuing economic slowdown and the reduction or elimination of partner agency travel budgets, training requests did not achieve initial expectations.

Program Goal 1.4: The DOR will develop and implement efficient and effective workforce development and leadership succession plans.

Objective 1.4.1:

Establish data sources upon which to make business decisions related to recruitment and retention.

1.4.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will establish at least 1 (one) new data source/baseline for assessing employee retention.

FFY 2010 target: 1 new data source

FFY 2010 achieved: 1 new data source

The DOR met this target.

The Human Resources Diversity Outreach & Workforce & Succession Planning Office launched the Employee Exit Questionnaire process in August with information sessions held on August 18 and 19, 2010. This new data source/baseline will be used to assess employee retention within the DOR. This tool will enhance turnover data, which will identify why Qualified Rehabilitation Professional staff leave the DOR, to assist in the development of retention strategies.

Objective 1.4.2:

Improve the recruitment and retention of Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals (QRP).

1.4.2.1Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will amend the California civil service Rehabilitation Supervisor (RS) job specification.

FFY 2010 target: Amend RS specification

FFY 2010 achieved: In progress

The DOR did not meet this target.

The DOR submitted a request to amend the Rehabilitation Supervisor job specification to its Control Agency in November 2009. The proposed amendment is currently under review by the Control Agency and status is pending.

Program Goal 1.5: The DOR will increase equality for persons with disabilities through systems change.

Objective 1.5.1:

The DORs Independent Living & Assistive Technology (ILAT) and Disability Access Sections (DAS) will support systems change activities.

1.5.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR’s DAS will provide at least 30 training sessions to California Departments and Agencies regarding employment law and architectural and program access.

FFY 2010 target: 30 training sessions

FFY 2010 achieved: 63 training sessions

The DOR met this target.

DAS provided reasonable accommodation, disability awareness, physical accessibility, and program access training for various State of California departments through interagency agreements to achieve the targeted number of training sessions. The interest in these topics by participating departments, including the Department of Rehabilitation, State Personnel Board, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Franchise Tax Board, Secretary of State, Department of Personnel Administration, and Employment Development Department, exceeded initial expectations, thereby exceeding the FFY 2010 target.

1.5.1.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will participate in the annual Golden Guardian testing exercise providing technical assistance and support to mass care and shelter of persons with disabilities.

FFY 2010 target: DOR participation in exercise

FFY 2010 achieved: Complete

The DOR met this target.

The annual Golden Guardian testing exercise was conducted in May 2010. The DOR participated through 1) the identification of staff to deploy in support of mass care and shelter of individuals with disabilities and 2) advisement regarding notification and evacuation impacts to individuals with disabilities and special needs. Lessons learned were incorporated, and practices and protocols are being refined as a result of the DOR’s participation.

1.5.1.3 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR, as a standing member, will participate in four (4) meetings of the Governor’s Emergency Operations Executive Council (GEOEC) providing technical assistance and consultation to ensure the emergency planning, preparedness, mitigation and recovery strategies account for and address the needs of persons with disabilities.

FFY 2010 target: 4 meetings

FFY 2010 achieved: 0 meetings

The DOR did not meet this target.

The DOR does not have the authority to schedule GEOEC meetings. Although the GEOEC did not hold any meetings during FFY 2010, related work continued, including meetings with the Disaster Coordinating Council, which works to be more inclusive and foster the integration of persons with disabilities into each phase of emergency preparedness, response, mitigation and recovery.

 

SE Goal 2.1: The DOR will increase competitive, integrated employment opportunities for consumers accessing Supported Employment (SE) services

Objective 2.1.1

The DORs SE program will maximize access to competitive, integrated employment opportunities.

2.1.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, at least 54% of successful SE outcomes will be individual placements in integrated employment.

FFY 2010 target: 54%

FFY 2010 achieved: 43%

The DOR did not meet this target.

Competition for jobs in California increased due to the downturn in the economy and increased unemployment. According to the California Employment Development Department, unemployment rates have increased from 7.3% in 2008 to 12.3% in 2010. An increase in the minimum wage may have also negatively impacted available job openings, since employers must do "more with less" to maintain payroll costs. All of these factors have led to decreased employment outcomes for consumers accessing SE services.

2.1.1.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will increase the number of SE individual successful employment outcomes (status 26) compared to FFY 2009 by 1% (FFY 2009 outcome times 1.01).

FFY 2009 achieved: 1031

FFY 2010 target: 1041

FFY 2010 achieved: 731

The DOR did not meet this target.

Competition for jobs in California increased due to the downturn in the economy and increased unemployment. According to the California Employment Development Department, unemployment rates have increased from 7.3% in 2008 to 12.3% in 2010. The decrease in total individual placements was -29% compared to -9% for group placements.

SE Goal 2.2: The DOR will enhance staff knowledge of SE regulations by providing training and technical assistance to staff.

Objective 2.2.1

The DOR’s SE staff will have necessary tools and technical assistance that are developed using research-based practices and a variety of modalities.

2.2.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will coordinate and implement two (2) regional VR WAP and SE liaison teleconferences with DOR staff. This group shall include but not be limited to staff serving individuals with developmental, mental health and brain injury disabilities.

FFY 2010 target: 2 teleconferences

FFY 2010 achieved: 2 teleconferences

The DOR met this target.

SE liaison teleconferences with DOR staff were held on August 25, 2010 and September 29, 2010.

Strategies implemented include:

• Reviewed a list of local collaborative meetings, derived from the 2009 Collaboration Survey;

• Discussed meeting tips and tools, including resources to include in collaborative activities with consumers;

• Discussed SE best practices and regulatory requirements relevant to the DOR’s new electronic recording system, AWARE, to be implemented in calendar year 2011.

In addition, select SE liaison staff participated in five (5) SE Program trainings held in May and June 2010. Training topics included Non-Habilitation sources of extended services, school-to-work Transition Services collaboration, SE Program for consumers with mental illness, and evidenced-based practices.

2.2.1.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will develop and disseminate training related to serving individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), utilizing appropriate training methodologies that include case studies.

FFY 2010 target: Disseminate training

FFY 2010 achieved: Complete

The DOR met this target.

Strategies implemented to develop and disseminate training included:

• Medical Aspects Training on ASD was provided statewide to 268 DOR staff in nine locations on ten dates from February through May 2010;

• Cooperative Education (Coop Ed) Programs, Education Training & Technical Assistance for 2008-2011, included the topic of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Since April 2009, there have been 6 Coop Ed trainings regarding ASD across the state;

• Website links, including the “Guide for Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals - Adult Autism & Employment,” were forwarded to rehabilitation counseling staff and added to the DOR Internet website;

• DOR and DDS participated in the Association of Regional Center Agencies (ARCA) employment committee bimonthly;

• DOR/DDS inter-agency workgroup met quarterly and is discussing strategic planning for consumers with ASD.

SE Goal 2.3: The DOR will promote and enhance collaboration with local and statewide SE partners and stakeholders.

Objective 2.3.1

The DOR will collaborate with SE partners and stakeholders to maximize opportunities for applicants and eligible individuals accessing SE services.

2.3.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the DOR will hold four (4) meetings, on a quarterly basis, with the California Department of Developmental Services (DDS), the Department of Veterans Affairs, and mental health organizations to promote and enhance collaboration.

FFY 2010 target: 4 meetings

FFY 2010 achieved: 4 meetings

The DOR met this target.

Four meetings were held between October 1, 2009 and September 30, 2010.

Strategies implemented include:

• Shared and analyzed employment outcome data in collaboration with the ARCA Employment Committee’s Transition Services subcommittee;

• Designed a qualitative “best practices” survey in cooperation with Association of Regional Center Agencies (ARCA) Employment Committee;

• Developed contacts with the Department of Veterans Affairs through efforts of the DOR’s Independent Living section;

• Maintained DOR collaborations between EPS districts and mental health organizations through quarterly meetings with each of their cooperative program partners and centrally through Mental Health Cooperative Programs.

2.3.1.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

During FFY 2010, the Workforce Development Section will hold monthly meetings with DDS to enhance employment opportunities and expand linkages to business partners.

FFY 2010 target: 12 meetings

FFY 2010 achieved: 7 meetings

The DOR did not meet this target.

Scheduling conflicts for all three departments prohibited the DOR from meeting its targeted number of meetings.

Strategies implemented include:

• Piloted a California public employment initiative starting with the Maintenance and Service Occupational Trainee (MSOT) program, designed to provide candidates with the necessary experience and job skills to successfully complete the States’ Service Assistant Custodian exam and ultimately transition to permanent custodian positions. Over 50 individuals with disabilities interviewed for the MSOT positions and 20 individuals were selected. Fifteen individuals, who were given the opportunity to take the exam, passed the exam by the end of the program in August 2010. Natural supports were sufficient to enable many of the permanent employees to meet all of their extended services needs. The employer, the Department of General Services, was delighted with the performance of the applicants and asked for additional applicants.

• Established linkages with the State Employment Leadership Network to explore stakeholder training options for FFY 2011.

 

The DOR did not pass RSA’s Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators for FFY 2010. The DOR will use the strategies outlined in State Strategies, Attachment 4.11(d) to improve performance during FFYs 2011 and 2012.

Indicator 1.1: Change in Employment Outcomes

RSA Definition: The difference between the number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the current performance period and the number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the previous performance period.

DOR Results: The DOR did not pass this indicator. RSA requires that employment outcomes equal or exceed previous performance. For FFY 2010, there were 10,719 employment outcomes, whereas in the prior FFY 2009, there were 11,605 employment outcomes, a reduction of 886 employment outcomes.

The economic downturn, high unemployment rates, and the increase in the minimum wage have negatively impacted successful employment outcomes statewide. Unemployment rates have increased from 7.2% in 2008, 12.2% in 2009, and 12.5% in 2010, and remain at 12.2% in February 2011. The DOR continues its efforts to increase employment outcomes by conducting job fairs, job clubs, referring consumers to on-line resources and providing collaborative networking opportunities for consumers, district staff, community agencies, and local employers.

Indicator 1.2: Percent of Employment Outcomes

RSA Definition: The percentage of individuals exiting the program during the performance period who have achieved an employment outcome after receiving services.

DOR Results: The DOR did not pass this indicator. In FFY 2010, for those individuals who exited the DOR vocational rehabilitation program after receiving services, DOR successfully assisted 42.2% in achieving a successful employment outcome. The figure is lower than the RSA-required 55.8%.

The same economic and employment challenges identified in Indicator 1.1 also adversely impacted DOR’s ability to meet the required benchmark for Indicator 1.2.

Indicator 1.3: Competitive Employment Outcomes

RSA Definition: This measures the percentage of individuals who exit the VR program in employment in integrated settings with or without ongoing support services, self-employment, or BEP employment with hourly rate of earnings equivalent to at least the federal or state minimum wage rate, whichever is higher, based on all the individuals exiting the program who have achieved an employment outcome after receiving services.

DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, 86.1% exited the vocational rehabilitation program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage. This percentage, which is higher than the RSA-required 72.6%, reflects the DOR’s strong emphasis on its goals to increase both the quality and quantity of consumer employment outcomes.

Indicator 1.4: Significance of Disability

RSA Definition: The percentage of those individuals identified in Indicator 1.3 who have significant disabilities.

DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator. Of all individuals who exit the vocational rehabilitation program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to or at least the minimum wage, 99.8% were individuals with significant disabilities, which exceeds the RSA requirement of 62.4%. Since 1995, the DOR has operated its vocational rehabilitation services program under an Order of Selection (OOS) process. As noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(3), Order of Selection, the DOR expects to continue the OOS process throughout FFY 2011 and FFY 2012.

Indicator 1.5: Earnings Ratio

RSA Definition: The ratio of the average hourly earnings of all individuals in competitive employment to the average hourly earnings of all employed individuals in the state.

DOR Results: The DOR did not pass this indicator. The DOR achieved a ratio of 0.492, which did not meet the RSA-required ratio of 0.52, due to the very high average hourly wage within the State (Department of Labor’s preliminary 2010 California wage is $24.55). The earnings for both DOR consumers and all employed Californians increased in FFY 2010 and the gap between them did not decrease.

Indicator 1.6: Self-Support

RSA Definition: For those identified in Performance Indicator 1.3, the difference in the percentage of individuals who at program entry reported their income as the largest single source of support, and the percentage that reported their personal income as the largest single source of support at program exit.

DOR Results: The DOR passed this indicator with 67.3%, exceeding the RSA requirement of 53%. The success reflects the commitment to outreach to individuals who require services in order to obtain employment.

Indicator 2.1: Minority Background Service Rate

RSA Definition: The ratio of the percent of individuals with a minority background to the percent of individuals without a minority background exiting the program who received VR services.

DOR Results: The DOR’s ratio of 1.0 is above the RSA-required 0.80 ratio, and reflects DOR’s commitment to the rich diversity of California.

 

Innovation and Expansion Goal 3.1: Electronic Records System (ERS)

Objective 3.1.1

The DOR has set aside a portion of funds allotted under Section 110 of the Act to replace its outdated mainframe system with a new ERS. The new ERS will be a commercial-off-the-shelf application that will improve accessibility, effectiveness and efficiency of the VR services program for individuals with disabilities.

3.1.1.1 Performance measure to be achieved:

The DOR will successfully complete the system design and interfaces by April 2010.

FFY 2010 target: Complete by April 2010

FFY 2010 achieved: Completed September 2010

The DOR did not meet the targeted date, but completed the task in September 2010.

The vendor was anticipated to begin work in April 2009. However, due to delayed review and approval by State Control Agencies, the ERS contract was not approved until May 2009 and the vendor began work on June 1, 2009. The late vendor start date resulted in a delayed completion date. Furthermore, the mandated furlough days limited the availability of state employees to complete the system design and interfaces.

3.1.1.2 Performance measure to be achieved:

The DOR will successfully complete the user acceptance testing (UAT) by May 2010.

FFY 2010 target: Complete by May 2010

FFY 2010 achieved: In process

The DOR did not meet this target.

The ERS Project was unable to meet the target date due to two significant external events that impacted the project as described below.

• Delayed Start Date for the ERS Vendor - As previously noted above.

• Mandated State Employee Furlough Days - On December 19, 2008, The Governor’s Office issued Executive Order S-16-08 mandating a furlough of two days per month for all state employees effective February 1, 2009, followed by a mandate of three furlough days per month beginning July 2009 through June 30, 2010. The mandated furlough days limited the availability of state employees to complete the ERS Project on its original schedule.

The DOR has nominated and selected field and administrative staff to participate in the UAT process as testers. Formal UAT of the new ERS AWARE began in August 2010. Field staff will formally test the DOR business processes in AWARE to ensure proper functioning of the processes and the system. UAT will be on-going through Trial, March 2011 and is scheduled to be completed prior to Pilot, during April 2011.

3.1.1.3 Performance measure to be achieved:

The DOR will begin to implement a two-month pilot in two (2) districts by August 2010.

FFY 2010 target: Implement pilots by

August 2010

FFY 2010 achieved: Delayed until FFY 2011

The DOR did not meet this target.

The ERS Project was unable to meet the target date due to the same two significant external events described above (in brief below).

• Delayed Start Date for the ERS Vendor

• Mandated State Employee Furlough Days

The DOR anticipates implementing a two (2) month pilot in two (2) districts, beginning April 2011 and ending May 2011.

Innovation and Expansion Goal 3.2: Establishment Grants

Innovation and expansion activities for State Fiscal Year (SFY) 2008-09*

*The DOR awarded E-grants on the SFY cycle (July 1 - June 30). As such, the following information is reported over SFY cycles.

The DOR has historically set aside $4,000,000 annually to establish, develop and improve services to VR consumers through the use of Establishment Grants (E-Grants) to Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs). E-Grant funds can only be used to support CRP staffing and/or equipment costs necessary to provide direct consumer services. E-Grant recipients must provide a (non-federal) cash match in the amount of 21.3% of the total budget. E-Grants are initially awarded for a 36-month period, with the potential to be extended for an additional 12 months.

In SFY 2008-09, the DOR encumbered $451,492 to continue funding 14 E-Grants:

• Thirteen (13) of which were in their third and entering their fourth funding year, and 1 in its second year entering its third year.

• One (1) of the 13 opted to discontinue services on 04-01-2009 due to an inability to fiscally sustain the program because of a lack of referrals.

• The final grantee concluded funding on June 14, 2010 (SFY 09/10). Services have continued under the Uniform Fee Structure.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2011 2:54PM by sacaadamsm

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Scope of Supported Employment Services

The Department of Rehabilitation (DOR) provides the full scope of Supported Employment (SE) services to individuals who:

• Are Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) eligible with the most significant disabilities,

• Require extended services to maintain employment, and

• Have at least a reasonable expectation that a source of extended services will be available at the time of transition to extended services.

Quality of Supported Employment Services

The DOR provides services that facilitate successful job matches and lead to successful job placements in integrated settings, primarily supported by community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) and partner agencies. In areas where provider organizations are not available, or an individual has needs beyond those that can be met by a CRP, an individual service provider approved by the district to provide job coaching services may be authorized.

In order to ensure quality services, the DOR Community Programs, Support and Development Section has developed strategies that include but are not limited to:

• Service specification guidelines

• Training and technical support through Community Resource Development Specialists out-stationed throughout the state

• DOR Certification and Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) accreditation of CRP’s

• Ongoing assessment and evaluation of end users

Extent of Supported Employment Services

SE Services are ongoing support services and other appropriate services needed to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in SE. SE services are provided by DOR for a period of time not to exceed 18 months, unless under special circumstances. SE Services encompass the following.

SE Intake Services include, but are not necessarily limited to, an initial meeting with the eligible individual; a review of the Supported Employment - Job Placement Parameters; and the development of a plan of action for job placement.

SE Placement Services include evaluation of labor market and identification of suitable employment sites; employer contacts; job seeking skills training; work site assessment; task analysis; evaluation and recommendation for job coaching plan; destination training; and other services necessary to secure and establish employment.

Consumers of SE services actively participate in a comprehensive assessment to identify quality employment outcomes that meet the individual’s strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice.

SE includes, if necessary, situational assessments through trial work experiences (TWE) to assess the individual’s interests and abilities and to allow the individual to consider multiple jobs, environments, settings, and tasks to maximize their potential. TWE is also used to determine the techniques best suited to assist the individual to learn the work skills and the work behaviors necessary for employment.

The DOR, as appropriate, coordinates benefits planning discussions with the consumer, Community Work Incentives Coordinators and/or other third parties to identify appropriate work incentive programs as well as potential sources for ongoing support.

During Federal Fiscal Year 2009, the DOR established a Social Security Program Section to efficiently and effectively disseminate information and provide technical assistance related to work incentive programs.

School-to-work transition services may include supported employment services to ensure that transition aged youth with intellectual disabilities go from school to post-secondary training and work.

Individuals with mental health disabilities are served on a limited basis through transitional employment services. Many of these individuals receive employment services that may rely on natural supports for extended services.

Timing of Transition to Extended Services

Once an appropriate supported employment position is identified for an individual, the DOR provides supported employment job coaching services Job coaching is an ongoing support service provided by DOR, which cannot exceed 18 months from time of job placement unless under special circumstances, and upon agreement of the consumer and counselor. The VR program funds job coaching until the individual is determined to be stable and has maintained that stability for at least 60 days.

The job coaching services vary from one-to-one support on the job in individual placements, to one-to-eight support on the job when individuals are working together in a group placement in the community. Job coaching services may also be provided off the job as necessary when working with employers, care providers, advocacy groups, or in the provision of other services necessary to assist the individual in maintaining employment.

Once the individual has maintained stability on the job for at least 60 days, the funding for and provision of job coaching transitions to an extended services provider. The rehabilitation counselor continues to track the individual’s progress and job stability during the transition period. If the individual maintains stabilization for 60 days after transition to extended services, the case is closed successfully.

Sources of extended services for SE consumers are detailed in Attachment 4.8(b)(4): Cooperative Agreements for Provision of Supported Employment Services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2011 6:46PM by sacahoshovskyn

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