ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Annual Review Report
Iowa Department for the Blind
FY 2006

The State Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services Program is a state-federal program that has been established to assist individuals with disabilities, particularly those with significant disabilities, to achieve high quality employment outcomes in integrated settings. In FY 2006, the VR program assisted 205,796 individuals with disabilities nationally to achieve employment. Qualified VR counselors employed by state VR agencies work together with individuals with disabilities to develop a plan of services leading to an employment outcome consistent with the individual's abilities, interests, and informed choice. The services provided by the VR agency can include but are not limited to the following: counseling and guidance, assessment, vocational training, post-secondary education, assistance with living expenses, transportation, personal assistance services, and job placement. The VR program is supplemented by the State Supported Employment Services program which provides services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who require on-the-job and other supports to maintain employment. Through informed choice and in partnership with the VR program and the broader rehabilitation community, individuals with disabilities are able to maximize their potential and reach the goal of employment in their local communities.

Section 107 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (the Act), requires RSA to conduct annual reviews and periodic on-site monitoring to determine if a state is complying with the provisions of its state plan and with the standards and indicators established under Section 106. This report contains the following information:

  • State goals and priorities
  • Individuals in the VR agency
  • Outcomes
  • Agency staffing patterns
  • Financial data
  • Compliance with standards and indicators
  • State policies and procedures/guidance materials
  • Activities conducted by the independent commission
  • Status of appeals

Please note that this report is written in nontechnical language for the general public and in some cases detailed categories have been collapsed. See Appendix A for statutory and regulatory definitions and reporting requirements. Appendix B contains a guide for technical users on how to find the source data for the tables in this report.

This report presents information about the performance of the Iowa Department for the Blind (IA-B) beginning on October 1, 2005 and ending on September 30, 2006 (FY 2006). It is based on data submitted to RSA by IA-B as of November 30, 2007.

Each state designates a state agency to administer the VR program. The Act provides flexibility for a state to have two state VR agencies - one for individuals who are blind and one for individuals with other types of disabilities, typically referred to as a general agency. Combined agencies serve individuals with all types of disabilities. IA-B is an agency serving blind individuals. All national averages are based on agencies of comparable type; for blind agencies, national averages are based on other blind agencies.

Table 1. Program highlights for FY 2006

Description Number
Total funds used $8,774,895
Successful employment outcomes 129
Average hourly earnings $12.98
Average hours worked per week 31.43
Average cost per employment outcome $68,022.44
Average time between application and closure (in months) for individuals with successful employment outcomes 35.5
Total individuals served 546
Average cost per individual served $16,071.24
Average number of individuals served per total staff 6.20
Average number of employment outcomes per total staff1.47
Evaluation standard 1 (see section VIII below) MET
Evaluation standard 2 (see section VIII below) MET *

* The agency has described to RSA the policies it has adopted or will adopt, and the steps it has taken or will take, to ensure that individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds have equal access to services. This satisfies the requirements of Indicator 2.1.

A state VR agency must implement an order of selection when it does not have enough fiscal and/or personnel resources to fully serve all eligible individuals. An order of selection is a list of priority categories from which eligible individuals are selected for services. Eligible individuals are assigned to priority categories based on the significance of their disability. When selecting individuals for services, first priority is given to individuals with the most significant disabilities. IA-B is not on an order of selection.

State VR agencies are required to submit a state plan annually to RSA that identifies the goals and priorities of the state in carrying out the program. The IA-B goals and priorities for FY 2006 and the extent to which the state has achieved these goals are described below.

Using the results of its comprehensive needs assessment, the Department identified seven "needs" categories and set goals to address those needs. Over the past year, the Department has made significant progress toward achieving the defined goals.

1. Adjustment to Blindness

Goal: The. Department will increase confidence and independence of blind Iowans so that they may live independently, work competitively, and be active in their community.

The Department 's Adult Orientation and Adjustment Center is an effective forum for blind Iowans to obtain the skills and positive philosophy of blindness. The Orientation Center is a residential training program for adults who are blind. Students receive training in four areas:

1) Development of self-confidence. Students learn that "It's okay to be blind."

2) Blindness skills. Students take classes in cane travel, home and personal management, industrial arts, Braille, and computer to learn the alternative or non-visual techniques of blindness that will enable them to perform everyday tasks effectively and efficiently.

3) Job readiness. Center students prepare for competitive employment by participating in career exploration, job shadowing, volunteering, and other job-related activities.

4) Public education. Since Center training is based on the fact that the real problems of blindness are caused by the misconceptions that are widely held about it, students learn how to deal with the situations they encounter when in public and participate in speaking engagements to share their experiences with others.

Since September 2005, thirty students have enrolled in the Center for training, and twenty-three have completed the program as of 3/31/2007. Eleven students are scheduled to enroll over the remainder of the current federal fiscal year. The Department's success in assisting Iowans achieve their employment goals is evident in the number of applications taken and the percentage of clients who achieve competitive employment outcomes in relation to all employment outcomes. In FY 2006, 174 new applications for VR services were taken. Also, 89% of clients with an employment outcome were in competitive employment, with an average hourly wage of $12.97.

2. Technology Accessibility and Training

Goal: The Department will improve the technology skills of blind Iowans by providing support and training in the use of assistive technology.

The Department's Technology Resource Center offers clients the opportunity to evaluate and learn to use a wide variety of assistive technology. In FY 2006, 44 individual technology skills assessments were performed.

All technology training activities focus on teaching troubleshooting and problem-solving skills so that clients learn to apply the knowledge and skills they acquire to new or updated technology. In FY 2006, 156 individuals received access technology training.

Goal: The Department will work to increase employer know/edge on software and web accessibility issues.

Education and technical assistance are key to increasing employer knowledge on accessibility of technology. The technology staff support employers through the performance of worksite assessments and through training and technical assistance that is customized to their employment situation. Our technology staff also offer information and advice on assistive technology and accessibility to employers through seminars, e-mail, telephone calls, and in-service demonstrations. In FY 2006, staff completed 27 worksite assessments and handled 121 contacts for technical support. ssistants.

3. Student Preparation for Higher Education and Employment

Goal: The Department will improve outreach services to transition age and college students and their families and educators.

A Transition Specialist oversees all of the Department's transition activities and coordinates services with the VR counselors. Last year, we provided transition services to 25 blind youths ages 14 to 18 through special programs and vocational rehabilitation services.

In 2006, the Department, the Iowa Braille School, and the Iowa Department of Education began a cooperative effort to improve the coordination and delivery of services to blind and visually impaired children in Iowa.

For older students, the Department hosts an annual two-day College Days workshop for students currently or newly enrolled in an institution of higher education. On the post-workshop assessment, 83% participants indicated that the information they obtained at the workshop would be beneficial to their success at college.

In 2003, the Department received a 5-year grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) to develop and implement a mentoring program. In FY 2006, 18 mentors and mentees participated in the program. The impact of the program on the participants has been carefully measured using assessment tools. Most recent assessments clearly show that participation in the program is having a measurable positive effect on the youth involved.

Goal: The Department will establish relationships with institutes of higher education in Iowa and educate these institutions about the Department's services and our positive philosophy of blindness.

The Department has secured an interagency agreement with the Iowa Board of Regents, representing the three major institutes of higher education in Iowa: Iowa State University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Northern Iowa. In addition, the Department has interagency agreements with each of the 15 community colleges in Iowa. Through these agreements, all signatories agree to a cost allocation plan to meet the needs of blind and visually impaired students in Iowa.

4. Employer Knowledge and Attitudes toward Applicants who are Blind

Goal: The Department will improve the understanding of employers and newly blind persons about the vocational capabilities of persons who are blind.

Focusing on Employers Developing positive relationships with employers directly benefits our clients who are seeking high-quality employment.

The Employer Disability Resource Network (EDRN) is a collaborative effort by the Department, IVRS, Iowa Workforce Development, SCORE, Division of Persons with Disabilities, Small Business Administration, Progress Industries, and Veterans Affairs to identify and mobilize resources, supports, and services that will add value to Iowa businesses hiring persons with disabilities. Currently, this group is working on developing a web portal where Iowa employers can obtain information about the benefits of hiring a person with a disability and access the services provided by these partner agencies.

In partnership with Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services (IVRS), the Department hosted an Employers for Excellence Appreciation Day luncheon in October 2006. Nineteen employers from around metro Des Moines came to the Department to learn about assistive technology, tour the Department, and speak with Department and IVRS staff.

Finally, the Department has signed a Memorandum of Agreement with Des Moines Area Community College, IVRS, and Veterans Affairs to work together to address anticipated worker shortage in Iowa's labor market.

Working with Employees To ensure that all blind Iowans have access to specialized employment services, the employment specialists travel across the state to provide career assessment and development training to Iowans in the communities where they live and plan to work. Some programs that have been implemented include Career Seminars and Job Clubs. The Career Seminars cover job seeking skills, career development, addressing blindness at the interview, the job application process, career exploration, and more. The Job Clubs are peer support networks for individuals who are blind and seeking employment.

To date, two job clubs have been organized: one in the Des Moines area and another in western Iowa. Thirty individuals participated in Job Club in 2006. Recently, the club in western Iowa disbanded because all members became employed.

Since 2006, the employment specialists have hosted six career-related seminars. Twenty people have achieved a successful employment outcome as a direct result of these seminars. The college days seminars, which are strictly informational, had approximately 69 students in attendance in 2006.

Goal: The Department will improve staff knowledge of employers in Iowa by developing a resource of potential employers

To ensure that relationships with employers are maintained, our employment specialists have developed a database of those employers with whom we are working to create jobs on behalf of our clients. The database currently has records for 313 employers. The database is a valuable resource to all staff who use it to identify local employers who have been contacted and to obtain basic contact information that can help in placing clients and networking.

5. Services to Unserved / Underserved Populations

Goal: The Department will identify unserved and underserved populations in Iowa.

Analysis of RSA 911 and U.S. Census data found that the Department is serving minority groups at a comparable rate with their representation in the state. Demographic projections show that Iowa is likely to experience an increase in minorities, especially among the Hispanic population, in the next 5 years and beyond.

The results of the needs assessment survey indicated that women may be an underserved population. However, analysis of current caseload data show that women are served equally to men. Data from the FY 2005 RSA 911 report showed that more women than men were closed in competitive employment. In FY 2006, women represented nearly half of the case load (48 percent) and represented exactly half (50 percent) of the competitive employment closures. Further, the average wage at closure for women ($13.08) was slightly higher than men at closure ($12.90).

Goal: The Department will raise the awareness in Iowa's minority populations of the Department's services.

Because demographic projections indicate a possible increase in Iowa's minority populations, especially, the Hispanic population, the Department's Marketing team is studying how new materials can be provided in Spanish and how outreach activities can be tailored to this population.

Recently, the Meskwaki tribal council submitted a grant application to provide rehabilitation services to its members. As part of their grant application process, the Meskwaki, the Department, and IVRS developed a cooperative agreement to ensure that these entities work together to provide effective rehabilitation services.

Through its involvement with the regional Workforce System partnerships and the statewide Governance Group, the Department has established a network of referral sources to tap into populations who may not be directly contacted by the Department or may not initially believe or realize the Department is a resource for them.

Finally, the Department performed 399 outreach events designed to improve the understanding of the general public, including newly blind persons, regarding the capabilities of persons who are blind. These events reached over 10,000 people. 6. Independent Access to Information

Goal: The Department will improve the ability of blind Iowans to independently access information.

The Iowa Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped is housed in the same building as the Department. The Library provides materials to over 8,000 eligible Iowans. The following table lists the items in alternative media circulated by the Library.

The technology staff also work to keep Department staff up to date on technology trends. In order to facilitate timely access to current print news media, the Department works closely with the NFB-NEWSLINE® and the Iowa Radio Reading Information Service for the Blind and Print Handicapped (IRIS). The NFBNEWSLINE® services gives individuals who cannot read standard print access to hundreds of newspapers using a touch-tone telephone. Through IRIS, Iowans can listen to news read from Iowa newspapers, magazines, and other publications in their own homes. The Department often refers individuals to NEWSLINE and IRIS. Applications for these services are available at the Department, and staff provide assistance in completing the application when necessary.

Goal: The Department will promote Braille literacy so that more blind Iowans are able to read and write Braille.

All clients who enroll in the Department's Orientation center receive intensive Braille instruction. In FY 2006, 30 students enrolled in the Orientation Center received instruction on Grade 1 and Grade 2 Braille. In FY2006 Rehabilitation Teachers provided 256 training units in Braille to 97 individuals.

7. Collaboration with Other Components of the Workforce Investment System

Goal: To provide training and technical support to partners in the Workforce Investment System

The Department has signed Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with all 16 boards. Through these MOU, the partners agree to provide cross-training on services and eligibility, share strategies for working with mutual clients, and provide and receive referrals. All VR counselors are charged with participating in the Workforce Investment partner meetings in their area. Governance Group partners have been successful at seeking funding for a variety of grant projects, most recently receiving a Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) grant from the Spcial Security Administration.

Supported Employment The Department provided supported employment services to fourteen individuals in FY 2006. These services included job development and placement, provision of skilled job coaches who provided intensive skills training at the individual's work site.

Highest priority is given to obtaining competitive employment at wages which match or exceed average wages for all Iowans in accordance with the informed choice of the individuals served. To support this priority, emphasis is placed on promoting a positive philosophy of blind and quality training in the alternative skills of blindness including travel, keyboarding and computer skills, Braille, home management, and self-care.

Standards and Indicators The Department met the RSA standards and indicators during FY 2006. The Department's performance average of FY 2005 and 2006 based on RSA's standards and indicators was as follows:

Performance Indicator 1.1 (Number of Individuals with Employment Outcomes)128. Performance Indicator 1.2 (Individuals Receiving Services under an Individualized Plan for Employment and Percentage with an Employment Outcome) 80.5%. Performance Indicator 1.3 (Competitive Employment Outcomes as a Percentage of all Employment Outcomes) 89.84%. Performance Indicator 1.4 (Competitive Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Significant Disabilities as a Percentage of all Individuals with Significant Disabilities) 100%. Performance Indicator 1.5 (Ratio of Average VR Wage to State Wage as a Percentage) 92.96% Performance Indicator 1.6 (Percentage of Individuals Achieving Competitive Employment Outcomes Reporting Own Income as Primary Source of Support at Application and Closure) 22.27% Performance Indicator 2.1 (Access to Services for Minorities)75.68%

The following table profiles individuals in the IA-B VR program. This table provides the following:

  • Applicants - the number of individuals who were applicants on October 1, 2006, plus those who applied for services in FY 2006
  • Individuals served - the number of individuals who received services during FY 2006
  • Closed after receiving services - the number of individuals whose cases were closed after receiving services during FY 2006. These fall into two groups:
    • Closed with employment outcomes
    • Closed without employment outcomes after receiving services

Table 2. Caseload statistics

Category Number Percent increase or decrease from prior year
Applicants 186-0.5%
Individuals served 546-2.9%
Closed after receiving services 158-0.6%
Closed with employment outcomes 129+0.8%
Closed without employment outcomes after receiving services 29-6.5%

The following section focuses on the 158 individuals whose cases were closed in FY 2006 after receiving services: by disability, special population, SSI recipients, and SSDI beneficiaries.

This table provides the number of individuals by type of disability whose cases were closed after receiving services in FY 2006 and provides percentages for each type of disability category based on both agency totals and national statistics.

Table 3. Individuals whose cases were closed after receiving services by disability for IA-B

Category Number Increase or decrease from prior year Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Visual impairments 158-1100.00%99.85%
All other impairments 0no change0.00%0.15%
Total 158-1 100.00% 100.00%

Refer to Appendix B for information on how the disability categories are computed.

Two groups merit particular attention because of their unique VR needs: those of transition age (ages 14-24) and those over 65. This section provides statistics for these special populations.

Table 4. Special populations served

Special population Number Increase or decrease from prior year Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Transition age (14-24) 20+312.66%8.98%
Over 65 10.50%

The following table shows Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries.

Table 5. SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries

Category Number Increase or decrease from prior year Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
SSI recipients 45+528.48%22.45%
SSDI beneficiaries 79+950.00%30.19%

The following table provides information on the number of individuals who received specific VR services in FY 2006.

Table 6. Services provided

Category Individuals served 2006 Increase or decrease from prior year
Assessment (purchased only) 43-15
Placement (purchased only) 2no change
Treatment of physical and mental impairments 14-5
Postsecondary education 56-20
Other training and education 208+12
Assistance with living expenses 141+31
Transportation 103+29
Personal assistance, reader, or interpreter services 51-1
Rehabilitation technology services 133+9
All other services 194+30

The following section focuses on outcomes in various ways: type of employment, disability, special populations, SSI recipients, and SSDI beneficiaries. For this section, "achieved employment" is defined as individuals who obtained employment after receiving services. See Appendix A for the definition of employment outcome and for criteria for closing cases (34 CFR 361.5(b)(16) and 361.56). Of the individuals whose cases were closed after receiving services from IA-B in FY 2006, 81.65% or 129 achieved employment, compared to the national average for blind agencies of 69.93%.

Of individuals who achieved employment, 89.15% or 115 achieved competitive employment, compared to the national average for blind agencies of 81.12%. Competitive employment means employment at or above minimum wage in an integrated setting. See Appendix A for the definition of competitive employment. See 34 CFR 361.5(b)(11).

Table 7. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings, competitive employment

Category Competitive employment
Average hours worked per week 31.43
National average for blind agencies hours worked per week 31.70
Average hourly earnings $12.98
National average hourly earnings for blind agencies $12.20

Individuals can achieve a variety of employment outcomes:

  • Employment without supports in an integrated setting is work performed in an integrated setting for earnings below, at, or above the minimum wage.
  • Employment with supports in an integrated setting is work performed in an integrated setting for earnings below, at, or above the minimum wage by individuals with significant disabilities who require ongoing support services to maintain employment.
  • Self-employment refers to work for profit or fees including operating one's own business, farm, shop, or office.
  • Business Enterprise Program (BEP) is a state-federal program that establishes small business or vending facility entrepreneurial opportunities under the Randolph-Sheppard Act for individuals who are legally blind.
  • Homemaker refers to men and women whose activity is keeping house for persons in their households or for themselves if they live alone.
  • Unpaid family worker is an individual who works without pay on a family farm or in a family business.

See Appendix A for the definitions used in the RSA-911 for reporting purposes.

Table 8. Employment outcomes by type of employment

Type of employment Number Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Employment without supports in an integrated setting10178.29%68.84%
Employment with supports in an integrated setting 118.53%2.81%
Self-employment 32.33%10.38%
BEP 1.34%
Homemaker and unpaid family worker 1410.85%16.30%

Table 9. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings by type of employment

Type of employment Average hours worked per week National average for blind agencies hours worked per week Average hourly earnings National average hourly earnings for blind agencies
Employment without supports in an integrated setting32.7132.81$13.40$11.81
Employment with supports in an integrated setting 21.3621.78$8.33$0.03
Self-employment 25.3325.66$15.79$8.88
BEP 37.57$13.43
Homemaker and unpaid family worker 0.000.14$0.00$15.21

The following tables provide the number of individuals who achieved employment in FY 2006, employment rates, average hours worked, and hourly earnings by disability. Employment rate is the percentage of cases closed with employment outcomes compared to all cases closed after receiving services.

Table 10. Employment outcomes by disability

Disability Number Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Visual impairments 129100.00%99.93%
All other impairments 00.00%0.07%
Total 129 100.00% 100.00%

Table 11. Employment rates by disability

Disability Employment rate Change from prior year National average for blind agencies
Visual impairments 81.65+1.1569.99
All other impairments 33.33

Table 12. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings by disability

Disability Average hours worked per week National average for blind agencies hours worked per week Average hourly earnings National average hourly earnings for blind agencies
Visual impairments 28.0226.39$11.57$9.98
All other impairments $12.00

Table 13. Employment outcomes for special populations

Special population Number Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Transition age (14-24) 1310.08%6.26%
Over 65 107.75%11.78%

Table 14. Employment rates for special populations

Special population Employment rate Change from prior year National average for blind agencies
Transition age (14-24) 65.00%+6.18%48.75%
Over 65 78.39%

Table 15. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings for special populations

Special population Average hours worked per week National average for blind agencies hours worked per week Average hourly earnings National average hourly earnings for blind agencies
Transition age (14-24) 31.3830.23$10.09$9.60
Over 65 19.8011.74$6.03$7.81

Table 16. Employment outcomes for SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries

Category Number Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
SSI recipients 3426.36%16.80%
SSDI beneficiaries 6449.61%27.63%

Table 17. Employment rates for SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries

Category Employment rate Change from prior year National average for blind agencies
SSI recipients 75.56%+18.06%52.34%
SSDI beneficiaries 81.01%+1.01%63.99%

Table 18. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings for SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries

Category Average hours worked per week National average for blind agencies hours worked per week Average hourly earnings National average hourly earnings for blind agencies
SSI recipients 20.9721.26$8.40$8.32
SSDI beneficiaries 23.3122.31$9.66$8.61

The table below provides the number of agency full-time equivalent (FTE) staff in each category, as compared to the prior year and national average for blind agencies. See Appendix A for the definitions used in the RSA-2 for reporting purposes.

Table 19. Staffing patterns

Type FY 2006 Increase or decrease from prior year Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Administrative staff12+113.64%15.75%
Counselor staff 25+128.41%31.90%
Support staff 6-26.82%38.35%
Other staff 45-151.14%14.00%
Total staff 88-1 100.00% 100.00%

A. Funds available

The financial resources available to IA-B to provide VR services to individuals with disabilities in FY 2006 are shown in the following table. The sources of funds are:

  • Final federal VR grant award.
  • Nonfederal expenditures (or match) - the state's share of specific program expenditures mandated by federal law. Currently, the state is required to contribute a minimum of 21.3% match for that portion of total expenditures subject to the match requirement. For FY 2006, Iowa was required to contribute a minimum of $8,765,425 and contributed $185,693 more than that amount.
  • Program income - income generated as a result of activities carried out by the VR program, the majority of which consists of reimbursements from Social Security for individuals who achieved employment and were SSI recipients or SSDI beneficiaries.
  • Carryover - in addition to the FY 2006 federal VR grant award and the nonfederal match provided, the funds available were supplemented by $0 in additional federal funds carried over from the prior fiscal year (FY 2005), program income received and expended during this year, and program income carried over from the prior fiscal year (FY 2005).
  • Federal supported employment program grant.

Table 20. Funds available

Category FY 2006 Increase or decrease from prior year
Final federal VR grant award $6,560,058+272,294
Nonfederal expenditures (Match) $1,775,467-261,253
Program income $842,787+799,083
Carryover - prior year's VR grant $0-285,915
Federal supported employment grant award$57,393+2,998
Total $9,235,705+527,207

B. Funds used

In FY 2006 IA-B used $8,774,895 for its VR program, a decrease of 2.79%. Compared to the prior year, the use of funds for administration decreased by 17.52% and the use of funds for all client services decreased by 0.96%. Of the funds used for client services, 81.02% was used for services provided directly by the agency and 18.98% was used for services purchased from other providers.

Table 21. Funds used

Type of funds FY 2006 Increase or decrease from prior year Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Administrative $825,442-175,3799.41%15.22%
Total all client services $7,949,453-76,90090.59%84.78%
Agency-provided services$6,440,912+18,81773.40%49.31%
Purchased services $1,508,541-95,71717.19%35.47%
Total funds used $8,774,895-252,279 100.00% 100.00%

Unused funds of $249,095 were available for carryover to FY 2007.

C. Expenditures on services

Of the $7,949,453 used on client services, 35.22% or $2,800,098 was used on services to groups. The following table provides the remaining expenditures on services provided to individuals, whether purchased or provided directly by IA-B.

Table 22. Services provided to individuals

Service FY 2006 Increase or decrease from prior year Percent of agency total National average for blind agencies
Assessment, counseling, guidance, and placement provided by IA-B personnel$1,454,688+140,19518.30%34.32%
Assessment (purchased only) $9,997-7,1300.13%2.20%
Placement (purchased only) $2,070-15,1110.03%1.86%
Treatment of physical and mental impairments $23,835-17,4640.30%5.68%
Postsecondary education $342,334-78,1324.31%4.99%
Other training and education $2,337,559-251,27829.41%20.16%
Assistance with living expenses $273,724-11,7833.44%2.64%
Transportation $39,278+2,4730.49%1.40%
Personal assistance, reader, or interpreter services$91,448-28,0401.15%0.50%
All other services $574,422+26,7967.23%13.06%
Total expenditures on services provided to individuals$5,149,355-239,47464.78%86.97%

Of the $7,949,453 used on client services, 1.14% or $90,944 was used on rehabilitation technology services.

RSA monitors and evaluates the agency's ability to meet or exceed standard performance measures. The standards are divided into two major content areas that encompass seven indicators. Each state agency's data is computed and measured against the standards and indicators on an annual basis. In order to meet Standard 1, an agency must meet or exceed the required performance levels for four of the six indicators, including two of the three primary indicators. In order to meet Standard 2, an agency must meet or exceed the required performance level for Indicator 2.1. The table below indicates that in FY 2006 IA-B met or exceeded the required performance level for indicators in Standard 1. IA-B had fewer than 100 individuals from a minority background exit the VR program during the reporting period, so Indicator 2.1 was not met.

Table 23. Standard 1: Did the state agency assist eligible individuals to obtain, maintain or regain employment?

Indicators RSA minimum performance level FY 2005 FY 2006
1.1 How many more or fewer individuals achieved employment?
Greater than or equal to prior reporting period
-8
Did not meet
-8
Did not meet
1.2 Of the individuals whose cases were closed after receiving services, what percentage achieved employment?
68.90% 82.30%
Met
81.07%
Met
1.3 (Primary Indicator) Of the individuals who achieved employment, what percentage achieved competitive employment?
35.40% 86.42%
Met
89.49%
Met
1.4 (Primary Indicator) Of the individuals who achieved competitive employment, what percentage had a significant disability?
89.00% 95.63%
Met
100.00%
Met
1.5 (Primary Indicator) What is the ratio of the average hourly wage of individuals who achieved competitive employment to the average hourly wage of all employed individuals in the state?
0.590 0.927
Met
0.842
Met
1.6 What was the increase or decrease in the percentage of individuals who achieved competitive employment who had their own income as a primary source of support at closure compared to the percentage who had their own income as a primary source of support when they applied for VR services? 30.40 22.27
Did not meet
22.61
Did not meet

Table 24. Standard 2: Did the state agency ensure that individuals from minority backgrounds have access to VR services?

Indicators RSA minimum performance level FY 2005 FY 2006
2.1 What was the ratio of the minority population served by the VR program compared to the ratio of the nonminority population served by the VR program? 0.800 Fewer than 100 minority applicants exited the program.
Did not meet
Fewer than 100 minority applicants exited the program.
Met *

* The agency has described to RSA the policies it has adopted or will adopt, and the steps it has taken or will take, to ensure that individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds have equal access to services. This satisfies the requirements of Indicator 2.1.

IA-B reports that, in FY 2006, it implemented changes to the following policies and guidance.

The Iowa Department for the Blind operates under a Commission consisting of members appointed by the Governor. The Commission is 100% consumer controlled. Per chapter 216B of the Code of Iowa, the Commission has authority to set policy and review all major components of the program. The Commission members met four times in FY 2006. These meetings were open to the public. Department staff provided updates on program activities, financial status, and legislative issues. The Commission members approved rule changes related to the Business Enterprises Program, specifically rules relating to disciplinary action, transfer and promotion of vendors, and non-driver identification card requirements. Other rules approved by the Commission related to prohibitions on smoking in the building and changes concerning weapons in the building and building access and security.

The Commission chairperson's membership expired in FY 2006. A current member was elected chairperson, and a new member was appointed by the Governor.

When participants in the VR program are dissatisfied with services, they have a variety of options for addressing their dissatisfaction. They may engage in mediation with concurrence of the state agency, may request an informal or formal review, or may take legal action.

Table 25. Decisions made in formal reviews

Type Number Increase or decrease from prior year
In individual's favor 0no change
In agency's favor 0no change

Table 26. Types of complaints/issues involved in disputes

Types of complaint or issue MediationImpartial hearing requestsReviews of IHO decisionsCivil actions
Applicant eligibility for VR 0000
Nature/contents/scope of IPE 0000
Quality of counseling services 0000
Delivery/quality of other VR services 0000
Cost of services 0000
Termination of services/service record closure 0000
All other complaints/issues 0000

Where the following definitions refer to the Code of Federal Regulations, it specifically means Title 34-Education, Chapter III-Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education, Part 361-The State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program (34 CFR 361). This may be viewed at http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_02/34cfr361_02.html

  • Administrative Staff - The FTE for the number of personnel that perform administrative functions. Included in this category are program evaluators, program planners, budgeting and fiscal personnel, and staff development personnel. Clerical personnel who support the above administrative staff functions are to be included here. This does not include the FTE of administrative staff whose salaries are subject to distribution pursuant to an Indirect Cost Agreement or Cost Allocation Plan unless those staff are part of the designated State VR Unit and under the control of its Director
  • Business Enterprise Program (BEP) refers to state agency-managed Randolph-Sheppard vending facilities and other small businesses operated by individuals with significant disabilities under the management and supervision of a State VR agency. Includes home industry where the work is done under the management and supervision of a State VR agency in the individual's own home or residence for wages, salary, or on a piece-rate. Individuals capable of activity outside the home, as well as homebound individuals, may engage in such employment. See 34 CFR 361.81
  • Competitive employment - competitive employment means work (i) in the competitive labor market that is performed on a full-time or part-time basis in an integrated setting; and (ii) for which an individual is compensated at or above the minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not disabled. See 34 CFR 361.5(b)(11)
  • Counselor Staff - The FTE for the number of personnel that are involved in direct provision of service to individuals with disabilities. Included in this category are counselors, counselor aides, supervisors and rehabilitation teachers who carry a caseload. Does not include FTE for clerical personnel supporting the staff defined in this category. Clerical support personnel are included with Support Staff (see below)
  • Employment outcomes - Employment outcome means, with respect to an individual, entering or retaining full-time or, if appropriate, part-time competitive employment in the integrated labor market to the greatest extent practicable; supported employment; or any other type of employment that is consistent with an individual's strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. See 34 CFR 361.5(b)(16)
  • Employment rate - The percentage of cases closed with employment outcomes compared to all cases closed after receiving services
  • Employment with supports in an integrated setting - Full time or part-time employment in an integrated setting with ongoing support services for individuals with most significant disabilities. For purposes of this report, compensation for such employment may be below, at, or above the minimum wage
  • Employment without supports in an integrated setting - Full-time or part-time employment in an integrated setting without ongoing support services. For purposes of this report, this is work performed for wages, salary, commissions, tips, or piece-rates, below, at, or above the minimum wage. Does not include self-employed individuals
  • FTE - Full-time equivalent. An acronym for 'full time equivalent' used for management and reporting purposes to define and track types and total numbers of employees that represent claims on an organization's resources. For example, fulltime employees, counted as one FTE each, are typically defined as those who work 40 hours per week. Total FTE employment is then the sum of full time workers plus the fractional contributions of other employees
  • Homemaker - Refers to men and women whose activity is keeping house for persons in their households or for themselves if they live alone
  • Independent commission - Responsible under state law for operating, or overseeing the operation of, the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation services. The commission is consumer-controlled by persons who are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities, and represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities. The commission includes family members, advocates, or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments. See 34 CFR 361.16(a)(1)
  • IHO - impartial hearing officer. See 34 CFR 361.5(b)(25)
  • Integrated Setting - See 34 CFR 361.5(b)(33)(ii)
  • IPE - the individualized plan for employment. See 34 CFR 361.45 and 34 CFR 361.46
  • Order of selection - An order of selection is a list of priority categories from which eligible individuals are selected for services. Eligible individuals are assigned to priority categories based on the significance of their disability. When selecting individuals for services, first priority is given to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Other staff - The FTE for the number of personnel that are not recorded as support staff, administrative staff, or counselor staff. Included in this category are staff providing management and supervision services under the Business Enterprise Program (e.g., Randolph-Sheppard Program), State Coordinators for the Deaf and the Deaf/Blind, et cetera
  • Program income - Income generated by VR programs including Social Security reimbursements (SSI or SSDI) . See 34 CFR 361.63(a) and 34 CFR 361.63(b)
  • Self-employment - For the precise definition see 34 CFR 361.81
  • SRC - State Rehabilitation Council. See 34 CFR 361.17
  • SSDI - Social Security Disability Insurance
  • SSI - Supplemental Security Income
  • Special populations - Two population groups require particular attention: those of "transition age" (ages 14-24) and those over 65. These are described as "special populations"
  • Support staff - The FTE for the number of personnel, other than those included as Counselor Staff above, who directly or indirectly support Counselor Staff in providing services to individuals with disabilities. Included in this category are clerical personnel (other than those included with Administrative Staff), medical consultants, interviewers, placement officers, and specialists, district and local supervisors (except that portion of their time assigned to a caseload), non-caseload carrying rehabilitation teachers, psychologists, social workers, and other professional personnel who do not have a caseload carrying responsibility
  • Supported employment - Supported employment is an employment outcome that establishes and provides the appropriate employment supports needed by individuals with most significant disabilities in order to secure and to maintain competitive employment in an integrated setting. These supports may be provided either at the work site or away from the work site, depending on each individual's needs and should be provided for the term of employment. Some of these services include facilitation of natural supports at the worksite, intensive on-the-job skills training, job follow-up services, including regular contact with employers, trainees, job station redesign, repair and maintenance of assistive technology. See 34 CFR 361.5(b)(53)
  • Unpaid Family Worker is an individual who works without pay on a family farm or in a family business

Annual Review Report - Appendix B



Table of contents


This technical document is an appendix to the RSA-MIS Annual Review Report. It lists the sources for data shown in tables on the report, and can be used by technical staff at state agencies to verify the data RSA shows on the RSA-MIS Annual Review Report.

(Nov 12, 2013)


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Sources of data


State agencies report to RSA on the following forms:

  • RSA-2
    An annual VR program and cost report. One report is submitted each fiscal year by each agency.
  • RSA-113
    A quarterly cumulative caseload report. Since four reports are submitted each year, we use data from the report submitted in the fourth quarter (July 1 through Sept. 30)
  • RSA-722
    Annual report on appeals process. One report is submitted each fiscal year by each agency.
  • RSA-911
    The case service report. One report is submitted each year for each individual whose case was closed. For this report, we aggregate data from all of the RSA-911 reports submitted by the agency for the fiscal year
  • SF-269
    A quarterly financial status report. Since four reports are submitted each year, we use data from the report submitted in the fourth quarter (July 1 through Sept. 30) of the fiscal year.

The original source data for this report may be viewed on-line in the RSA Management Information System (RSA-MIS). From the MIS, select Main Menu then select Data Entry to view the reports submitted by the agency (note: the RSA-911 data shown in the RSA-MIS is aggregated data). Use the Ad Hoc Query feature (on the Quick Queries menu) to verify national averages.

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Table 1. Program highlights


There are two versions of Table 1, depending on the year of the report. Additionally, there are changes in FY 2012 regarding how competitive employment is calculated.

For FY 2012 and later

  • Average hourly earnings for competitive employment outcomes—
    Sum of individuals’ weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by the total hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) for individuals where weekly earnings at closure > 0, where the type of closure (record position 198) = 3, and where employment status (record position 161) is 1 or 3 or 4 or 7 and where the average hourly wage is not less than the greater of the state minimum wage or the federal minimum wage.
    Note: this report rounds the weekly earning to the penny before the division, where Standards and Indicators does not. In a few cases, there may be a difference of a penny or so.
  • Average hours worked per week for competitive employment outcomes—
    Average hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) for individuals where weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) > 0 and where the type of closure (record position 198) = 3 and where employment status (record position 161) is 1 or 3 or 4 or 7 and where the average hourly wage is not less than the greater of the state minimum wage or the federal minimum wage.
  • Average time between application and closure (in months) for individuals with competitive employment outcomes—
    Average of individuals date of closure (record position 201-208) minus date of application (record position 15-22) in months where type of closure (record position 198) = 3 and where employment status (record position 161) is 1 or 3 or 4 or 7 and where the average hourly wage is not less than the greater of the state minimum wage or the federal minimum wage.

For FY 2008 and later

  • Total funds expended—
    RSA-2 line I.4
  • Individuals whose cases were closed with employment outcomes—
    RSA-113 line D1
  • Individuals whose cases were closed without employment outcomes—
    RSA-113 line D2
  • Total number of individuals whose cases were closed after receiving services—
    RSA-113 line D1+D2
  • Employment rate—
    RSA-113 line D1 divided by sum of RSA-113 line D1+D2, multiplied by 100
  • Individuals whose cases were closed with SE outcomes—
    Total number of individuals whose employment status at closure (record position 161) = 7 in the RSA-911 report
  • New applicants per million state population—
    RSA-113 line A2 divided by the result of the estimated state population divided by 1 million. The estimated state population is found on the following Web site: http://www.census.gov/popest
  • Average cost per employment outcome—
    Sum of RSA-911 Cost of Purchased Services (record position 104-109) for individuals who exited the VR program with an employment outcome divided by the RSA-911 number of individuals who exited the VR program during the fiscal year with an employment outcome.
  • Average cost per unsuccessful employment outcome—
    Sum of RSA-911 Cost of Purchased Services (record position 104-109) for individuals who exited the VR program without an employment outcome (record position 198 = 4) divided by the total number of these individuals
  • Average hourly earnings for competitive employment outcomes—
    Sum of individuals’ weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by the total hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) for individuals where weekly earnings at closure > 0, where the type of closure (record position 198) = 3, and where competitive employment (record position 162) = 1.
  • Average state hourly earnings—
    Using the most relevant available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Report (http://www.bls.gov), state average annual earnings divided by 2,080 hours
  • Percent average hourly earnings for competitive employment outcomes to state average hourly earnings—
    Average hourly earnings for competitive employment outcomes (above) divided by the Average state hourly earnings (above) multiplied by 100
  • Average hours worked per week for competitive employment outcomes—
    Average hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) for individuals where weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) > 0 and where the type of closure (record position 198) = 3 and where competitive employment (record position 162) = 1.
  • Percent of transition-age youths served to total served—
    Total number of individuals whose age at application is 14-24 and whose type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4 divided by all individuals of any age whose type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4
  • Employment rate for transition population served—
    Total number of individuals whose age at application is 14-24 and whose type of closure (record position 198) = 3 divided by the number of individuals whose age at application is 14-24 and whose type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4 multiplied, the result of which is multiplied by 100
  • Average time between application and closure (in months) for individuals with competitive employment outcomes—
    Average of individuals date of closure (record position 201-208) minus date of application (record position 15-22) in months where type of closure (record position 198) = 3 and where competitive employment (record position 162) = 1.
  • Evaluation Standard 1—
    See section Table 23 below
  • Evaluation Standard 2—
    See section Table 24 below

For FY 2007 and earlier

  • Total funds expended—
    RSA-2 line I.4
  • Successful employment outcomes—
    RSA-113 line D1
  • Average hourly earnings—
    Average of RSA-911 reports' weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) for individuals where weekly earnings at closure > 0 and where the type of closure (record position 198) = 3. Note: In an effort to represent the data in a more accurate manner, this data element has been computed differently in this year's Annual Review Report than it was in the FY 2005 Annual Review Report where we computed the number based on all employment outcomes regardless of their weekly earnings
  • Average hours worked per week—
    Average of RSA-911 reports hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) for individuals where weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) > 0 and where the type of closure (record position 198) = 3. Note: In an effort to represent the data in a more accurate manner, this data element has been computed differently in this year's Annual Review Report than it was in the FY 2005 Annual Review Report where we computed the number based on all employment outcomes regardless of their weekly earnings.
  • Average cost per employment outcome—
    Sum of RSA-911 Cost of Purchased Services for individuals who exited the VR program with an employment outcome divided by the RSA-911 number of individuals who exited the VR program during the fiscal year with an employment outcome.
  • Average time between application and closure (in months) for individuals with successful employment outcomes—
    Average of RSA-911 reports date of closure (record position 201-208) – date of application (record position 15-22) in months where type of closure (record position 198) = 3
  • Total individuals served—
    RSA-113 lines C3 plus D1 plus D2
  • Average cost per individual served—
    RSA-2 line I.4 is divided by RSA-113 lines C3 plus D1 plus D2
  • Average number of cases per total staff—
    RSA-113 lines C3 plus D1 plus D2 is divided by RSA-2 lines III.1 + III.2 + III.3 + III.4
  • Average number of employment outcomes per total staff—
    RSA-113 line D1 is divided by RSA-2 lines III.1 + III.2 + III.3 + III.4
  • Evaluation standard 1—
    See section Table 23 below
  • Evaluation standard 2—
    See section Table 24 below
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Table 2. Caseload statistics


  • Applicants—
    RSA-113 lines A1 plus A2
  • Individuals served—
    RSA-113 lines C3 plus D1 plus D2
  • Closed after receiving services—
    RSA-113 lines D1 plus D2
  • Closed with employment outcomes—
    RSA-113 line D1
  • Closed without employment outcomes after receiving services—
    RSA-113 line D2
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Table 3. Individuals whose cases were closed after receiving services by disability


  • Visual impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 01, 02, or 08 where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4
  • Physical impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, or 16 where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4
  • Communicative disorders—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, or 09 where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4
  • Cognitive impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 17 where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4
  • Mental and emotional (psychosocial) disabilities—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 18 or 19 where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4
  • Total—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is between 01 and 19 where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4
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Table 4. Special populations served


  • Transition age (14-24)—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is 14-24 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4.
  • Over 65—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is over 65 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4.

NOTE: Beginning FY2008 Transition Age is calculated using Age at Application.
To calculate age at application:
Subtract [application year (record position 15-18) from birth year (record position 23-26)] - 1 where [birth month (record position 27-28) = application month (record position 19-20) AND birth day (record position 29-30) > application day (record position 21-22)] OR [birth month (record position 27-28) > application month (record position 19-20)].
Subtract [application year (record position 15-18) from birth year (record position 23-26)] where [birth month (record position 27-28) = application month (record position 19-20) AND birth day (record position 29-30) = application day (record position 21-22)] OR [birth month (record position 27-28) < application month (record position 19-20)] OR [birth month (record position 27-28) = application month (record position 19-20) AND birth day (record position 29-30) < application day (record position 21-22)].

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Table 5. SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries


  • SSI recipients—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 59) or at closure (record position 169) is 1 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4.
  • SSDI beneficiaries—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 62) or at closure (record position 172) is 1 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4.
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Table 6. Services provided


  • Assessment (purchased only)—
    RSA-2 line II.2
  • Placement (purchased only)—
    RSA-2 line II.8
  • Treatment of physical and mental impairments—
    RSA-2 line II.3
  • Post-Secondary Education—
    RSA-2 line II.4a
  • Other Training and Education—
    RSA-2 line II.4b plus II.4c plus II.4d
  • Assistance with Living Expenses—
    RSA-2 line II.5
  • Transportation—
    RSA-2 line II.6
  • Personal Assistance Services—
    RSA-2 line II.7
  • Rehabilitation Technology Services—
    RSA-2 line II.12
  • All Other Services—
    RSA-2 line II.9
  • Agency Total
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Table 7. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings, competitive employment


This table averages the number of hours worked RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 and the average hourly wage (RSA-911 report weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 for each of the following categories:

For FY 2012 and later

  • Competitive employment—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where employment status (record position 161) is 1 or 3 or 4 or 7 and where the average hourly wage is not less than the greater of the state minimum wage or the federal minimum wage.

For FY 2011 and earlier

  • Competitive employment—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where for FY 2011 and earlier competitive employment (record position 162) and where the average hourly wage is not less than the greater of the state minimum wage or the federal minimum wage.
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Table 8. Employment outcomes by type of employment


  • Employment without supports in an integrated setting—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 1 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3
  • Employment with supports in an integrated setting—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 7 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3
  • Self-employment—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 3 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3
  • BEP—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 4 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3
  • Homemaker and unpaid family worker—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 5 or 6 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3
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Table 9. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings by type of employment


This table averages the number of hours worked RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 and the average hourly wage (RSA-911 report weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 for each of the following categories:

  • Employment without supports in an integrated setting—
    RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 1
  • Employment with supports in an integrated setting—
    RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 7
  • Self-employment—
    RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 3
  • BEP—
    RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 4
  • Homemaker and unpaid family worker—
    RSA-911 reports where employment status at closure (record position 161) is 5 or 6
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Table 10. Employment outcomes by disability


This table looks at those RSA-911 reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 for each of the following categories:

  • Visual impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 01, 02, or 08
  • Physical impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, or 16
  • Communicative disorders—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, or 09
  • Cognitive impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 17
  • Mental and emotional (psychosocial) disabilities—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 18 or 19
  • Total—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is between 01 and 19
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Table 11. Employment rates by disability


This table looks at those RSA-911 reports where employment rate, the percentage of the number of reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 divided by the sum of the number of reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4, for each of the following categories:

  • Visual impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 01, 02, or 08
  • Physical impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, or 16
  • Communicative disorders—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, or 09
  • Cognitive impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 17
  • Mental and emotional (psychosocial) disabilities—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 18 or 19
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Table 12. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings by disability


This table averages the number of hours worked, RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168), and the average hourly wage, RSA-911 report weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by the number of hours worked, RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 for each of the following categories:

  • Visual impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 01, 02, or 08
  • Physical impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, or 16
  • Communicative disorders—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, or 09
  • Cognitive impairments—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 17
  • Mental and emotional (psychosocial) disabilities—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where primary disability impairment code (record position 43-44) is 18 or 19
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Table 13. Employment outcomes for special populations


  • Transition age (14-24)—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is 14-24 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3
  • Over 65—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is over 65 and type of closure (record position 198) is 3

Note: Beginning FY2008 Transition Population is calculated using Age at Application. See the note on Table 4 for directions on how to calculate the age at application.

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Table 14. Employment rates for special populations


This table looks at RSA-911 reports employment rate, the percentage of the number of reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 divided by the sum of the number of reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4 for each of the following categories:

  • Transition age (14-24)—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is 14-24
  • Over 65—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is over 65

Note: Beginning FY2008 Transition Population is calculated using Age at Application. See the note on Table 4 for directions on how to calculate the age at application.

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Table 15. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings for special populations


This table averages the number of hours worked, RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168), and the average hourly wage, RSA-911 report weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by the number of hours worked, RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 for each of the following categories:

  • Transition age (14-24)—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is 14-24
  • Over 65—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where age at application is over 65

Note: Beginning FY2008 Transition Population is calculated using Age at Application. See the note on Table 4 for directions on how to calculate the age at application.

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Table 16. Employment outcomes for SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries


This table looks at those RSA-911 reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 for each of the following categories:

  • SSI recipients—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 59) or at closure (record position 169) is 1
  • SSDI beneficiaries—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 62) or at closure (record position 172) is 1
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Table 17. Employment rates for SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries


This table looks at those RSA-911 reports where employment rate, the percentage of the number of reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 divided by the sum of the number of reports where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 or 4, for each of the following categories:

  • SSI recipients—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 59) or at closure (record position 169) is 1
  • SSDI beneficiaries—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 62) or at closure (record position 172) is 1
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Table 18. Average hours worked per week and average hourly earnings for SSI recipients and SSDI beneficiaries


This table averages the number of hours worked, RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168), and the average hourly wage, RSA-911 report weekly earnings at closure (record position 163-166) divided by the number of hours worked, RSA-911 report hours worked in a week at closure (record position 167-168) where type of closure (record position 198) is 3 for each of the following categories:

  • SSI recipients—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 59) or at closure (record position 169) is 1
  • SSDI beneficiaries—
    Number of RSA-911 reports where type of public support at application (record position 62) or at closure (record position 172) is 1
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Table 19. Staffing patterns


  • Administrative staff—
    RSA-2 line III.1
  • Counselor staff—
    RSA-2 line III.2
  • Support staff—
    RSA-2 line III.3
  • Other staff—
    RSA-2 line III.4
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Table 20. Funds available


For Fiscal Year 2009 and earlier, financial reporting was performed using the SF-269; for Fiscal Year 2010 and later, the SF-425 was used.

  • Final federal VR grant award—
    SF-269 line 10.o for 'Basic Support' / SF-425 line 10d for ‘Basic Support’
  • Nonfederal expenditures (match)—
    • For FY 2010 and earlier: SF-269 line 10.i plus 10.l for the 4th quarter
    • For FY 2011 and later: SF-425 Line 10.j plus 12.d for the latest/final or the 4th quarter whichever is less
  • Program income
    SF-269 line 10.t / SF-425 line 10l
  • Carryover—
    • For FY 2010 and earlier, this is computed from the RSA-2 line V.2 plus V.4 plus V.6
    • For FY 2011 and later, the Lesser of Total Federal Funds Matched - SF-425 line 10j/.213*.787 - or Total Federal Funds Authorized – SF-425 10d minus Federal Cash Receipts - SF-425 Line 10a (if negative amount, 0) from the prior year's 4th quarter SF-425
  • Federal supported employment grant award—
    SF-269 line 10.o for Program 'Supported Employment' / SF-425 Line 10d for Program ‘Supported Employment’
  • Required match—
    (Final federal VR grant award / 0.787) * 0.213
  • Over / Under match—
    Required Match minus the Nonfederal expenditures (match)
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Table 21. Funds used


  • Administrative—
    RSA-2 line I.1
  • Total all client services—
    RSA-2 line I.4 minus RSA-2 line I.1
  • Agency-provided services—
    RSA-2 line I.2.A.1.a plus I.2.A.1.b plus I.2.A.2.a plus I.2.A.2.b plus I.3.a plus I.3.b plus I.3.c plus I.3.d
  • Purchased services—
    RSA-2 line I.2.B.1 plus I.2.B.2 plus I.2.B.3 plus I.2.B.4
  • Total funds used—
    RSA-2 line I.4

For reports from Fiscal Year 2005 and earlier, the following items were included on this table.

  • Carryover—
    RSA-2 line V.1 plus V.3 plus V.5
  • Expenditures on groups—
    Comes from RSA-2 lines I.3.a plus I.3.b plus I.3.c plus I.3.d
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Table 22. Services provided to individuals


  • Assessment, counseling, guidance, and placement provided by agency personnel—
    RSA-2 lines I.2.A.1.a plus I.2.A.2.a
  • Assessment (purchased only)—
    RSA-2 line II.2
  • Placement (purchased only)—
    RSA-2 line II.8
  • Treatment of physical and mental impairments—
    RSA-2 line II.3
  • Post-Secondary Education—
    RSA-2 line II.4a
  • Other Training and Education—
    RSA-2 line II.4b plus II.4c plus II.4d
  • Assistance with Living Expenses—
    RSA-2 line II.5
  • Transportation—
    RSA-2 line II.6
  • Personal Assistance Services—
    RSA-2 line II.7
  • Rehabilitation Technology Services—
    RSA-2 line II.12
  • All Other Services—
    RSA-2 line II.9
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Table 23. Standard 1


For all of the RSA-911 computations, the performance period is one year for general and combined agencies, and two years for blind agencies. All of the following computations depend on looking at aggregated RSA-911 information.

Indicator 1.1

Subtract the number of RSA-911 records where position 198 is 3 for the prior performance period from the number of RSA-911 records where position 198 is 3 for the current performance period. (Position 198 is closure type, and a value of 3 indicates employment outcomes.).

Required Performance Level: The required performance level is zero or higher.

Indicator 1.2

For the performance period, divide the number of RSA-911 records where record position 198 is 3 (this represents the number individuals who exited the VR program in employment) by the number of RSA-911 records where record position 198 is either 3 or 4 (this represents the number of individuals who exited the VR program after receiving services), then multiply by 100.

Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSUs, the required performance level is 55.8%; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is 68.9%.

Indicator 1.3

Perform the following steps:

  1. For each individual with an employment outcome who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting (record position 198 =3 AND (record position 161 = 1 OR record position 161 = 3 OR record position 161 = 4 OR record position 161 = 7)), divide earnings in the week before closure (record position 163-166) by the number of hours worked in the week before closure (record position 167-168) to obtain an hourly wage. Use mathematical rounding rules when computing the hourly wage. That is, round up if the computed wage is greater than or equal to .nn5 and round down or truncate if the computed wage is .nn49 (where n is a relevant number.) For example, an hourly wage of $6.145 would round to $6.15. An hourly wage of $6.1449 would round down to $6.14.
  2. Select all cases where the hourly wage is greater than or equal to the minimum wage to obtain the number of individuals who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage. Use the higher of federal minimum wage or State minimum wage. RSA will use the minimum wage in effect on October 1, the first day of the fiscal year. When using two years of data (agencies for blind), use the minimum wage relevant for each specific year. In FY 2005, use the October 1, 2004 minimum wage for records closed in FY 2005; use the October 1, 2003 minimum wage for records closed in FY 2004. This computation produces a weighted average.
  3. Divide the number of cases from step 2 by the total number of individuals who exited the VR program with an employment outcome (record position 198 is 3).
  4. Multiply the result by 100.
Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSUs, the level is 72.6%; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is 35.4%.

Indicator 1.4

Perform the following steps:

  1. Perform Step 1 from Indicator 1.3 above
  2. Perform Step 2 from Indicator 1.3 above
  3. Identify the number of these individuals who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage (item 2 above) whose disabilities are significant (record position 211 = 1).
  4. Divide the number of individuals whose disabilities are significant (item 3 above) by the total number of individuals who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage (item 2 above.)
Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSUs, the level is 62.4%; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is 89.0%.

Indicator 1.5

Perform the following steps:

  1. For each individual with an employment outcome who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting (RP 198 =3 AND (RP 161 = 1 OR RP 161 = 3 OR RP 161 = 4 OR RP 161 = 7)), divide earnings in the week before closure (RP 163-166) by the number of hours worked in the week before closure (RP 167-168) to obtain an hourly wage.
  2. Select all cases where the hourly wage is greater than or equal to the minimum wage to obtain the number of individuals who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage. Use the higher of federal minimum wage or State minimum wage. RSA will use the minimum wage in effect on October 1, the first day of the fiscal year. When using two years of data (agencies for blind), use the minimum wage relevant for each specific year. That is, use a weighted average.
  3. For each individual identified in item 2, compute the hourly wage by dividing each person's weekly earnings by that person's hours worked.
  4. Add the hourly wages of all of the persons in item 3 and divide the sum by the total number of these individuals to obtain the average hourly earnings for all individuals who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage.
  5. Using the most relevant available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Report, State Average Annual Pay, divide the State's average annual pay by 2080 to obtain average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed. When using two years of data (agencies for blind), use the state average wage relevant for each specific year. That is, use a weighted average. Beginning in FY 2004, RSA is computing annual pay from the weekly wage data of quarters that correspond to our fiscal year. At the time the Standards and Indicators were computed, state average annual pay was computed using preliminary 2005 annual weekly wage data. For agencies that serve the visually impaired, fiscal year wages for FY 2004 and FY 2005 were used to obtain a weighted average.
  6. Divide average hourly earnings for all individuals who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage (item 4 above) by average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed (item 5 above) to obtain the ratio.
Computation note for average VR hourly wage: It is important to compute the hourly wage for each individual client and then obtain the average hourly wage by summing all of these individuals' hourly wages and dividing by the number of clients as described in steps 3 and 4. A different result is obtained if the total of weekly wages for all relevant clients is first summed and then is divided by the total of hours worked by those clients.

Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSUs, the level is a ratio of .52; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the ratio is .59.

Indicator 1.6

Perform the following steps:

  1. For each individual with an employment outcome who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting (RP 198 =3 AND (RP 161 = 1 OR RP 161 = 3 OR RP 161 = 4 OR RP 161 = 7)), divide earnings in the week before closure (RP 163-166) by the number of hours worked in the week before closure (RP 167-168) to obtain an hourly wage. Use mathematical rounding rules when computing the hourly wage. That is, round up if the computed wage is greater than or equal to .nn5 and round down or truncate if the computed wage is .nn49 (where n is a relevant number.) For example, an hourly wage of $6.145 would round to $6.15. An hourly wage of $6.1449 would round down to $6.14.
  2. Select all cases where the hourly wage is greater than or equal to the minimum wage to obtain the number of individuals who exited the VR program in competitive, self-employment, BEP employment, or supported employment in an integrated setting with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage. Use the higher of federal minimum wage or State minimum wage. RSA will use the minimum wage in effect on October 1, the first day of the fiscal year. When using two years of data (agencies for blind), use the minimum wage relevant for each specific year. That is, use a weighted average.
  3. Divide the number of individuals who reported their own income as their primary source of support at application (RP 82 = 1) by the total number of such individuals (item 2 above) and multiply by 100.
  4. Divide the number of individuals who reported their own income as their primary source of support at closure (RP 192 = 1) by the total number of such individuals (item 2 above) and multiply by 100.
  5. Subtract the percentage that reported their own income as primary source of support at application (item 3 above) from the percentage that reported their own income as primary source of support at closure (item 4 above).
Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSUs, the level is an arithmetic difference of 53.0; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is a difference of 30.4.

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Table 24. Standard 2


Indicator 2.1

Perform the following steps on RSA-911 records:

  1. Select individuals from minority backgrounds who exited the VR program (record position 33 = 1 or record position 34 = 1 or record position 35 = 1 or record position 36 = 1 or record position 37 = 1).
  2. Divide the number of individuals from minority backgrounds (obtained in step 1) who exited the VR program after receiving services (record position 198 = 3 or record position 198 = 4) by the total number of individuals from minority backgrounds who exited the VR program (all cases obtained in step 1) and multiply by 100 to obtain a service rate for minority individuals.
  3. Select individuals from non-minority backgrounds who exited the VR program (record position 32 = 1 and record position 33 = 0 and record position 34 = 0 and record position 35 = 0 and record position 36 = 0 and record position 37 = 0).
  4. Divide the number of individuals from non-minority backgrounds (obtained in step 3) who exited the VR program after receiving services (record position 198 = 3 or record position 198 = 4) by the total number of individuals from non-minority backgrounds who exited the VR program (all cases obtained in step 3) and multiply by 100 to obtain a service rate for non-minority individuals.
  5. Divide the service rate for minority individuals (item 2 above) by the service rate for non-minority individuals (item 4 above).

Required Performance Level: All agencies must attain a ratio level of .80.

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Table 25. Decisions made in formal reviews


  • In individual's favor—
    RSA-722 line II.B.2
  • In agency's favor—
    RSA-722 line II.B.3
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Table 26. Types of complaints/issues involved in disputes


  • Applicant eligibility for VR—
    RSA-722 line V.1
  • Nature/contents/scope of IPE—
    RSA-722 line V.2
  • Quality of counseling services—
    RSA-722 line V.3
  • Delivery/quality of other VR services—
    RSA-722 line V.4
  • Cost of services—
    RSA-722 line V.5
  • Termination of services/service record closure—
    RSA-722 line V.6
  • All other complaints/issues—
    RSA-722 line V.7
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This content was copied from www.ed.gov on 02/09/2018

This appendix is also available on the ed.gov website at https://www.ed.gov/rschstat/eval/rehab/rsamis/ann_appendix_b.html.

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