ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
ED

Supported Employment (SE) Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities

Purpose



Program Office: Rehabilitation Services Administration

CFDA Number: 84.187
Program Type: Formula Grants
Also Known As: Supported Employment for Individuals With the Most Significant Disabilities, Title VI-B State Grants


Program Description


This program provides grants to assist states in developing and implementing collaborative programs with appropriate entities to provide programs of supported employment services for individuals with the most significant disabilities who require supported employment services to achieve employment outcomes. Grant funds are administered under a state plan supplement to the Title I state plan for vocational rehabilitation (VR) services designated by each state.


Types of Projects


Supported employment grant funds are used to supplement funds provided under the state VR grants program for the costs of providing supported employment services. Program funds may be used to supplement assessments under the Title I program and supplement other VR services necessary to help individuals with the most significant disabilities find work in the integrated labor market. Funds cannot be used to provide the extended services necessary to maintain individuals in employment after the end of supported employment services, which usually do not exceed 18 months.


Additional Information


To be eligible for this current-funded formula grant program, states must submit a supplement to their Title I Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants program plan. States may carry over unobligated funds to the next fiscal year. Funds are distributed on the basis of population, except that no state receives less than $300,000, or one-third of 1 percent of the sums appropriated, whichever is greater. The minimum allotment for territories is one-eighth of 1 percent of the sums appropriated.

This content was copied from www.ed.gov on 09/28/2016

Eligibility



Who May Apply: States and public or nonprofit agencies and organizations, including Indian tribes and Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs).

This content was copied from www.ed.gov on 09/28/2016

Awards to Grantees

Note on this table: the numbers shown represent the awards made during the fiscal year to RSA grantees. There may be additional set-asides for the program which are not shown.

State Grantee PR Award ID Current Awards FY 2016 Total Awarded FY 2015 Total Awarded FY 2014
Alabama Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services H187A160001 $370,088 $353,080 $349,717
Alaska Alaska Dept of Labor and Workforce Development - Division of Vocational Rehab H187A160002 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Arizona Arizona Rehabilitation Services Administration H187A160003 $480,412 $477,188 $475,274
Arkansas Arkansas Division of Services for the Blind H187A160005 $50,679 $41,000 $36,000
Arkansas Arkansas Rehabilitation Services H187A160004 $264,000 $264,000 $264,000
California California Department of Rehabilitation H187A160006 $2,769,257 $2,785,054 $2,758,952
Colorado Colorado Department of Labor and Employment H187A160091 $275,000
Colorado Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160007 $107,237 $379,379 $376,229
Connecticut Bureau of Rehabilitation Services H187A160008 $255,000 $255,000 $255,000
Connecticut Services for the Blind, Vocational Rehabilitation Program H187A160009 $45,000 $45,000 $45,000
Delaware Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired - DHHS Campus H187A160011 $42,000 $45,000
Delaware Delaware Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160010 $258,000 $255,000 $300,000
District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration, DC Dept. on Disability Services H187A160012 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Florida Florida Division of Blind Services H187A160087 $241,356 $239,363 $238,171
Florida Florida Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160086 $1,178,388 $1,168,653 $1,162,834
Georgia Georgia Vocational Rehabilitation Agency H187A160089 $720,627 $719,543 $719,443
Hawaii Hawaii Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160016 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Idaho Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired H187A160018 $3,000 $3,000 $3,000
Idaho Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160017 $297,000 $297,000 $297,000
Illinois Illinois Division of Rehabilitation Services H187A160019 $919,261 $927,652 $933,777
Indiana Indiana Bureau of Rehabilitation Services H187A160020 $470,804 $473,176 $474,120
Iowa Iowa Department for the Blind H187A160022 $57,000 $57,000 $57,000
Iowa Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services H187A160021 $243,000 $243,000 $243,000
Kansas Kansas Department for Children and Families H187A160023 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Kentucky Kentucky Office for the Blind H187A160025 $40,947 $41,146 $41,300
Kentucky Office of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160024 $295,872 $280,362 $276,389
Louisiana Louisiana Rehabilitation Services H187A160026 $331,838 $333,084 $333,752
Maine Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired H187A160084 $48,000 $48,000 $48,000
Maine Maine Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160027 $252,000 $252,000 $252,000
Maryland Maryland Division of Rehabilitation Services H187A160028 $426,524 $426,938 $426,777
Massachusetts Massachusetts Commission for the Blind H187A160030 $72,211 $72,293 $72,302
Massachusetts Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission H187A160029 $409,195 $409,662 $409,709
Michigan Bureau of Services for Blind Persons H187A160032 $84,870 $85,511 $86,015
Michigan Michigan Rehabilitation Services H187A160090 $622,378 $627,080 $630,775
Minnesota Minnesota State Services for the Blind H187A160034 $70,104 $75,259 $70,222
Minnesota Minnesota Vocational Rehabilitation Services H187A160033 $319,363 $320,067 $319,900
Mississippi Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services H187A160035 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Missouri Missouri Rehabilitation Services for the Blind H187A160038 $56,257 $56,582 $56,777
Missouri Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160037 $376,489 $378,663 $379,967
Montana Montana Disability Employment and Transitions Division H187A160039 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Nebraska Nebraska Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired H187A160041 $30,000 $30,000 $30,000
Nebraska Nebraska Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160040 $270,000 $270,000 $270,000
Nevada Nevada Rehabilitation Division H187A160042 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
New Hampshire New Hampshire Division of Career Technology and Adult Learning H187A160043 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
New Jersey New Jersey Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired H187A160045 $127,580 $128,170 $128,581
New Jersey New Jersey Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services H187A160044 $510,319 $512,678 $514,323
New Mexico New Mexico Commission for the Blind H187A160047 $55,500 $55,500 $55,500
New Mexico New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160046 $244,500 $244,500 $244,500
New York New York Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped H187A160049 $225,480 $226,415 $227,093
New York New York Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services H187A160048 $1,183,768 $1,188,677 $1,192,238
North Carolina North Carolina Division of Services for the Blind H187A160051 $120,646 $18,630
North Carolina North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services H187A160050 $589,034 $690,536 $707,268
North Dakota North Dakota Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160052 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Ohio Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities H187A160053 $827,452 $833,222 $837,244
Oklahoma Oklahoma Department of Rehabilitation Services H187A160054 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Oregon Oregon Commission for the Blind H187A160056 $37,500 $37,500 $37,500
Oregon Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services H187A160055 $262,500 $262,500 $262,500
Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Office of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160057 $975,876 $919,851 $925,674
Rhode Island Rhode Island Office of Rehabilitation Services H187A160059 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
South Carolina South Carolina Commission for the Blind H187A160062 $44,835 $44,536
South Carolina South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department H187A160061 $300,049 $299,141 $298,052
South Dakota South Dakota Division of Rehabilitation Services H187A160063 $300,000 $300,000 $294,000
South Dakota South Dakota Division of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired H187A140083 $6,000
Tennessee Tennessee Division of Rehabilitation Services H187A160064 $467,414 $467,780 $468,238
Texas Texas Division for Blind Services H187A160066 $187,055 $180,911 $170,066
Texas Texas Division of Rehabilitative Services H187A160065 $704,755 $1,723,643 $1,719,875
Texas Texas Workforce Commission H187A160093 $1,032,053
Utah Utah State Office of Rehabilitation H187A160067 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Vermont Vermont Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired H187A160069 $6,000 $6,000 $6,000
Vermont Vermont Vocational Rehabilitation Division H187A160068 $294,000 $294,000 $294,000
Virginia Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired H187A160071 $77,250 $77,329 $77,178
Virginia Virginia Department of Rehabilitative Services H187A160070 $558,184 $517,509 $516,501
Washington Washington Department of Services for the Blind H187A160073 $60,476 $60,242 $60,025
Washington Washington State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160072 $443,491 $441,774 $440,180
West Virginia West Virginia Division of Rehabilitation Services H187A160074 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Wisconsin Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160075 $410,906 $413,537 $415,306
Wyoming Wyoming Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160076 $135,000 $300,000 $300,000
American Samoa American Samoa Office of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160077 $34,435 $34,435 $34,435
Guam Guam Division of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160078 $34,435 $34,435 $34,435
Northern Marianas Northern Marianas Office of Vocational Rehabilitation H187A160079 $34,435 $34,435 $34,435
Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Vocational Rehabilitation Administration H187A160081 $300,000 $300,000 $300,000
Virgin Islands Virgin Islands Division for Disabilities and Rehabilitation Services H187A160082 $34,435 $34,435 $34,435

Performance



FY 2003 Annual Program Performance Report

This content was copied from www.ed.gov on 09/28/2016

Total Awards to RSA Grantees

Note on this table: the numbers shown represent the sum of awards made during the fiscal year to RSA grantees. There may be additional set-asides for the program which are not shown.

CFDA Number Program Number of Awards FY-2016 Current Awards FY-2016 Total Awarded FY-2015 Total Awarded FY-2014
84.187 Supported Employment (SE) Services for Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities 82 $27,272,520 $27,272,520 $27,272,520

Laws, Regulations and Guidance



Legislation




Regulations




Guidance



Technical Assistance Circulars




Policy Directives




Other Communication


Items in this section are not policy or subregulatory policy or formal guidance; rather they are general communications to RSA grantees.

  • Accessing and Initiating Changes to Formula Grant Award Notifications
    This document describes the process to be used to request changes to the GAN (Grant Award Notification) such as address; however this process may be used only when the rights and obligations of the grantee are not affected.
    Mar. 3, 2014 — MS Word (48KB) | PDF (232KB)

This content was copied from www.ed.gov on 09/28/2016

Frequently-Asked Questions




  1. How must a State calculate the amount it must reserve for the provision of supported employment services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?
  2. How does a State calculate the 10 percent match requirement for the 50 percent reserve of SE funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?
  3. Can a State carry over any portion of its SE allotment, whether for SE reserve purposes or not?
  4. How must a VR agency account for the Federal SE funds it reserves for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?
  5. Can a State expend more than 50 percent of its SE Federal funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?
  6. What are the potential consequences of a State not reserving and using the requisite amount of funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?
  7. How is the SE reservation requirement affected when there are two VR agencies (General and Blind)?
  8. When may a State expend SE award funds for the provision of SE services to individuals with the most significant disabilities?
  9. How do States pay for costs of administering the SE award in excess of the 2.5 percent administrative cap?



1. How must a State calculate the amount it must reserve for the provision of supported employment services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?

Section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Rehabilitation Act), as amended by the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), requires a State to reserve and expend half of its State allotment, under the State Supported Employment (SE) Services grant (CFDA 84.187A), for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. It reads:

SEC. 603. ALLOTMENTS.
(d) Services for Youth with the Most Significant Disabilities. - A State that receives an allotment under this title shall reserve and expend half of such allotment for the provision of supported employment services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities in order to assist those youth in achieving an employment outcome in supported employment.

The State allotment, which forms the basis for the reservation of funds requirement, refers to the Federal SE funds awarded pursuant to section 603(a) of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 603(b) of the Rehabilitation Act makes clear that funds received during reallotment are considered an increase to the State’s allotment for that Federal fiscal year (FFY). Consequently, receiving additional funds during reallotment will mean that the State will need to calculate a proportionate increase to the amount of funds it must reserve for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. Similarly, funds relinquished during reallotment are considered a reduction to the State’s allotment. Relinquishing funds during reallotment will mean that the State may calculate a proportionate decrease to the amount of funds it must reserve for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. In the case of a State either receiving additional funds or relinquishing funds during reallotment, the State is still obligated to reserve 50 percent of the State’s increased or decreased allotment for that fiscal year for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities.

In calculating the 50 percent minimum amount to be reserved, States must base the percentage on the total amount allotted to the State in the fiscal year of appropriation. In other words, a State should use the amount listed on the State’s Grant Award Notification (GAN) as the basis for ensuring that it has reserved 50 percent of that amount for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. See Example 1 below. A State may choose to adjust its calculations with each GAN it receives during the fiscal year of appropriation, taking into account adjustments made throughout the FFY for continuing resolutions and allotment fund increases or decreases through the reallotment process, for this purpose. See Examples 2 and 3 below. The important point to note is that a State’s final calculation of its reserve must be based on the final sum of its allotments listed on all of the GANs it received during the fiscal year of appropriation. Deobligation of SE funds, as opposed to relinquishment through reallotment, either requested by the State or as a result of grant closeout after September 30 of the year of appropriation will not affect the amount of the required 50 percent reserve determined at the end of the year of appropriation based on the State’s allotment identified in its GAN. See Example 4 below.

The following are examples of how a State may calculate the amount to be reserved for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities.

Example 1: A State receives only one GAN for the FFY for $100,000. The State must reserve 50 percent of that amount, or $50,000, for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities.

Example 2: A State receives two GANs - one at the beginning of the FFY for $100,000 and a second during the reallotment process for an additional $10,000. The State must reserve 50 percent ($55,000) of the total funds allotted ($110,000) during that FFY. This means the amount to be reserved was adjusted upwards to account for the additional funds received during reallotment.

Example 3: The State receives a GAN for $100,000, but relinquishes $10,000 for reallotment to other States later in the year. As a result of the decrease in funds, the State receives a second GAN showing a total allotment for the year of $90,000. This means that the State must reserve 50 percent of the $90,000 in SE funds it received that year, or $45,000. In other words, the amount to be reserved was adjusted downward from the amount that would have been based on the initial allotment of $100,000 to take into account the amount of funds relinquished during the reallotment process.

Example 4: A State receives only one GAN for $100,000. However, at the end of the year of appropriation, the State has $10,000 remaining in unexpended Federal funds. The State did not relinquish these funds during the reallotment period in the year of appropriation. In this case, the GAN in the year of appropriation still reflects an allotment of $100,000. The State must reserve the full 50 percent, or $50,000, based on the total allotment to the State in the year of appropriation - not the amount of funds actually used. Any reduction to the SE allotment that occurs after the year of appropriation through deobligation, including the deobligation of Federal funds carried over into the subsequent fiscal year in accordance with section 19(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act, will not reduce the 50 percent reserve calculated at the end of the year of appropriation (4th quarter).

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2. How does a State calculate the 10 percent match requirement for the 50 percent reserve of SE funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?

Section 606(b)(7)(I) of the Rehabilitation Act requires States to provide a match of at least 10 percent in non-Federal expenditures for the total amount of expenditures incurred with the half of the allotment reserved to provide SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. This section reads:

SEC. 606. STATE PLAN.

****

(b) CONTENTS.—Each such plan supplement shall—

****

(7) provide assurances that—

****

(I) with respect to supported employment services provided to youth with the most significant disabilities pursuant to section 603(d), the designated State agency will provide directly, or indirectly through public or private entities, non-Federal contributions in an amount that is not less than 10 percent of the costs of carrying out such services;

The statutory 10 percent match requirement applies to the costs of carrying out the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. This means that the 10 percent is applied to total expenditures, including both the Federal and non-Federal shares, incurred for this purpose, and that the non-Federal share MUST also be spent on the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. (Note: This is different than the State Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Services’ 15 percent pre-employment transition services award reserve, for which the non-Federal share is not required to be expended solely for the provision of pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities).

Example 1: A State receives only one GAN for the FFY for $100,000. The State must reserve 50 percent of that amount, or $50,000 (representing the Federal share), for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. To determine the total expenditures for carrying out the reserve, the $50,000 (Federal share) is divided by 0.90, resulting in $55,556. The non-Federal share amount is then determined by multiplying the $55,556, ( total expenditures for SE reserve purposes) by 0.10 (10 percent match), resulting in a non-Federal share amount of $5,556 in non-Federal funds that must be spent on the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities.

Example 2: A State receives two GANs - one at the beginning of the FFY for $100,000 and a second during the reallotment process for an additional $10,000. The State must reserve 50 percent ($55,000) of the total funds allotted ($110,000) during that FFY. This means the amount to be reserved was adjusted upwards to account for the additional funds received during reallotment. To determine the total expenditures for carrying out the reserve, the $55,000 is divided by 0.90, equaling $61,111. The non-Federal share amount is then determined by multiplying the $61,111 (total expenditures for SE reserve purposes) by 0.10 (10 percent match), resulting in $6,111 in non-Federal funds that must be spent on the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities.

Example 3: The State receives a GAN for $100,000, but relinquishes $10,000 for reallotment to other States later in the year. As a result, the State receives a second GAN showing a total allotment for the year of $90,000. This means that the State must reserve 50 percent of the $90,000 in SE funds it received that year, or $45,000. Note the amount to be reserved was adjusted downward from the amount that the State would have had to reserve ($50,000) based on the initial allotment of $100,000 to take into account the amount of funds relinquished during the reallotment process. To determine the total expenditures for carrying out the reserve, the $45,000 is divided by 0.90, equaling $50,000. The non-Federal share amount is then determined by multiplying the $50,000 (total expenditures for SE reserve purposes), resulting in $5,000 in non-Federal funds that must be spent on the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities.

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3. Can a State carry over any portion of its SE allotment, whether for SE reserve purposes or not?

The half of the SE award that is NOT reserved for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities does not have a match requirement. Therefore, any unobligated portion of these unreserved funds may be carried over into the succeeding FFY for obligation and expenditure.

Similar to the VR award funds, the 50 percent reserve of SE funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities must be matched by September 30 of the fiscal year of appropriation for the State to fully expend the reserved funds, or permit the carry over of any unobligated portion of the reserved funds into the succeeding FFY for obligation and expenditure. Any amount of the reserved funds carried over into the next FFY must be spent on supported employment services, including extended services, for youth with the most significant disabilities in that carryover year.

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4. How must a VR agency account for the Federal SE funds it reserves for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?

Because section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act is clear that the State must reserve and use 50 percent of its total SE allotment for a specific purpose (SE services, including extended services) that benefit a specific population (youth with the most significant disabilities), it will be critical that the designated State unit implement internal controls that ensure proper data collection and financial accountability of these reserved funds. The State’s accounting procedures must be such that the designated State unit will be able to accurately complete all required forms, including financial reports, that show the reservation and use of these funds for this purpose and for this population, as required by Uniform Guidance at 2 CFR 200.302.

In order to track and account for the proper expenditure of funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities, agencies should consider those services as a cost objective in order to effectively track the use of reserve funds within the SE program. The Uniform Guidance at 2 CFR 200.28 defines a cost objective as:

“a program, function, activity, award, organizational subdivision, contract, or work unit for which cost data are desired and for which provision is made to accumulate and measure the cost of processes, products, jobs, capital projects, etc. A cost objective may be a major function of the non-Federal entity, a particular service or project, a Federal award, or an indirect (Facilities & Administrative (F&A)) cost activity….”

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5. Can a State expend more than 50 percent of its SE Federal funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?

Yes. Section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act requires a State to reserve “half” of its SE allotment for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. However, this does not preclude the State from providing SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities in an amount that is in excess of 50 percent of the State’s SE allotment with its SE funds or VR funds.

In the event that a State does expend more than 50 percent of its SE allotment to provide SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities, there is no requirement that the State provide non-Federal expenditures to match the Federal funds in excess of the 50 percent reserved amount expended for this purpose.

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6. What are the potential consequences of a State not reserving and using the requisite amount of funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities?

Section 603(d) of the Rehabilitation Act requires a State to reserve half (50 percent) of its allotment for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. Therefore, the statute makes clear that the reservation and use of SE funds for this purpose is mandatory, not discretionary, for States. Section 107(a)(1) requires the Commissioner of RSA to conduct annual reviews and periodic on-site monitoring of the VR program, and ensure that the State is complying with the provisions of the State plan, which includes a supplement for the provision of SE services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act, including those provided to youth with the most significant disabilities. Section 107(a)(4)(B) requires the Commissioner to examine, among other things, the provision of services, including SE services and extended services to youth with the most significant disabilities, when conducting reviews or monitoring. Section 107(b) and (c) specify the remedies available to the Commissioner if a State fails to satisfy Federal requirements governing the VR program and services authorized under the State plan, which includes requirements related to SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities. These remedies may include a corrective action plan and recovery and/or withholding of funds. In this manner, compliance with requirements governing SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities is the same as it is for any VR or SE program requirement. States that fail to meet the 50 percent reserve requirement may also face potential consequences resulting from audit findings stemming from Department of Education Inspector General, State, or Single Audits.

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7. How is the SE reservation requirement affected when there are two VR agencies (General and Blind)?

The reservation of funds for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities is a State matter that must be resolved at the State level when there are two agencies. For this reason, RSA encourages agencies to coordinate to ensure State compliance. While RSA recommends that each designated State unit, particularly when a State has two designated State units, reserve 50 percent of its SE allotment to facilitate tracking of State compliance of the reservation requirement, there is no statutory requirement that this be done. If one agency (when a State has two VR agencies) uses more of its funds than the other, the State would be in compliance so long as the State’s total of funds reserved and expended for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities, is at least 50 percent of the State’s total allotment, including any adjustments that affect the amount of the Federal award to one or both agencies.

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8. When may a State expend SE award funds for the provision of SE services to individuals with the most significant disabilities?

Because supported employment funds are meant to be used to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in employment, the provision of SE services may not be provided prior to an individual being placed into an employment position requiring supported employment services. Section 7(39) of the Rehabilitation Act indicates that SE services are “ongoing support services, including customized employment, needed to support and maintain an individual with a most significant disability in supported employment…” Section 7(38) of the Rehabilitation Act defines supported employment:

(38) Supported employment.— The term ‘supported employment’ means competitive integrated employment, including customized employment, or employment in an integrated work setting in which individuals are working on a short-term basis toward competitive integrated employment, that is individualized and customized consistent with the strengths, abilities, interests, and informed choice of the individuals involved,…

Because the use of SE funds can begin only when an individual with a most significant disability is placed in an employment position requiring supported employment services, this means that all Federal expenditures for that individual that occur prior to the individual being placed into supported employment, must be provided with VR funds. If the individual is a youth with a most significant disability, the expenditures, since they are made with VR, rather than SE funds, do not count toward the 50 percent reserve requirement. Additionally, any non-Federal funds expended on VR services provided to an individual who is a youth with a most significant disability prior to his or her placement into a supported employment position do not qualify as SE services, and may not be counted as non-Federal share for the 50 percent SE reserve requirement for the provision of SE services, including extended services, to youth with the most significant disabilities.

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9. How do States pay for costs of administering the SE award in excess of the 2.5 percent administrative cap?

WIOA amended section 603(c) of the Rehabilitation Act to reduce the amount of the SE allotment that States can spend on administrative costs from 5 to 2.5 percent. In accordance with section 608(a), however, nothing prohibits States from using VR funds to pay for SE services, including administrative costs in excess of the 2.5 percent allowed from the SE allotment itself.

(Aug. 8, 2016)

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Last Modified: 08/12/2016

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Contacts



Carol Dobak
Carol.Dobak@ed.gov
U.S. Department of Education, OSERS
Rehabilitation Services Administration
400 Maryland Ave., SW, Room 5014, PCP
Washington, DC 20202-2800
Phone: 202-245-7325
Fax: 202-245-7590

For this program, RSA has designated State Liaisons for each state and territory.

Additionally, RSA has designated State Liaisons for each state and territory. See https://rsa.ed.gov/people.cfm for a list of the current liaisons.

This content was copied from www.ed.gov on 09/28/2016

Please report errors on this page to RSAMIS.Technical.Support@ed.gov.